F-35 Flight Simulator with Lockheed Martin [FLY EXPLAINED]

Discuss the F-35 Lightning II
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doge

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Unread post02 Dec 2020, 18:22

Advantages of the Simulator : Can Try again as many times as like. 8)
https://www.standard.net/hilltop/388th- ... 22a79.html
388th Fighter Wing develops leaders with every sortie
BY MICAH GARBARINO 388th Fighter Wing Public Affairs Aug 13, 2020
HILL AIR FORCE BASE — For U.S. Air Force combat pilots, a culture of continuous improvement is the key to success in combat, especially when developing and honing tactics with a fairly new weapon system.
The 388th Fighter Wing at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, is the Air Force’s first combat-capable F-35A Lightning II wing. It declared Full Warfighting Capability in January 2020. The wing, alongside the Reserve 419th Fighter Wing, flies 50-100 sorties every day, training and developing leaders.
“We only have one person in that cockpit. You have to be able to think on your own and make critical decisions that affect an entire formation in a split second,” said Col. Steven Behmer, 388th Fighter Wing commander. “Those are the type of Air- men we’re developing every day.”

Training regimen
A variety of training missions are flown: offensive and defensive counter-air, suppression of enemy air defenses, and escorting other aircraft are the F-35A’s bread and butter, said Lt. Col. Michael Blauser, 388th Operations Group deputy commander.
The training sorties that depart and return to Hill nearly every day are usually in groups of 8, 10, or 12 aircraft. These groups are broken into two or four-ship formations, each with different training objectives for the pilots.
The objectives for each pilot are typically driven by three things: a training syllabus, the integrated wing training plan and specific preparation requirements for deployments or large exercises.
“I showed up at Hill just after graduating the basic F-35 course. It’s the only fighter I’ve flown and the course is pretty simulator heavy,” said Capt. Grant Schwartz, a pilot with the 4th Fighter Squadron. “We started training for Red Flag and then immediately went to Nellis. It was eye-opening to have that be my first experience as a fighter pilot and to see the capabilities the F-35 brings and contributes to the fight.”
In addition to specific deployment preparations, each pilot has training requirements based on where they are in their development.
“The need for progression as a fighter pilot never stops,” said Blauser. “From the day you leave the basic fighter course, you’re always in some kind of seasoning.”
That progression in the skill of a pilot — from mission-ready wingman, to flight lead, to instructor pilot, to flight evaluator or mission commander — is one of the Air Force’s greatest strengths, and what will bring the best out of whatever weapon system they are employing, said Behmer.
“As an Air Force, our tactical advantage is that we develop Airmen who can think critically, make real-time decisions and get off-script when they need to,” said Behmer. “From the youngest wingman, we ask them and train them to think outside the box to solve tactical problems.”

Simulator and reality
One training tool is the simulator. There are six at Hill AFB, linked together, that pilots use every day to progress in their training. The simulator bays are exact replicas of a cockpit. Pilots climb inside. The cockpit moves forward on rails into a 360 degree dome, “like being inside a snow globe,” said Schwartz.
For brand-new wingmen, a simulator session may just be taxiing, using the radio, taking off and landing in Hill’s airspace. For more experienced wingmen, a session may be facing a complex scenario with multiple high-end threats built in — some that aren’t even available to train against in real life.
“It provides a great sense of realism and it is a cost-effective way to get repetition on things we can’t always do during a live sortie, like an engine failure or flying against more advanced threats,” said Blauser.
Compare the simulator to a weekday football practice. You’re going through the plays. You may be wearing pads. You’re getting close to full speed, but you’re not getting hit, and nothing can replicate full-contact Sunday football, said Behmer.
“In the simulator, you can make a bad decision. They just reboot it. That’s not how it happens in real life,” said Behmer. “We use the simulator to run the plays over and over again. When you get into a real-life dynamic environment and you see something there you didn’t expect, at least you’ve seen that defensive scheme before, and you are now able to audible into something more successful.”
“That’s what we’re trying to perfect here, Airmanship. Some of the building blocks can be developed in the simulator, but you cannot replicate that
seat-of-your-pants feeling, when the hair on the back of your neck stands up, and you know your life is in danger, and you’ve got to make split-second decisions,” said Behmer.

Future capabilities
The success of the F-35A, which processes and displays information faster than the human brain can comprehend, is dependent on pilots who can filter and focus that data on the mission, make risk-assessments and those quick judgment calls. The more the wing can develop that kind of Airmanship, the brighter the future for the weapon system, said Behmer.
“It is human nature to try to apply what you’ve learned in previous airplanes, but this is not the F-16. It’s not the A-10,” said Behmer. “With the F-35, you have to change your assumptions, and that leads to better tactics that fit the new capabilities this aircraft provides. As they progress with this aircraft, our young Airmen will continue to unlock that potential.”
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Unread post01 Feb 2021, 16:24

Marine's Simulator. 8)
https://www.3rdmaw.marines.mil/News/Art ... nter-fury/
F-35 simulator building unveiled during Winter Fury
By 1st Lt. Charles C. Allen | PEO Land Systems | January 25, 2021
MARINE CORPS AIR STATION MIRAMAR, Calif. --
3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (MAW) dedicates its inaugural F-35 simulator building aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar January 21, 2021. This marks the next step in streamlining the training process of the fifth-generation joint strike fighter, which has been recognized as one of the most advanced aircraft in military history.
In addition to providing a much more efficient means of producing highly trained pilots to operate the fifth-generation stealth fighter, this simulator will allow 3rd MAW aviators to train, rehearse, and refine their integrated abilities alongside the Navy and other Marine Corps allies operating across the globe.

“This building coming together will train pilots to bring violence to the people that desperately need it,” said Maj. Gen. Christopher Mahoney, 3rd MAW Commanding General. “That’s what this represents, another step that forces our competitors and adversaries, whether they’re Chinese or anybody else, to think twice.”
Flight simulators are an essential tool and an integral part of Marine aviation training that allow 3rd MAW squadrons to hone critical skills in simulated environments that refine their ability to conduct operations with a variety of aviation platforms in multiple environments from a centralized location.

“Distributed mission training will have the ability to integrate with other Navy and Marine Corps assets that are off site,” said Jennifer Moore, Training and Operations Manager for Lockheed Martin. “So we’ve got the F-35 simulators here on site that we’re going to be able to link with air wing operations that Navy counterparts that they’re going to be flying with in combat, as well as integrates other Marine Corps units as well, and able to have everybody join on the same simulated environment. The Air Force has their own distributed mission training network and the next step would be to get connected and let all the services play in the same domain.”

“The building is a manifested result of the teamwork and dedication of Marines that everyone talks about,” said Mahoney. “To the team here that allows us to take another step against our adversaries, my hat’s off to you.”
3rd MAW continues to “Fix, Fly and Fight” as the Marine Corps’ largest aircraft wing, and remains combat-ready, deployable on short notice, and lethal when called into action.
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Unread post01 Feb 2021, 16:26

Simulator Mode Select Menu. 8)
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200131-M-KY522-1154 Date 2020-01-31, Lockheed Martin representatives use an F-35 simulator to demonstrate the abilities of the aircraft during flight on Marine Corps Air Station Miramar Calif., Jan 31.jpg
F-35 Simulator Mode Select Menu.jpg
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Unread post02 Apr 2021, 08:43

VR and 5th-Gen Fighter are a good match compatibility ? :roll:
https://www.military.com/daily-news/202 ... ilots.html
The Air Force's Virtual Reality Fighter Training Is Working Best for 5th-Gen Pilots
26 Mar 2021 Military.com | By Oriana Pawlyk
The Air Force is finding that experimental virtual reality fighter pilot training is working best for students who want to fly the service's most advanced stealth platforms -- though leaders are not exactly sure why.
Maj. Gen. Craig Wills, 19th Air Force commander within Air Education and Training Command, said that as the service collects feedback from units accepting graduates from the Pilot Training Next program, which uses virtual and augmented reality technology to train on fundamental aviation skills, it appears students who fly the F-22 Raptor and F-35 Joint Strike Fighters are leading in the field.
"For whatever reason, [students] tend to do better in F-35 and F-22-type courses comparatively [to] how they've done in the fourth-generation fighters," Wills said during a roundtable discussion with reporters Tuesday.

Wills could not explain this finding, but noted that fourth-generation fighter students -- those who fly F-15 Eagles or F-16 Fighting Falcons -- sometimes see a six-to-seven month break in training as they await acceptance into their formal training unit, or FTU. The FTU is where pilots are assigned to their official aircraft following undergraduate pilot training, or UPT.
The Air Force has seen benefits from having pilots learn basics through cutting-edge virtual reality technology, Wills said. But the service is still trying to find the best way to track how students are progressing overall, he said.
"We're working through some of those challenges to get the hardcore data," Wills said.

In 2018, the service introduced a first-of-its-kind Pilot Training Next (PTN) experiment at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, Texas, to test students' abilities within an augmented reality space meant to resemble an in-flight experience.
PTN has graduated 41 pilots to date with its three classes.
While the experiment uses simulators to teach aircraft familiarization, the focus has really been on individual students and ensuring they progress at the right pace. Student pilots have traditionally begun their training with heavy academics and regimented simulator time, but PTN plunges them directly into augmented reality and simulator training, allowing them to learn and self-correct as they participate in realistic flight scenarios before they get into the T-6 Texan II trainer aircraft used for instrument familiarization, and low-level and formation flying.

Reiterating previous comments made by AETC officials, Wills said pilot performance and washout rate in PTN closely resembles a conventional undergraduate pilot training class of 30 individuals. PTN classes, by comparison, have been smaller ,with roughly 15 to 20 airmen at the start of each class.
"Broadly speaking, folks have met the standard and moved on," he said. Wills added that the PTN instructors are in touch with field and operations commanders to get updates on these students anecdotally, but no concrete performance data has been compiled yet.
Wills said outdated systems -- scoresheets that vary from unit to unit and score pilot criteria in different ways -- are often manual or handwritten files, making it difficult to compile and centralize performance data.

"One of the big initiatives in AETC we're trying to move towards is this thing called an Airman Learning Record," he said. The Airman Learning Record, a cloud-based online record that allows students to track their training progression from any mobile device, was introduced as a concept in 2017, and began beta testing in 2018. Wills did not say when the tool would be fully established.
In July, the service introduced a new program, dubbed Undergraduate Pilot Training 2.5, which builds off the PTN effort.
After seven months, 10 pilots graduated from the program from Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph last week.

"With respect to UPT 2.5. It's just too early to tell what we've seen so far," Wills said of data tracking.
Primary training for UPT 2.5 begins in the T-6 aircraft, but then transitions to virtual reality, simulator and tablet learning mechanisms.
"We've introduced about 100 extra hours of immersive training devices, the VR simulators," Wills said Tuesday.

Wills previously told Military.com the program will focus more heavily on revamping training for the mobility and special operations communities in order to help the service phase out the T-1 Jayhawk at Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training (SUPT) locations between fiscal 2023 and 2025. SUPT teaches flying, airmanship, instrument knowledge, rules and regulations.
The simulator-heavy experiment now halves the length of the current T-1 course to roughly 12 weeks within the training program, accelerating a pilot's path to graduation.
The Air Force also just completed another new program, "Accelerated Path to Wings," that is shorter than traditional training but does rely more on the T-1 than UPT 2.5.

Students learn general aviation foundation skills in the classroom and then head straight into the Jayhawk, finishing in roughly seven months time instead of the traditional 12 months.
Seven airmen graduated from the program on March 12.
While the Air Force is progressing with these programs, it's also looking to outsource training to private industry to boost yearly pilot output as it races to produce 1,500 pilots a year. The Air Force fell short of that production goal -- first set in 2018 -- in fiscal 2020, producing 1,263 pilots.

Wills knows these programs represent a major shift in training.
He has seen some reluctance, he said, to replace real-world flight hours with simulation.
"A lot of the changes that we are making are very controversial," he said. "I won't sugarcoat it, there are a lot of folks in the pilot force that don't like it.

"Anytime you change something that you were doing in an airplane, and you put it in a simulator, it's not going to be popular."
Over the next few months, Wills and his team will visit every active-duty flying wing and many of the Guard and Reserve units to talk about the pilot training transformation.
"We've got our work cut out for us with respect to moving forward and educating the force on what we're up to, to get that buy-in," he said.
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Unread post10 Apr 2021, 16:40

F-35C's simulator. 8)
https://www.militaryaerospace.com/compu ... networking
Navy to build new F-35C simulation facility at West Coast base, which is likely to include networking
New F-35C simulator facility should be completed by 2023, and will house four simulators, administrative spaces, server rooms, and other support spaces.

John Keller Mar 29th, 2021
LEMOORE NAS, Calif. – U.S. Navy combat aircraft experts are ready to expand simulation and training capacity at Lemoore Naval Air Station, Calif., to enable Navy pilots of the Lockheed Martin F-35C carrier-based jet fighter-bomber to train together for combat missions without ever leaving the ground.
Officials of the U.S. Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command Southwest in San Diego announced a $25.4 million contract Thursday to Soltek Pacific Construction Co. in San Diego to design and build a new F-35C simulator facility at the Central California jet base, which is headquarters for the Navy Pacific Fleet Strike Fighter wing.
The new F-35C simulator facility, which should be completed by October 2023, will house four simulators, administrative spaces, server rooms, and other support spaces. The new facility will be next to an simulator center at Lemoore NAS for pilot training and mission planning.

Lemoore NAS is home base for the Navy Pacific Fleet's growing number of F-35C fighter-bombers, which are to replace the Navy's inventory of F/A-18E/F Super Hornet jet fighter-bombers. The F-35C has a tail hook and reinforced structure that enable it to take off and land from aircraft carriers.
Lemoore has 19 strike fighter squadrons, two of which have the F-35C, and the rest that still fly the Super Hornet. The base has hosted F/A-18 simulation and training facilities since the early 1980s.
The new four-simulator F-35C training facility will enable Navy pilots to fly a variety of different missions, ranging from elementary flight-control training to full-up synchronized missions and adversarial dogfighting.
Pilots should be able to fly the future simulators on their own, or with other pilots in the additional simulators either as teams or as adversaries. In addition, it's likely these simulators will have networking capabilities that will enable F-35C pilots at Lemoore train together with F/A-18E/F Super Hornets in other simulators on the base, or with other military pilots at other bases in the U.S. and throughout the world.
The Lockheed Martin Training and Logistics Solutions segment in Orlando, Fla., is responsible for designing, building, and installing the F-35C flight simulators.
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Unread post10 Apr 2021, 21:58

doge wrote:F-35C's simulator. 8)
https://www.militaryaerospace.com/compu ... networking
Navy to build new F-35C simulation facility at West Coast base, which is likely to include networking
New F-35C simulator facility should be completed by 2023, and will house four simulators, administrative spaces, server rooms, and other support spaces.


Will the Navy release a version for PC? :mrgreen:
“Active stealth” is what the ignorant nay sayers call ECM and pretend like it’s new.
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Unread post16 Apr 2021, 20:48

10 Ways the F-35 Simulator is Changing Pilot Training
15 Apr 2021 LM PR

"1. All services, all variants, one simulator.
2. Distributed Mission Training (DMT) connects pilots for the high-end fight.
3. Pilots can fly 45-55% of initial training flights in the FMS.
4. Over 1,300 pilots and counting have trained on the FMS.
5. NextGen visuals for a 5th Gen fighter.
6. 100 F-35 FMS delivered - tens of thousands of hours flown across 21 sites.
7. Every F-35 FMS is built in the training capital of the world.
8. Replication within simulation.
9. We’re accelerating production, reducing manufacturing time by 40 percent.
10. Training saves lives and simulation saves money.



Source: https://www.f35.com/f35/news-and-featur ... ining.html
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A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
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