30 more Rafale's for Egypt

Military aircraft - Post cold war aircraft, including for example B-2, Gripen, F-18E/F Super Hornet, Rafale, and Typhoon.
  • Author
  • Message
Offline
User avatar

edpop

Forum Veteran

Forum Veteran

  • Posts: 638
  • Joined: 02 Feb 2008, 20:43
  • Location: Macomb, Michigan

Unread post05 May 2021, 22:04

Egypt has confirmed that it will buy another 30 Rafale fighters from France, after the deal was disclosed by investigative website Disclose on May 3. Disclose had said that the deal is worth $4.5 billion. Egypt revealed that it will take a 10-year loan for the purchase.
Vietnam veteran (Combat Engineer) 1967
Retired from Chrysler Engineering
Offline

Fox1

Active Member

Active Member

  • Posts: 219
  • Joined: 05 Jul 2005, 04:16

Unread post11 May 2021, 02:54

Are they buying these in addition to the Su-35 fighters they planned to buy from Russia? Or are they buying these as an alternative to the Su-35 in order to avoid backlash from Washington?
Offline

Corsair1963

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 7546
  • Joined: 19 Dec 2005, 04:14

Unread post11 May 2021, 04:41

Fox1 wrote:Are they buying these in addition to the Su-35 fighters they planned to buy from Russia? Or are they buying these as an alternative to the Su-35 in order to avoid backlash from Washington?




QUOTE: “Egyptian leaders think of their country as a major regional power,” according to Bahgat who pointed out that the U.S. has an issue with Egypt acquiring the Russian Su-35 air superiority fighter.

Egypt is believed to have signed a contract with Russia for the purchase of 21 Su-35SE, and at least five have been delivered.


“The Egyptian military needs new highly advanced warplanes, which the U.S. refused to provide, especially the F-16 Block 70, and that is why it decided to seek other sources like Russia,” Al Kenany said. “Egypt faces several challenges in the region that necessitate its possession of superior capabilities to maintain a high level of deterrence. So, I believe that Egypt will proceed with acquiring the Su-35.”

https://breakingdefense.com/2021/05/egy ... logistics/
Offline

mixelflick

Elite 4K

Elite 4K

  • Posts: 4439
  • Joined: 20 Mar 2010, 10:26
  • Location: Parts Unknown

Unread post11 May 2021, 15:40

Egypt likely wanted to diversify arms suppliers more than anything. Unless there's some underlying fundamental problem with their F-16's picking up the air to surface role, its hard to justify the Rafale's expense. I'm assuming their Rafale's were bought for the air to ground mission, although I might be wrong.

Much would depend I think if Metor comes along for the ride. They might be looking at that as a secondary (but very nice to have) air to air capability...
Offline

Corsair1963

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 7546
  • Joined: 19 Dec 2005, 04:14

Unread post12 May 2021, 09:52

mixelflick wrote:Egypt likely wanted to diversify arms suppliers more than anything. Unless there's some underlying fundamental problem with their F-16's picking up the air to surface role, its hard to justify the Rafale's expense. I'm assuming their Rafale's were bought for the air to ground mission, although I might be wrong.

Much would depend I think if Metor comes along for the ride. They might be looking at that as a secondary (but very nice to have) air to air capability...


The Saudi's and/or other Gulf States have to be picking up the tab. Otherwise, it would be crazy not to just buy more F-16's...
Offline

mixelflick

Elite 4K

Elite 4K

  • Posts: 4439
  • Joined: 20 Mar 2010, 10:26
  • Location: Parts Unknown

Unread post12 May 2021, 14:31

Corsair1963 wrote:
mixelflick wrote:Egypt likely wanted to diversify arms suppliers more than anything. Unless there's some underlying fundamental problem with their F-16's picking up the air to surface role, its hard to justify the Rafale's expense. I'm assuming their Rafale's were bought for the air to ground mission, although I might be wrong.

Much would depend I think if Metor comes along for the ride. They might be looking at that as a secondary (but very nice to have) air to air capability...


The Saudi's and/or other Gulf States have to be picking up the tab. Otherwise, it would be crazy not to just buy more F-16's...


Are you being serious? Tough to say after reading your comment..

The reason I ask is.... would the Saudi's/other Arab states really pay for an aircraft used by another country? Why? And it's not like Rafale is cheap, its one of the most expensive options out there! Perhaps that's what's happening, but I've never heard of such a thing post WWII. Israel is of course another exeption when it comes to US aid...
Offline

Corsair1963

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 7546
  • Joined: 19 Dec 2005, 04:14

Unread post13 May 2021, 01:15

mixelflick wrote:
Corsair1963 wrote:
mixelflick wrote:Egypt likely wanted to diversify arms suppliers more than anything. Unless there's some underlying fundamental problem with their F-16's picking up the air to surface role, its hard to justify the Rafale's expense. I'm assuming their Rafale's were bought for the air to ground mission, although I might be wrong.

Much would depend I think if Metor comes along for the ride. They might be looking at that as a secondary (but very nice to have) air to air capability...


The Saudi's and/or other Gulf States have to be picking up the tab. Otherwise, it would be crazy not to just buy more F-16's...


Are you being serious? Tough to say after reading your comment..

The reason I ask is.... would the Saudi's/other Arab states really pay for an aircraft used by another country? Why? And it's not like Rafale is cheap, its one of the most expensive options out there! Perhaps that's what's happening, but I've never heard of such a thing post WWII. Israel is of course another exeption when it comes to US aid...



You really think Egypt can afford all of these new weapons on their own??? :roll:
Offline

herciv

Active Member

Active Member

  • Posts: 145
  • Joined: 04 May 2016, 08:24

Unread post13 May 2021, 08:27

One contract could hide an other.
https://www.latribune.fr/entreprises-fi ... 84070.html
Paris has guaranteed French banks a 5.4 billion euro financing package for several arms contracts with Egypt, including the sale of 30 Rafales (nearly 4 billion euros) but also an observation satellite (Airbus) and two MRTT tanker aircraft.

Behind the Rafale contract, which will be put into effect in June or even July by Egypt, other orders could be announced very quickly, such as the sale of a spy satellite and two MRTT tanker aircraft to the Egyptian armed forces. France has given a guarantee to several French banks - BNP Paribas, Crédit Agricole, Société Générale and CIC - not for a financing of 4 billion euros (30 Rafales) but for a total amount of 5.4 billion, according to concordant sources. The observation satellite will be supplied by Airbus Space, as revealed by La Tribune last December, and the two MRTTs by Airbus. Finally, Cairo recently purchased four GM400s, the formidable 3D long-range air defense radars developed and designed by Thales, according to our information.

Negotiations for the sale of the observation satellite are a very long story that could perhaps find its conclusion soon. During the visit of Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sissi to France last December, there was already hope of a decisive breakthrough on this file, carried by Airbus. But in the end, it was not mature enough, particularly in terms of financing, to result in a contract, or even an announcement. Especially since some industrialists felt a real discomfort on the part of certain French politicians to discuss arms issues during the reunion between France and Egypt after an icy period.
Airbus and Thales, then Airbus without Thales

The history of these negotiations dates back to 2015 when François Hollande and his Defense Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian were in power and surfing on the excellent relations between the two countries. The Egyptian president expressed his desire to buy an observation satellite and a military telecom satellite from Paris very quickly. The French team was put in place: Airbus DS and Thales Alenia Space (TAS), designated at the time as the agent for the operation by the Ministry of Defense. The two industrialists offered the Egyptians a contract worth about 1 billion euros for the two satellites. Despite Cairo's willingness to move forward as quickly as possible, negotiations dragged on for months. And the arrival in Paris in December 2015 of a high-level Egyptian delegation to finalize the contract did not allow the negotiations to be concluded, or even to make a decisive breakthrough.

Then, in April 2016, Airbus DS and TAS finally managed to finalize negotiations but for the military telecom satellite only. The contract is estimated to be worth around €600 million. An agreement was announced on the sidelines of French President François Hollande's visit to Cairo in April 2016. On May 10, TAS and Airbus DS signed the contract in Paris, and in July, the first installment was paid to the manufacturers. It is the concretization of about seven months of negotiations between the two French industrialists and Cairo. Why only one satellite? The Egyptians had found the bill for the two satellites much too high. The observation satellite was therefore postponed. Several times announced to foreign competitors, this contract could finally be awarded six years later to Airbus, which in the meantime has dumped its partner but also rival, Thales. But that's another story...

Follow La Tribune
Share economic information, receive our newsletters


Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

Return to Modern Military Aircraft

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 25 guests