Experimental F-16s

  • aam.jpg
    Detailled rear view of a standard P&W F-100-200 still installed in the LOAN aircraft and the LOAN nozzle in the foreground [LMTAS photo]
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    USAF F-16C Block 25, #83119, with a special paint coat used in 'paintless aircraft' testflights [USAF photo]
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    USAF F-16C Block 25, #83119, with a special paint coat used in 'paintless aircraft' testflights [USAF photo]
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    USAF F-16C Block 25, #83119, refuelling [USAF photo]
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    USAF F-16C Block 25, #83119, with a special paint coat used in 'paintless aircraft' testflights [USAF photo]
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    The first YF-16 (#01567) was used in the early eighties on the Controlled Configured Vehicle (CCV) program. This program tested the possibilities of turning without having to bank. Although achieving promessing results, the advantages (being better aiming when firing a missile because of better stability) were not of that kind that it allowed to introduce this costly modification. With the latest missile technology (thrust vector control), this isn't even necessary any more. [LMTAS photo]
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    Conformal Fuel Tank (CFT) testing (#87353). [LMTAS photo]
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    USAF F-16B block 15 #81-0816 is seen here when it was used to test the auto terrain following feature on the viper. [Michel Klaver collection]
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    USAF F-16B #75-0752 (and others, all A-models) where used during CAS testing at Nellis AFB. [USAF photo - Mike Kopack collection]
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    USAF F-16C block 25 (#83-1120) modified with a diverterless supersonic inlet, or DSI, developed for the Joint Strike Fighter program. [Lockheed Martin photo]
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    Nose detail of USAF F-16C block 25 #83-1120 who is reconfigured with a JSF inlet. [LMTAS photo]
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    Testflight of USAF F-16C #83120, with the air intake modified as a JSF inlet [LMTAS photo]