UK MOD in a muddle over F-35C

Program progress, politics, orders, and speculation
  • Author
  • Message
Offline
User avatar

steve2267

Elite 2K

Elite 2K

  • Posts: 2580
  • Joined: 12 Jun 2016, 17:36

Unread post15 Dec 2020, 16:28

I corresponded with a LM Pather keeper @ Edwards. The F135 motor is proving to be very, very reliable. Unless something comes up, the motors are staying put in the planes for 6, 9, 10 months. As Spaz points out, the hangar space onboard the QE and PoW is cavernous. If the Brits can stash four or even six spare motors on board, they probably have this issue covered quite well, and don't have to wait for a COD flight from somewhere...
Take an F-16, stir in A-7, dollop of F-117, gob of F-22, dash of F/A-18, sprinkle with AV-8B, stir well + bake. Whaddya get? F-35.
Offline

noth

Active Member

Active Member

  • Posts: 116
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2005, 14:16

Unread post15 Dec 2020, 21:05

aussiebloke wrote:
noth wrote:
The RFA Fort Victoria has the ability to resupply the carriers with F135 engines.


Not so if I am understanding this report correctly:

Rolls Royce has developed a completely new fast, high-capacity Heavy Replenishment at Sea (HRAS) system that can transfer 25 loads per hour of up to 6 tonnes...... HRAS is therefore particularly important for the QEC and the original specification required the system be capable of transferring heavy and bulky items such as packaged Storm Shadow missile or a complete F135 jet engine for an F-35....... RFA Fort Victoria will emerge from this refit able to transfer stores to the carrier but will still be limited to 2-tonne transfers, primarily because she does not have the internal equipment to handle such large loads. Only when the new purpose-built Fleet Solid Support ships (FSS) fitted with HRAS rigs and mechanised stores handling systems arrive in the mid-2020s, will the full 6-tonnes be possible.
https://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/rfa-fo ... -carriers/

As an aside since the above article came out it appears that the Fleet Solid Support ships’ “HRAS capability has been deleted as it is hard to justify the additional expense.”
https://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/fleet- ... n-britain/


Thanks, I hadn't seen that report go by. Disappointing they cancelled HRAS for cost reasons, yet again.
Offline

noth

Active Member

Active Member

  • Posts: 116
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2005, 14:16

Unread post16 Dec 2020, 10:59

https://www.theyworkforyou.com/wrans/?i ... 8.126964.h

So three months later, and about a week after we found out via online sources, official statement:

Stephen Morgan Shadow Minister (Defence) (Armed Forces and Defence Procurement), Shadow Minister (Defence)
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress his Department is making on repairing HMS Prince of Wales after its second flooding incident in October 2020; and if he will make a statement.


(Citation: HC Deb, 14 December 2020, cW)
Photo of Jeremy QuinJeremy Quin The Minister of State, Ministry of Defence
Repairs of the damage caused by floodwater in the engine room of HMS PRINCE OF WALES are progressing as planned. The Ship's Company is conducting concurrent preparations for their programme of at sea training activity in 2021 which precede her operational commitments.


Photo via @NavyLookout on twitter.com
Attachments
PoW-flooded-engineroom.jpeg
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 25129
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post18 Dec 2020, 22:08

Avengers Assemble - USMC F-35s in the UK [3 page PDF of article attached]
Jan 2021 Peter R Foster

"US Marine Corps F-35B Lightning IIs of VMFA-211 ‘Wake Island Avengers’ recently joined HMS Queen Elizabeth for a joint embarkation alongside 617 Sqn. As Peter R Foster reports, this was just one of a series of exercises staged out of RAF Marham during the Marines’ deployment...

...Operating the same F-35B aircraft means there is commonality with the UK so spares, weapons and support can be shared. But, during the summer, dedicated US Marine Corps command and control (C2) and IT systems were installed in the ship....

...The carrier F-35 force were pitted against a number of challenging scenarios with a gradual cross-over of teams as both operational flying and maintenance saw integration between UK and US personnel. The pilots did not fly each other’s jets, but mixed missions were flown....

...VMFA-211 is scheduled to return to the UK in 2021: under current plans the marine fighter attack squadron will deploy in March with the complete carrier strike group, which will put to sea for a final three to four-week Certification Exercise (‘CertEx’), as part of the year’s first Joint Warrior (JW21-1)....

...Planning for the air group continues to evolve and should consist of eight UK and six US Marine Corps F-35Bs plus nine Merlin HMA2s of 820 Naval Air Squadron. A number of Wildcats will also be deployed, armed with the new Martlet missile. Crowsnest, the replacement airborne surveillance and control (ASaC) platform for the Sea King ASaC7 of 849 Naval Air Squadron, will not formally achieve initial operating capability until September, but three of the nine Merlins are planned to be fitted with pre-IOC standard kits. At least the CGS will have some kind of ASaC, even if not properly certified and complete.

The first operational cruise of a UK Carrier Strike Group has been many years in the making – it will now head east to sail the waters of the Indian and Pacific Oceans."

VMFA-211 F-35B UK DEPLOYMENT [2020]
-BuNo -MODEX
169620 CF-00
169621 CF-01
169587 CF-02
169588 CF-03
169589 CF-04
169607 CF-06
169608 CF-07
169610 CF-08
169614 CF-09
169414 CF-25

Source: AVIATION News Magazine January 2021
Attachments
F-35B VMFA-211 Aboard QE Aviation News Jan 2021 pp3.pdf
(484.49 KiB) Downloaded 687 times
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 25129
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post23 Dec 2020, 09:42

A year in review – the Royal Navy in 2020
22 Dec 2020 SaveTheRoyalNavy

"...a serious flood on board HMS Prince of Wales while alongside in Portsmouth during October. A significant internal leak damaged the high voltage electrical systems and repairs to will cost £3.3M. Remedial work on the High-Pressure Salt Water systems on both aircraft carriers to prevent further floods is costing £2.2M. HMS Prince of Wales will miss at least two planned periods at sea conducting FOST activities and helicopter training. Her Westlant 21 trip to the US has also been abandoned, saving £2M but also delaying F-35 developmental flying...."

Source: https://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/a-year ... y-in-2020/
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
Offline
User avatar

doge

Forum Veteran

Forum Veteran

  • Posts: 531
  • Joined: 13 Jul 2015, 16:07

Unread post24 Dec 2020, 15:10

Threat Emitter vs F-35B 8)
https://news.northropgrumman.com/news/r ... r-exercise
Northrop Grumman Joint Threat Emitter Deployed in Support of UK-Led Joint Warrior Exercise
December 01, 2020
LONDON – Dec. 1, 2020 – Northrop Grumman Corporation’s (NYSE: NOC) Joint Threat Emitter (JTE) was recently deployed to assist Royal Air Force (RAF), Royal Navy (RN) and U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) F-35B aircrew training as a component of Exercise Joint Warrior, the largest military exercise in Europe.
JTE is a mobile air defence electronic warfare threat simulator that provides a battlespace environment, designed to help train military personnel to identify enemy missile or artillery threats. During the exercise, JTE provided electronic range simulation training capabilities and played a key role in the training of F-35B pilots from the RAF, RN and USMC.
“Warfighters need realistic training and it’s particularly important to the UK, and its allies, as they bring the F-35 Lightning II into service,” said Andy Horler, director, business development, Northrop Grumman. “Our Joint Threat Emitter offers a high level of preparation for aircrews as they train to combat various threats.”
Exercise Joint Warrior brings together all branches of the UK’s armed forces combining with NATO and other allied forces, incorporating 58 aircraft and 16 warships from 14 allied nations. Going head to head against the JTE simulation is a key component of the F-35B aircrews’ training ahead of their deployment as part of the UK Carrier Strike Group in 2021.
For more information on JTE, please visit: https://www.northropgrumman.com/joint-t ... itter-jte/
Attachments
Northrop+Grumman+Joint+Threat+Emitter+deployed+in+support+of+UK-Led+Joint+Warrior+Exercise_19bd64fd-0df7-4856-bc3b-064af6d43b9b-prv.jpg
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 25129
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post04 Jan 2021, 17:16

Carrier Strike Group hits important milestone
04 Jan 2021 UK MoD

"The UK’s Carrier Strike Group (CSG) has achieved a major milestone ahead of its first operational deployment this year.

The CSG has reached Initial Operating Capability (IOC), meaning all elements of the group from fighter jets to radar systems to anti-ship weapons have been successfully brought together and operated.

Both the air and naval elements of the CSG have now met this milestone, which includes qualified pilots and ground crews being held at short notice for carrier-based operations and trained to handle weapons and maintain the equipment.

Another marker of success at this stage includes the ability to deploy Anti-Submarine Warfare capabilities such as frigates & destroyers, as well as both fixed & rotary wing aircraft including Merlin helicopters to operate alongside the carrier....

...Following the success of the NATO Joint Warrior Exercises last autumn, the Carrier Strike Group capability has reached the key IOC milestone for the programme on schedule....

...Full operating capability for the CSG is expected by December 2023."

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/carr ... -milestone
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
Offline

timmymagic

Enthusiast

Enthusiast

  • Posts: 42
  • Joined: 27 Apr 2019, 19:48

Unread post04 Jan 2021, 18:47

aussiebloke wrote:
noth wrote:
The RFA Fort Victoria has the ability to resupply the carriers with F135 engines.


Not so if I am understanding this report correctly:

Rolls Royce has developed a completely new fast, high-capacity Heavy Replenishment at Sea (HRAS) system that can transfer 25 loads per hour of up to 6 tonnes...... HRAS is therefore particularly important for the QEC and the original specification required the system be capable of transferring heavy and bulky items such as packaged Storm Shadow missile or a complete F135 jet engine for an F-35....... RFA Fort Victoria will emerge from this refit able to transfer stores to the carrier but will still be limited to 2-tonne transfers, primarily because she does not have the internal equipment to handle such large loads. Only when the new purpose-built Fleet Solid Support ships (FSS) fitted with HRAS rigs and mechanised stores handling systems arrive in the mid-2020s, will the full 6-tonnes be possible.
https://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/rfa-fo ... -carriers/

As an aside since the above article came out it appears that the Fleet Solid Support ships’ “HRAS capability has been deleted as it is hard to justify the additional expense.”
https://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/fleet- ... n-britain/


HRAS has been deleted, as have the mechanised stores handling. Some RFA types have said that the mechanised systems made sense in the QE's magazine, but not on the stores ship and massively increased costs for little real benefit. But HRAS is a loss, no 2 ways about it. The RN has had the training rig set up for years now. It was developed by Rolls Royce as part of their marine division, but that was sold off to Kongsberg some time ago. Not sure if that has had any bearing. No-one else seems to have been interested either, pity really, but as only the UK and US have a requirement for a Solid Stores only ship perhaps understandable.
Offline

hythelday

Forum Veteran

Forum Veteran

  • Posts: 656
  • Joined: 25 Jul 2016, 12:43
  • Location: Estonia

Unread post05 Jan 2021, 08:10

More news articles regarding the CSG IOC:

UK’s Carrier Strike Group Reaches Initial Operating Capability
04 January 2021, by Xavier Vavasseur

https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/20 ... apability/

UK Royal Navy Declares IOC for Queen Elizabeth Carrier Strike Group Ahead of Spring Deployment
04 January 2021, by Megan Eckstein

https://news.usni.org/2021/01/04/uk-roy ... deployment

UK Carrier Strike Group declares Initial Operating Capability

https://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/uk-car ... apability/

British Carrier Strike Group to deploy to Pacific
04 January 2021, by George Allison

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/british ... o-pacific/


The last two are the more detailed ones. Recap:
  • Mediterranean Sea, the Persian Gulf and end up in the Pacific
  • 24 F-35Bs, including USMC ones
  • Planned escort is 2x Type 45, 2x Type 23, 1x SSN (my guess is the newer Astute class) and Tide-class and Fort-class support ships
  • Crowsnest AEW still not IOC until September 2021, but will be onboard for deployment

Big day for Royal Navy.
Offline

krieger22

Active Member

Active Member

  • Posts: 102
  • Joined: 10 Jul 2018, 22:02

Unread post06 Jan 2021, 18:24

And now, a £550 million contract for demonstration and manufacture of SPEAR3.

https://www.overtdefense.com/2021/01/06 ... itime-ioc/

MBDA says that guided firings of the SPEAR from Eurofighter Typhoons for the demonstration phase will begin within 18 months, with production of the SPEAR missiles and launchers beginning in 2023.
Offline
User avatar

doge

Forum Veteran

Forum Veteran

  • Posts: 531
  • Joined: 13 Jul 2015, 16:07

Unread post14 Jan 2021, 16:03

Some sentences I've seen before, others I've never seen. 8)
An interesting feature called VSBIT. Checking the F-15 and F-16 takes a one-day, but checks the F-35 only takes 60 seconds, It says that. :shock: wow
https://topgear.com.my/reviews/f-35-lig ... w-jet-like
https://www.topgear.com/car-reviews/loc ... -lightning
F-35 Lightning review: what's the RAF's new jet like?
By topgear, 07 January 2021
A hugely capable device. Not cheap, but it should be easy to run. By, y'know, jet fighter standards
1. Overview
What is it?
It’s a £100m, 1,200mph fighter jet. Numbers which are way, way beyond the realms of even the most fantastical of hypercars. The F-35 Lightning is made by Lockheed Martin in North America, but it’s the end product of a project involving nine nations, who all operate fleets of F-35s from their home soil.
The Royal Air Force, here in the UK, is running a bunch of them out of RAF Marham in Norfolk as well as on the Royal Navy’s new Queen Elizabeth aircraft carrier. UK parts and knowhow have fed heavily into the Lightning’s development and production, not least because of the demands placed on its optional short take-off and vertical landing system (STOVL) by the unique length of Queen Elizabeth. The ship, not the lady.
Rather like you can buy your Audi A5 as a coupe, convertible or hatchback, you can spec an F-35 in three different forms. The F-35 A packs in more missiles and can achieve 9G, while the F-35 B – employed by the RAF – gets those STOVL systems which eat into missile space and curb you to a still-quite-dramatic 7.5G. The F-35 C is designed for Navy carriers where vertical landing isn’t necessary, with longer wings and stronger landing gear to allow for catapult launches.
What unites them all is how stealthy they are. They are all classified as fifth-generation fighter jets, where their ability to accrue, process and share information on the enemy is at least as important as attacking them. “The fourth-generation adage was ‘speed is life and more is better’ – basically, ‘I can’t fly fast enough’,” Lockheed Martin’s Steve Over tells us. “Today, F-35 pilots say ‘information is life, and more is better’.”
The Lightning is as stealthy as fighter jets currently get. But to achieve this, it needs as few creases and inconsistencies on its surface as possible. So all of its weapons are kept within its radar-deflecting skin, as is the 29,000 horsepower lift fan on the F-35 B that allows the RAF’s jets to demonstrate their mesmerising hovering trick.
Supplied by Rolls-Royce, it’s among 15 per cent of the F-35’s components originating in Great Britain. While Lockheed Martin will sell more F-35 As, it’s the B we’ve focused on in the coming pages, as that’s what the RAF will purchase 138 examples of, the first gaggle of which live at RAF Marham under the watch of Station Commander Jim Beck. Who’s here to talk us through just what it’s like to fly these things…

2. Driving
What is it like on the road?
“Oh yeah, there’s an excitement to your first time flying the F-35,” Jim Beck assures us. “You’re breathing slightly quicker. And I went in there with 2,000 hours in various other jets. I was ridiculously confident in my own abilities but still found myself nervous when I got to the end of the runway.
“The performance of this jet – when you let the brakes go and do a burner take off – it’s ‘WOAH, well I wasn’t expecting that’. You take off at 150 knots. Once you get it airborne, and the sim has taught you everything, your nerves go right down. Then I brought it back and I’d never hovered in anything else – I’d just taught myself on the sim – so I was nervous. But as I got down, the first thing I said to the other pilots in the squadron is ‘my god, the simulator’s realistic’.
“The jet fuses all of its data together and only presents about one per cent of it to the pilot, when a human decision is required. The actual ‘flying’ is the easiest bit. You don’t even think about it anymore. You ask the jet ‘can I do something’ and the jet will do it if it’s safe to do so. There isn’t a car like that out there.”
Especially given the F-35s employed by the Royal Air Force are B models, meaning they can vertically hover before landing. “Autopilot is a little smarter in the STOVL and hover modes,” says Jim. “We’ve got numerous hover modes but the coolest is when the engine is just holding you up, you’ve got no lift off the wings. All 40,000 pounds of thrust is keeping you in the air. You’re fully in autopilot at that point.
“We’ve actually got modes where it’ll decelerate itself alongside the Queen Elizabeth carrier, by analysing what speed the ship is doing. It’ll come alongside and control its deceleration automatically. Returning to a boat is now actually quite a stress-free environment. Years ago, Harrier pilots would come back dripping in sweat thinking about STOVL or hover. We don’t do that!
“Let go of the controls and it just stabilises. When you’ve finished a manoeuvre you’ve asked the jet to do, the safest thing is to just let off the controls and it’ll right itself. It’s probably the smartest autopilot in the world right now.”
Which rather begs the question, given how much pushback there is in the car enthusiast world against autonomous driving and the swathes of active safety systems swiftly becoming the norm, is the F-35 too clinically adept to make its pilot a hero?
“Not when you’re doing ‘doggers’, as we call them,” Jim assures us. “We fly a thing called ‘angle of attack’ and while a Tornado could go 19AOA, we’re going to 50AOA. Which means I’m flying 80 knots and still fighting it. We just keep going up, and the last person to stop going up will win that fight. And that’s absolutely exhilarating. If I tried that in a Tornado I’d be in a parachute.”
It’s also, Jim suggests, an increasingly old-fashioned skill. “The dogfight exists but in a completely different domain now. If we were to go against an adversary, I’m doing it in a dogfight, but I’m not doing it in the jet’s physical domain. It takes place on the information spectrum now. And that information is shared between a pack of F-35s.
“Ideally we never want to get anywhere near our adversary. We want the battle to be done tens and tens of miles away, far enough that I won’t even get to see him through the naked eye. We’re talking ranges where our radars never used to see the opponent.”

3. On the inside
Layout, finish and space
We can’t actually show you the insides of an F-35 – that’s classified, somewhat inevitably – but we’ve had a poke around a simulator and a mock-up cockpit, which the F-35’s engineering team practice fixing the ejector system on (yikes). It was enough of a glimpse to confirm, like in the world of cars, the screens are taking over, scooping up the functions previously served by oodles of buttons and rationalising them into customisable displays.
And the physical controls that do remain? They’re largely just there to stop us fleshy old-fashioned ‘people’ thingies freaking out. “It won’t let you fly into the ground or into another jet, it’ll just say ‘No! Now you go and do your human things you need to do’,” says Jim.
“It’s just breath-taking, it really is. The controls only move for human comfort, to help us comprehend it. They’re only really there because that’s how pilots have always been trained.”
While the head-up display made famous by jets has now drip-fed down into even the smallest of cars, the F-35 will burst the bubble of any pub boasts: it’s ditched HUD and now feeds all the key displays into a £250,000 helmet, which is bespoke-fit for each pilot.
“Fitting a HUD in modern jets is so expensive, so complex, and it’s really heavy,” says Jim. “The helmet is arguably a tenth of the cost of a HUD. And I’m no longer constrained to seeing what’s in each bit of the cockpit, I’ve got all the displays wherever I look.
“As for the physical controls and displays, the team worked incredibly hard so it is incredibly intuitive. There are two sticks with 18 buttons each. It takes eight hours a day for eight weeks to learn it all to the point it’s natural.”

4. Owning
Running costs and reliability
‘Owning’ is quite the phrase. Because an F-35 B costs somewhere in the region of £100m (the simpler F-35 A is more like £85m), and you don’t just buy one. You buy and run a bunch of them to work together in packs.
But the Lightning aims to counteract its slightly high point of entry with significantly lower maintenance costs than all the jets that have gone before it. So you’re looking at figures like six hours of maintenance per flying hour (rather than nine), and three engineers per check-up (as opposed to ten). It’s all aimed at reaching a target running cost of $25,000 per flying hour.
The jet doesn’t just use automated tech to help out its pilot, either. It assists its maintenance team in a similar manner, with its onboard computers flagging up potential faults or maintenance requirements before they become critical, and even identifying to what extent the F-35’s stealth coating might need repair – and calculating when it’ll be best to park the jet up and have this done. A process which can take place in the confines of a carrier, where it previously needed a forensic lab on dry land.
All of which makes us ask Jim whether the jet – and its array of systems – could be vulnerable to cyber-attack that makes it redundant – or worse – turns it against its own force.
“Its brain conducts a really clever thing called a VSBIT – a vehicle systems built-in test,” says Jim. “The pilot presses a button just before he’s going to take off and the jet looks at itself and asks ‘am I fit to fly?’
“You’re watching its panels fly everywhere, it’s doing all this funky stuff, and then it comes back and says ‘VSBIT complete’. So long as that’s done, it doesn’t matter what’s happening on the outside world, the jet is good to go.”
It can do that offline – making the F-35 able to operate in the unlikely event of a cyber-attack on its systems – and the VSBIT takes one minute. Sixty seconds to perform checks which comprised a one-day process on F-15, or an entire shift for the F-16. Where those fourth-generation jets needed their engines firing up to perform pre-flight checks, you simply press a button on a computer screen for the Lightning.
The lifetime of F-35 is officially 8,000 hours, but that’s a figure actually decided by the US government, who officially head up the programme (or ‘program’, given it’s ‘Murican). Lockheed Martin has successfully tested F-35 As for 24,000 hours, and has the data to prove a safe 12,000 hours of airworthiness, so expect the jet’s lifespan to be extended in the years to come.

5. Our verdict
Final thoughts and pick of the range
"A hugely capable device. Not cheap, but it should be easy to run. By, y'know, jet fighter standards"
The F-35 hasn’t had an easy time of it, with critics claiming it’s late, over budget or simply not quick or nimble enough to be a proper dogfighter. But for the role planes like this fill nowadays, its vast complexity helps it meet its brief – one simply not applicable to jets in the generations before it.
“Let’s say I offered you the keys to a Sixties 911 or a brand-new Tesla, and it’s a hot summer’s day and you can drive one to France,” Jim proffers. “I bet by Dover you’d be wanting to hand the 911 keys back. There is a bit of romance about flying older planes, but we’re a professional force and it’s more about what the jet can do. That’s the difference between a ‘pilot’ and a ‘fighter pilot’. It’s pulling the wings off the jet, seeing what it can do, and pushing your body to its limits.”
But while it’s still thrilling to fly in the right hands, the F-35 is also so much more – an intelligent being that takes the hard work out of the pilot’s hands and can translate nine million lines of source code into one nugget of information, fed into a helmet that costs more than a modestly specced McLaren 720S. It’s a fighter jet that operates very differently to those that went before it, but is no less awe-inspiring for it.
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 25129
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post19 Jan 2021, 22:20

American warship, F-35 jets to deploy with British fleet
19 Jan 2021 Andrew Chuter

"LONDON — U.S. combat jets and a destroyer are to join the British Royal Navy’s new aircraft carrier on its maiden operational deployment to the Asia-Pacific region later in 2021, after officials formally approved the deployment Tuesday.

British Defence Secretary Ben Wallace and U.S. acting Defense Secretary Christopher Miller co-signed a joint declaration approving the deployment of U.S. Marine and U.S. Navy assets as part of a carrier strike group led by the HMS Queen Elizabeth, the British Ministry of Defence announced. U.S. assets attached to the carrier strike group will include a detachment of Marine F-35Bs and the destroyer The Sullivans, the announcement said....

...The inclusion of Marine combat jets on the warship has long been planned by the two governments, not least because Britain has a modest numbers of F-35Bs available....

...The British government has not officially announced where the deployment is expected to take the carrier force, but Prime Minister Boris Johnson previously said the group would be going to the Mediterranean, Indian Ocean and the Pacific region. That’s expected to include Singapore, South Korea, Japan and Oman; Britain has a naval support base in the latter.

British officials previously signaled the carrier and its support ships could transit through the South China Sea, where the U.S. regularly conducts freedom of navigation operations in disputed waters claimed by China...."

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/global/euro ... ish-fleet/
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 25129
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post21 Jan 2021, 02:38

Attachments
Communications-Strategy-Carrier-Strike-Group.jpg
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
Previous

Return to Program and politics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: boogieman and 10 guests