F-22 Database and photo thread

Anything goes, as long as it is about the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor
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Scorpion1alpha

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Unread post19 Apr 2021, 12:13

The first two airshows locations for the F-22 Demo Team this season were literally happening simultaneously: the Sun 'n Fun Airshow at Lakeland, Fl (16-18 April) and the Cocoa Beach Airshow, Fl (17-18 April). The F-22 was so fast, it can finish one show and then zoom over and do another. LOL.

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Facing the beast.

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The night lights up when the beast is around.
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Scorpion1alpha

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Unread post26 Apr 2021, 13:13

Artsy and a surprise?
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Photo credit: Britt Dietz

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F-22 found out it has a new sibling.
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jetblast16

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Unread post26 Apr 2021, 14:25

I'll take the real McCoy :wink:
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Unread post03 May 2021, 12:55

The first 3 photos remind me of what author Steve Davies said he experienced in his backseat ride in an F-15D chasing F-22s.

Davies was a photog in the backseat of the F-15D and the two F-22s they were flying in formation with then pitched up and lit the burners to simulate an intercept course. The pilot of the F-15D then lit his burners in an attempt to stay in formation with the F-22s. Davies said the F-22s ran away from the Eagle to the point where the Eagle’s motors “petered out”. Davies said he watched in amazement as the F-22 continued their zoom upward and then leveled out miles ahead of them.

There isn’t a plane that can out climb the Raptor in our inventory.

Maj Andy "Lite" Gray. F-22 Raptor driver.
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Unread post03 May 2021, 13:57

I once spoke with an F-15C driver who said something similar..

This wasn't a climb though, it was a flat out drag race. He mentioned that he was absolutely clean and had already "burned down some gas" before engaging the Raptor in such. Claimed that for the first few seconds or so, they were neck and neck. Shortly afterward, his recollection was that of a speck that kept getting smaller and smaller, LOL.

For such a boxy looking fuselage (at least from some angles), it certainly slices through the air with ease. I suspect its visually deceiving... meaning you don't realize perhaps its (arguably) a blended wing/body lifting platform. In that respect, it mimics the Eagle IMO. Recall that Israeli fighter that lost an entire wing, yet still made it back to base! Pilot claimed that as long as he kept his speed up, fuselage lift was such that he was able to save the aircraft..
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Unread post03 May 2021, 16:13

Don't forget, the Raptor has more raw thrust than the Eagle. A reengined Eagle, with the right motors, could settle the score :wink:
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Unread post04 May 2021, 12:32

jetblast16 wrote:Don't forget, the Raptor has more raw thrust than the Eagle. A reengined Eagle, with the right motors, could settle the score :wink:


It's not just thrust, but also drag. F-15 is just not optimized for supersonic flight the way the F-22 is. Maybe subsonic an F-15 with new engines can compete but when in supersonic flight, the F-15's aerodynamics is not in it's favor.
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Unread post04 May 2021, 13:00

disconnectedradical wrote:
jetblast16 wrote:Don't forget, the Raptor has more raw thrust than the Eagle. A reengined Eagle, with the right motors, could settle the score :wink:


It's not just thrust, but also drag. F-15 is just not optimized for supersonic flight the way the F-22 is. Maybe subsonic an F-15 with new engines can compete but when in supersonic flight, the F-15's aerodynamics is not in it's favor.


Especially so when F-15C/Ds almost always carry EFTs.
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Unread post04 May 2021, 15:34

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think anyone shared/posted this before, so here it goes...
https://www.dvidshub.net/news/395398/va ... light-line

VaANG maintainers rebuild F-22 Raptor after collapse on JBLE flight line

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Photo By Tech. Sgt. Lucretia Cunningham | Virginia Air National Guard Airmen assigned to the 192nd Maintenance Group prepare to launch F-22 Raptor tail #85 April 9, 2021, at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia. The team of maintainers became dedicated to rebuilding the fighter jet after a mishap upon landing in January 2020. This was the first time the aircraft had completed a successful take off and landing since the incident. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Lucretia Cunningham)

HAMPTON, VA, UNITED STATES
04.09.2021
Story by Tech. Sgt. Lucretia Cunningham
192nd Wing

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, Va. — For the first time in his more than 20 year career, Master Sgt. Christopher Plath held his breath and felt the intense pressure during the take off and landing of F-22 tail #85 on April 9, 2021. As a flight chief in the 192nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Plath stayed quietly in command of his exclusive team of Virginia Air National Guard maintainers, advising them to stay focused even while a crowd of onlookers started to gather on the Langley flight line in hopes of witnessing the end result of what Plath said were long, tireless hours.

“I knew without a doubt that my team was the best possible team I could’ve had and that we did everything within our power to make that jet better than it was the day before the mishap,” Plath said. “But, there’s still doubt in the back of your mind ‘did we do everything?’ ‘did we miss something?’”

In the days leading up, the Guardsmen went to great lengths to double, and triple check their work. They consulted with Lockheed Martin engineers, conducted a high-speed taxi to test any rattling or drag on the brake system and even took the jet into the Hush House, a specialized, insulated facility where jet engines are tested at their maximum performance, to induce any possible points of failure.

Since January 2020, “eight-five” had been sitting in a hangar after an incident upon landing caused the fifth-generation Raptor to skid across the runway. Maintenance Airmen reported hearing the unnerving sound as it came to a screeching stop on its right wing that day.

“As soon as it touched down and collapsed, I was in shock,” Plath said. “We kind of just stood there staring at it, praying the canopy is going to open up and the pilot is going to get out.”

Once they confirmed the pilot was safe, 1st Fighter Wing and 192nd Wing maintainers immediately got to work ordering parts and formulating a plan to get eight-five back into the fight.

VaANG Airmen train and fight side-by-side with active-duty Airmen as part of the total force integration between the 1st FW and 192nd Wing, contributing to the Combat Air Forces’ warfighting capabilities. The partnership was established in 2005 and allows the VaANG to share in the support of airpower worldwide, including the maintenance and operation of the F-22 Raptor.

Guard members working in garrison with an active duty unit are also able to provide home-station continuity during Regular Air Force (RegAF) mobilizations and changes in permanent duty stations. Maintainers from the 1st FW were responsible for the jet until they were tasked with a deployment before parts started rolling in. To maintain continuity, Plath was officially appointed “impound official” in December 2020 to oversee the rebuild. After doing his own inspection of the damage and documentation of initial repairs, Plath said he knew he needed to select a crew to ensure they could all remain on the same shift and be dedicated to nothing more than the task at hand.

Before it could take off, tail #85 required a massive overhaul including new landing gear, a new flight control surface on the right wing and a new wing tip.

The team: Staff Sgt. Drevonte Swain and Senior Airman Ethan Martin, 192nd Maintenance Squadron low observable Airmen, were pivotal in repairing significant outer-skin damage. Tech. Sgt. Kenneth Carpenter and Staff Sgt. Nicholas Potter, 192nd AMXS weapons load crew members, ensured the main weapons-bay door was replaced and the weapons bay operational. Staff Sgt. Lauren Hayes, 192nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron avionics specialist, ensured the integrity of the aircraft’s integrated systems. Along with Plath, Tech. Sgt. Eric Talman and Staff Sgt. James Sheaves Jr., 192nd AMXS crew chiefs, were in charge of the overall maintenance and repairs—together they were “Team 8-5.”

More than 130 days of collaborating diverse specialties proved successful for the team. But also, Plath added, the crew was able to learn from each other and gain a certain respect for each other’s expertise while working together and offering a helping hand or assistance to their teammates when needed.

“I couldn’t be prouder of this team of maintainers,” said Col. Matthew Hummel, 192nd Maintenance Group commander. “Through their dedication, expertise and hard work, they resurrected aircraft 85, five months ahead of schedule. More importantly, however, they learned from each other and helped each other across normal Air Force Specialty Code boundaries, making them individually and collectively better.”

As it taxied down the flight line towards its first takeoff in over a year, Talman bid the jet a final “see you soon” with a slight graze on its left wing as it went by. Plath, along with Lt. Col. Timothy Strouse, 192nd AMXS commander, and Chief Master Sgt. Gregg Allen, 192nd AMXS superintendent, walked down to get a closer view of the aircraft taking flight.

Maj. Daniel “Honcho” Thompson, the F-22 pilot assigned to the 149th Fighter Squadron, ripped through the air space as observers watched idly for almost an hour; “the real test is the landing,” Plath said. After safely landing and taxiing to his staging area, Thompson signaled a sign of approval.

“He gave me a thumbs up as he went by,” Plath said. “It made me feel super relieved, and words can’t describe how proud I am of the men and women assigned to my team. All the hard work; the blood, sweat, tears. The nerves and anxiousness, at some points frustration and anger. All of that came to an end and became worth it to see the airplane take off and land safely.”
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Unread post10 May 2021, 12:43

Aloha!
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Unread post17 May 2021, 13:18

Regarding the other topics that popped up recently about the F-22’s Sunset scheduled around the year 2030, I’ll say this.

The F-22 is as indispensable for the high-end fight now as it ever was. 2030 is about 8.5 years away and nobody said as soon as it turns 2030, the F-22 is gone. Dependent on the NGAD’s progress and the amount of operationally capable aircraft fielded at a given timeframe will determine when the drawdown of F-22 operations will occur. That could be 4-5-10 years after 2030 (12.5-18.5 years away) and that just a guess.

Apparently, the NGAD program is progressing well. The prototype was shown to key congressional members and the pilots and personnel on that program are talking good things about it, although work to integrate key components and testing (and tweaking) still needs to be done. I said it before, I’ll say it again…NGAD will have to be quite the aircraft(s) to replace the F-22. I’m hoping that is true.

Until that day for the NGAD comes, the F-22, along with upgrades it’s still scheduled to receive, is and continues to be the most dominant fighter in the world.
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Unread post17 May 2021, 21:46

Scorpion1alpha wrote:Regarding the other topics that popped up recently about the F-22’s Sunset scheduled around the year 2030, I’ll say this.

The F-22 is as indispensable for the high-end fight now as it ever was. 2030 is about 8.5 years away and nobody said as soon as it turns 2030, the F-22 is gone. Dependent on the NGAD’s progress and the amount of operationally capable aircraft fielded at a given timeframe will determine when the drawdown of F-22 operations will occur. That could be 4-5-10 years after 2030 (12.5-18.5 years away) and that just a guess.

Apparently, the NGAD program is progressing well. The prototype was shown to key congressional members and the pilots and personnel on that program are talking good things about it, although work to integrate key components and testing (and tweaking) still needs to be done. I said it before, I’ll say it again…NGAD will have to be quite the aircraft(s) to replace the F-22. I’m hoping that is true.

Until that day for the NGAD comes, the F-22, along with upgrades it’s still scheduled to receive, is and continues to be the most dominant fighter in the world.


^ This
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