GE Aviation’s future fighter engine TECHNOLOGY XA100

All about the Pratt & Whitney F135 and the (cancelled) General Electric/Rolls-Royce F136
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weasel1962

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Unread post05 Apr 2022, 01:24

steve2267 wrote:If memory serves, Gen. Bogdan commented at one point about there being another platform that was using (or going to use) the F-135, or the F-135 core.


There are multiple programs ongoing. One might want to check out the Megawatt Tactical Aircraft.
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Corsair1963

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Unread post05 Apr 2022, 01:38

Old source but still gives a little more specifics.....



QUOTE:

The planned B21 stealth bomber will likely use a pair of unaugmented 28,000lbs-class F135s engines from the F-35 With some tweaks, such as an increased bypass ratio, a version of the F135 could probably produce more than 30,000lbs of thrust while potentially increasing fuel efficiency. Sixty thousand pounds of thrust should be more than adequate for a highly efficient flying wing that’s slightly smaller than the B-2.


https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2016/03/t ... ts-of.html
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b52buff

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Unread post05 Apr 2022, 12:56

i think it will not be the F135 but rather a concept called P&W9000, because a bomber has different flight parameters from those of a fighter
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sferrin

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Unread post05 Apr 2022, 15:32

b52buff wrote:i think it will not be the F135 but rather a concept called P&W9000, because a bomber has different flight parameters from those of a fighter


The B-2 uses the F118 which is a non-afterburning F110.
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Unread post06 Apr 2022, 02:58

b52buff wrote:i think it will not be the F135 but rather a concept called P&W9000, because a bomber has different flight parameters from those of a fighter



Do you have a source? From all of the sources that I've seen. They say the B-21 will use two non-afterburning F135s.
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Unread post06 Apr 2022, 03:06

I did find this........

QUOTE:

Presumably, the B-21 should incorporate all the best from the B-2 and at the same time be cheaper in terms of purchase and operation costs. Reducing the cost is planned to be achieved by reducing the dimension of the new bomber and its carrying capacity, as well as partial unification with other aircraft of the American Air Force. In particular, two Pratt & Whitney F135 engines from the fifth generation F-35 fighter are supposed to be used as a power plant. Another possible alternative is the Pratt & Whitney PW9000 power plant, developed on the basis of the Pratt & Whitney PW1000G "civilian" engine, using the technologies of the aforementioned Pratt & Whitney F135.

https://en.topwar.ru/174256-b-21-raider ... aNycGzNCmU
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b52buff

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Unread post07 Apr 2022, 06:00

Corsair1963 wrote:I did find this........

QUOTE:

Presumably, the B-21 should incorporate all the best from the B-2 and at the same time be cheaper in terms of purchase and operation costs. Reducing the cost is planned to be achieved by reducing the dimension of the new bomber and its carrying capacity, as well as partial unification with other aircraft of the American Air Force. In particular, two Pratt & Whitney F135 engines from the fifth generation F-35 fighter are supposed to be used as a power plant. Another possible alternative is the Pratt & Whitney PW9000 power plant, developed on the basis of the Pratt & Whitney PW1000G "civilian" engine, using the technologies of the aforementioned Pratt & Whitney F135.

https://en.topwar.ru/174256-b-21-raider ... aNycGzNCmU


you might want to check this link
https://www.flightglobal.com/pratt-and- ... 96.article
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ricnunes

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Unread post07 Apr 2022, 22:12

b52buff wrote:
Corsair1963 wrote:I did find this........

QUOTE:

Presumably, the B-21 should incorporate all the best from the B-2 and at the same time be cheaper in terms of purchase and operation costs. Reducing the cost is planned to be achieved by reducing the dimension of the new bomber and its carrying capacity, as well as partial unification with other aircraft of the American Air Force. In particular, two Pratt & Whitney F135 engines from the fifth generation F-35 fighter are supposed to be used as a power plant. Another possible alternative is the Pratt & Whitney PW9000 power plant, developed on the basis of the Pratt & Whitney PW1000G "civilian" engine, using the technologies of the aforementioned Pratt & Whitney F135.

https://en.topwar.ru/174256-b-21-raider ... aNycGzNCmU


you might want to check this link
https://www.flightglobal.com/pratt-and- ... 96.article


Unfortunately the link seems to be behind a "paywall".

But even if it says that the B-21 will use the PW9000 and that ends up being correct then note that the PW9000 is somehow based on the F-135 or more precisely it uses technology from F135.
“Active stealth” is what the ignorant nay sayers call ECM and pretend like it’s new.
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Unread post07 Apr 2022, 22:20

Can't read article above because I'm UNsubscribed having reached limit. Any chance you can excerpt relevant bits please?
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doge

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Unread post11 Apr 2022, 06:28

https://www.flightglobal.com/pratt-and-whitney-lifts-wraps-on-pw9000-future-military-engine/92196.article

I was able to get through Flightglobal's subscription paywall by way of pasting the URL into Google Translate. 8) (Then switch to original Language English. :devil: )
Pratt & Whitney lifts wraps on PW9000 future military engine
By Stephen Trimble25 February 2010
Pratt & Whitney has started working on a new family of engines for the military aircraft market based on a gear-less version of the PW1000G series now under development for airliners.
The company has begun a "limited development activity" to adapt the smallest version of the PW1000G - the 15,000lb-thrust (67kN) PW1215 - for military applications, says Jimmy Reed, P&W's director of advanced engine programmes.
At that size, P&W could offer the rebranded PW9000 for the US Air Force's emerging MQ-X unmanned air system requirement, or perhaps to re-engine its Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawks, Reed says.
Northrop officials note, however, that they are not aware of any plans to replace the RQ-4's Rolls-Royce AE3007 engine.
The same engine technologies could be scaled up to power the next generation of military airlifters, Reed says.
Alternatively, a 30,000lb-thrust PW9000 could be adapted for the fighter market, with a re-engining for the F100-series powering Boeing F-15s and Lockheed Martin F-16s possibly under consideration. The new engine could provide 18% better fuel economy than the latest F100 product, Reed says.

The disclosure of the PW9000 offers a glimpse of P&W's future strategy for the military market.
Despite largely dominating military engine technology, the company's prospects appeared to dim in 2007. The Air Force Research Laboratory awarded contracts to start developing the military's next-generation jet engines to General Electric and Rolls-Royce, rejecting two separate bids by P&W.
GE and R-R are both working to develop the so-called Ad-Heete engine, which combine a variable cycle core with an ultra-high pressure ratio combustor, producing an engine vastly more efficient at both subsonic and supersonic speeds.
Meanwhile, P&W has worked to introduce the geared turbofan for the commercial market. In addition to the gear, the PW1000G series includes an all-new, more efficient core. So far, three new aircraft development programmes - the Bombardier CSeries, Irkut MS-21 and Mitsubishi MRJ regional jet - have the geared turbofan selected.
The company has also adapted the PW1000G engine core for business jets with the gear-less PW800. However, the PW9000 will be different from the PW800.
The military engine family will include a smaller fan diameter and more fan stages to increase the pressure ratio, improving acceleration performance at the expense of fuel economy.
Source: Flight International
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doge

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Unread post11 Apr 2022, 06:37

GE official XA100 pages 8)
https://www.geaviation.com/military/eng ... cle-engine
XA100 Adaptive Cycle Engine
Sized and optimized for the F-35
A new era of combat propulsion
As we enter a new phase of near-peer competition, more capability is needed from the engines that power our military’s aircraft. GE is ready to answer that need with the XA100 engine. Designed, built and tested with the U.S. Air Force, XA100 is the world’s first flight-weight three stream adaptive engine. The XA100 engine represents the next generation of propulsion for the F-35.
Creating new operational possibilities
>10% MORE THRUST
Adaptive engine
This variable cycle engine provides a high thrust mode for maximum power and high efficiency mode to extend mission range. Automatically alternating between these modes dramatically transforms mission capability and enables unrestricted operations.

2x THERMAL MANAGEMENT CAPABILITY
Third stream advantage
This advanced capability provides an extra source of cooled air to improve propulsive and fuel efficiency. Most importantly, it enables a step-change in thermal management capability to accommodate next-generation mission systems and provide higher thrust in and out of supersonic flight.

25% BETTER FUEL EFFICIENCY
Advanced materials and components
Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) can withstand temperatures of hundreds of degrees while being lighter weight and more durable than traditional materials. The use of additive manufacturing has lessened the engine’s weight, reduced the number of parts, and will improve serviceability.

Fuel savings
Three-stream, adaptive architecture enables lower fuel spend and reduces tanker reliance
25% better
Fuel Consumption

More thrust
To give fighter pilots more of what they need, when they need it
>10%
Greater Thrust

Better heat absorption
Enabled through 3D-printed (additive) heat exchangers
2x
Thermal Management Capacity

Carbon reduction benefits
Reducing CO2 emissions over F-35 life cycle
SAF Compatible
Can operate on U.S. Air Force-approved Sustainable Aviation Fuels (SAF), commonly known as "biofuels"

Lighter and more durable
Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are 1/3 the weight of traditional metal parts
500°F
Can withstand 500°F more heat

Aircraft Benefits
Uniquely designed to fit both the F-35A and F-35C without any structural modifications to either airframe

Increased range
So pilots can fly longer in more combat scenarios
30%
Increase in range

Increased acceleration
To allow pilots more nimble tactics and aggressive pursuit
20-40%
Greater acceleration

Next-generation mission systems
As new missions systems are introduced, this engine’s third stream will provide significant improvements in thermal management
2X
Mission systems growth potential

Phase 2 8)
https://insidedefense.com/insider/ges-s ... se-2-tests
GE's second XA100 prototype kicks off Phase 2 tests
By Briana Reilly / March 30, 2022
General Electric's second XA100 adaptive cycle engine has begun Phase 2 testing at the Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Complex, the company announced today.
The next round of testing, which started March 25, comes after GE wrapped up its first phase in November 2021.
The multimonth Phase 2 work will allow the company to “fill in” its current dataset, leverage more precise measurements, and complete the full-flight envelope for its offering, David Tweedie, GE’s general manager for advanced combat engines, told Inside Defense recently.
“If you want to know if the engine works, we already have that data; we’ve shared it with the Air Force,” he said in an interview at the Air Force Association’s Warfare Symposium earlier this month. “If you want to have the engineers have all the data in hand so they can execute a low-risk [engineering and manufacturing development] program in five years, filling out all that last bit of data for the engineers is what we’re [working toward] at this point.”
Company executives developed the XA100 through the Air Force’s Adaptive Engine Transition Program, in which engine manufacturers are creating prototypes to fit the F-35A conventional variant. Pratt & Whitney, the F-35’s F135 engine maker, is also maturing advanced engine technology through AETP with its own XA101.
The Air Force in late January published a sources-sought listing for the EMD phase of the AETP effort. Called the F-35 Adaptive Engine Replacement Program, the notice directed companies to describe their “capability to enter into a contract committing to the delivery of F-35 engines” and begin low-rate initial production in fiscal year 2028.
Meanwhile, the service is working with the Navy and Marine Corps through the F-35’s Joint Program Office to develop options to incrementally upgrade the current F135 engine, an approach Pratt favors, or replace it.
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Unread post22 Jun 2022, 14:10

spazsinbad wrote:Can't read article above because I'm UNsubscribed having reached limit. Any chance you can excerpt relevant bits please?

you can use private navigation or links like hidemyass.com (online VPN)
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