F-35B (Non-US) Pocket Carriers

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spazsinbad

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Unread post14 Oct 2021, 11:52

【ショート版】護衛艦「いずも」での発着艦検証作業 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGc32EyVCXk

[Short version] Departure / arrival verification work on the escort ship "Izumo"

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Unread post06 Nov 2021, 01:14

F-35 testers support 5th generation air system’s demo aboard Japanese navy ship
03 Nov 2021 2021 F-35 Joint Program Office Public Affairs

"NAVAL AIR STATION PATUXENT RIVER, Md. (NOV 3, 2021) – A pair of F-35B Lightning II fighter jets performed first-time-ever vertical landings and short takeoffs in early October aboard a Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force helicopter destroyer undergoing modifications to support F-35 operations.

Prior to two U.S. Marine pilots flying these demonstration flights aboard Japanese Ship Izumo off the coast of Japan on Oct. 3, the Naval Air Station Patuxent River-based F-35 Integrated Test Force played a key role in designing and executing a test plan for the demonstration, which is a critical step on the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force’s (JMSDF) path to conducting at-sea F-35 operations....

...“Our work started with the mission rehearsals at (Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division’s Manned Flight Simulator) using the Japanese Ship Izumo model, deck motion and simulated air wake,” said Hess [F-35 ITF Basing and Ship Suitability (BASS) Lead Ron Hess] of the mission planning that began in the spring. “We developed a sortie timeline and fuel ladder [never knew what that is until NOW! :-) ]that we took to Japan,” explained Hess, who embarked Izumo with two other ITF colleagues for the historic event. A fuel ladder is an assessment of the weight of fuel required for the different phases of flight during the demonstration; it is a critical component of mission planning, Hess said. And, it is one example of the precise calculations required by the F-35 ITF team to ensure a safe and successful operation.

The first vertical landing shortly after 9 a.m. Japan Standard Time was the culmination of months of detailed test planning, training, and rehearsals that required extensive coordination across 13 time zones in two languages. The full demonstration was a total of one landing and takeoff of each of the two F-35Bs involved. All flights were completed in one day....

...While the pilots’ job was to fly the jets to the ship, two members of the F-35 ITF Basing and Ship Suitability team were on board helping to guide the ship to a location with the right test conditions for the demonstration.

Prior to the F-35Bs touching down on Izumo, Hess was aboard in flight control, calculating true wind and ship movements to set the desired wind-over-deck conditions. As he gathered data, Hess communicated with his teammate Elliott Kandler, who was on Izumo’s bridge monitoring the mission radio and working through an interpreter to answer questions from the JMSDF admiral overseeing the operation, and the ship’s captain and executive officer. Together, Hess, Kandler, and the ship’s crew positioned the almost 250-meter long Izumo for optimal demonstration conditions....

...The JMSDF demonstration objectives included collecting noise and deck temperature data to validate engineering work done to date on JS Izumo and JS Kaga to inform decisions about the ships’ suitability for future F-35B operations, according to Rowell [F-35 Joint Program Office Japan Country Manager Graham Rowell]...."

Photo: "A U.S. Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II aircraft with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 242 conducts a vertical landing aboard the Japanese Ship Izumo off the coast of Japan, Oct. 3, 2021. U.S. Marines and Sailors embarked aboard the Japanese Ship Izumo in support of the first ever F-35B Lightning II operations aboard a Japanese vessel. The U.S. and Japan continue to work closely together to broaden their operational capabilities, support the Treaty of mutual Cooperation and Security, and maintain a free and open Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Tyler Harmon)" https://www.dvidshub.net/download/image/6872882 (JPG 11.9Mb)


Source: https://www.dvidshub.net/news/408633/f- ... -navy-ship
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Unread post09 Nov 2021, 05:23

Navy unveils 3D rendering of envisioned light aircraft carrier

SKCVL.jpg


South Korea's Navy has unveiled a three-dimensional rendering of an envisioned light aircraft carrier in a show of its resolve to build the warship by 2033 amid lingering doubts over its feasibility and necessity.

After five months of preparations, the Navy posted the six-minute clip depicting the carrier strike group on its YouTube channel Monday as part of an annual program to mark the 76th anniversary of its founding, which falls on Thursday.

The clip shows the 30,000-ton carrier operating at sea in tandem with other core components of its strike group, including an Aegis-equipped destroyer, combat support ship and submarine. Vertical take-off and landing fighters are also seen aboard the carrier.

The Navy has been pushing for the carrier project, saying it will enhance its naval defense capabilities in a region surrounded by major maritime powers, such as China and Japan.


Critics, however, often describe aircraft carriers as "floating coffins," as they can be easily exposed to advanced anti-ship weapons and torpedoes. They say the Navy should instead focus on more effective assets for underwater operations.

Brushing aside such criticism, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Boo Suk-jong said during a parliamentary audit last month the Navy will carry out the project "no matter what challenge lies ahead."

The estimated cost for the planned light aircraft carrier is 2 trillion won (US$1.68 billion), according to the Navy. The defense ministry allocated 7.2 billion won for next year as the first step of the program.

https://youtu.be/4DQ4eGxnABY
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Unread post09 Nov 2021, 05:31

From above video link: Strange F-35X Burner Take Off & VL STOVL Doors Open Video Screenshot
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Unread post09 Nov 2021, 05:34

Japan's defense chief visits ship being remodeled into aircraft carrier

JAPCVL.jpg


Yokosuka, Kanagawa Pref. – Defense Minister Nobuo Kishi visited the Maritime Self-Defense Force’s (MSDF) Izumo helicopter carrier on Monday to see progress in retrofitting the ship into a full-fledged aircraft carrier.

Kishi inspected the flight deck of the Izumo, which has been reinforced to withstand the heat emitted by F-35B jets during short landing and vertical takeoff procedures, and was briefed on test runs using U.S. aircraft conducted last month.


“It is absolutely necessary that we are capable of launching and landing F-35Bs at sea in order to successfully carry out defense policy, so that we can deal with the new security environment and be prepared to defend our territory, which includes a wide area in the Pacific Ocean,”
Kishi told reporters after boarding the ship at the MSDF’s base in Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture.

Japan plans to introduce a total of 42 F-35B jets, with the first to enter service as early as fiscal 2024. It is modifying its two Izumo-class helicopter carriers — the other is the Kaga — to house the advanced stealth fighter jets, including by changing the front of the ships into a squarer shape.

The plan is aimed at countering China’s growing assertiveness in regional waters and improving interoperability with the U.S. military, which already operates F-35B jets out of one of its bases in Japan.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2021/ ... t-carrier/

https://youtu.be/XVsvo80vckU
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Unread post10 Nov 2021, 01:45

Looks like Japan and South Korea will both be buying more F-35B's. :wink:
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Unread post16 Nov 2021, 18:32

Corsair1963 wrote:Looks like Japan and South Korea will both be buying more F-35B's. :wink:


The 42 for Japan is enough to equip 2 x Izumo Class and have enough for maintenance, training etc ashore. Realistically they're only going to need to equip 1 routinely for more than 30% of the time as the other will be in maintenance. They could run small numbers on the 2nd Izumo Class when available if necessary and surge to 2 air groups each with 12 aircraft.

As for South Korea 20 F-35B should be fine for 1 ship as long as they mesh their training and maintenance on the air and ship side like the French Marine Nationale does with the CdG and Rafale M fleets.
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Unread post16 Nov 2021, 23:35

timmymagic wrote:
Corsair1963 wrote:Looks like Japan and South Korea will both be buying more F-35B's. :wink:


The 42 for Japan is enough to equip 2 x Izumo Class and have enough for maintenance, training etc ashore. Realistically they're only going to need to equip 1 routinely for more than 30% of the time as the other will be in maintenance. They could run small numbers on the 2nd Izumo Class when available if necessary and surge to 2 air groups each with 12 aircraft.

As for South Korea 20 F-35B should be fine for 1 ship as long as they mesh their training and maintenance on the air and ship side like the French Marine Nationale does with the CdG and Rafale M fleets.



Sorry, 42 F-35B's is totally inadequate to support two Air Wings for the Izumo Class. Same could be said of the 20 F-35B's for the forthcoming South Korean Aircraft Carrier too.
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Unread post25 Nov 2021, 07:34

Turkey, Spain discuss sale of aircraft carrier, submarine

Nov 17, 2021

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Wednesday that his country hopes to increase defense cooperation with NATO ally Spain through the purchase of a second aircraft carrier and possibly a submarine.

Erdogan said Turkey and Spain had already cooperated on the construction of a Spanish assault ship.

“The first aircraft carrier was not a large-scale one. We have agreed on the construction of a large scale (carrier,)” Erdogan said at a joint news conference with visiting Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez.

“And perhaps, we will also enter (cooperation) for a submarine.”

“There is so much we can do in the defense industry, including (concerning) armed and unarmed unmanned aerial vehicles,” Erdogan said without elaborating.

Erdogan and Sanchez earlier oversaw the signing of six agreements, covering cooperation in renewable energy, disaster response and sports.

Erdogan, meanwhile, refused to comment on reports that Russia had begun transferring technology to Turkey for its S-400 missile defense systems, following the controversial sale of the anti-aircraft missiles to Turkey in 2017.

The United States strongly opposed Turkey’s purchase of the Russian technology and pushed Ankara out of its F-35 fighter jet program. It also imposed sanctions on several Turkish defense officials.

Washington and Turkey’s other NATO allies insist that S-400s pose a threat to the F-35 project. Turkey rejects that argument.

https://ktar.com/story/4771997/turkey-s ... submarine/
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Unread post25 Nov 2021, 15:46

I would assume Turkey is eyeing the Juan Carlos 1 design. I wonder what they plan to operate from such a carrier? It is a VSTOL type carrier/amphibious assault ship. If they are planning to fly manned, fixed wing aircraft from such a ship, they must be banking on getting back into the F-35 program at some point, unless of course they also plan on buying up Spain's used Harriers as a part of the deal.
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Unread post28 Nov 2021, 23:20

Fox1 wrote:I would assume Turkey is eyeing the Juan Carlos 1 design. I wonder what they plan to operate from such a carrier? It is a VSTOL type carrier/amphibious assault ship. If they are planning to fly manned, fixed wing aircraft from such a ship, they must be banking on getting back into the F-35 program at some point, unless of course they also plan on buying up Spain's used Harriers as a part of the deal.



Turkey already has a Juan Carlos Class Carrier. (LHD) Yet, the story says they wanted something larger....
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Unread post30 Nov 2021, 02:25

From cost overruns to unmanned VTOL AEW aircraft: ROKN responds to CVX criticism

Debate over the CVX aircraft carrier project continues in South Korea's National Assembly. With funds requested for the project in 2022 denied by the National Assembly for the second straight year, the Republic of Korea Navy (ROKN) faces an uphill battle to get the approval of the National Defense Committee for CVX. Naval News obtained statements from a ROKN flag officer familiar with the program reacting to the criticism recently published by local media. This article will examine the major points of contention in the debate.


On November 16, the National Assembly authorized KRW 500 million or USD 400,000 for the CVX program, far less than the requested budget of KRW 7.2 billion. National Assembly member Shin Won Sik even went as far as saying, “The requested budget is 30% more than previous estimates. The entire project should be reexamined because growth in the estimated cost has crossed the 20% threshold.”

While it is true that the estimated cost of the program has grown since its inception, proponents of the program say this is to be expected. The ROKN flag officer said:

“Acquisition of new platforms happens in four stages. This is because in large projects like this, unexpected expenditures need to be accounted for. We are currently in stage three which is where finalization of the budget occurs. During this stage, significant changes in the budget can be made. It’s only in the fourth stage where cost overruns of 20% or more lead to wholesale reevaluation of the project.”

Submarine Escorts

Critics of the program point out that the diesel-electric submarines currently operated by the ROKN are too slow to keep up with its surface vessels, including CVX. For example, the Sejong the Great-class destroyers, the ROKN’s largest escort ship, and the Dokdo-class amphibious assault ships, the current flagships of the fleet, have a top speed of 30 kn and 24 kn respectively. The new KSS-III submarines (Dosan Ahn Changho-class) of the ROKN have a maximum speed of 20 kn. Even the fastest submarines in service with the ROKN, the smaller and less capable KSS-I (Chang Bogo-class), have a top speed of only 22 kn. This means the submarines currently in service are unlikely to be able to keep up with CVX when it is travelling at top speed which is expected to be in the mid-20 kn range. Critics say that an effective submarine escort would have to be nuclear powered, an asset that the ROKN does not have currently.

The officer, however, claimed that the slow speed of its submarines will not negate the operational effectiveness of CVX:

“Carriers and their escort group usually cruise at around 17 kn. However, with the sonar technology that is currently available, a submarine cruising at that speed near the carrier would not be an effective asset due to noise and other disturbances generated at such speeds, regardless of whether it was nuclear-powered or not.”

Because of this, escort submarines are usually deployed ahead of the carrier group. Once it confirms that there are no enemy submarines the carrier strike group commences operations in the area, while the submarine moves on to conduct surveillance in a different area. This doctrine was used to great effect during the Falklands War. HMS Conqueror, a British Churchill-class submarine, was deployed ahead of the British task force to monitor Argentine Naval assets and sank the General Belgrano, an Argentine surface vessel, before it came within range of the group.

“It’s actually better for there not to be friendly submarines in the area the carrier group is operating in,” the officer explained. “This removes the hassle of needing to identify submarine contacts detected in the carrier group’s operational area, meaning that any bogey can be targeted and neutralized immediately.”

He continued, “If the operational area of CVX changes, we will deploy submarines and anti-submarine aircraft, such as the P-3CK and P-8K, before the carrier group. Only after they have confirmed that there are no enemy assets will the carrier itself move in.”


Another point broached by critics would be the lack of airborne early warning (AEW) aircraft that can be deployed from the carrier. The ROKN does not yet have plans to operate AEW helicopters from CVX, let alone fixed-wing AEW aircraft, limiting its detection capabilities.

The officer, however, claimed AEW capability for CVX is not absolutely necessary given South Korea’s security environment. “North Korea has no aircraft that can threaten aircraft carriers,” he said. “In any case, we will operate the F-35 which is an amazing early warning platform in itself.”

This rebuttal does have some merit. North Korea has an almost “ancient” air force with only 35 4th-generation Mig-29 fighter aircraft. Its ability to target surface vessels using these aircraft is very limited. A greater threat would be the KN-09 surface-to-ship cruise missile which has a range of 200 km. The Sejong the Great-class destroyers’ Aegis radar is more than capable of detecting the KN-09 at that range, negating the need for an AEW platform.

However, in high-intensity conflicts with other neighbors, South Korea’s CVX is unlikely to be able to operate far from shore without AEW aircraft. China, for example, is developing the Xi’an KJ-600, a fixed-wing AEW aircraft meant to be operated from its type 003 aircraft carriers. This means that in a hypothetical conflict with China, even advanced aircraft like the F-35 will have inferior situational awareness unless supported by ground-based aircraft.

“It is true that AEW platforms enhance the effectiveness of carriers in ship-to-ship engagements. However, the islands over which South Korea has territorial disputes with neighbors are relatively close, meaning that we can receive support from ground-based AEW aircraft.

If the need arises we can acquire AEW helicopters. However, given the 12-year time frame [until the carrier becomes operational], we believe that we could develop an unmanned vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft to fill this role instead. Right now we are deliberating about which one to choose if we do end up acquiring AEW aircraft.”


ROKN flag officer

The development of unmanned aircraft is a global trend. Korean Aerospace Industries is developing several unmanned platforms. Moreover, the Republic of Korea Armed Forces has been focusing on the development of unmanned platforms in recent years. Other navies, such as the Royal Navy, are also planning on operating a high number of unmanned aircraft from their carriers. The ROKN seems to be trying to keep up with this trend. However, there are no unmanned VTOL AEW aircraft in service anywhere in the world. Moreover, the ROKN will likely face more budgetary challenges. Given the resistance to CVX, any plans that do exist for an unmanned VTOL AEW aircraft are likely to be preliminary.


https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/20 ... i-lWed-gGg
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Unread post04 Dec 2021, 20:29

South Korea’s CVX Aircraft Carrier Project Secures Last Minute Funding
03 Dec 2021 Juho Lee

"...the KRW 7.2 billion (around USD 6.1 million) requested by the government for CVX development was approved after heated debates. KRW 6.2 billion (around USD 5.2 million) was allocated for preliminary design of CVX, KRW 0.85 billion (around USD 0.72 million) for aircraft-related expenses, and a further KRW 0.99 billion (around USD 0.84 million) for other CVX-related expenses...."

Photo: "HHI unveiled a stunning CVX light aircraft carrier design at MADEX 2021" https://www.navalnews.com/wp-content/up ... caled.jpeg


Source: https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/20 ... e-funding/
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Unread post05 Dec 2021, 20:30

You don't need E-3 when you have F-35.

It's a nice to have, not a must have with other 4.5 gen aircraft.
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Unread post05 Dec 2021, 23:19

I still hope they select the HHI Design..... :wink:
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