Of DAS, EOTS etc..

Cockpit, radar, helmet-mounted display, and other avionics
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ricnunes

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Unread post15 Apr 2020, 21:00

wrightwing wrote:Each sensor has ~30° overlap on either side, by a neighboring sensor, so any 2 sensors will have a ~60° FOV. Thats not perfect, but it's pretty significant. Obviously it gets even better as a multi-ship formation.


Yes, I fully agree with you.


wrightwing wrote:Would you not agree that a 60° shared FOV between any 2 sensors is fairly useful, even in a 1v1 situation? It's not perfect, but it certainly greatly increases the probability of getting some range/geolocation data. The EOTS could also be slewed for an extra point of reference (as well as radar/ESM.)


I certainly agree with what you said above!
“Active stealth” is what the ignorant nay sayers call ECM and pretend like it’s new.
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Unread post15 Apr 2020, 21:20

“Would you not agree that a 60° shared FOV between any 2 sensors is fairly useful, even in a 1v1 situation? It's not perfect, but it certainly greatly increases the probability of getting some range/geolocation data.”

Useful? Certainly. But it’s not symmetric and the proximity of the sensors to each other makes the solution somewhat less accurate than a fused solution provided by sensors more widely spaced. If ownship data is all you have, that’s better than what anyone else is flying with. The other glory is that the jet tells the pilot which sensors are contributing and provides a confidence level in what it is providing.
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Unread post15 Apr 2020, 21:22

“In the video you have a triangulation made by a 2 F-35s, that's correct. But then again, it should be possible to perform triangulation without a second F-35 (although and granted with a 2nd or better a 3rd and 4th F-35 would be better/preferable), this by resorting to another source. Again, using a second DAS sensor or better yet, the EOTS would provide a good source of ID and triangulation.“

Yep. That’s called fusion.

Spaz has a slide somewhere that provides a conceptual depiction of how the fusion engine works. Many think it is simply the aggregation — on one display — of what the jet knows about the world around it. That’s not the magic; the magic is how it tasks the sources it has available to keep track of, or learn more about what it sees and what it thinks it knows — and the pilot doesn’t need to tell it to do so.
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Unread post15 Apr 2020, 22:54

Slip Slidin' Away, Slip Slidin' Away eh ehay…: http://image.slidesharecdn.com/combatsy ... 1334993866
&
How fused is my sensor: https://www.ncoic.org/apps/group_public ... 090225.pdf (7.4 Mb) No LONGER so attached below

Mentioned here: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=20144&p=228550&hilit=Weigel#p228550
& here: viewtopic.php?f=62&t=19268&p=225428&hilit=Weigel#p225428

CLICK de graphic & click it again to see it BETTA!
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F-35_Jahner_Weigel_20090225.pdf
(7.36 MiB) Downloaded 1778 times
F-35sensorFusionPLUSforum.gif
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
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Corsair1963

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Unread post20 May 2020, 00:29

What's the word on the DIRCM for the F-35??? Are they still developing the Northrop Grumman "The Threat Nullification Defensive Resource — ThNDR" for the aircraft and when is it suppose to be available??? (block 5/6?)
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Dragon029

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Unread post20 May 2020, 06:28

There's been no word on ThNDR for a few years and there's zero indication that it's being procured for Block 4. Stakeholders probably want to first see what happens with things like the USAF's SHiELD program - no point spending a bunch of money on DIRCM if the F-35 could instead get a laser that acts as both DIRCM and destructive HEL.

It's unlikely you could mount such lasers into all F-35s (like you presumably could with ThNDR), but if HELs work well enough against missiles then it might be more advantageous to just have a portion of the fleet flying with something like an LO-podded or weapon-bay-mounted laser.
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Unread post20 May 2020, 08:39

Dragon029 wrote:There's been no word on ThNDR for a few years and there's zero indication that it's being procured for Block 4. Stakeholders probably want to first see what happens with things like the USAF's SHiELD program - no point spending a bunch of money on DIRCM if the F-35 could instead get a laser that acts as both DIRCM and destructive HEL.

It's unlikely you could mount such lasers into all F-35s (like you presumably could with ThNDR), but if HELs work well enough against missiles then it might be more advantageous to just have a portion of the fleet flying with something like an LO-podded or weapon-bay-mounted laser.



Interesting........ :|
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Unread post26 May 2020, 19:27

F-35 touch screen off :D
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ricnunes

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Unread post27 May 2020, 15:51

Are those fingerprints or is it the way that the screen looks when turned off?
“Active stealth” is what the ignorant nay sayers call ECM and pretend like it’s new.
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Dragon029

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Unread post28 May 2020, 08:13

Fingerprints
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ricnunes

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Unread post29 May 2020, 16:22

Thanks Dragon
“Active stealth” is what the ignorant nay sayers call ECM and pretend like it’s new.
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doge

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Unread post02 Dec 2020, 17:18

8)
https://www.lockheedmartin.com/en-us/ne ... ystem.html
Cost Per Flight Hour Reduced by 25% for F-35 Targeting System
09/14/2020
Considerable work behind the scenes goes into keeping the F-35 in the air and ready to support pilots and their missions. Part of that effort includes decreasing costs of aircraft sustainment.
Lockheed Martin has reduced the sustainment cost per flight hour for the Electro-Optical Targeting System (EOTS) and Distributed Aperture System (DAS) Window Panels for the F-35 by 25 percent since last year.
The reduction is part of the overall initiative to improve F-35 mission capable rates and reduce sustainment costs for the F-35 to less than $25,000 by 2025. As part of the multi-year Performance Based Logistics (PBL) contract that was introduced in mid-2019, Lockheed Martin has implemented long-term cost reduction strategies and improved efficiencies. With these strategies, the team has achieved a 15 percent reduction in repair turnaround times and a 96 percent reduction in Mission Impaired Capability Awaiting Parts (MICAPs).
“We’re taking aggressive actions to ensure continued cost reduction and increased availability of our F-35 products,” said Brett Rolston, director of F-35 Sensors at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. “With F-35 production increasing year after year, it is vital that we drive reliability improvements into the sensors while driving sustainment costs down to meet customer expectations.”
Improvements are not anticipated to end any time soon. The team is working to expedite depot test equipment configuration updates and increase repair capabilities at F-35 military service depots. This will continue to reduce the cost per flight hour even further.
EOTS is the first sensor to combine forward-looking infrared and infrared search and track functionality to provide F-35 pilots with precise air-to-air and air-to-ground targeting capability. EOTS enhances F-35 pilots’ situational awareness and allows aircrews to identify areas of interest, perform reconnaissance and precisely deliver laser and GPS-guided weapons.
Advanced EOTS, an evolutionary electro-optical targeting system, is available for the F-35’s Block 4 development. Designed to replace EOTS, Advanced EOTS incorporates a wide range of enhancements and upgrades, including short-wave infrared, high-definition television, an infrared marker and improved image detector resolution. These enhancements increase F-35 pilots’ recognition and detection ranges, enabling greater overall targeting performance.
Of note, Advanced EOTS will provide more than $1 billion in life cycle cost savings. This next evolution of the EOTS sensor continues Lockheed Martin’s commitment to lowering the cost of F-35 Sensors.
The DAS Window Panel consists of six low-observable, infrared transparent windows for Electro-Optical (EO) DAS sensors on the F-35. Each shipset of windows enables the EODAS sensor to provide threat detection and 360-degree situational awareness to the pilot.

Celebrating Production Milestones
Lockheed Martin is scheduled to make its 700th EOTS delivery in mid-September, supporting the increasing F-35 production demands.
Earlier this year, the team delivered its 5,000th DAS Window Panel, marking a significant milestone as deliveries continue at more than 100 DAS Window Panels per month.
“Ultimately, it comes down to following our Lockheed Martin values of doing what’s right, respecting others and performing with excellence for our customer,” Rolston said. “Meeting our delivery commitments and ensuring the highest quality products are delivered to our customers is our focus."


https://www.f35.com/resources/gm-detail ... -9-17-2020
F-35 Cost Reduction Success at MFC
Week of 9/17/2020
Today, the F-35 Program continues to drive toward our $25K by 2025 Cost Per Flight Hour goal. I want to highlight how our partners at Missiles and Fire Control have reduced Sustainment costs for the Electro-Optical Targeting System (EOTS) by 25%.
The team is working to expedite depot test equipment configuration updates and increase repair capabilities at F-35 military service depots. Due to their efforts, we see a 15% reduction in repair turnaround times and a 96% reduction in Mission Impaired Capability Awaiting Parts (MICAPs).
The cost reductions stem from an overall initiative to improve F-35 mission capable rates and reduce Sustainment costs. The team continues to put in place long-term cost-reduction strategies to improve efficiencies while maintaining superior customer support.
F-35 Nation, I appreciate your hard work across the enterprise. Thank you and stay safe!
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doge

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Unread post02 Dec 2020, 17:23

Usually, Isn't DAS used so often? :roll:
https://theaviationist.com/2020/07/28/e ... htning-ii/
Enjoy This New Walkaround Tour Of The U.S. Air Force F-35A Lightning II
July 28, 2020 David Cenciotti
F-35 Demo Pilot Capt. Kristin “Beo” Wolfe introduces you to the Lightning II stealth aircraft.
U.S. Air Force Captain Kristin “Beo” Wolfe, the F-35A Demo Team Pilot for the 2020 and 2021 air demonstration season, does not need any introduction: she is the first female F-35A Demo pilot and only the second USAF F-35A Demo Team Pilot in history. As such, she was aboard the F-35 that, on May 29, 2020, at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, flew the first-ever Lightning II demonstration that was broadcast live around the world on social media.
As you may understand, she’s one of the most qualified F-35 pilot around to guide you through a walkaround tour of the U.S. Air Force 5th generation stealth jet.
Here are some details worth a comment that I’ve noticed in the footage, filmed once again by our friend Erik Johnston.
The walkaround starts with “Beo” talking about the EOTS (Electro-Optical Targeting System) with its T-FLIR (Targeting Forward Looking Infra-Red), that provides, through the IR, a black and white display in the cockpit that shows hot things really dark, so that the pilot can see hot moving vehicles, buildings, people, etc. There’s also a laser incorporated in the system, that allows to use LGBs (Laser Guided Bombs) like GBU-12s and GBU-49s on moving targets. At 03:45 we get some details about the endurance of the aircraft that can fly 1.5 – 2 hour missions without Air-to-Air Refueling. Next is a look at the engine, capable of 40,000 lbs of thrust: “for the demo I typically take off at a reduced fuel load, so about 40,000 gross weight or less, so we are quickly to the 1:1 thrust to weight ratio that people talk about”.
At 06:00 we learn another interesting detail: F-16 travel pods are used by the F-35 demo team to carry all the things they need (from luggage, to backpacks to swag to be sold at airshows) and these travel pods fit, one in each weapons bay, inside the Lightning II, where the GBU-31, 2,000-lb bombs are attached.
At around 06:50 we are reminded about the internal gun and its 181 rounds (25 mm, bigger than many jets, not as big as the 30 mm ones of the A-10), that can be fired in a 3-sec strafe.
At 08:00 we hear something interesting about the DAS, the Distributed Aperture System, a network of six cameras around the aircraft that provide 360 degree field of view to the pilot, giving him also the ability to see through the aircraft structure (and own body), thanks to the imagery projected onto the helmet’s visor. We have heard a lot about it, but I find it interesting to learn that it is “not used a ton tactically, although it’s a cool feature”.
We don’t get a chance to have a look into the cockpit, but we know it’s a glass cockpit that only has about 20 switches. Dealing with the helmet, features images, generated by two projectors and then displayed on the inner visor, that can include DAS imagery, flight critical info (like speed, direction and altitude), tactical info (like targets, friendly aircrafts, navigation waypoints) and night vision. Another value add of the helmet is the integrated NVGs (Night Vision Googles). Until today, during night operations US pilots had to choose between NVGs and JHMCS (Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System) because NVGs need to be mounted a few centimetres in front of the eye and would interfere with the visor, leaving no space to project the symbology.
At 11:40 mark we learn that the F-35 usually rotates between 140 and 160 knots (depending on several factors, including air density, pressure altitude, weight etc), gear must be up by 300 knots. Pattern is flown between 300 and 350 knots, landing, with AOA at 13 and airspeed again between 140 and 160 KIAS.

https://youtu.be/FoIbyrJFNaE


On the other hand, F-35 pilots Tucker “Cinco” Hamilton and Justin "HASARD" Lee says DAS it helps at night.
Is wonder if it DAS used differently depending on the pilots or military belongs ? :roll: (Interesting DAS 8) )
https://www.instagram.com/p/CDhoxr4BkOv/
cincohamilton AUGUST 6 2020
Awesome night catapult of an F-35C! One of the benefits of the F-35 is the fantastic night vision capability. While taking off at night we will display our DAS (distributed aperture system) onto one of the 4 portals that make up our 8x20inch touchscreen. This DAS system has 6 cameras mounted on the skin of the aircraft to provide 360-degree video to the pilot of the world around them. It also turns night into day and gives full spatial awareness to the pilot. We can also pull it up in our helmet and have it overlay what we are looking at, but we don’t use that during takeoffs and landings because it is more of a detractor.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gN6rI53vGp0
@37:20~
Q: what about is it more of a novelty or is it of real functional use this concept of being able to look through the aircraft but between your legs.
A [F-35 pilots Justin "HASARD" Lee]: so what would you use that at night?

Q: so that's night.
A: okay, it's almost like being in a 90's video game. so it's definitely not like your eyes but at night it's great especially.

Q: if you're seeing an IR synthetic aperture radar view is what you're saying, yeah?
A: yeah, and it works in no Illume so where's in night-vision goggles that amplifies the moonlight this it'll work in total darkness.
So, we have both we have a night-vision camera. And then we can switch to the DAS just to distribute assists of all right.
it's pretty cool to see at night. in fact we're gearing up for a night week next week so we were testing out all the cameras is that.

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ricnunes

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Unread post02 Dec 2020, 18:01

doge wrote:Usually, Isn't DAS used so often? :roll:
https://theaviationist.com/2020/07/28/e ... htning-ii/
Enjoy This New Walkaround Tour Of The U.S. Air Force F-35A Lightning II
July 28, 2020 David Cenciotti
F-35 Demo Pilot Capt. Kristin “Beo” Wolfe introduces you to the Lightning II stealth aircraft.
...
At 08:00 we hear something interesting about the DAS, the Distributed Aperture System, a network of six cameras around the aircraft that provide 360 degree field of view to the pilot, giving him also the ability to see through the aircraft structure (and own body), thanks to the imagery projected onto the helmet’s visor. We have heard a lot about it, but I find it interesting to learn that it is “not used a ton tactically, although it’s a cool feature”.
...
Another value add of the helmet is the integrated NVGs (Night Vision Googles). Until today, during night operations US pilots had to choose between NVGs and JHMCS (Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System) because NVGs need to be mounted a few centimetres in front of the eye and would interfere with the visor, leaving no space to project the symbology.



On the other hand, F-35 pilots Tucker “Cinco” Hamilton and Justin "HASARD" Lee says DAS it helps at night.
Is wonder if it DAS used differently depending on the pilots or military belongs ? :roll: (Interesting DAS 8) )
https://www.instagram.com/p/CDhoxr4BkOv/
cincohamilton AUGUST 6 2020
Awesome night catapult of an F-35C! One of the benefits of the F-35 is the fantastic night vision capability. While taking off at night we will display our DAS (distributed aperture system) onto one of the 4 portals that make up our 8x20inch touchscreen. This DAS system has 6 cameras mounted on the skin of the aircraft to provide 360-degree video to the pilot of the world around them. It also turns night into day and gives full spatial awareness to the pilot. We can also pull it up in our helmet and have it overlay what we are looking at, but we don’t use that during takeoffs and landings because it is more of a detractor.



If I have to give my interpretation or personal guess about what you posted, I would say:
- The DAS features/functions that are used the most "tactically" which are MWS (Missile Warning System) and 360º spherical IRST are fully automatic (they constantly feed the Sensor Fusion engine) which means that they aren't activated/triggered or otherwise directly manipulated by the pilot so this means that the pilot won't have the perception that he or she is actually "using" DAS.
- Anyway, it seems that the pilot (Capt. Kristin “Beo” Wolfe) when referring to DAS was actually referring to the 360º IR vision around the aircraft function which should indeed be the 'less used' function of DAS (compared to all the other functions of DAS which are 'always' and automatically used) and at the same time it's the only function of DAS which is 'manually triggered' by the F-35 pilot.
- Together with the point above, it seems or it could be that Capt. Kristin “Beo” Wolfe prefers to use Helmet mounted Night Vision System as opposed to the DAS 360º IR vision during night flying since the former has a better resolution then the later (allowing for example, night landings) although the later should have better vision range and this advantage of DAS (better vision range) could be the reason why pilots Tucker “Cinco” Hamilton and Justin "HASARD" Lee prefer or usually use DAS (as opposed to Capt. Kristin “Beo” Wolfe).
Anyway, we must remember that pilots are Human beings and as such and like other Human beings they don't always prefer to use the same things/features.
“Active stealth” is what the ignorant nay sayers call ECM and pretend like it’s new.
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Unread post17 May 2021, 21:31

Electro-Optical Targeting System for the F-35 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZ0nwQ4wO2s

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