Norwegian F-35As take up QRA duties in Iceland

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energo

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Unread post18 Jun 2020, 21:12

More USAF B-2 and RNoAF F-35 interoperability training today:

https://thebarentsobserver.com/en/secur ... -norwegian

Two B-2 Spirit strategic stealth bombers were Thursday flying from an airbase in Missouri across the North Atlantic to the skies over the northernmost parts of the Norwegian Sea.

[...]

As the long-range bombers approached international air space outside northern Norway, a pair of F-35s from the Norwegian Air Force teamed up.

[...]

September 2019: B-2s flew for the first time above the Arctic Circle over the Norwegian Sea.
November 2019: Three B-52s and six Norwegian F-16s over the Barents Sea.
March 2020: Norwegian F-35s trained the first time together with a pair of B-2s outside Iceland.
May 2020: Norwegian and Swedish fighter jets train together with a pair of B-1 bombers over Scandinavian air space.
June 2020: Four Norwegian F-35s and three F-16s flying over the Barents Sea together with a B-52.
June 2020: Norwegian F-35s trained together with a pair of B-2s above the Arctic Circle over the Norwegian Sea.
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energo

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Unread post03 Nov 2020, 20:51

Air force recruitment video from the Noggies showing some nice F-35 and F-16 flying. Followed by a video from the Iceland detachment earlier this year:



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energo

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Unread post16 Dec 2020, 00:56

Overview of the RNoAF scrambles and identifications 2006-2020 showing the increasing activity of the Russians. These are currently performed by the F-16s out of Bodø MAS, however in 2022 the F-35 operating from Evenes FOB about 100 miles (160 Km) further north will take over the mission.

RNoAF_scrambles.jpg
Royal Norwegian Air Force scrambles and identifications 2006-2020


Source:
https://translate.google.com/translate? ... jen/173021
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Unread post16 Dec 2020, 01:30

The traditional, annual RNoAF Christmas Star F-16 formation over northern Norway on December 11. This year a 24 ship formation by 331 sqd. out of Bodø MAS. Further south the 332 sqd. from Ørlandet MAS flew a 12 ship F-35 formation over the southern parts of the country.

https://www.facebook.com/Luftforsvaret/ ... 3484572012

https://www.vol.no/nyheter/sortland/202 ... wsource=cl

https://www.vgtv.no/video/209749/spekta ... julehilsen (unfortunately commercial first)

RNoAF_2020_F-16_Christmas_Star_formation.jpg
RNoAF 2020 F-16 24 ship Christmas Star formation
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energo

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Unread post19 Dec 2020, 04:04

Double post.
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energo

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Unread post27 Feb 2021, 02:38

Latest reports on the second RNoAF NATO QRA deployment to Iceland.
(right click in the article text in your browser and select "Translate To English")

https://www.tu.no/artikler/slik-ser-det ... qdtPrjF-y0

https://www.tu.no/artikler/samme-dag-so ... rag/507138

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herciv

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Unread post27 Feb 2021, 09:16

The photo above are made from a french KC-135.
http://www.opex360.com/2021/02/25/un-c- ... iere-fois/
Air and Space Army C-135 refueled four Norwegian F-35As for the first time
Admittedly, after almost 60 years of service with the Strategic Air Force [FAS], the C-135FR tanker is near retirement, with the A330 MRTT "Phoenix" gradually entering staffing. But being near the end in no way precludes taking part in missions never before seen for the Air & Space Army [aAE]. Like, for example, refueling F-35A fighter jets of the Royal Norwegian Air Force [Luftforsvaret].

That a KC-135 refuels an F-35 in flight is certainly nothing new: the American planes have been doing it for a long time ... But in the case of the French tanker plane, it requires some adaptation.

In fact, the EA usually uses a supply pole on which there is a flexible hose at the end of which is attached a basket. However, certain foreign planes, like the F-35A, are refueled in flight via a rigid pole. However, the C-135 can use both modes.

"The expansion of the in-flight refueling capabilities of French squadrons to foreign nations equipped with this system [the rigid pole, note] is essential", argues the AAE, for whom the mission carried out by this C-135 of the Air Refueling Squadron [ERV] 4/31 “Sologne” emphasizes “capacity building for interoperability. "

Usually based in Istres, the C-135FR therefore refueled four Norwegian F-35As, as part of an "Air Policing" mission. For a few days now, Norway has in fact been providing the sky police in Iceland, within the framework of NATO. The mission took place on February 22.

This "first" could herald others. This June, Rafales from the 30th Fighter Wing will travel to Bodø [Norway], to take part in the 2021 edition of the Arctic Challenge Exercise [ACE]. A C-135FR could be involved, unless an A330 MRTT is designated instead.

Photo: EMA COM
Last edited by herciv on 27 Feb 2021, 09:43, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread post27 Feb 2021, 09:42

@all
what is the volume at the right side ? Is it specific to norvegian F-35 ?
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ricnunes

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Unread post27 Feb 2021, 14:43

herciv wrote:@all
what is the volume at the right side ? Is it specific to norvegian F-35 ?


What 'volume'? Could you be a bit more specific?

In case you're talking about the thing which I think you are, here it is:

Image

All F-35A's (doesn't matter which country) have this 'bump'.
The F-35B and F-35C don't have this bump because they don't carry an internal gun (in these variants the gun is carried externally in a pod mounted under the central fuselage station)

But if you're not talking about that 'bump' which I mentioned above then I ask you (again) to be more specific.
“Active stealth” is what the ignorant nay sayers call ECM and pretend like it’s new.
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spazsinbad

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Unread post27 Feb 2021, 21:07

A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
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herciv

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Unread post27 Feb 2021, 21:20

@ricnunes @spaz Thanks a lot.
It is the bump you've mentioned.
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doge

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Unread post03 Mar 2021, 20:43

NATO 8)
https://ac.nato.int/archive/2021/NOR_F35_Ready
NORWAY'S F-35 CERTIFIED TO SAFEGUARD SKIES IN NATO’S HIGH NORTH
MAR 3 2021
RAMSTEIN, Germany - After bedding down the force and conducting familiarization flights in Iceland, the Norwegian F-35 detachment underwent a two-day certification test for NATO's Air Policing mission in Iceland.
NATO’s Combined Air Operation Centre (CAOC) at Uedem, Germany, verified that the detachment has all the tactics, techniques and procedures in place required to provide 24/7 intercept capabilities to protect the airspace above Iceland.
    We are set to launch the first of three fighter deployments to Iceland in 2021 showcasing NATO's comprehensive and effective Air Policing measures for all our Allies
"Together with the Icelandic Coast Guard staff in Control and Reprting Centre (CRC) Keflavik, we challenged the Norwegian detachment and reviewed their setup and processes to bring their fighters in the air within the required response time,” said Colonel Wilhelm May, German Air Force, head of the CAOC Uedem certification team. “I am very pleased to say they finished this challenge very successfully - just as they did last year with the F-35s,” he added.
“We ran the certification process virtually, as we did ´for the previous fighter
detachments in Iceland mitigating for the restrictions imposed to combat the pandemic,” Colonel May explained. “We have resilient procedures in place that benefit from excellent communications and flawless liaison between our teams at Uedem and Keflavik. This means we are set to launch the first of three fighter deployments to Iceland in 2021 showcasing NATO's comprehensive and effective Air Policing measures for all our Allies. Together we are vigilant, capable and ready to support deterrence and defence including in the High North,” he concluded.
"We demonstrate that Norway is capable of effectively executing missions with the F-35 both inside and outside Norwegian territory," said Lieutenant Colonel Tron Strand, Commander of the Norwegian F-35 detachment for Iceland Air Policing. "It is important that Norway participates and contributes to NATO's total defence to safeguard the sovereignty of the Alliance," he added.
For the coming three weeks Norway will once more demonstrate modern aircraft integration bringing their F-35 fighters into the Alliance’s enduring collective mission safeguarding the NATO skies.

Story by Allied Air Command Public Affairs Office
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doge

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Unread post05 Mar 2021, 19:29

NATOoooo... 8)
https://ac.nato.int/archive/2021/COM_JFCNF_ISL
COMMANDER JOINT FORCE COMMAND NORFOLK, “CONNECTING DOTS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC”
MAR 4 2021
KEFLAVIK, Iceland - During his visit to Iceland on March 3, 2021, the Commander of NATO’s Joint Force Command (JFC) Norfolk, United States, underlined the importance of NATO’s vigilance, deterrence and promotion of stability in the High North.
Vice Admiral Andrew L. Lewis visited Keflavik, Iceland to meet with Gudlaugur Thór Thórdarson, Minister for Foreign Affairs and International Development Cooperation of Iceland and the leadership of the Icelandic Coast Guard. "Iceland sits on an important crossroads in the North Atlantic and plays a crucial role in securing the transatlantic strategic lines of communication,” said Vice Admiral Lewis. “As head of JFC Norfolk, I was delighted to meet with Icelandic authorities and witness first-hand the ongoing activity at Keflavik Air Base,” he added.
    Complex, multi-domain operations that NATO and its members conduct in Iceland help ensure that we remain vigilant to any potentially dangerous developments, deter aggression, and promote security
"I'm really impressed with the Allied operations here in Keflavik. It speaks to the professionalism of the Icelandic hosts, specifically their Coast Guard, when you see what they have done to maintain operational capability while protecting public health at every turn,” Vice Admiral Lewis said. “The NATO Control and Reporting Centre they operate enables the success of NATO Air Policing Missions conducted by Allied Air Command at Ramstein,” he added.
NATO’s Allied Air Command at Ramstein, via the Alliance’s northern Combined Air Operations Centre (CAOC) at Uedem, Germany, oversees the enduring Air Policing mission across the European continent; the mission the Royal Norwegian Air Force F-35 detachment conducts in Iceland is an essential contribution to the Alliance’s vigilance and deterrence in the High North.
"I was glad I had the chance to meet with the members of the Royal Norwegian Air Force, who are conducting their second Air Policing Mission with F-35s in Iceland. These aviators, with cutting-edge technology and regional expertise, pack a big punch for NATO and help keep the airways secure,” he said when handing over, on behalf of the CAOC, the certificate that confirms F-35s mission-readiness.

“It was also great to meet with the US Navy personnel operating our P-8 Poseidon Maritime Patrol Aircraft out of Keflavik, conducted on the basis of the Bilateral Defence Agreement between Iceland and the USA. They, too, bring amazing technical know-how and state-of-the-art sensors, that together with NATO operations builds a comprehensive situational understanding in the Greenland-Iceland-UK Gap,” Vice Admiral Lewis said.
“These complex, multi-domain operations that NATO and its members conduct in Iceland help ensure that we remain vigilant to any potentially dangerous developments, deter aggression, and promote security,” concluded Vice Admiral Lewis.
As one of NATO’s newest command authorities, JFC Norfolk, United States has reached its initial operational capability in September 2020. The JFC is part of the Allied Command Operations structure and provides a joint multi-national operational command responsible for the North Atlantic, the High North and adjacent littorals.

Story by Allied Air Command Public Affairs Office
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Unread post09 Mar 2021, 09:27

more than 20,000 earthquakes in Iceland recently, an volcanic eruption may be imminent but the airbase seems safe:

According to Stian Roen, spokesperson for the Air Force, a possible volcanic eruption will not affect their daily operations in Iceland. The assignment "Iceland Air Policing" lasts for three weeks.

- The Icelandic authorities update us continuously, and according to the latest information, our base will not risk getting in the way of any lava flows. We have been on standby for NATO since Tuesday, and will operate as normal in the future, Roen told Teknisk Ukeblad.

According to the Meteorological Institute, the lava flows from a possible eruption will not threaten any other inhabited areas on the peninsula either. A quake last week had a magnitude of 5.7.

- The magma breaks up, and it is so close to the surface that we must take this seriously, said Freysteinn Sigmundsson at the University of Iceland on Wednesday, according to NTB.

Although an outbreak is possible, Sigmundsson says it is not certain. The situation can persist for hours or longer with many small earthquakes.

The potential threat volcanoes pose to jets has been well known to the aerospace industry and air defense for a long time. Most people also learned about this when the eruption from Eyjafjallajökull paralyzed air traffic in Europe almost eleven years ago.

What makes volcanic ash scary for jet engines is that the silicate particles can melt in the combustion chamber, glaze the inside of the turbine and lead to gradually poorer performance and in the worst case a complete stop on the engine. The ash can clog both the fuel nozzles and the ventilation openings and lead to temperatures so high that the turbine blades melt.
The ash particles are hard, which in itself can be destructive to the turbine components, and is also sulfur-containing and can thus corrode the engine parts. In addition, there are several examples that flying through volcanic ash means sandblasting the fuselage and destroying the view from the cockpit.

It should be unlikely that a possible outbreak will now have similar consequences:

- We will not experience something like this this time. The alkaline, thin-flowing lava on Reykjanes will probably give relatively little ash formation, geologist Børge Johannes Wigum told VG on Thursday .


auto-translated from:
https://www.tu.no/artikler/er-der-med-f ... 2021-03-06
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Unread post18 Mar 2021, 16:51

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