Dutch MoD choose definitely for F-35

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ricnunes

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Unread post27 Apr 2021, 14:35

magitsu wrote:Typhoon was really something else in the HX challenge publicity reels in this regard.

https://youtu.be/RJFS9VZ94dw?t=66

(with burners, classic Hornet to without burners immediately follows for convenient comparison)


LOL, that's a classic 'apples with oranges' and biased comparison... :roll:
“Active stealth” is what the ignorant nay sayers call ECM and pretend like it’s new.
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doge

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Unread post06 May 2021, 19:08

ALIS is active in the field. 8)
https://www.vbm.info/images/stories/tri ... 2-2019.pdf (Language is Dutch. Use Google Translate.)
Guest column: F-35 pilot Ian Knight
12 - 2019 | Trivizier
October 31, 2019. A moment that many CLSK and Defense employees have been looking forward to for more than 15 years. For the first time ever, we had our own 5th generation fighter plane permanently on Dutch soil. A fighter aircraft that stands out for its invisibility, modern sensors and networks and that can be the backbone for defense operations worldwide in the coming decades. It is therefore not surprising that politics, the media and our own people often focus on the device itself.
But in the background something more fundamental is actually changing within CLSK than just having a new aircraft. "5th gen" works. But what exactly is that? To answer that question, we have to go back to January 16, 2015. At Edwards AFB, a small, close-knit team of highly motivated CLSK people, thousands of miles away from their family and friends and after months of training, will be responsible for the first two F-35s. A small team, because CLSK has no capacity to send more people to the US. F-16 operations continue as usual.
Pioneers who embark on the outdoor adventure, despite poor financial prospects and while the cabinet has not even taken an official decision on the purchase of the F-35: it could just be over. This pioneering mentality leads to a lot of "out of the box" thinking. Sometimes also out of necessity, because scarcity means that we have to deploy people as flexibly and widely as possible. The goal is to use that state-of-the-art F-35 as effectively as possible. Not even 30 professionals, who will be at the basis of the next 40 years of fighter flight operations.

We soon find out that the F-35 requires much stronger cooperation within the squadron than we were used to. An example: after landing, the F-35 automatically reports via the F-35 -ALIS computer system that a cryptographic card is broken. The pilot and the avi-onica specialist discover that the card itself or the fiber optic connection is broken. To check the fiber optic cables, the LO specialist must first remove the Low Observable Stealth Coatings at the access panel.
Coating recovery takes time and means choosing a good time for the repair or working with the pilots and LO specialists to determine what will be the result of flying for a while without that piece of coating. The card turns out to be the culprit and the avionics engineer and ALIS administrators install the cryptographic keys on the new card in the F-35 with a laptop. Complaint resolved, but you can only put your puzzle piece together in this jigsaw puzzle if you know a lot about each other's work.
But what has my concrete role been in this example? Those of the other officers? Nothing. That is the second characteristic of 5th gen work: when leaders ensure that the experts can do their work without hindrance. Provide a lot of eagerness to learn. That everyone would like to know what all the puzzle pieces look like. Then be proud afterwards when the beautiful jigsaw puzzle is finished super-fast. 5th gen.
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Unread post06 May 2021, 19:11

Dutch pilots Ian Gladys Knight Interview. 8)
part 1 https://aerobuzz.de/militar/interview-i ... der-rnlaf/ (Language is German. Use Google Translate.)
Interview: Ian "Gladys" Knight, one of the first F-35 pilots for the RNLAF
F-35A-JSF-KLU-KONINKLIJKE LUCHTMACHT-LIGHTNING II-LOCKHEED MARTIN-ROYAL NETHERLANDS AIRFORCE
Lt. Col. Ian "Gladys" Knight was the pilot of the first Italian-made F-35A Lightning II for the Dutch Air Force (RNLAF). He flew the modern stealth fighter from Italy to Leeuwarden Air Base in the north of the Netherlands on October 31 of this year. Bob Fischer had the opportunity to meet Lt. Interview Col. Knight.
December 18, 2019 by BOB FISCHER
The surname of Lt. Col. Ian "Gladys" Knight is from Scotland, having been born there since father was born. His tactical callsign - which nowadays almost every fighter pilot in a Western air force receives after his training - refers to the famous singer Gladys from the group Gladys Knight & the Pips.
Knight wanted to study physics when he was young, but when he saw an advertisement for pilots, he decided to change his career path. He said in an interview: “The attraction of becoming a pilot is that you are challenged both physically and mentally. That was an important reason for me. "

F-35A of the RNLAF
In 2003 - when he was First Lieutenant - Ian Knight was involved in the F-35 project of the Royal Netherlands Airforce (RNLAF). The project team wanted younger pilots to get to know the F-35 as well, so he took part in various simulator flights. He was ordered from Twenthe Air Base to the United States and became an exchange pilot with the 77th Fighter Squadron, a unit of the US Air Force that specializes in the suppression and destruction of enemy air defenses ((D) SEAD) is specialized. The F-35 was also designed for these types of missions.
Knight was one of only a few pilots to take part in the "F-16 replacement" project in the Defense Materiel Organization (DMO) team, which is responsible for the overall F-35 procurement project for the Netherlands. Thanks to his deep and specific knowledge of the Joint Strike Fighter, he was selected to be one of the first RNLAF pilots to fly the F-35A.
He says, “All F-16 pilots can fly the F-35. Currently, some F-16 pilots have been retrained to become F-35 pilots. In future, pilots will be selected for the F-16 or F-35 directly after their training at Sheppard Air Force Base. "Since 2014, Knight has not been flying the F-16 any more. He says: “In the future we will see whether the F-16 pilots can also stay on their old 'current' pattern during the transition to the F-35. This results in advantages, but also disadvantages. "

The F-35 is easier to fly than the F-16
According to Lt. Col. Knight, flying the F-35 is even easier than the F-16. Of course, the new fighter is much more advanced. But the ease with which the F-35 can be flown gives the pilot more time for his actual work, using the F-35 as a weapon and sensor platform.
The engine is more powerful and accelerates faster, which has been proven in aerial battles and simple aerial combat maneuvers (Basic Fighter Maneuvers / BFM). If you look at air combat capabilities only, the F-35 falls between the F-16 and the F-18 Hornet. Another difference is that the F-35 is equipped with an autothrottle, which acts as a kind of cruise control. The g-forces faced by an F-35 pilot are the same as the F-16, around 9 g.
All navigation information is shown on a large display in the instrument panel, but paper maps are still used in the cockpit. A military variant is used for the approach charts.
The system backup consists of several levels, it looks like a GPS or an INS and is comparable to the F-16, but of course much more advanced in the F-35. It is surprising that the checklists will only be available as a digital version in the future; today's version is still printed on paper.
The F-35 is equipped with a black box to find and document possible causes of errors. In addition to the black box, the F-35 reports codes to the technicians and the pilot via a mobile storage device. It reports which part may have to be replaced or where there is a fault. The software is so sophisticated that it can even predict the possible failure of a system, so that the technicians are informed early on when certain parts are due to be replaced.

The Dutch F-35s are modified so that they can be equipped with brake parachutes. The facilities for this are available, but the umbrellas themselves have yet to be purchased.
What would be the ideal number of F-35 for the Netherlands? Lt. Col Knight says, “There are many different numbers. The Dutch Aerospace Center (NLR) and TNO (Innovation for Life) scientifically concluded that the ideal number is 114 aircraft, which according to the budget is not realistic. Over the years that the F-35 project has been running, purchases have finally dropped to 37, but we have now ordered 46 and hope to be able to demonstrate the importance of this multitool for our defense in the years to come. "

part 2 https://aerobuzz.de/luftverkehr/intervi ... der-rnlaf/ (Language is German. Use Google Translate.)
Interview: Ian "Gladys" Knight, RNLAF F-35 pilot
F-35A-JSF-KLU-KONINKLIJKE LUCHTMACHT-LIGHTNING II-LOCKHEED MARTIN-RNLAF
Part II of the interview with Lt. Col. Ian "Gladys" Knight. Bob Fischer had the opportunity to meet Lt. Interview Col. Knight.
1.12.2019 by BOB FISCHER
For the F-35, Knight sees a close cooperation with the new Reaper drones of Squadron 306 (No. 306 Squadron), which are expected to be delivered at the end of 2020. “Of course we will train a lot together in order to work as interoperably as possible via data networks and connections such as the Link 16. I have to gain as much experience as possible, but we can't do that in Leeuwarden until we have both weapon platforms in our inventory. "
Turkey still operates NF-5s that previously flew with the RNLAF. Former RNLAF F-16s fly in Chile and Jordan. Then wouldn't it be a good idea to leave some of the younger F-16s in the Netherlands to use them as aggressor aircraft for enemy portrayal? Lt. Col Knight understands the question but is not an expert on the retirement of the F-16.
In future, the F-35A Lightning II from Koninklijke Luchtmacht (KLu) will get through the takeover process faster than is the case today. The RNLAF has learned from the previous handovers and incorporated this experience into the processes.
In Leeuwarden, the base where the first F-35A of the RNLAF are stationed, the Royal Netherlands Airforce operates four full mission simulators. The Volkel Air Base will also receive some, and the simulators will be networked with one another. However, the RNLAF does not procure any additional procedural equipment.

Use of wing stations
Aerobuzz: “We saw that the F-35 can be armed with an under-wing armament. That seems logical, but how does this affect stealth capabilities? "
Knight: “Yes, anything that can be seen on the outside of the jet reduces the stealth properties. But above all, stealth supports a surprise effect. After a few days during a conflict, you want to bring as much armament into combat as you can, and then stealth skills are less important. "

Aerobuzz: "It is rumored that the F-35 is visible to some radars despite its stealth camouflage."
Knight: “The RNLAF is very satisfied with the stealth capabilities of the F-35. The main goal is that the opponent only sees you when it is too late. "

Aerobuzz: “Right now you are in command of the 3XX squadron. Will it be season 322 in the near future? "
Knight: “3XX is a temporary working name that will only be used during the restructuring phase to separate the 322 squadron with the F-16 and the future 322 squadron with the F-35. We have a 322 commander in charge of the F-16, and I'm the commander of the F-35 squadron. I am proud of the first colleagues of this new season, they are a fantastic team! We cultivate real teamwork and do a lot of pioneering work together, also with the other comrades at the air base. "
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Unread post06 May 2021, 19:14

Dutch pilots admire the F-35's cockpit. 8)
https://magazines.defensie.nl/defensiek ... vlieger_38 (Language is Dutch. Use Google Translate.)
'Yes, I'm in the F-35'
Defense newspaper 38, Friday 25 September 2020 Text Jack Oosthoek
More and more pilots on Lightning II
The era of the F-35 is getting more and more color. Of the 46 aircraft ordered, 4 are now at Leeuwarden Air Base. And training at Luke Air Force Base in the United States is in top gear. As a follow-up to the interview with the Dutch Senior National Representative at Luke Air Force Base in the previous issue, the Defense newspaper spoke this time with a newly trained Leeuwarder F-35 pilot.
Colonel pilot Henk Doorten never dreamed of becoming a pilot in the past. Now he is "graduated" on the F-35 Lightning II, the official name for the JSF. At the end of July, Doorten was awarded the license, or type certificate, at Luke Air Force Base. “After many years of F-16, this was a great moment in my career. I thought, "yes, I'm in the F-35". "
Doorten followed the abbreviated retraining in America. As the new commander of Leeuwarden Air Base, he cannot be away from home for too long. Therefore, he needs "only" to know the box in general and how it works. “Contrary to young pilots, as a commander I don't have to be ready for combat immediately. I may go on a mission, but for the time being the priority in the work lies with the young pilots. Still, I will regularly fly the F-35. ”

Think and switch
Training was not unknown territory for the colonel. In recent years, he was closely involved in, among other things, staff positions with the arrival of the F-35. In Washington he worked at the F-35 Joint Program Office. “In all those years I typed the word F-35 almost every day, now I'm in it,” jokes the air force officer. According to him, the training is both physically and mentally 'doable'. As one of the major differences with the F-16, which has been operational in our country since 1979, he mentions the much better ergonomic cockpit design and the ditto system of levers and buttons. The F-35 also has contemporary sensor fusing, with which the pilot can properly interpret the flow of information. It is much larger than in the F-16.
Doorten: “The F-35 course is suitable for every F-16 pilot. You don't need any extra skills. However, the first few flights take a lot of energy, because you have to constantly think and switch. After that, everything slowly becomes more automatic. However, I never had a feeling of "how hard it is all." The training is well designed and balanced. It just takes discipline to keep it up. You must always "stand there"; every new week more is required of you. Whether you make it is up to you. To a novice pilot going to initial flight training, I would say "hold on, don't give up. When you eventually take-off in the F-35, you will be richly rewarded for your efforts "."

Important, beautiful, unique
Doorten himself feels proud during an operation with an F-35, he says. “You realize how unique it is to work with this technological cream of the crop. A lot of information comes to you, making the F-35 more relevant as a weapon system than the F-16 in important operations. Whether flying with it is the ultimate childhood dream? Hard to answer. I never dreamed of a career as a pilot before. With the F-35 you help to guard peace and security in this increasingly troubled world. Against that background, this is an important, beautiful and unique profession. ”
"The F-35 training is suitable for any F-16 pilot"

Compared to the F-16, the cockpit design of the F-35 is decidedly better.

The avalanche of information that the pilot receives makes the F-35 a more relevant weapon system than the F-16.

Not only the cockpit design is much better than the F-16. The interaction with the ultramodern kite helmet is also a step forward.
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Unread post06 May 2021, 19:17

Dutch pilots say the F-35's sensors can see a few hundreds km ahead. :shock: (!?) WoW.
https://magazines.defensie.nl/defensiek ... liegers_37 (Language is Dutch. Use Google Translate.)
"Razor" trains F-35 pilots
Defense newspaper 37, Friday 18 September 2020 Text Jack Oosthoek Photo Defense Media Center
"It is incredibly well put together"
"Flying with an F-35 is no more difficult than with an F-16, but it is different." If anyone can know it is Lieutenant Colonel Aviator Gert, nicknamed Razor. In 2019 he was one of the first Dutchmen to complete the training at Luke Air Force Base. Due to his current position as flight instructor and commander of the Dutch unit at Luke, he knows better than anyone how the training works.
A large but busy airspace, usually good weather and excellent housing. These are the reasons why the former F-16 training site Luke Air Force Base in Arizona has been turned into a training base for the F-35.
Dyed-in-the-wool kites who have flown with the predecessor for years await a training of almost 5 months. Due to the corona crisis, possibly a little longer. Newcomers who have only recently received their military pilot's license have to work for 9 months. But they cannot currently begin F-35 training.

Hardly visible
According to Razor, an experienced pilot gets the job done fairly effortlessly. “It's not super tough for him, but he has to keep his brains up. It is all a lot, it takes a long time, you have to study a lot yourself. Sometimes you make 12-hour days. No one has lost weight so far.
Have you passed the basic training at Woensdrecht for new KLu pilots and the follow-up training at Sheppard Air Force Base? Then there is a good chance that you will also pass the F-35 training. “I found it challenging myself. Flying in a new generation fighter plane works differently than with an F-16. With the sensors of the F-35, for example, you can look around you for a few 100 kilometers. Fantastic… In an F-16 your situational awareness is less. Due to specific coatings on the skin and the ditto shapes of the aircraft, the F-35 is stealth, or hardly visible to the enemy. Incidentally, you are therefore not invincible; it does give you an advantage in battle. ”

Bit of making do
The "transition", to be taught by Dutch and American instructors, starts with a 6-week program with theory lessons and training in a simulator. According to Razor, it simulates reality well. “In the simulator for the F-16 it is a bit of a struggle in that respect. Incidentally, it is a wonderful 23 degrees in the F-35 simulator. Outside, on the other hand, it is very hot on the flight line in the real plane in the summer. That is why preventing heat injuries is a point of attention. "

Tremendous experience
After the simulator, the training moves to American airspace north of Mexico. Takeoff, landing, special patterns flying: all registers open. This is followed by exercises in base and long-range air combat, attacks on ground targets, shooting with the on-board gun, dropping different types of bombs. “An enormous experience in such a new device for all students. This is what you do it for, ”says Razor. The final chord is the offensive counterair phase, in which all lessons learned are reviewed again. Followed by the presentation of the diploma, or type certificate.

Gain experience quickly
Back in the Netherlands, the F-35 pilot is almost immediately deployable, or mission capable. But since he still has relatively little experience, it is important to participate in small and large international exercises, such as Frisian Flag. Razor knows how important that is. "The training is incredibly well designed, but I am learning more during every flight after that."
"In an F-16 your situational awareness is less"

"It's a lovely 23 degrees in the simulator"

According to flight instructor and commander Razor, the F-35 training is doable for any experienced pilot.
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Unread post06 May 2021, 19:19

Dutch is filming the removal of the F-35 coating sticker. :shock: Wow. (Rare video. 8) )
@5:10~
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_v062qUv9Vc
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Unread post20 Nov 2021, 07:20

Dutch Partners to layover with VTANG
19 Nov 2021 Marcus Tracy; Joint Force Headquarters - Vermont National Guard Public Affairs

"SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt. - Eight Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) F-35 jets are scheduled to arrive at the 158th Fighter Wing on Monday, November 22 and depart on Wednesday, November 24.

The RNLAF will layover in Vermont as they transition back across the U.S. to the Netherlands. They will not train with the 158th Fighter Wing during their transition home...."

Source: https://www.dvidshub.net/unit/JFHVNG
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
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