Bye Bye ODIN, Welcome Back ALIS

Discuss the F-35 Lightning II
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talkitron

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Unread post23 Apr 2021, 00:10

The F-35's ODIN software development is on hiatus due to a funding cut from Congress. ALIS will keep being used.

F-35 program office announces a “strategic pause” on new logistics system


https://www.defensenews.com/air/2021/04/22/f-35-program-office-announces-a-strategic-pause-on-new-logistics-system/
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Unread post23 Apr 2021, 01:30

Not all bad news while pause in development seems reasonable as described there are some positive developments also:
"...However, ODIN hardware development is moving forward. Lockheed delivered the first hardware kit for testing at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma in September.

The new kit is 75 percent smaller, weighs 90 percent less than the current hardware, and is projected to be 30 percent cheaper. In addition to the smaller footprint, we are seeing significant performance improvements in ALIS such as data processing and synchronization times 2-3 times faster than ever seen before,” Fick wrote in testimony.

The program office plans to roll out additional kits this summer, which will save money by being able to host multiple squadrons on a single unit, Fick said. The Defense Department plans to invest $471 million into both ALIS and ODIN over the next five years."
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Unread post23 Apr 2021, 03:01

Presumably pausing ODIN development would cause all the software developers to be laid off or moved to other projects.
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steve2267

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Unread post23 Apr 2021, 05:19

talkitron wrote:Presumably pausing ODIN development would cause all the software developers to be laid off or moved to other projects.


Perhaps. But I was under the impression that said ODIN developers were all from some vaunted Air Force talent pool? If so, as gummint employees they will prolly still be around (not laid off), but could very well be moved to other projects.

Gummint never ceases to amaze me that you have nimrods like that Washington Congressional Rep (an apparent Boing shill) flapping their lips about a program (F-35) being too expensive, but then they (being the dominant political party at the time) refuse to fund the work they were decrying 6-12 months earlier as not having been implemented by the Pentagon which would greatly diminish the costs of said program.
Take an F-16, stir in A-7, dollop of F-117, gob of F-22, dash of F/A-18, sprinkle with AV-8B, stir well + bake. Whaddya get? F-35.
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Unread post23 Apr 2021, 05:48

The Resurrection of ALIS. Easter. 8)

PDF List: https://docs.house.gov/Committee/Calend ... tID=112494
Mr. Gregory Ulmer Executive Vice President of Aeronautics, Lockheed Martin
http://docs.house.gov/meetings/AS/AS25/ ... 210422.pdf
F-35 PROGRAM UPDATE: ACCOMPLISHMENTS, ISSUES, AND RISKS WITHIN THE AREAS OF DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCTION, TESTING, FIELDING, AND SUSTAINMENT ACTIVITIES
APRIL22, 2021

4. INCREASING AVAILABILITY ACROSS A GROWING FLEET
For the warfighter to achieve their mission we must ensure that there is an ever-ready deterrent. The fact remains that over the last 18 months readiness metrics on F-35 have steadily trended in a positive direction, all this while adding 120 aircraft to thefleet in 2020 and 134 in 2019. The F-35 is proven to be more reliable than 4th Generation aircraft with a mean flight hour between failure (MFHBF) rate -the time that parts remain on the aircraft before needing to be repaired -more than twice that of a4th Generation weapons system.

Readiness rates continue to rise across the fleet.The U.S. Air Force recently returned from 18 consecutive months in the CENTCOM Aera of Responsibility (AOR)where they flew more than 1,300 sorties,with an average Mission Capable (MC) rate of73.5% with many periods of time operating at 80%–90%, and even 100% MCrate at some points.

The fact is that todeliver an initial operational capability, trades were made across the enterprise early in the program, and today weare playing catch up on sustainment. Lockheed Martin is working closely with our customer to accelerate depot activations for 68 repair lines five years ahead of plan.

We have completed 32 of the 68 workloads with an additional 11 planned for this year and the balance to be completed and repairing at rate by the end of 2024. Lockheed Martin is also applying the full force of its supply chain to drive down cost by aggregating sustainment demand with production orders and further enabling cost reduction objectives.

Expanding F-35 component repair capacity, in the very near term, is essential to improving readiness. Our Public Private Partnerships (PPP) are enabling Organic Depot repair and are the centerpiece of our success. As the fleet expands and flying hours increase, the demand for repair will outpace the organic depot capacity, and without adding supply chain and international capacity to the repair network, the current component repair backlog will grow. Lockheed Martin is 100% committed to F-35 Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) and Title 10 requirements, and we see these Industry/Depot PPP as a proven win-win strategy for sustainment moving forward.

We have also made significant progress in partnership with our customers on the transition from the Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS) to the Operational Data Information Network (ODIN). Our shared goal is continue improving speed, minimizing hardware footprint, reducing required labor, and enhancing user experience and overall capability. We continue to make improvements with each ALIS software update.

We are currently fielding the latest release of ALIS, which includes improvements in Air Vehicle Transfer times now measured in minutes instead of days, workflow and user interface improvementsto include a new weapons load page that reduces user burden by 54%, 15 additional Electronic Equipment Logbook (EEL) software fixes, ALIS Windows 7 to Windows 10 migration, and improvements to cyber security based on Joint Operational Test Team assessments. The previous release of ALIS, which completed fielding in November 2020, included a 50% reduction in executing Air Vehicle releases, improved F-35 Portable Memory Device (PMD) download processing by 30%, and also included 50% reduction in manual EELs.

The ALIS and ODIN primary purpose remains the same –to be the F-35’s logistics system for maintenance, health/diagnostics, supply chain management, and fleet management; however, ODIN is being led by the JPO and will be developed with current tools and technologies with the aim of improving on the current ALIS system.

Lieutenant General Eric Fick Program Executive Officer, F-35 Joint Program Office
http://docs.house.gov/meetings/AS/AS25/ ... 210422.pdf
F-35 PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS, ISSUES, AND RISKS
APRIL 22, 2021

Affordability
We absolutely understand that all F-35 customers have limits on the resources available to the program. If we, the F-35 Enterprise, do not meet affordability requirements, our customers will be forced to choosebetween buying less, flying less, or pursuing alternative solutions to meet their fighter force needs.The F-35 JPO, U.S. Services, and Partners are working together to identify waysto drive down costs. In the last year,we introduced a variety of affordabilityinitiatives, designed to drive cost out of the program and ensure our warfighters have the capability they need.The JPO has established strategic Affordability Targets throughout the program aimed at reducing the total cost of ownership of the F-35. In development, the program’s focus is on cost control of TR-3 and other Block 4 capabilities, as well as reducing the cost of the test enterprise and other fixed development costs. In production, the program continues to honeinternal affordability objectives for unit costs of the engine and air vehicle for Lots 15-23, and in sustainment, the U.S.Services have provided affordability constraints for Cost per Flight Hour and Cost per Tail per Year to address life cycle cost drivers.From Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 to today, we have reduced the aircraft procurement cost by 26 percent –going from almost $108 million to $80 million for upcoming U.S. Air Force F-35A deliveries. Despite that strong effort on production costs, we vividly understand that the largest share of program cost is in sustainment; in fact, sustainment costs are projected to constitute 80 percent of the program’s lifecycle cost. The F-35 JPOrecognizes the imperative to drive down the sustainment cost of the platform for all of our stakeholders, and weare doing just that.

In 2019 using then year dollars, the F-35 fleet average cost per flight hour was $42,400 and the cost per tail per year was $7.9 million. In constant year 2012 dollars, the most recentF-35 JPO actual cost per flight hour data is $38,300 and cost per tail per year is $7.5 million averaged across all F-35 variants. Further more, and also in constant year 2012 dollars, the U.S. Air Force’s F-35A 2020 actuals show the cost per flight hourwas $33,300 and cost per tail per year was $7.0 million.

Though we have experienced challenges in reducing sustainment costs for the F-35, we project a decrease to sustainment costs overthe life of the program as fleet size grows and the Department of Defense maximizeseconomies of scale.The remaining 2020 actuals are still in work.But scale alone will be insufficient. Accordingly, we are aggressively pursuing Reliability and Maintainability initiatives and examining both organic and contract logistics support options to reduce sustainment costs over the life cycle. F-35 lifecycle costs include, but are not limited to: personnel, maintenance, fuel, ordinance, training and simulation systems,reprogramming laboratories, physical infrastructure, and a global supply network that will keep a fleet of more than 3,000 domestic and international aircraft fully-operating, and contributing to the fight for decades to come. We must leave no stone unturned in each and every one of these areas in order to drive improved life cycle affordability into the program.AvailabilityLast year, the overall Mission Capability rate for the F-35 Fleet continued its steady rise, increasingto an annual average of 68percent through November, an improvement of 5.4percentfrom calendar year 2019, while flying nearly 94,000 hours, which was over 18,000 morehours than in the year prior.
In October 2020, USAF F-35As completed 18 months of continuous Middle East combat, flying roughly 4,000 combat sorties and 20,000 combat hours, and employing just shy of 400 weapons while maintaining a 74 percent Fully Mission Capable rate. At this stage in F-35 fleet maturity, our production line is stable, and aircraft rolling offthe line are performing well. Many of our earlier lot aircraft require modifications, andwe are working through retrofits with fleet customers to optimize the timing of these modifications to minimize operational impacts. Government and industry teams are working to accelerate an affordable long-term solution while maximizing near-term F-35 availability for training and operations. These changes are drivinga steady increase in aircraft full-mission capablerates, and we anticipate fleet availability willcontinue to climb as F-35 maintenance systems and best practices mature.

As you are also well aware, and as we discussed extensively in my last testimony, the F-35 Enterprise has historically struggled with the Autonomic Logistics Information System(ALIS)system. ALIS is a complex system with numerous documented shortfallsand technical challenges. You will recall last year that we announced the start of a new system, known as the Operational Data Integrated Network(ODIN), to replace ALIS. ODIN will incrementallyprovide a modern, user-friendly integrated information system for the F-35. It will becomprised of multiple elements to include modern hardware, architectures, software development methods, data environments, and platforms.In 2020, we achieved several accomplishments to improve the warfighterexperience while also beginningthe migration to ODIN. With direct input from the users, we delivered multiple ALIS software updates and capabilities that enhanced the user experience, increasedsystem performance, and reducedcyber vulnerabilities. Further, we establishedmultipleinitiatives that are laying the foundation to drive down the number of ALIS administrators to sustain the systemand reduce sustainment costs. In September 2020, we tested a modern ODIN hardware kit at U.S. Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Yuma, AZrunning current ALIS software. The new kit is 75percentsmaller, weighs 90percentless than the current hardware, and is projected to be 30 percentcheaper. In addition to the smaller footprint, we are seeing significantperformance improvements in ALIS such asdata processing and synchronization times 2-3 times faster than ever seen before as well asfaster screenrefresh and responsetimes.According to the users, the new hardware is a “Grand Slam!” We have already procured multiple ODIN hardware kits that will begin to roll out to units later this summer.Although these efforts have demonstrated positive outcomeswith legacy ALIS software, the outdated ALIS system architecture, which is over 15 years old, prevents us from taking full advantage of modern technologies, modern software development practices, and improved cybersecurity. ODIN began its initial journey working with the U.S. Services and Partners to establish the Capability Needs Statement and User Agreement in late 2020. These two documents established the foundational requirements for the ALIS to ODIN migration and described how the users will stay engaged during development activities.The JPO and Lockheed Martin established a contract that captured data rights, frequent software deliveries, and proper data marking for modern software development.ODIN software was developed using modern tools, techniques, and standards. Additionally, Lockheed Martin developedsoftware in a Government-provided environmentand demonstrateddata integration in a Government-managed data environment.

Despite all the positive activities, we underestimated the complexity of deprecating ALIS capabilities while migrating to ODINand learned several important lessons. Our approach must maintain ourexisting, legacy business system (while operations continue to grow and scale) while simultaneously transitioning to a modern system –in other words, as we transition from ALIS to ODIN, it will be an evolution, not a switch. There is work underwayto develop the overarching enterprise architecture to guide transition activities and maximizethe use of commercial off the shelf and government off the shelf capabilities.As our team laid the foundation for the ODIN strategy and worked to understand the implications of what we learned technically over the course of 2020, theappropriated ODIN Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation funding in FY2021 was reduced to 42 percentless than requested and required.This reductionwill serve asan opportunity to take a “strategic pause”, while weuse our 2020 accomplishments and lessons learned to inform and updatethestrategy for the ALIS to ODIN evolution. We will continue to field and leverage the modern ODIN hardware. For example, the processing power of the new hardware will allow us to host multiple squadrons on a single kit which will yield a drastic reduction in hardware procurement costs and administrators. Wehave initiatedthe development of an enterprise architectureleveraging commercialand governmentbest practices to document the stakeholders, business processes, data, and technology to build the transformational roadmap to migrate from ALIS to ODIN. We are strengthening our partnership with industryLockheed Martinsince they have deep knowledge of the existing system,and also collaborating with the Navy and Air Force to leverage their ongoing development activities to maximize our alignment with their roadmaps.The JPO is currently updating its ODIN development plan based onthe updated strategy, available resources,as well as inputs received from our users.We look forward to continuing to update you on ALIS and ODIN progress and milestones in the coming months.

MFHBF is more than double the 4th GEN fighter !? :shock: :doh: MC rate 100% !? :shock: :doh:

CPFH $33,300. 8) Up to the 25,000, there are 8,300 left.
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Unread post23 Apr 2021, 08:31

I think one problem with F-35 operating cost figures is that people don't understand (or don't want to) is that different fiscal year dollars have significant impact on them. For example I've seen people comparing costs that use fiscal year dollars that are two decades apart. Anyway, it seems like neither costs nor reliability/availability are any real concern any more. Comparing it to F-16 or even F-15E is IMO pretty stupid as F-35 can do so much more.

One thing that's interesting is that F-35s are flying about 200 hours a year. I think that's pretty damn good at this point of the program.
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Unread post23 Apr 2021, 14:30

Salute!

Always amuses me talking about $$ per flying hour. It is a poor metric. PERIOD!

There are too many factors contributing to that thing. Same for the $$ per plane many folks talk about. The only military vehicle I can think of that has a decent number of unit cost is the Ford carrier. One platform. So all the $$ from concept to construction to qualification can be tied to a single thing. You cannot do that with our planes or tanks or helos.

I cannot come up with a great metric equation this morning, but would rather use something like JP-4, tire wear, engine time between scheduled overhaul, and $$ per hour for the wrench benders and pilots.

Nevertheless, my guts are telling me that the "never F-35" folks in the new administration and a few powerful allies in Congress are gonna deliver the death blow just as they did for the F-22 25 years ago.

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Unread post23 Apr 2021, 15:34

Gums wrote:Nevertheless, my guts are telling me that the "never F-35" folks in the new administration and a few powerful allies in Congress are gonna deliver the death blow just as they did for the F-22 25 years ago.


Wow. CeeCeePee wins. That will be a fantastic return on their $10M investment.
Take an F-16, stir in A-7, dollop of F-117, gob of F-22, dash of F/A-18, sprinkle with AV-8B, stir well + bake. Whaddya get? F-35.
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Unread post23 Apr 2021, 15:36

Many US allies have staked their defense and air force's futures to the F-35. How ironic if the F-35 program survives selling to foreign countries and they end up purchasing more than the US.
Take an F-16, stir in A-7, dollop of F-117, gob of F-22, dash of F/A-18, sprinkle with AV-8B, stir well + bake. Whaddya get? F-35.
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Unread post23 Apr 2021, 15:37

It's difficult to imagine a dumber, more damaging decision than Gates' cutting the F-22 numbers. But an F-35 cut could indeed Trump that. The fulcrum of Western air power... cut off at the knees.

You'd think they would have learned with the F-22, but nope...
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Unread post23 Apr 2021, 15:44

I distinctly recall at the time the F-22 cut was announced, an article in which the gummint promised (guaranteed?) Lockheed Martin that the US would purchase the full quantity of the F-35 if LM would not contest the F-22 cut. I want to say the article quoted Gates.
Take an F-16, stir in A-7, dollop of F-117, gob of F-22, dash of F/A-18, sprinkle with AV-8B, stir well + bake. Whaddya get? F-35.
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Unread post23 Apr 2021, 22:57

I think we’re a little too far out over our skis on this. The HASC Chair simply said, don’t expect any plus-ups. That’s a long way — at this point — from cancellation.

I’m inclined to advise caution when it comes to taking counsel of our fears.
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Unread post23 Apr 2021, 23:00

Will these US 'congress critters' ensure appropriate funds are made available for more spares & aircraft refurbishment?
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Unread post24 Apr 2021, 12:30

Conspicuous in its absence is any discussion of how much cost growth is attributable to USG activities that support the program.
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Unread post24 Apr 2021, 14:06

quicksilver wrote:I think we’re a little too far out over our skis on this. The HASC Chair simply said, don’t expect any plus-ups. That’s a long way — at this point — from cancellation.

I’m inclined to advise caution when it comes to taking counsel of our fears.


That would be a fairly significant reduction in orders though (AF only requested 48 F-35A's last year in the PB) as services have benefited greatly from the Congress consulting their respective UPL's and adding F-35's. However, the real test would be the overall $$ put on the project. If HASC hearing wasn't just a scripted show, then members would want to keep the overall program spend about the same, and perhaps invest more in sustainment and MILCON etc instead of procurement. But somehow I don't think the likes of Garamendi really care about the O&S or LCC of the F-35. They just want to take dollars away and don't really plan to put them back strategically in areas that can help with that.
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