F-22 Upgrades

Anything goes, as long as it is about the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor
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mixelflick

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Unread post10 Oct 2014, 21:32

Does anyone know what's remaining/timeframe they start?
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neptune

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Unread post10 Oct 2014, 23:21

mixelflick wrote:Does anyone know what's remaining/timeframe they start?



http://dtic.mil/descriptivesum/Y2013/Ai ... B_2013.pdf

....SORT OF A SUMMARY.....

Increment 3.1

The first of three Operational Flight Program software upgrades. Increment 3.1 gives the Raptor air-to-ground capability, using the GBU-39/B Small Diameter Bomb. The Raptor can carry eight GBU-39/Bs, four per weapons bay mounted on BRU-61 racks. To be released at speeds up to Mach 1.5, the GBU-39/B can strike targets at very long stand-off ranges. A new SAR mode provides high resolution (black and white photo-quality) images and allow the pilot to designate the target, transfer that information to the GBU-39/B and release the weapon. Increment 3.1 entered US Air Force service in March 2012.

Increment 3.2

Increment 3.2 has been split into smaller packages called A, B and C and will will introduce new weapon options (AIM-9X Sidewinder and AIM-120D AMRAAM) updated avionics and the ability to independently retarget up to eight SDBs against eight separate targets.

Increment 3.2A

Increment 3.2A will add new electronic protection measures and new combat identification capabilities to the Raptor. It will also field the Multifunction Advanced Data Link, enabling the Raptor to correlate data from the receive-only Link 16 data-link and fuse it with the F-22's integrated sensors.

Increment 3.2B

In 2017 the US Air Force hopes to start installing Increment 3.2B modifications onto its Raptor fleet. Increment 3.2B is a hardware and software upgrade that will fully incorporate the AIM-120D and AIM-9X air-to-air missiles onto the F-22. It will also further upgrade the aircraft's geo-location and electronic protection capabilities. However, the US Air Force expects to incorporate rudimentary AIM-9X and AIM-120D capability onto the Raptor before 2017. An AIM-9X missile was launched from an F-22 for the first time on 17 May 2012, followed by the first supersonic AIM-9X launch on 30 July 2012)

Increment 3.2C

Not yet been fully defined, but the US Air Force is trying to add open-architecture hardware and software
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mixelflick

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Unread post11 Oct 2014, 00:21

Awesome! Thanks so much..

The sooner they get the new avionics and missiles, the better... :D
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Unread post14 Oct 2014, 15:39

HMD?
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zero-one

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Unread post15 Oct 2014, 07:18

Question is, how much weight will this add to the Raptor?

I know that the raptor could afford to have more weight, but I won't want it to follow the path of its 4th gen predecessors

the F-15 was originally 25,000 lbs but current C models can be as heavy as 30,000 lbs

Viper As were 16,000 lbs while current block 60s are 22,000 lbs
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Unread post15 Oct 2014, 08:28

zero-one wrote:Question is, how much weight will this add to the Raptor?

I know that the raptor could afford to have more weight, but I won't want it to follow the path of its 4th gen predecessors

the F-15 was originally 25,000 lbs but current C models can be as heavy as 30,000 lbs

Viper As were 16,000 lbs while current block 60s are 22,000 lbs

The F-22A will probably reduce weight as the electronics is modernized. Electronics and sensors are getting lighter in weight.

The F-16C (& F-16E) recieved major structural upgrades compared to the F-16A Block 15,
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mixelflick

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Unread post16 Oct 2014, 21:29

I notice they quote the F-22's motors are in the "35,000lbs" class.

Can only imagine this growing, and wouldn't be surprised to see 40,000lbs/per engine in the near future. If not already... :shock:
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Unread post17 Oct 2014, 03:05

If the AF were to prioritize any enhancements to the F119, I really doubt increasing thrust would be at the top of the list. Improvements in Fuel efficiency, maintainability, reliability are some areas which are likely more desirable.
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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Unread post28 Jan 2021, 23:42

https://www.wpafb.af.mil/News/Article-D ... -upgrades/

https://www.dvidshub.net/news/387645/f- ... e-squadron

F-22 Raptor gets major upgrades courtesy of Hill AFB’s 574th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron

Image
Photo By Alex R. Lloyd | Adam Hinrichs, 574th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron low observable technician, monitors the progress of an F-22 Raptor undergoing robotic painting at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, Nov. 24, 2020. The squadron processed 135 F-22s through the F-22 Structural Repair Program by performing structural modifications to increase total flying hour serviceability on each aircraft by 8,000 hours. (U.S. Air Force photo by Alex R. Lloyd)

HILL AIR FORCE BASE, UT, UNITED STATES
01.26.2021
Story by Alex R. Lloyd
Ogden Air Logistics Complex

The 5th-generation F-22 Raptor has been one of the world’s most dominant fighter aircraft since entering service and has defined what air dominance means to the U.S. Air Force.

To ensure that it remains relevant for years to come, the Ogden Air Logistics Complex’s 574th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, through collaborative efforts of the F-22 System Program Office along with partners Lockheed Martin and Boeing, recently completed the last aircraft to go through the F-22 Structural Repair Program that has been generating aircraft for the last 14 years.

“This is a great milestone for the program,” said Misty Stone, 574th AMXS director. “Since Hill Air Force Base gained the F-22 workload in 2006, the 574th AMXS team of 400 employees has remained focused and dedicated on expanding the combat capabilities of the F-22 weapon system,”

The program was responsible for increasing mission capabilities by performing structural modifications to increase total flying hour serviceability on each aircraft by 8,000 hours.

The 574th maintenance team processed 135 F-22 Raptors through six unique maintenance machines for structural repair, modification, coatings restoration and aircraft damage repair while completing thousands of hours of Time Compliance Technical Orders. In addition, hundreds of thousands of hours were dedicated to coating restoration, mitigating corrosion, aircraft modifications, modernization and repair.

With the program completed, the 574th AMXS will shift from a workload that was a structural based requirement to a 10-year reversion workload, which is a new sustainment modification that was first prototyped in 2019.

This new modification will refurbish the low observable coatings on the engine inlets, and provide an inspection and overhaul of the aircraft’s flight controls.

Over the past several years, the aircraft maintenance squadron has also supported the warfighter by overhauling five aircraft that had been damaged through the unscheduled depot level maintenance program totaling 50,900 hours.

“We have already ramped up our new reversion workload producing nine aircraft totaling nearly 200,000 hours to date. In conjunction with this workload, we are currently posturing ourselves to accomplish avionics upgrades that will greatly improve the already amazing capabilities of the F-22,” said Paul Woolever, 574th Production/Flight Test section chief. “The success of the 574th AMXS ability to produce modifications, repairs, and upgrades to the Raptor is a direct result of the amazing team of skilled mechanics, dedicated supervisors, and the expert knowledge of the planning and scheduling department that we have.”

The growth from 40% to 75% for the low observable coating reversion workload highlights the performance excellence of the 574th employees. Their shared commitment to superior results, specialized coatings expertise, open communication, strong sense of accountability and trust among our members have made this increased workload possible,” said David Strunk, 574th AMXS low observable production chief.

“Our high performance work team has been enhanced through our collaboration with Air Force Research Laboratory, Lockheed Martin low observable engineering team, and aircraft maintenance group process engineers,” he said. “Their specialized expertise, complementary skills and innovation equipped us with new tooling and processes making it possible for us to thrive despite facility and manpower constraints. Collectively, the 574th employees and mission partners have exhibited incredible creativity, flexibility and commitment to supporting the warfighter.”

Stone added, “Finishing the final aircraft is a great way to start fiscal year 2021. It allows the team to be ready to focus on new challenges and firsts with the reversion requirement.”

(Editor’s note: This article was corrected Jan. 28. The original article indicated 247 aircraft were processed at Hill AFB through the F-22 Structural Repair Program. The correct number for aircraft processed at Hill is 135. The original number incorrectly included aircraft that were processed at other locations and in some cases aircraft inducted more than once due to program modifications.)
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mixelflick

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Unread post29 Jan 2021, 19:04

Strange.

When military watch magazine reported on these enhancements, they positioned it such that the Raptor's avioncs were still "dated" and "obsolele" vs. the SU-57's, J-20's and F-15EX's.

Something tells me Russian/Chinese intelligence analysts wouldn't turn their noses up to these Raptor upgrades should they land in their lap, LOL. They also claim a Raptor can only fly one sortie per WEEK, and is "hopelessly outclassed" by many other jets flown by our adversaries.

I bet they wish that was the case...

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