419fw [lots of youtube videos/info etc.]

F-35 unit & base selection, delivery, activation
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spazsinbad

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Unread post07 Apr 2020, 22:23

419th Fighter Wing hosts F-35 virtual field trip
06 Apr 2020 419th Fighter Wing hosts F-35 virtual field trip

"HILL AIR FORCE BASE, Utah (AFNS) --
With closures at schools across the nation due to COVID-19, the 419th Fighter Wing invited students to use their computers or cellphones to “visit” for a virtual field trip to see the Air Force’s newest fighter, the F-35 Lightning II.

Col. Brian Silkey, the wing’s vice commander and longtime fighter pilot, recorded a video for the wing’s Facebook page and YouTube channel. “We wanted to do a little something for America’s students during this difficult and uncertain time,” Silkey said. “We thought it would be fun to use the technology we have at our fingertips to bring the F-35 to them. Ultimately, we want them to know we’re all in this together and we hope that some are inspired to follow their dreams to serve in the U.S. military.”

During the virtual field trip, Silkey provided an overview of the aircraft’s capabilities to his online audience to include details on its stealth technology and how it gives pilots a significant advantage on the battlefield. He also showed off his G-suit and futuristic helmet.

Members of the 419th FW and their active-duty counterparts in the 388th FW are currently the only combat-capable F-35 units in the Air Force. Even amid the coronavirus pandemic, the wings are sustaining mission-essential flying operations with limited manning to maintain readiness. Several hundred personnel from the wings are deployed to the Middle East.

In addition to its F-35 mission, the 419th FW also has a full-spectrum mission support group to include civil engineering, security forces, medial, logistics, aerial port, firefighting, supply and transportation. The unit is made up of about 1,300 Reserve Citizen Airmen who serve part-time in the military, but are full-time members of the local community."

Source: https://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display ... ield-trip/

419fw: https://www.youtube.com/user/419fw & https://www.419fw.afrc.af.mil/

F-35 Virtual Field Trip https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QpFUvBlqkY


http://www.f-16.net/g3/var/resizes/f-16 ... 1371905391

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Unread post08 Apr 2020, 12:13

Seeing more and more F-35's flying with the 9x.

Hmmm....
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Unread post11 Apr 2020, 07:57

They've only been allowed to carry them for the past 3 years (less for some units), and it takes time to qualify pilots to use them on the jet. You're also seeing F-35s being used operationally more, where often they're tasked with something like air policing, where if they're going to be saying hello to another jet up close, and that jet turns hostile within visual range, it's nice to have the 9X's as an option.
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Unread post08 May 2020, 21:32

Hill Airmen, F-35s Return from Middle East Deployment 07 May 2020 Brian W. Everstine

https://www.airforcemag.com/hill-airmen ... eployment/
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Unread post04 Feb 2021, 14:38

Does F-35 often cause a Sonic Boom (i.e. Supersonic) happening a lot ? :roll:
Does that Means that F-35 can easily break through supersonic speeds but... 8) (The Powerrrrrrrr)
https://www.ksl.com/article/50100832/hi ... into-april
Hill Air Force Base's F-35 night training continues into April
By Mike Anderson, KSL TV | Posted - Feb. 3, 2021
HILL AIR FORCE BASE — Utahns can expect more F-35 training at night through mid-April, but pilots said they'll be less likely to hear any more sonic booms like the one that startled residents on the Wasatch Front last week.
Both the 388th Fighter Wing and the 419th Reserve Wing will be out over the Utah Test and Training Range in Tooele County.
While flying in the dark can be more difficult, it's the time when most of their combat operations happen.
The F-35 is loud and it is fast. The high-tech jet can hit well over 300 mph during takeoff alone.

"I love it. I love flying fighters and I have really enjoyed flying the F-35," said pilot Johnathan Hassell, who is one of the dozens of pilots stationed at Hill Air Force Base.
He scheduled many of the training missions Utahns will be hearing in the coming weeks around Davis County.
The goal is to be ready to handle combat at night.
"It is a huge factor in what we do. It is also much more difficult at that time," Hassell said.

They have to be ready to fly in any condition, but most of their operations happen at night and they use thermal or night-vision imaging to see what they're doing.
A lot of what they do happens beyond the speed of sound.
"We actually fly supersonic quite a bit as part of our normal training, and I know last week there was a sonic boom heard over Salt Lake City. And, to be honest, that was a bit of a surprise for us as well," Hassell said.
It was a surprise because the test and training range on the west end of Tooele County is usually far enough away to avoid catching residents off guard along the Wasatch Front.

"I've been flying fighters for over a decade and I have never heard of a sonic boom being felt or heard, I think it was 50 or 60 miles away from our training area," Hassell added.
Last week's inversion was blamed for the unusual distance the boom was heard.
Hassell said for them, going supersonic happens with the simple push of the throttle. "And then it's almost imperceptible in the cockpit itself," he said.
While those closest to the base will hear them, he said it's unlikely that the Wasatch Front will hear those booms again.

"I can't guarantee that that won't happen again," Hassell said. "But my understanding was that was a rather unusual occurrence as far as the weather patterns of that night."
Most of the training will wrap up between 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. It will end on April 9.
Over the past couple of years, all three HAFB fighter units have supported combat operations in the Middle East.

https://www.fox13now.com/news/local-new ... ntil-april
Hearing ‘Sonic Booms’ unlikely as F-35 night-flying continues until April
By: Brian SchneePosted, Feb 03, 2021
OGDEN, Utah — Consistent with past night-flying operations out of Hill Air Force Base in the past, the 388th Fighter Wing will continue to fly at night until early April.
“We expect to be flying almost every weekday kind of now through April,” said Jonathan “Rev” Hassell, a pilot and Director of Operations for the 388th Operations Squad. “The F-35 is a all-weather fighter, we’re trained to fly all of our missions during the day and nighttime so as part of that, maintaining our combat readiness we need to train at those missions during the nighttime.”
Hassell has been flying the F-35 for about two years and recently returned from a deployment with the 421st Fighter Squadron overseas.
Within the past few weeks, Utahns across the Wasatch Front were reporting a loud boom and shaking from a ‘sonic boom’ that had been confirmed by the 388th Fighter Wing. Hassell says that it’s common for pilots to break the speed of sound, but it’s not every day you can hear or feel the sonic boom from such great distances.

“We actually fly supersonic quite a bit as part of our normal training and I know last week there was a sonic boom heard over Salt Lake City and to be honest that’s a bit of a surprise for us as well,” said Hassell. “I’ve been flying fighters for over a decade and I have never heard of a sonic boom being felt or heard I think it was 50 of 60 miles away.”
Both active duty 388th and reserve 419th Fighter Wings are conducting night-flying on weeknights where weather permits safe flying conditions.
“These times may also change based on a number of factors including weather, airspace availability on the Utah Test and Training Range, and other support elements,” the 388th Fighter Wing stated in a media release.
“It is (night-flying) a huge factor in what we do,” said Hassell. “If you take our regular mission set whether it’s air-to-air training or air-to-ground training and then you make it dark, it’s just much more difficult to accomplish.”

Over the course of the past two years, all three of the wing’s fighter squadrons have deployed in support of combat operations in the Middle East
78 F-35A Lightning IIs called Hill Air Force Base ‘home’.
“The 388th and Reserve 419th are the Air Force's first combat-capable F-35A units, and fly and maintain the jet in a Total Force partnership, which capitalizes on the strength of both components,” the 388th said.
“The F-35 this is the most advanced fighter we call it a fifth generation aircraft,” said Hassell.
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doge

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Unread post15 Feb 2021, 16:52

HillAFB uses the HMD at night. 8)
https://www.abc4.com/news/local-news/ni ... may-occur/
Night training continues at Hill AFB, sonic booms may occur
by: Tracy Smith Posted: Feb 4, 2021
HILL AIR FORCE BASE, Utah (ABC4) – Night flight training will continue for Hill Air Force Base members through the first week of April.
Most of the flying is scheduled to finish between 7 and 10 p.m., but there will times where the flying ends later at night.
And even though it is unlikely, you could hear more sonic booms.
Jonathan “Rev” Hassell, Director of Operations of the 388th Operations Support Squadron and a pilot, explains, “We do try to train during the wintertime, as you know the sun sets a lot earlier then. So we are able to get our training over with between 7 and 10 p.m.”

The times can vary depending on weather, airspace availability on the Utah Test and Training Range, and other flight support elements.
The pilots of the fighter wings train at night to keep their combat readiness and all-weather capabilities.
Hassell says, “Night flying is a huge factor in what we do; it’s also much more difficult at times. if you take our regular mission set, air to air training or air to ground training, and then you make it dark, it’s much more difficult to accomplish.”
Night flying is usually limited to what is required to keep the pilots at the top of their game with the skillset.

Hassel explains they use different systems in the F-35 to accomplish the same tasks at night as you would in the daytime.
“We have a system in our helmet, a night vision camera, it actually portrays the image from the night vision camera right on the front of my visor,” he says. “I can look everywhere and see, it almost turns night into day. We also have the thermal imaging cameras located around the F-35 we are able to tie into and display that image on our helmet as well.”
Hill AFB has had all three of its fighter squadrons deployed to support the efforts in the Middle East.

Hassell says the best way to find out what is happening is to check the 3-day fighter wing schedule web page and follow Hill’s social media.
Hassel has flown both the F-22 and now the F-35 and says they are the best in the world at what they do. Both aircraft are powerful and go faster than the speed of sound, which can cause a sonic boom.
Hassell explains, “We actually fly supersonic quite a bit as part of our normal training. I know last week there was a sonic boom heard over Salt Lake City, and to be honest, that was a bit of a surprise for us as well. I’ve been flying fighters for over a decade, and I have never heard of a sonic boom being felt or heard – I think it was 50 or 60 miles away from our training area.”
He continued, “I can’t guarantee it won’t happen again, but it’s my understanding it was part of an unusual occurrence with the weather patterns that night.”

Hassell explains breaking the sound barrier is not like it was with aircraft in the past. Now, he says, “It’s as easy as pushing the throttle forward and is almost imperceptible in the cockpit.”
Utah’s Hill Air Force Base is home to the F-35 Lightning II. The 388th and 419th are the Air Force’s first combat-capable F-35A units. They serve as part of the Air Force’s Total Force Partnership.
Hassell ended by saying, “Those of us here at Hill Air Force base and living in the community, really appreciate the support of the local community, it’s been phenomenal to see. I really love living in Utah and looking out at these beautiful mountains and enjoying all of the outdoor activities as well as the great flying.”

https://www.standard.net/news/military/ ... b1327.html
F-35 night flying continues at Hill AFB, with regular sorties scheduled through April
By MITCH SHAW Standard-Examiner Feb 4, 2021
HILL AIR FORCE BASE — Officials from Hill Air Force Base say F-35 pilots there will soon be taking to the night skies yet again, and this time it’s for an extended period of time.
Micah Garbarino, spokesperson with Hill’s 388th Fighter Wing, said base pilots are scheduled to conduct local night-flying operations on most weekdays, now through the second week of April. Garbarino said most of the flying is scheduled to be finished by 10 p.m., but there will be some instances when flying ends later than that. He also said the times could change based on things like weather, airspace availability on the Utah Test and Training Range, and other support elements.
During the flying operations, Northern Utah residents should expect increased noise.
Garbarino said Hill pilots regularly fly a limited number of night hours to meet Air Force proficiency requirements.

Jonathan Hassell, director of operations with Hill’s 388th Operations Support Squadron and an F-35 pilot, said night flying is a quintessential part of the jet’s existence. The plane’s stealth capability, which includes remaining inconspicuous under cover of darkness, has consistently been touted in Air Force circles as one of its main advantages over other fighter jets. Hassell describes the F-35 as an “all-weather fighter” and said pilots need a broad range of experience flying in various conditions.
“Night flying is a huge factor in what we do — it’s also much more difficult at times,” Hassell said. “If you take our regular mission set, whether it’s air-to-air training or air-to-ground training, and then you make it dark, it’s just much more difficult to accomplish.”
Hassell said night training is a pilot’s only opportunity to practice using certain systems of the Air Force’s “next-generation” fighter, like the jet’s night and thermal vision cameras, which essentially light up darkness and display a clear, visible portrait of the night landscape on a pilot’s helmet visor.

“It almost turns night into day,” Hassell said.
According to an Air Force fact sheet, Hill operates one of the busiest airfields in the military, with approximately 45,000 flight operations taking place there annually. Aircraft from all over the United States and internationally frequently fly into Hill’s Ogden Air Logistics Complex, which performs maintenance on dozens of aircraft. Hill’s Utah Test and Training Range in Utah’s west desert also draws aircraft from all over the world.
But the fighter wings perform the bulk of flight operations on base, training to remain combat ready with the F-35. Arrivals and departure are coordinated with the Federal Aviation Administration, Salt Lake International Airport and Ogden-Hinckley Airport. The base fact sheet says pilots limit flying over densely populated areas, schools, churches and other public buildings. F-35s climb to assigned altitudes as quickly as possible to mitigate noise.

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