F-16 take off distance

Operating an F-16 on the ground or in the air - from the engine start sequence, over replacing a wing, to aerial refueling procedures
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f100pw229

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Unread post06 Mar 2004, 07:55

I'm new here. Thanks for having me. My favorite airplane ever, I know much about it and it will be weird to be around ppl who know more.... :D

What is the average take off distance required for the F-16?
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Habu

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Unread post06 Mar 2004, 09:17

1500 ft.

welcome n00b!
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Viperwiper

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Unread post28 Mar 2004, 08:06

I believe block 50's take off in less? I could have been imaging things when I saw a 50 take off..
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Gman

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Unread post10 Jun 2008, 04:07

How is the "go/no go" determined?
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PeFo

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Unread post10 Jun 2008, 05:13

Whether or not that yellow and black D ring is pulled :whistle:
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JpoLgr

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Unread post10 Jun 2008, 15:12

Hello,
Viper take-off distances range from roughly 1000 to 5000 ft.
A common distance for a jet with 2 370's is 2000 ft.
There is no such thing as a go/no go speed up to about 40.000lbs T/O weight. Heavier jets have a refusal speed. That's how it's called in fighters.

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Gman

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Unread post10 Jun 2008, 15:30

I was a boomer in KC-135s back 40 years ago, and I remember the co-pilot keeping track of the airspeed and location on the runway as we were in a takeoff roll. In the mission planning, the go/no go was calculated based on runway length and gross weight. We had to be at a certain speed at a certain spot on the runway or we aborted take off.
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elguapo

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Unread post10 Jun 2008, 19:15

In the mission planning, the go/no go was calculated based on runway length and gross weight. We had to be at a certain speed at a certain spot on the runway or we aborted take off.


Density altitude is also used in calculating the go/nogo point on the runway. Also know as V2 in pilot terms
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Magnum

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Unread post10 Jun 2008, 23:59

The go / no-go decision in the F16 is directly proportionate to your gear position. Gear up - eject. Down - no go. With only 1 engine you don't have much of a choice in the matter. The 1500' or less t/o roll is only possible via an A/B takeoff in a clean / pseudo-clean config. Otherwise the BLK50 is normally around 3k.
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Shaft

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Unread post11 Jun 2008, 05:33

Density altitude is also used in calculating the go/nogo point on the runway. Also know as V2 in pilot terms[/quote]

I think you mean V1 is the go/no go speed. V2 is the climb speed one would fly if they lost an engine in the early phase of flight.

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