Helmet-mounted displays

Cockpit, radar, helmet-mounted display, and other avionics
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neptune

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Unread post09 Jan 2012, 19:42

It continues to boggle my mind that the JSF program is wasting it's time on "display compatible with night vision goggles....". It amazed me that the poor pilot in the doomed F-22 was struggling in an environment with this "clap-trap" strapped to his helment and ultimately contributed to his demise. Regardless of a scenario where exiting the a/c in milliseconds with this "c..rap" affixed to your helment into a jet stream. I clearly have seen the benefit of night vision environments outside modern jets but this has to be the ultimate "Rube Goldberg" concept "in jets". I only hope that the integration of this funtion into the HMDS is truly integrated and not some silly "clip-on". VSI expects to deliver the enhanced HMDS beginning in the third quarter of 2013 (without googles?). What kind of neck training exercises must these kids endure? http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/01/05 ... ry-pilots/ :?: :wtf: Can we not get some type of radar dish to clip on to the flight helment, as well :lol: :lmao: :poke:
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Unread post09 Jan 2012, 20:20

Procedure to handle pilot breathing problems in the 21st Century.

When a pilot is having trouble breathing, he hands off control of the aircraft to another pilot, either in the same building or another facility. He then rolls his office chair back, stands up and walks over to his desk for his inhaler and perhaps goes outside for some fresh air.

Gimmicky personal breathing gear is so 20th Century. :devil:
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Unread post10 Jan 2012, 01:13

maus92 wrote: Is it a 40 degree (segment of 360) field of view as you turn your head?


Yes.
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Unread post10 Jan 2012, 01:49

quicksilver wrote:
maus92 wrote: Is it a 40 degree (segment of 360) field of view as you turn your head?


Yes.


That's not especially good, IMO. I have ~200 degree FoV naturally, so that's literally an 80% reduction for me. Is this any better than preexisting goggles??
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Unread post10 Jan 2012, 17:11

Compare that 40 FOV to the miniscule FOV looking through NVGs and you will quickly see (pardon the pun) the improvement.
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Unread post24 Jan 2012, 22:00

Pilots discuss their experience flying the F-35 Lighting II during an LMCO webinar GO TO URL TO HEAR STUFF....

http://www.vsi-hmcs.com/index.php/blog/ ... co-webinar
(then a sound file link to click on the page)

Quotes about VSI’s F-35 HMDS from LMCO F-35 Test Pilots Alan Norman and Bill Gigliotti:

“It always gives you that outside world view so, what that gives the pilot is the opportunity to look through the aircraft essentially and Al and I have both flown this and immediately fallen in love with the capability and the idea of looking through the cock pit looking through the airplane, seeing the ground seeing a target below the airplane and being able to place another sensor on it is just unheard of and the F-35 is the first and only aircraft to do that. “ – Bill Gigliotti

“This helmet is amazing. The things that it allows us to do are amazing and what people have to realize is that this is an integrated system with a heads up display that we can move around anyway we go anyway we look.” – Alan Norman

“We get to see a 360 degrees spherical view of the world around us and honestly it brings night into day if you will- it turns night into day and gives us just a background view of what is up and what is down and which is the right way to go and in addition, the night vision camera is integrated into this so no longer do we have to wear goggles so all those things combined really are a good news story about the helmet.” – Alan Norman

“This plane is so second nature to fly that after flying once you fall in love with it and that helmet is one of those systems that is like that.”- Bill Gigliotti

“I was just telling someone yesterday the view that you get is amazing I go back and forth with one day flying the F-35 and one day flying the F-16 and even with the wide HUD on the F-16 its too little I have to move my head"

Alan (Al) Norman, F-35 Chief Test Pilot, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company
Prior to joining Lockheed-Martin in 1999, Al served in the United States Air Force for 23 years as a fighter pilot and test pilot. In 1999, Al left active duty and became an experimental test pilot for the Lockheed-Martin Corporation on the F-22 program at Edwards Air Force Base. Al tested all aspects of 5th generation fighters and the Raptor’s flight regime while in the Combined Test Force at Edwards. In addition to flight test and production work on the F-22 and T-50, Al has performed production and test work on all models of F-16. Al has over 6,000 hours of flying time in more than 70 different aircrafts. Currently, he works out of Lockheed Martin Aeronautics in Fort Worth, Texas on the F-35 Lightning II program. Al is a native of Sherman Oaks, California. He holds a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Astronautical Engineering from the United States Air Force Academy. He worked on his Master’s and PhD in Electrical Engineering at the University of South Florida. He is a graduate of the United States Air Force Test Pilot School. Al and his wife Cyndi live in Aledo, Texas with their two daughters, Alexandra and Amanda. Quote: “I feel very honored and privileged to be named the F-35 Chief Test Pilot. This is a very fast-paced and challenging time for the F-35 program. I am thrilled and humbled to be working with such a tremendously talented team that spans industry and government across the world. Over the next few years, I very much look forward to contributing to our effort of fielding the most capable multi-role 5th Generation fighter, the F-35 Lightning II.”

Bill Gigliotti, F-35 Test Pilot, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company
A graduate of the US Naval Academy, Bill is a combat proven US Navy fighter and test pilot. He is a graduate of both the US Navy Fighter Weapons School (TOPGUN) and the US Naval Test Pilot School. He joined Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company in December 2003 as a project pilot for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program. As one of the initial cadre of Lockheed Martin test pilots to fly the F-35, he is involved in all aspects of engineering design and flight test operations, is one of only three Flight Examiners and is currently the Fort Worth Site Lead Test Pilot and Production Lead Test Pilot. Additionally, he is the Chief Air Show Pilot for the F-16 and routinely performs acceptance, delivery, test support, and air show flights on all models of the F-16 aircraft. He has accumulated over 6,000 hours of flight time on over 25 different aircraft types and has logged over 400 carrier landings."
_____________________

VSI Appoints Phil King as President

http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/557513

"SAN JOSE, Calif., Jan. 23, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Vision Systems International (VSI), a leader in advanced Helmet Mounted Display Systems for tactical aircraft, has appointed Philip King as president.

Phil King will replace Drew Brugal as the senior executive at VSI, reporting to the company's board, which has representatives of the two parent companies — Rockwell Collins and Elbit Systems.

Prior to joining VSI, King held a variety of management and leadership positions at McDonnell-Douglas/Boeing over a 26-year career. He also managed the Joint Helmet Mounting Cueing System program for six years, from its inception to early 2011, and is considered one of the "Founding Fathers" of the program. King began working on helmet displays in 1986 with the original Kaiser Electronics Agile Eye.

Prior to Boeing, King served 13 years as a fighter pilot in the U.S. Air Force, flying the F-4, O-2A (FAC), and the F-15. He also served in the U.S. Navy Reserve from 1988 to 2005, assigned to the Naval Air System Command.

Originally from Cleveland, King earned both a Bachelors and Master's Degree in electrical engineering from Case Western Reserve University and Florida Institute of Technology...."
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Unread post24 Jan 2012, 23:06

Yeah, it's all fine to look out any direction from where your aircraft is now, but when are we going to get god mode?

The pilot is sitting in his cockpit and a 3D map of the target area is displayed in mid air. He releases his control stick and traces with his gloved finger the path his flight will take for the attack and points at the targets to be hit. The computer adjusts the path to not run into obstacles, while staying within the G-limits of the pilot and his UCAV wingbots and plots out the release points for the weapons.
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Unread post24 Jan 2012, 23:18

hcobb wrote:Yeah, it's all fine to look out any direction from where your aircraft is now, but when are we going to get god mode?

The pilot is sitting in his cockpit and a 3D map of the target area is displayed in mid air. He releases his control stick and traces with his gloved finger the path his flight will take for the attack and points at the targets to be hit. The computer adjusts the path to not run into obstacles, while staying within the G-limits of the pilot and his UCAV wingbots and plots out the release points for the weapons.


You play too many video games, methinks.
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Unread post24 Jan 2012, 23:56

Ah well, it's been done already.

http://www.afcea.org/signal/articles/te ... &zoneid=56
Pilots testing F-35 simulators generally have preferred to have the aircraft’s tactical situation display (TSD) presented on one screen, Rubino relates. He describes this display as “the God’s eye view” of the aircraft’s situational awareness system. Pilots can program any of the three TSDs to fuse all information or break it down into different elements.

The TSD comes with a cursor that the pilot manipulates from the left-hand (throttle) control. The pilot places the cursor on air or ground target icons for identification or target designation. After placing the cursor, the pilot can zoom in on an icon or a group of icons, and the display will show an arc that reports the position of the zoomed-in targets relative to the aircraft—4 o’clock, 10 o’clock or 2 o’clock, for example. A numerical readout gives the range—the display also informs the pilot of whether the target is within range of the aircraft’s weapons—and the targets are differentiated by circles for air targets and triangles for ground targets. The display also shows the time to release and the time to target.


Why can't I ever come up with anything original?
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Unread post25 Jan 2012, 00:03

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Unread post25 Jan 2012, 01:05

Salute!

The pilot I talked with last Friday said that the "look thru the floor" mode was most useful for landing the "B" in the VTOL mode.

The other thing of interest was how critical the alignment of the helmet and the sensor that tracks the actual eyes of the pilot was to avoid orientation problems and headaches. Apparently, tracking the basic helmet LOS by the cockpit sensors is not a big deal unless that buffet thing is making itself known. Maybe there's a calibration procedure that lets the pilot to look at something and zero out any mis-alignment.

The symbology of an old HUD was absolutely glued to the airframe line of sight, and even if you couldn't see all the symbology when looking out to the left/right/behind, then BFD. The sucker was not affected by buffet, although the pilot's vision may have been, heh heh.

I am all for a HMD for off-boresight aiming and tgt acquisition.. Simply wonderful. But for basic HUD-type data I have grief. I am thinking about landing in 100 and a fourth or on a boat. So the doofer has a mis-alignment problem and you're back to the 1950's.

Next tour at Eglin I hope to try out the thing and report back, but there are actual 33rd Wing folks looking at these forums and maybe one can sign in and post using a neat, anymouse name.

I do not mean to denigrate anyone in the program, but the USAF/USN/USMC spec seems too "cosmic" to this old curmudgeon. I can't understand why the jet could not have a basic HUD and then use the HMD for neat, new things.

respectfully, Gums sends...
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Unread post25 Jan 2012, 01:10

The F-35C at least will have high precision JPALS carrier landing ability for those without optimum 'eye'sight. :D
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Unread post26 Jan 2012, 01:52

southernphantom wrote:
quicksilver wrote:
maus92 wrote: Is it a 40 degree (segment of 360) field of view as you turn your head?


Yes.


That's not especially good, IMO. I have ~200 degree FoV naturally, so that's literally an 80% reduction for me. Is this any better than preexisting goggles??


Your eyes don't perform as well in the dark regardless of the FOV advantage.
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Unread post26 Jan 2012, 03:11

Gums wrote:Salute!

The pilot I talked with last Friday said that the "look thru the floor" mode was most useful for landing the "B" in the VTOL mode.

The other thing of interest was how critical the alignment of the helmet and the sensor that tracks the actual eyes of the pilot was to avoid orientation problems and headaches. Apparently, tracking the basic helmet LOS by the cockpit sensors is not a big deal unless that buffet thing is making itself known. Maybe there's a calibration procedure that lets the pilot to look at something and zero out any mis-alignment.

The symbology of an old HUD was absolutely glued to the airframe line of sight, and even if you couldn't see all the symbology when looking out to the left/right/behind, then BFD. The sucker was not affected by buffet, although the pilot's vision may have been, heh heh.

I am all for a HMD for off-boresight aiming and tgt acquisition.. Simply wonderful. But for basic HUD-type data I have grief. I am thinking about landing in 100 and a fourth or on a boat. So the doofer has a mis-alignment problem and you're back to the 1950's.

Next tour at Eglin I hope to try out the thing and report back, but there are actual 33rd Wing folks looking at these forums and maybe one can sign in and post using a neat, anymouse name.

I do not mean to denigrate anyone in the program, but the USAF/USN/USMC spec seems too "cosmic" to this old curmudgeon. I can't understand why the jet could not have a basic HUD and then use the HMD for neat, new things.

respectfully, Gums sends...


I'm not actually sure that the giant mega-LCD of doom has an airspeed indicator in most configurations, but I agree. It would be good to either have a conventional HUD or steam gauges as backup, or both. A one-giant-screen-and-six-button-style cockpit doesn't sound like a good sign for reliability. Steam gauges and physical switch backups may not be glamorous, but they are proven technology.
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Unread post26 Jan 2012, 03:29

There is a standby instrument group: http://www.jsf.mil/downloads/documents/ ... ept_06.pdf {5.9Mb) (page 37)

"Standby Flight Display System: The standby display system independently displays attitude, altitude, airspeed, vertical velocity and angle of attack. The display system is centrally located in the cockpit front panel and incorporates fully agile performance."

Location of text: http://www.smiths.com/press_release_det ... easeID=203
________________

Will Projection Displays Give F-35 an Edge? June 1, 2004 by James W. Ramsey

http://www.aviationtoday.com/av/militar ... e_922.html

"...While the F-35 features an 8-by-20-inch viewing area, the display system currently is limited by processing capacity to the two adjacent 8-by-10s. "We had looked at using a 9-by-16-inch HDTV [high-definition TV] format, but based on redundancy needs in the cockpit, we felt better off with two 8-by-10s built together as a single 8-by-20—you get more display surface for the same redundancy that we needed," Frey points out. The displays incorporate a zoom-in capability to make features larger.

The redundancy allows one computer to substitute for the other if it should fail. "When using voice recognition, for instance, the master display computer takes the digital voice stream coming in and does all the appropriate commands, and then the slave computer knows that, if the master goes down, it picks up those extra functionalities," Frey says.

Each 8-by-10-inch section of the 8-by-20-inch display has its own graphics processor and projection engine that create the symbology. The airplane's different sensors ship the video to the display system, which inserts it in the correct portal, Frey explains....

...Smiths Aerospace, of Cheltenham, UK, is providing the F-35's standby 3-by-3-inch active matrix LCD flight display system, which independently displays attitude, altitude, airspeed, vertical velocity and angle of attack. The display system is centrally located in the cockpit front panel. And VSI Systems International, a joint venture between Collins and Israel's Elbit Systems, provides the JSFs helmet-mounted displays...."
_______________

Some may find this info interesting:

IEEE 1394 standard takes controls of F-35 fighter Oct 1, 2007

http://www.interconnectionworld.com/ind ... ghter.html
&
IEEE-1394 is proving to be a Stalwart of Aviation Vehicle Management Systems
By Richard Mourn, Astek Corp. [X-47B but related to F-35]

http://www.1394ta.org/press/WhitePapers/2011_AVMs.html

"IEEE 1394b (also known as beta) is completing its second successful deployment as an aircraft Vehicle Management System (VMS) network. It was first used in the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, and now it is being used in a similar capacity in the X47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration (UCAS-D)...."
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