F-16 Aircraft Database

F-16 Accidents & Mishaps for the United States Air Force




Found 503 aircraft, displaying 406-420 [Sorted by Date]
Date Status Local S/N Aircraft AF/Unit Version Info Details
16 Dec 1991 [w/o] 89089 89-2089 USAF 363 TFW F-16C Block 42F Details
Crashed 2,5 miles southwest of Mullins, South Carolina at 17:17 hours enroute to conduct 1v1 night intercepts. It suffered a dual engine fuel resolver failure resulting in fuel starvation and engine stall / stagnation. Unsuccessful airstart and subsequent engine fire required the pilot, Capt David R. Rue, to eject. The ejection was successful with minor injuries to the pilot.
23 Dec 1993 [act] 89091 89-2091 USAF 112 FS F-16C Block 42F Details
The right main landing gear failed. This caused the aircraft to skid across runway, two taxi ways and the ramp coming to rest in front of the port authority fire department building. There were no injuries.
31 Jul 1996 [w/o] 89093 89-2093 USAF 68 FS F-16C Block 40F Details
Suffered a Class A mishap, but is surprisingly considered repairable, but most likely will not be repaired. It was written-off at Kirtland AFB, New Mexico. The aircraft was the 3rd out of a 4-ship to take off, but it had no rotation of the stabs and subsequently the nose did not rise. The runway barrier did not raise in time and the aircraft went off the runway. The pilot, Captain Peter H. Parsons, ejected safely. Pilot had not taken into account Kirtland's high altitude and tried to rotate for take-off too early. There was suspicions of under-serviced nose strut contributing to crash but this was disputed due to the fact that the aircraft still should have rotated and numerous other Moody aircraft had improperly serviced struts and why didn't they have the same problems.
16 Feb 2000 [w/o] 89094 89-2094 USAF 63 FS F-16C Block 42F News Article Details
Major Anthony Barrell had problems with his aircraft so diverted to Gila Bend, but did not make it. He ejected at about 12:10 hours. All Luke F-16's were grounded as a result.
21 Apr 1997 [w/o] 89095 89-2095 USAF 68 FS F-16C Block 40F News Article Details
Crashed as the result of an engine flameout at a low altitude. The air plane crashed in the southern portion of Georgia, seven miles southwest of Pearson. A malfunction in the main engine control component caused the flame-out. Aircraft was nicknamed Satan and spent a lot of time code 3. The pilot, 1st Lt. Joseph C. Thomas, ejected safely.
14 Mar 2006 [w/o] 89099 89-2099 USAF 35 FS F-16C Block 40F News Article Details
Lost at sea around 09:30 hours twenty miles off the coast of Kunsan AB, Korea. Pilot was Capt. Donald Siegmund, of the 35th Fighter Squadron ejected safely and returned to base shortly after. He spent about 55 minutes in the water before a South Korean air force rescue helicopter dispatched to the scene found and lifted him to safety.
23 Aug 1996 [w/o] 89101 89-2101 USAF 34 FS F-16C Block 40F Details
Crashed near Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. The crash was caused by an engine flame-out during take-off. The pilot, Capt. Charles A. Durfee, ejected safely.
24 Mar 2009 [act] 89102 89-2102 USAF 510 FS F-16C Block 40F News Article Details
Suffered an in-flight emergency which led to the pilot deciding to drop the external tanks which landed in a local village. The aircraft landed safely at Aviano AB.
16 Nov 2000 [w/o] 89104 89-2104 USAF 68 FS F-16C Block 40G News Article Details
Suffered a mid-air collision with a civilian Cessna 172N (N73829) at 15:56 hours. It happened at 1,200 feet near Sarasota, Florida. The Cessna pilot, Jacques Oliver, was killed. His aircraft came down in a golf coarse. Captain Greg Kreuder tried to take his F-16 for a landing at MacDill AFB, but the engine failed and the cockpit was shattered, forcing him to punch out. The F-16 came down in a wooded area four miles south of the Cessna's. The Cessna pilot never responded to Miami control to help avoid the collision. The F-16 was in a two ship formation on a ground attack training sortie. It turns out the F-16's were using the wrong frequency to contact Tampa, which had control of the airspace. Only Miami was able to keep contact. The aircraft was on loan to the 69 FS at the time of the accident.
22 Jun 2009 [w/o] 89108 89-2108 USAF 4 FS F-16C Block 40G News Article Details
The aircraft crashed in a remote part of the Utah Test And Training Range at 22:25h local time. The pilot, Captain George Bryan Houghton, was killed in the mishap. The crash was caused by target fixation and disorientation due to low night illumination.
24 Apr 1992 [w/o] 89110 89-2110 USAF 308 FS F-16C Block 40G Details
Three days prior to the accident the engine was installed by SSgt Al Lynch, SSgt Stewart Baily, SSGT Jim Biggs, Sgt Paula Forness, AIC Jerrod Whittaker and AIC Jason Wollever. After several delays, the aircraft was launched by SSGT Scott Ramsour. The aircraft taxied and went to EOR arm crew. On take-off the engine lost power and the pilot climbed to MSA to bring the aircraft back to the base. The aircraft made an emergency landing attempt and struck the approach overrun area 100 yards short of the runway on the right side. The main landing failed and the aircraft collapsed along with the nose landing gear. The aircraft came to rest between the taxiway and runway after sliding 1,500 feet. The pilot raised the canopy electrically and tried to climb out but couldn't since his G-suite hose was still connected. He was burned and recieved injuries to his back and spine but did survive after being rescued by the fire brigade. The pilot, Captain Mark A. Merkel, was initialy rescued by passing personel. The cause of the accident was determined to be a faulty augmentor fan control unit (AFT).
25 Oct 2002 [w/o] 89111 89-2111 USAF 4 FS F-16C Block 40G Details
Destroyed in a mid-air collision with F-16C (89-2006). First Lieutenant, Jorma D. Huhtala, was killed in the mid-air. The mishap was caused by the failure of both pilots to properly deconflict their flight paths during a tactical turn. Other contributing factors included: loss of situational awareness, misinterpretation of closure and visual cues, task misprioritization and channelization, and expectancy.
30 Mar 2006 [w/o] 89115 89-2115 USAF 421 FS F-16C Block 40G News Article Details
The pilot, 1st Lt. Jay Bear, was conducting a close-air support training mission over the northern Utah Test and Training Range. He ejected safely. The aircraft went down in a muddy tidal area along one of the islands in the Great Salt Lake. The F-16 suffered an engine failure.
Unknown [act] 89116 89-2116 USAF 421 FS F-16C Block 40G Details
During a strafing run, a bullet blew up prematurely causing damage to the airframe. This was repairable.
08 Jan 1998 [w/o] 89131 89-2131 USAF 34 FS F-16C Block 40G News Article Details
Crashed while on a bombing run at the Test and Training Range, 100 miles west from home base, Hill near Salt Lake City. The pilot, Lieutenant Colonel Judd Kelley, ejected safely. A US Army HH-60 Black Hawk rescued him. The 388th Fighter Wing cancelled all flying for two days. The cause of the crash was due to a missing combustion diffuser pressure seal in the engine. Lack of parts forced the rebuild of the engine to take seven months. Proper daily maintenance logs were not kept to show what work had been preformed. The overheated engine caused it to seize, and no chance for a restart. The aircraft had flown for almost eighteen months without the seal before the crash.

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Abbreviations and symbols:
[act] Active [i/a] Instructional Airframe [sto] Stored (e.g. at AMARG)
[cld] Cancelled Order [msh] Involved in Mishap [w/o] Write-off
[con] Converted [o/o] On Order
[des] Destroyed (drone) [pre] Preserved (museum, gateguard) T/V LM Aero Type/Version (Construction) number
[emb] Embargoed [scr] Scrapped Photo Available



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