F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 01 Apr 2016, 22:09
by neptune
https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/video-f-35-begins-raytheon-jsow-qualification-fligh-423782/

F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

01 April, 2016 BY: James Drew
Washington DC

The Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II will soon count Raytheon's AGM-154 Joint Standoff Weapon (JSOW) among its list internally carried munitions after “cleanly” releasing the 475kg (1,050lb) inert glide bomb during a trial off the coast of Maryland. The drop test on 23 March by the Naval Air Station Patuxent River-based CF-05 test aircraft is the first of many that will take place in 2016 to qualify the bomb for use by the stealthy combat jet.

Until now, the F-35 has only released satellite-guided Mk80-series bombs equipped with Boeing Joint Direct Attack Munitions (JDAM) tail kits from its internal weapons bay. Equipping the aircraft with a “standoff” glide bomb allows it to hit threatening targets, like anti-aircraft missiles, from safer distances.

“The addition of this guided glide bomb equips the F-35 Lightning II with a medium-range, all-weather weapon capable of engaging targets from further vantage points well out of range of typical enemy anti-aircraft and counter-air defenses,” the US Navy says in a statement on 1 April. “This lethality and survivability delivers a decisive advantage over adversaries.”

According to Raytheon, JSOW can strike targets 22km (12nm) away when released from an altitude of 500ft, or 130km (70nm) when released at 40,000ft. JDAMs, meanwhile, can hit targets up to 28km (15nm) away, depending on the speed and altitude of its release.

By comparison, the Russian SA-2 surface-to-air missile system can target aircraft within a 43km radius, and the mobile SA-6 can reach out 26km. More powerful Russian missile systems like the SA-10 (S-300) and SA-21 (S-400) have ranges approaching 150km and 431km, respectively, according to a report by the Mitchell Institute.

JSOW will come standard in the F-35 Block 3F configuration, and must be qualified for use by the navy's first combat-coded F-35C squadron at the time it declares initial operational capability (IOC) in 2018. Other Block 3F-specific weapons include the Boeing Small Diameter Bomb as well as the MBDA AIM-132 Advanced Short Range Air-to-Air Missile (ASRAAM) and Raytheon UK Paveway IV for the Royal Air Force. ASRAAM units were recently shipped to the USA for F-35 testing and the 227kg (500lb) Paveway IV was first dropped from a B-model in June.

:)

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 01 Apr 2016, 22:46
by spazsinbad
VIDEO from 'neptune' link above....


Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 22 Jun 2016, 02:01
by spazsinbad
Navy's first network-enabled weapon ready for fleet operations
20 Jun 2016 PEO(U&W) Public Affairs NavAir

"NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND, PATUXENT RIVER, Md. – The Navy’s first air-to-ground network-enabled weapon, JSOW C-1, has been delivered to the fleet after achieving Initial Operational Capability (IOC) in early June....

...The newest iteration of JSOW is integrated with a Link 16 network radio, enabling the weapon to engage moving targets at sea. The radio allows the launch aircraft or another designated controller to provide real-time target updates to the weapon, reassign it to another target, or to abort the mission. The weapon also uses a terminal IR seeker and GPS/INS for guidance.

"The precision targeting of this weapon and its ability to receive real-time target updates makes it the fleet’s weapon for the fight tonight,” said Cmdr. Sam Messer, JSOW program manager. “JSOW C-1 provides the ability to engage our enemies at longer ranges and the flexibility to engage in direct attack even if enemy air defenses deny our aircraft access.”

The Raytheon-built weapon will be launched from F/A-18E/F and F-35A/C aircraft."

PHOTO: "A Joint Standoff Weapon (JSOW) C-1 impacts a target during a flight test in March 2016 at Point Mugu Sea Test Range, Calif. (U.S. Navy photo)" http://www.navair.navy.mil/img/uploads/ ... 202016.jpg (5.1Mb)


Source: http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=6295

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 22 Jun 2016, 02:18
by popcorn
Looking forward to the next iteration, JSOW-ER featuring a 500Km range. At a targeted unit cost of $350K, a lot of bang for the buck.

https://youtu.be/Z83zXB8j5ow

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 22 Jun 2016, 06:00
by jessmo111
Does anyone expect the Jsow, to be used, anywhere else but the anti-shipping role? Why carry only 2 1k glide bombs, when you can carry 8 SDB 2 versus a SAM. The SDBs have the same range.

I'm sorry Jsow has the slight edge, but I am sure I've read about SDBs being fired at mach 1.5+ to increase range

SDB I (GBU-39)
more than 60 nmi (110 km)[4]
SDB II (GBU-53)
45 miles (72km) against moving targets[

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 22 Jun 2016, 06:17
by hornetfinn
jessmo111 wrote:Does anyone expect the Jsow, to be used, anywhere else but the anti-shipping role? Why carry only 2 1k glide bombs, when you can carry 8 SDB 2 versus a SAM. The SDBs have the same range.[


Yes, when there is need for heavy warhead and standoff delivery, JSOW will likely be the weapon of choice. Targets for it are hard or large fixed targets like fortified buildings, command centers, bridges, refineries, airfield and port facilities, power plants etc. JDAM would likely be used more often if defences are lighter and lesser standofff will do. SDB would not work against these kinds of targets that well as it has small blast fragmentation warhead. Of course against large targets with multiple targets with different attributes like airfields, combining JSOW and SDB would be best option.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 22 Jun 2016, 06:49
by Dragon029
popcorn wrote:Looking forward to the next iteration, JSOW-ER featuring a 500Km range. At a targeted unit cost of $350K, a lot of bang for the buck.

https://youtu.be/Z83zXB8j5ow


Any idea what the change in dimensions is?

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 22 Jun 2016, 06:55
by popcorn
Dragon029 wrote:
popcorn wrote:Looking forward to the next iteration, JSOW-ER featuring a 500Km range. At a targeted unit cost of $350K, a lot of bang for the buck.

https://youtu.be/Z83zXB8j5ow


Any idea what the change in dimensions is?

AFAIK the dimensions are unchanged. Vanilla JSOW seems have empty volume to spare for engine and fuel. Also, have read that JSOW had LO as a design criteria though likely not as advanced as JASSM.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 22 Jun 2016, 12:53
by Dragon029
popcorn wrote:
Dragon029 wrote:
popcorn wrote:Looking forward to the next iteration, JSOW-ER featuring a 500Km range. At a targeted unit cost of $350K, a lot of bang for the buck.

https://youtu.be/Z83zXB8j5ow


Any idea what the change in dimensions is?

AFAIK the dimensions are unchanged. Vanilla JSOW seems have empty volume to spare for engine and fuel. Also, have read that JSOW had LO as a design criteria though likely not as advanced as JASSM.


If that's correct then it's going to be an impressive weapon in terms of delivering long range high ordnance.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 22 Jun 2016, 14:09
by popcorn
Dragon029 wrote:
If that's correct then it's going to be an impressive weapon in terms of delivering long range high ordnance.


Even more so if they can deliver it at the $350K unit cost. AFAIK other AShM alternatives cost at least 2X-3X more.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 22 Jun 2016, 15:21
by sferrin
popcorn wrote:
Dragon029 wrote:
If that's correct then it's going to be an impressive weapon in terms of delivering long range high ordnance.


Even more so if they can deliver it at the $350K unit cost. AFAIK other AShM alternatives cost at least 2X-3X more.


You get what you pay for.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 22 Jun 2016, 15:38
by castlebravo
hornetfinn wrote:
jessmo111 wrote:Does anyone expect the Jsow, to be used, anywhere else but the anti-shipping role? Why carry only 2 1k glide bombs, when you can carry 8 SDB 2 versus a SAM. The SDBs have the same range.[


Yes, when there is need for heavy warhead and standoff delivery, JSOW will likely be the weapon of choice. Targets for it are hard or large fixed targets like fortified buildings, command centers, bridges, refineries, airfield and port facilities, power plants etc. JDAM would likely be used more often if defences are lighter and lesser standofff will do. SDB would not work against these kinds of targets that well as it has small blast fragmentation warhead. Of course against large targets with multiple targets with different attributes like airfields, combining JSOW and SDB would be best option.


Large fixed targets that are too well defended to strike with GBU-31 might be better serviced through tomahawks than through air launched stand off weapons.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 22 Jun 2016, 16:53
by ruderamronbo
spazsinbad wrote:
Navy's first network-enabled weapon ready for fleet operations
20 Jun 2016 PEO(U&W) Public Affairs NavAir

The Raytheon-built weapon will be launched from F/A-18E/F and F-35A/C aircraft."

PHOTO: "A Joint Standoff Weapon (JSOW) C-1 impacts a target during a flight test in March 2016 at Point Mugu Sea Test Range, Calif. (U.S. Navy photo)" http://www.navair.navy.mil/img/uploads/ ... 202016.jpg (5.1Mb)


Source: http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=6295


It would be odd (stupid?) for the Air Force F-35A to employ a weapon the Service abandoned long ago in favor of the WCMD...

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 23 Jun 2016, 00:47
by popcorn
sferrin wrote:
You get what you pay for.



A bargain? How else to deliver a 500Kmprecision strike at aprojected $350K price point?

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 23 Jun 2016, 02:43
by arian
JSOW is only used by the Navy. There's been about 4,000+ acquired so far, so not a small number, but it seems JASSM is being acquired at a higher rate. So I'm not sure the services were all too happy with JSOW, as it has been thus far.

Large fixed targets that are too well defended to strike with GBU-31 might be better serviced through tomahawks than through air launched stand off weapons.


At 1/5 the price for far more numerous platforms.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 23 Jun 2016, 06:25
by jessmo111
Im not sure about T-Lams ability to penetrate an IADS. and bump

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 23 Jun 2016, 06:52
by jessmo111
Bump again LOL

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 23 Jun 2016, 13:58
by popcorn
Dragon029 wrote:
popcorn wrote:Looking forward to the next iteration, JSOW-ER featuring a 500Km range. At a targeted unit cost of $350K, a lot of bang for the buck.

https://youtu.be/Z83zXB8j5ow


Any idea what the change in dimensions is?

Found this:
RAYTHEON COMPLETES FREE FLIGHT OF JOINT STANDOFF WEAPON EXTENDED RANGE
NAVAL AIR WARFARE CENTER WEAPONS DIVISION SEA TEST RANGE, Calif., Nov 02, 2009 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ -- Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) and the U.S. Navy completed the first free-flight demonstration of the Joint Standoff Weapon Extended Range air-to-surface precision guided missile.
The JSOW-ER is a powered variant of the combat-proven glide JSOW. It takes the GPS-inertial navigation system reliability of existing JSOW variants and combines it with the network-enabled maritime-interdiction capabilities currently in development for the JSOW C-1. The JSOW-ER also integrates the Hamilton-Sundstrand TJ-150 engine, currently in production for Raytheon's Miniature Air Launched Decoy.

"JSOW-ER will provide the warfighter with a powered spiral of JSOW C-1, extending the range of the weapon from 70 nautical miles (81 statute miles) to 300 nautical miles (345 statute miles)," said Harry Schulte, vice president of Raytheon Missile Systems Air Warfare Systems' product line. "Because JSOW-ER has the same outer mold lines and mass properties of the glide JSOW, it can be integrated on any aircraft capable of carrying glide JSOW. The cost of integration is negligible and the impact is reduced."

Question... If it has the same mass properries as JSOW does that mean the latter had ballast built in in anticipation of a future engine upgrade?

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 23 Jun 2016, 22:25
by arian
popcorn wrote:Question... If it has the same mass properries as JSOW does that mean the latter had ballast built in in anticipation of a future engine upgrade?


The fuselage is square but the unitary warhead is round, so the fuel could be placed around the warhead. Or maybe the warhead itself is smaller.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 07 Feb 2017, 03:12
by steve2267
JSOW-ER was a Raytheon funded endeavor. Does anyone know if any military service is planning on purchasing the JSOW-ER?

Also, is the JSOW considered to be stealthy at all? Given that it was originally a glide bomb, and that the Hamilton Sunstrand engine only puts out 150lbs, I don't think it is attacking ala T-LAM via nap-of-the-earth flying, but rather the engine is just extending its range either on a very extended, very shallow ballistic arc, OR cruising at a given altitude until it arrives at its target and noses over for the terminal dive / attack maneuver (which I am guessing is probably ballistic in nature).

Which leads me to my next question, if JSOW / JSOW-ER is NOT NOE / high-g terminal maneuver capable, would it be susceptible to being intercepted by an advanced IADS?

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 07 Feb 2017, 03:49
by spazsinbad
Bloody Hell no wonder stuff cannot be found as JSF/F-35 info is moved ELSEWHERE on this forum - BAH HUMBUG!

viewtopic.php?f=38&t=24176&p=255531&hilit=affordable#p255531

Good way to fragment perfectly good F-35 information to put it elsewhere.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 07 Feb 2017, 03:56
by popcorn
LO was a design consideration. Also note that it's a networked missile with all that implies in terms of being able to prosecute a target with the best chance of success.

http://www.deagel.com/news/Raytheon-Dem ... 01536.aspx

The engine ground test of JSOW ER successfully evaluated a flush inlet design and overall engine performance and showed that engine performance matched simulation results. The inlet will maintain the missile's excellent low observable characteristics.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 07 Feb 2017, 04:42
by SpudmanWP
Forgot about the JSM as it's got NOE/land attack modes also.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 07 Feb 2017, 05:19
by popcorn
SpudmanWP wrote:Forgot about the JSM as it's got NOE/land attack modes also.

Also getting an active seeker.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 07 Feb 2017, 07:53
by arian
steve2267 wrote:Also, is the JSOW considered to be stealthy at all?


If you get real close to one, you'll notice all the gaps in the panels are filled in with some sort of ceramic material. So it's definitely designed for stealth. I'm not revealing anything as one can see them up close in many museums.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 07 Feb 2017, 08:15
by hornetfinn
arian wrote:
steve2267 wrote:Also, is the JSOW considered to be stealthy at all?


If you get real close to one, you'll notice all the gaps in the panels are filled in with some sort of ceramic material. So it's definitely designed for stealth. I'm not revealing anything as one can see them up close in many museums.


It's very clear that JSOW is very stealthy design and would be very difficult target for AD systems. It has shaping that would direct radar waves away from threat radar and surfaces look like they are made from material with low radar reflectivity. With no engine it has very low IR signature and even JSOW-ER has so small engine that it doesn't matter much. Engagement ranges for defensive systems are likely very short and even then several simultaneous JSOWs will likely overwhelm the defenses quickly.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 07 Feb 2017, 08:24
by SpudmanWP
JSOW has nose chines and serrated edges on the first joint.

I would not be surprised to find out it had some 1st gen RAM, but that's pure conjecture.

Image

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 08 Feb 2017, 00:50
by arian
SpudmanWP wrote:JSOW has nose chines and serrated edges on the first joint.

I would not be surprised to find out it had some 1st gen RAM, but that's pure conjecture.

Image


You can see even in this image that the joints are filled in with some material. When I took a close look at one, it appeared to be some sort of permanent ceramic-looking material.

Since this is a weapon, meaning pieces of it will be left over in the enemy's territory, I would think they aren't using RAM or something which would give technology to an adversary. Maybe earlier generation RAM paint.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 08 Feb 2017, 00:59
by SpudmanWP
Here is a Hi-Res side profile of a JSOW. Note how none of the panels lines are perpendicular or join at a 90 degree angle.

Link only as it's a large image.

http://www.navair.navy.mil/img/uploads/JSOW2_11_1.jpg

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 08 Feb 2017, 01:00
by steve2267
arian wrote:
SpudmanWP wrote:JSOW has nose chines and serrated edges on the first joint.

I would not be surprised to find out it had some 1st gen RAM, but that's pure conjecture.

You can see even in this image that the joints are filled in with some material. When I took a close look at one, it appeared to be some sort of permanent ceramic-looking material.


If this is the case, why are the fasteners not covered over with a similar type of RAM putty? Would not the fasteners need to be covered over? Or would that be one of the last things they would do before hanging the munition on an aircraft? (Similar to they way they would butter the F-117s before a mission?)

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 08 Feb 2017, 01:03
by steve2267
SpudmanWP wrote:Here is a Hi-Res side profile of a JSOW. Note how none of the panels lines are perpendicular or join at a 90 degree angle.

Link only as it's a large image.

http://www.navair.navy.mil/img/uploads/JSOW2_11_1.jpg


The horizontal gap between panels (left side of the image just behind the folded wing) does not appear to be uniform. Isn't that a bit sloppy for stealth / VLO purposes?

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 08 Feb 2017, 01:17
by marauder2048
From: fbo.gov Oct 20, 2016

The Sources Sought notice is being posted to satisfy the requirement of DFARS PGI 206.302-1. The Naval Air System Command (NAVAIR), Patuxent River, Maryland, intends to issue a sole source contract to Raytheon Missile Systems (RMS), Tucson, AZ to conduct a flight test demonstration of an extended range capability for the Joint Standoff Weapon (JSOW) AGM-154C-1 All Up Round (AUR). The upgrade includes hardware modification to add a production representative engine/fuel/inlet system to the AGM-154C-1 variant as well as software modification to optimize midcourse and endgame performance for the powered JSOW.

Looking at the FY2017 budget, there is some money set aside for a demonstration.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 08 Feb 2017, 01:19
by popcorn
I guess the priority would be in reducing the frontal RCS.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 08 Feb 2017, 01:29
by archeman
RE: side panel gaps....

Remember this is mid-90s stealth design era for a throw away munition.
So.....close enough.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 08 Feb 2017, 01:44
by steve2267
archeman wrote:RE: side panel gaps....

Remember this is mid-90s stealth design era for a throw away munition.
So.....close enough.


I'll buy the "throw away munition" argument, and I think Popcorn was on the right track about stealth from the front, since that is the aspect the target should be seeing. But even in the mid-90s, the F-117 guys were paranoid about joint fit among other things, and that was from the early-mid '80s.

With JSOW-ER, if you're going to be flying a several hundred miles, possibly at medium - high altitude, side aspect could become more important.

But my original question was about munitions being shot down by some sort of point-defense weapons system, and, at least in the case of JSOW, the powers that be appear to have taken that under some amount of consideration.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 08 Feb 2017, 02:45
by SpudmanWP
There is also the "Not For Production Use" sticker to consider.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 08 Feb 2017, 14:10
by hornetfinn
steve2267 wrote:
arian wrote:
SpudmanWP wrote:JSOW has nose chines and serrated edges on the first joint.

I would not be surprised to find out it had some 1st gen RAM, but that's pure conjecture.

You can see even in this image that the joints are filled in with some material. When I took a close look at one, it appeared to be some sort of permanent ceramic-looking material.


If this is the case, why are the fasteners not covered over with a similar type of RAM putty? Would not the fasteners need to be covered over? Or would that be one of the last things they would do before hanging the munition on an aircraft? (Similar to they way they would butter the F-117s before a mission?)


I think the fasteners are so small that they will matter very little in being detected by regular radar systems. They are simply so small as not to reflect or scatter much radar energy. Of course it might be that they are covered with tape or putty or spray or whatever only before real combat sortie and only when deemed necessary. Any tape or putty might well deteriorate during storage and they'd also negatively affect serviceability of the munitions.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 08 Feb 2017, 14:30
by popcorn
hornetfinn wrote:
I think the fasteners are so small that they will matter very little in being detected by regular radar systems. They are simply so small as not to reflect or scatter much radar energy. Of course it might be that they are covered with tape or putty or spray or whatever only before real combat sortie and only when deemed necessary. Any tape or putty might well deteriorate during storage and they'd also negatively affect serviceability of the munitions.


Also, JSOW should not be considered in isolation but rather as part of a highly scripted choreography with different actors supporting and contributing to the overall success. Following is how Raytheon pitches the benefits of a collaborative strike. MALD-J could very easily make up for whatever RCS penalty those exposed fasteners may impose. :mrgreen:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0acJ3xyhaJo

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 09 Feb 2017, 02:26
by squirrelshoes
popcorn wrote:Also, JSOW should not be considered in isolation but rather as part of a highly scripted choreography with different actors supporting and contributing to the overall success. Following is how Raytheon pitches the benefits of a collaborative strike. MALD-J could very easily make up for whatever RCS penalty those exposed fasteners may impose.

A wave of MALD + JSOW + SDB could be a serious IADS SAM battery depleter. If MALD works as advertised you can't ignore any of it.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 09 Feb 2017, 12:04
by popcorn
squirrelshoes wrote:
popcorn wrote:Also, JSOW should not be considered in isolation but rather as part of a highly scripted choreography with different actors supporting and contributing to the overall success. Following is how Raytheon pitches the benefits of a collaborative strike. MALD-J could very easily make up for whatever RCS penalty those exposed fasteners may impose.

A wave of MALD + JSOW + SDB could be a serious IADS SAM battery depleter. If MALD works as advertised you can't ignore any of it.

and add 5Gens with their own unique capabilities to the mix that can get much closer to the threat systems and it gets even worse. But can't blame Raytheon for excluding them, they want to highlight what their products bring to the fight and they paid for the video after all. :mrgreen:

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 02 Jun 2017, 00:40
by popcorn
Work ongoing to give JSOW C-1 much needed longer legs.

http://www.militaryaerospace.com/articl ... range.html

Raytheon ready to flight-test an extended-range powered and data-linked JSOW to attack moving ships

PATUXENT RIVER NAS, Md. – Smart munitions experts at the Raytheon Co. are making plans to flight-test a powered and extended-range version of the data-linked AGM-154C-1 Joint Standoff Weapon (JSOW) to attack moving maritime targets like enemy surface warships.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 18 Nov 2019, 12:36
by spazsinbad
DUBAI: Raytheon Joint Standoff Weapon to be certificated for F-35A
18 Nov 2019 Garrett Reim

"The AGM-154 JSOW precision-strike glide bomb is to be certificated for the internal weapons bay of the US Air Force's F-35A Lighting II stealth fighter by the end of November 2019. The weapon's manufacturer, Raytheon, says the approval would allow it to sell the standoff weapon to international operators of the F-35A. The conventional take-off and landing F-35A is the most popular variant of the type with international customers.

The US Navy has already qualified the JSOW on its F-35C variant and now the USAF is to use that testing data to integrate the weapon onto its aircraft, says Mark Borup, senior manager of business development for Raytheon Missile Systems’ air warfare systems.

“It is going to be fully integrated on the F-35-A and the importance of that is that the USA has a number of friends and allies who have the F-35A,” he says. “It's very significant. It's a capability that many of our friends and allies really, really advocate for.”... [then stuff about JSOW-C Block III]

...Raytheon says it is also seeing interest from Middle East countries in the JSOW’s ability to glide into a target at a shallow angle. “Just recently one of the points of interest that we learned was a cave defeat capability is something that's needed,” says Borup. “If [the pilot] needs to get a 30⁰ dive angle to hit a vertical target, such as the front of a cave entrance, he can do that.” Raytheon declines to say who Middle East nations are targeting inside caves."

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... ic-462320/

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 18 Nov 2019, 15:58
by ricnunes
popcorn wrote:Work ongoing to give JSOW C-1 much needed longer legs.

http://www.militaryaerospace.com/articl ... range.html

Raytheon ready to flight-test an extended-range powered and data-linked JSOW to attack moving ships

PATUXENT RIVER NAS, Md. – Smart munitions experts at the Raytheon Co. are making plans to flight-test a powered and extended-range version of the data-linked AGM-154C-1 Joint Standoff Weapon (JSOW) to attack moving maritime targets like enemy surface warships.


According to the link above:
Extending the range of the AGM-154C-1 involves adding a Hamilton-Sundstrand TJ-150 turbojet engine to the ordinarily unpowered JSOW to extend the smart munition's range from 70 to 300 nautical miles.


WoW.
From what I read the extended range AGM-154C-1 could be a serious contender against the JSM for example! The extended range AGM-154C-1 has longer range (300 nautical miles against 150+ nautical miles) and a much bigger warhead (1000lb versus 275lb or so) compared to the JSM. What do you guys think about this?

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 18 Nov 2019, 16:38
by steve2267
IMO, comparing apples and oranges.

JSM is a nap-of the earth (sea?), high subsonic speed, smart weapon. JSOW, being a glide weapon, now powered, will probably not be as fast as JSM, and will be coming in from a high altitude. Not sure how to compare their observability characteristics; my impression is that JSM has lower LO than JSOW.

I think they may be more complementary than competitors.

Also, since Raytheon has teamed with Kongsberg... not sure how keen Raytheon would be to anger their partner?

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 18 Nov 2019, 16:39
by wrightwing
ricnunes wrote:


WoW.
From what I read the extended range AGM-154C-1 could be a serious contender against the JSM for example! The extended range AGM-154C-1 has longer range (300 nautical miles against 150+ nautical miles) and a much bigger warhead (1000lb versus 275lb or so) compared to the JSM. What do you guys think about this?



https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/2 ... -it-sounds

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 18 Nov 2019, 16:58
by ricnunes
First of all thanks to steve and wrightwing for your feedback.

Of particular interest is wrightwing's link (which again, I thank) and from where I'll quote the following paragraph:

The JSM is based on Naval Strike Missile (NSM) and was developed in partnership with Raytheon. The JSM has a top range of roughly 350 miles and a low altitude penetration range of about half that. It carries a 500lb warhead and is guided by a navigation suite that includes GPS, INS, and terrain mapping—the latter of which will help out greatly in GPS denied environments.


Ok, from what I read above, the JSM has the chance to by flown towards the target in either a high-altitude or low-altitude profiles. In high-altitude profiles it even have longer range (by 50 nautical miles) compared to the Extended-Range JSOW and on top of that it has the possibility to fly in a low-altitude which of course has a much shorter range but with other tactical advantages.
Apparently it also has more guidance modes (GPS for example).
The warhead is still much smaller but the other advantages may offset this in some/many cases.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 18 Nov 2019, 18:24
by sferrin
Warhead size is more like 270-ish. NOT 500 lbs.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 18 Nov 2019, 18:35
by wrightwing
ricnunes wrote:First of all thanks to steve and wrightwing for your feedback.

Of particular interest is wrightwing's link (which again, I thank) and from where I'll quote the following paragraph:

The JSM is based on Naval Strike Missile (NSM) and was developed in partnership with Raytheon. The JSM has a top range of roughly 350 miles and a low altitude penetration range of about half that. It carries a 500lb warhead and is guided by a navigation suite that includes GPS, INS, and terrain mapping—the latter of which will help out greatly in GPS denied environments.


Ok, from what I read above, the JSM has the chance to by flown towards the target in either a high-altitude or low-altitude profiles. In high-altitude profiles it even have longer range (by 50 nautical miles) compared to the Extended-Range JSOW and on top of that it has the possibility to fly in a low-altitude which of course has a much shorter range but with other tactical advantages.
Apparently it also has more guidance modes (GPS for example).
The warhead is still much smaller but the other advantages may offset this in some/many cases.


The JSOW-ER Is still a vital weapon, though. I'm guessing from a cost standpoint, they'll have a lower price point which allows for larger inventories. They'll compliment the JSMs capabilities nicely.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 18 Nov 2019, 23:48
by ricnunes
wrightwing wrote:The JSOW-ER Is still a vital weapon, though. I'm guessing from a cost standpoint, they'll have a lower price point which allows for larger inventories. They'll compliment the JSMs capabilities nicely.


Yes, absolutely.
Lower price and a much bigger/powerful warhead are indeed major pluses for the JSOW-ER.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 21 Nov 2019, 21:04
by squirrelshoes
I know it has it's supporters in these parts but I'd be really surprised if any branch of US Military bought JSM, especially given the significant bump in production numbers for LRASM to where it's no longer something that can be painted as stopgap or interim. It's probably going to be LRASM, JSOW, AARGM-ER, and SDB2 as the options for standoff weaponry of USN/USMC in the 2020s.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 22 Nov 2019, 01:03
by usnvo
squirrelshoes wrote:I know it has it's supporters in these parts but I'd be really surprised if any branch of US Military bought JSM, especially given the significant bump in production numbers for LRASM to where it's no longer something that can be painted as stopgap or interim. It's probably going to be LRASM, JSOW, AARGM-ER, and SDB2 as the options for standoff weaponry of USN/USMC in the 2020s.


I could see the Navy buying the JSM although not in huge numbers. Not so much for the F-35C since JSOW also offers internal carriage, but for the MH-60R. Much like the Penguin, It would allow standoff ASCM capability against short ranged missile armed FAC/Corvettes/etc as well as providing limited strike capability. All in a missile that is about the same weight as the MK54 torpedo. It can also be fitted to a tactical length MK41 launcher, something you can't do with a LRASM, so you could add ASCM capability without using cannisters.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 21 Apr 2020, 03:38
by Dragon029
https://www.janes.com/article/95608/csb ... on-on-f-35

JSOW C-1 Network Enabled Weapon (NEW) is being integrated 2 years earlier than planned.

The article doesn't say when it's being integrated exactly, but last year at Tailhook a slide indicated "JSOW C-1" was being integrated in 2022 - assuming "C-1 NEW" isn't any different to "C-1", then that would indicate that the F-35C will be getting it some time this year.

Image

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 29 Apr 2020, 21:30
by wolfpak
If the USAF would equip their F-35A's with the JSOW C-1 and train up a number of pilots in each squadron it would certainly help the Navy in the Pacific. F-35's sitting on island airstrips across the Pacific would pose a great challenge to any aggressor seeking to dominate the Pacific with their warships. Is the Navy in the UAI program?

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 29 Apr 2020, 22:21
by bring_it_on
wolfpak wrote:If the USAF would equip their F-35A's with the JSOW C-1 and train up a number of pilots in each squadron it would certainly help the Navy in the Pacific. F-35's sitting on island airstrips across the Pacific would pose a great challenge to any aggressor seeking to dominate the Pacific with their warships. Is the Navy in the UAI program?


Or the USAF could always buy a small quantity of the JSM if they want a multi-mission medium-long range cruise missile. I wonder what the time to target looks like from say 80 miles when launching a JSM compared to a glide munition. Of course, something like a JSM can sea skim and has other advantages. I'd think that the missile can execute the entire JSOW-C max range while flying at low altitudes.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 29 Apr 2020, 22:54
by marauder2048
bring_it_on wrote:
wolfpak wrote:If the USAF would equip their F-35A's with the JSOW C-1 and train up a number of pilots in each squadron it would certainly help the Navy in the Pacific. F-35's sitting on island airstrips across the Pacific would pose a great challenge to any aggressor seeking to dominate the Pacific with their warships. Is the Navy in the UAI program?


Or the USAF could always buy a small quantity of the JSM if they want a multi-mission medium-long range cruise missile. I wonder what the time to target looks like from say 80 miles when launching a JSM compared to a glide munition. Of course, something like a JSM can sea skim and has other advantages. I'd think that the missile can execute the entire JSOW-C max range while flying at low altitudes.


I would think the non-recurring costs for such a small buy would make JSOW-ER more attractive.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 30 Apr 2020, 02:37
by bring_it_on
marauder2048 wrote:
bring_it_on wrote:
wolfpak wrote:If the USAF would equip their F-35A's with the JSOW C-1 and train up a number of pilots in each squadron it would certainly help the Navy in the Pacific. F-35's sitting on island airstrips across the Pacific would pose a great challenge to any aggressor seeking to dominate the Pacific with their warships. Is the Navy in the UAI program?


Or the USAF could always buy a small quantity of the JSM if they want a multi-mission medium-long range cruise missile. I wonder what the time to target looks like from say 80 miles when launching a JSM compared to a glide munition. Of course, something like a JSM can sea skim and has other advantages. I'd think that the missile can execute the entire JSOW-C max range while flying at low altitudes.


I would think the non-recurring costs for such a small buy would make JSOW-ER more attractive.


Yes the JSOW-ER would also be way more attractive than a glide munition based Anti-Ship capability (if you use a glide munition I'd much rather the add a maritime capability and have F-35's lob half a dozen SDB II's at a surface vessel). It would be interesting to compare those two weapons in terms of their ability to fly low altitude profiles, execute terminal maneuvers etc. I'd imagine the JSM would be similar to the NSM in that regard. AARGM-ER / SiAW would also have some capability for this role.

Re: F-35 begins Raytheon JSOW qualification flights

Unread postPosted: 30 Apr 2020, 03:13
by wrightwing
bring_it_on wrote:
wolfpak wrote:If the USAF would equip their F-35A's with the JSOW C-1 and train up a number of pilots in each squadron it would certainly help the Navy in the Pacific. F-35's sitting on island airstrips across the Pacific would pose a great challenge to any aggressor seeking to dominate the Pacific with their warships. Is the Navy in the UAI program?


Or the USAF could always buy a small quantity of the JSM if they want a multi-mission medium-long range cruise missile. I wonder what the time to target looks like from say 80 miles when launching a JSM compared to a glide munition. Of course, something like a JSM can sea skim and has other advantages. I'd think that the missile can execute the entire JSOW-C max range while flying at low altitudes.

If they're using JSM, they could launch from 150+.