Australian lawmakers confident in F-35's future

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spazsinbad

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Unread post18 Jun 2019, 22:07

LHD Wasp enters Sydney [18 Jun 2019 + F-35Bs] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_L_nDa1qKk

RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post19 Jun 2019, 01:59

Apparently similar photos on DVIDS - this one via e-mail - I'll look for DVIDS content later [nice tail emblem on F-35B].

https://i.imgur.com/jxlOzGk.jpg Here ye goes: https://www.dvidshub.net/search?q=sydney&view=grid

https://www.dvidshub.net/image/5501111/ ... sit-sydney

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____________________________________________________________

https://i.imgur.com/4M93rQc.jpg

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https://www.dvidshub.net/image/5501111/ ... sit-sydney “190618-N-RI884-1262 SYDNEY (June 18, 2019) Sailors and Marines man the rails aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) as the ship arrives in Sydney for a port visit. Wasp, flagship of the Wasp Amphibious Ready Group, with embarked 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, is operating in the Indo-Pacific region to enhance interoperability with partners and serve as a ready response force for any type of contingency. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Barker)” https://www.dvidshub.net/download/image/5501111
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post23 Jun 2019, 09:53

If you want to keep things in their threads, I would suggest you quote what you want and repost it in the thread you think it belongs. Then If seen, answers would have posted here. It's a bit funny doing and continuing the exchange till you are headbanging. Doing the same thing you are criticising others about on the Norway thread
viewtopic.php?f=58&t=27952&start=300

spazsinbad wrote:Properly this segue about 'F-22 for Australia' belongs on the Australian thread where it has been made clear the RAAF NEVER required the F-22. They wanted the all singing all dancing STRIKE FIGHTER wot is F-35A. Nobody offered the F-22 to Australia. It was perhaps mentioned BUT NEVER OFFERED and Oz NEVER WANTED IT. I'll provide reference to go there:

http://www.defence.gov.au/dmo/ceo/record/21FEB.pdf [probably no longer there so go here:]

viewtopic.php?f=58&t=23043&p=307623&hilit=Harvey#p307623 [one of 3 references in thread]

download/file.php?id=21995 21FEB 2007 no F-22 for OZ original.pdf (10Kb)

spazsinbad wrote: :bang: :roll: :doh: This thread is now back to NORWAY (or the HIGHWAY?!) :devil: 8) :shock:
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Unread post23 Jun 2019, 10:57

That then is your opinion so here we are as I suggested. Any Questions? I spy with - my naval eye - an F-35B or two in Oz.
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post18 Jul 2019, 23:57

"ROYAL AUSTRALIAN Air Force (RAAF) F-35A A35-014 returns to Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, after a training mission to the nearby Gila Bend Air Force Auxiliary Field with a new pilot at the controls. This is the 14th and latest Lightning II for the service, recently accepted from Lockheed Martin and ferried to Luke after being used as chase aircraft by the manufacturer at its Final Assembly and Check Out facility at Fort Worth, Texas." AIRforces Monthly Magazine August 2019 Issue 377
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Unread post26 Jul 2019, 09:16

See reports above for F-35Bs of USMC visiting Oz (not a peep that I know of from RAN - it is said 'they are not interested').

Meanwhile for youse edification: https://news.usni.org/2019/07/25/marine ... t-rotation [2.5K Marines based in Darwin]
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post06 Aug 2019, 07:56

Previous page and others on this thread have NGJ development info so here is some more....
Raytheon delivers first Next Generation Jammer Mid-Band pod for Navy testing
05 Aug 2019 RAYTHEON PR

"New Mid-Band pod extends range, tracks multiple targets, and jams signals simultaneously

EL SEGUNDO, Calif., Aug. 5, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Raytheon Company delivered the first Next Generation Jammer Mid-Band Engineering and Manufacturing Development pod to the U.S. Navy to begin ground and aircraft integration testing. Raytheon will deliver 15 EMD pods for mission systems testing and qualification as well as 14 aeromechanical pods for airworthiness certification.

Because of Raytheon's Next Generation Jammer Mid-Band's increased jamming capabilities, the EA-18G Growler can operate in more optimum locations to support both strike aircraft and weapons. NGJ-MB is a high-capacity and power airborne electronic attack weapon system for the EA-18G GROWLER. It will protect air forces by denying, degrading and disrupting threat radars and communication devices.

"The first NGJ-MB pod is out the door," said Stefan Baur, vice president of Raytheon Electronic Warfare Systems. "We are one step closer to extending the Navy's jamming range and capability. Delivery of this pod will allow for the initial verification of ground procedures, mass properties, aircraft installation, and Built In Test checks in preparation for future chamber and flight test."

Additionally, in the third quarter of 2019, Raytheon will utilize a Prime Power Generation Capability pod installed on a commercial Gulfstream aircraft in order to conduct power generation flight testing and risk reduction efforts in support of the initial flight clearance process.

Raytheon's NGJ-MB architecture and design include the ability to operate at a significantly enhanced range, attack multiple targets simultaneously and advanced jamming techniques. The technology can also be scaled to other missions and platforms."

Source: http://raytheon.mediaroom.com/2019-08-0 ... vy-testing
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post10 Aug 2019, 09:19

This time I did a search on the Australian Gov/RAAF websites. But, There wasn't much information I liked.
If I'm forced to mention, My favorite information is...
    The F-35 is easier to upgrade than F/A-18.
    The hardware change upgrade from LRIP6 to LRIP10 takes 4 months.
There was only that.
I also searched on the Gov/Mod or Air Force websites in the Netherlands, Denmark, Canada, Belgium, but there was no information I liked. (disappointing. :( )
https://news.defence.gov.au/media/stori ... capability
F-35As to transform Australia's air combat capability
24 April 2014
Australia will acquire another 58 F-35A Lightning II aircraft in a major boost to the nation’s air combat capability, Prime Minister Tony Abbott announced in Canberra on April 23.
The additional aircraft will lift the total number of F-35As Australia will acquire to 72, after a previous decision to purchase 14.

This will create a total of three operational squadrons – two at RAAF Base Williamtown and one at RAAF Base Tindal – and a training squadron at RAAF Base Williamtown
The F-35A will replace the Royal Australian Air Force’s fleet of F/A-18A/B Hornets.

The first aircraft will arrive in Australia in 2018, with Number 3 Squadron operational by 2021. All 72 aircraft are expected to be operational by 2023.
The total cost will be $12.4 billion including about $1.6 billion for new facilities at RAAF Bases Williamtown and Tindal.

The Chief of Air Force, Air Marshal Geoff Brown, is enthusiastic about the F-35’s stealth capabilities.
He said the jump between a fourth- and fifth-generation fighter was dramatic.

“It’s the difference between being in a biplane against a monoplane pre-World War II, the difference between a piston engine and a jet – it’s one of those game-changing events,” he said.
Air Marshal Brown said the announcement of an additional 58 Joint Strike Fighters allowed Air Force to plan for the full withdrawal of the 71 F/A-18A/B Hornets.

“The Hornet’s been the mainstay of our air combat fleet for nearly 30 years. To be signed up to the future means we can go forward and plan how we’re going to transition,” he said.
“The transition will be quite a difficult thing to do because we need to move people from that era of technology into a completely different generation.”

Air Marshal Brown said the F-35As would need upgrades to maintain their combat edge but the Joint Strike Fighter program was designed for easier improvements than the F/A-18s.
He said the F-35As would be complemented by the RAAF’s 24 F/A-18F Super Hornets and 12 EA-18G Growlers.


https://www.airforce.gov.au/news-and-ev ... -come-life
Strike fighters come to life
11/08/2017
The appearance of the F-35A at Avalon was a chance for Australians to see the future in the ‘flesh’.
It was a privilege for test pilot SQNLDR David Bell to touch down at the Australian International Airshow on March 3 in one of the first two F-35A aircraft to debut in Australia.

SQNLDR Bell said it was a great opportunity to show the Australian public that the F-35A wasn’t just on paper.
“It’s flying and there are now about 200 of them. It was great to talk to people about how the jets are performing and our impressions of it,” SQNLDR Bell said.

“Most people wanted to know how the F-35A compared to the Hornet and Super Hornet and there were some who asked more pointed questions based on critical media reports.
“It was good to be able to talk to them and provide perspective on reports that weren’t correct or were completely out of context. Everybody was positive and happy to see the F-35 fly.”
The 16,000 kilometre trip to Australia via Hawaii and Guam for WGCDR Andrew Jackson in A35-001 and SQNLDR Bell in A35-002 took about 20 hours of flying.

They flew alongside an Air Force KC-30A multi-role tanker transport, which provided air-to-air refuelling about every 45 minutes.
The arrival of Australia’s two F-35As was a significant undertaking, with Air Force personnel in Canberra, Amberley, Williamtown and Avalon working closely with CASG, Lockheed Martin and the US Air Force (USAF).

CAF AIRMSHL Davies thanked everyone for their significant work.
“Many Australians don’t realise just how close our F-35A capability is to arriving in Australia permanently. To be able to bring the aircraft out to the airshow was a great opportunity to showcase this aircraft to the Australian public,” he said.

F-35A for the information age SQNLDR Bell, of the Air Combat Transition Office, is attached to the 61st Fighter Squadron at Luke Air Force Base in Phoenix, Arizona.
He was posted to Arizona nearly two years ago, where he spent two months on a conversion course to transfer his pilot skills from the F/A-18 Classic Hornet to the F-35A.

Now he is an instructor with three other Australians at the multinational Pilot Training Centre, teaching Italian, Norwegian and USAF pilots to fly the F-35A.
SQNLDR Bell said the first difference for the pilots was the F-35A had only one seat.

“We spent a lot of time training in the simulator but the first solo flight on the new aircraft was a highlight of the conversion training,” he said.
“The main difference from the F/A18 is the sheer volume of information the jet collects. It presents it to the pilot in a usable fashion but we still need to know what’s important and when and how the information can be used to the best advantage.

“Because it’s a stealth aircraft the tactics we use are different to the Classic Hornet so getting across those and learning how to manage the information are the two biggest challenges.”
SQNLDR Bell said prioritisation was a core skill of flying any fighter.

“With the F-35A it’s very easy to stare down at the screens, because there’s so much information there and we get it at much longer ranges than we previously did. We need to force ourselves to look outside from time to time as well as attend to other priority tasks,” he said.
As Australia’s first instructors on the fifth-generation aircraft SQNLDR Bell and the other Australian pilots in the US will have important leadership and training roles as future instructors for the F-35A.

They will form the nucleus of instructional staff for training the initial cadre of Air Force pilots who will form the first F-35A squadron at RAAF Base Williamtown.
SQNLDR Bell is instructing about eight pilots at a time on five- to sixmonth courses at Luke Air Force Base.

“The classes overlap but there are about five or six classes a year who graduate as instructor pilots from the Pilot Training Centre,” he said.
“Some finish two months early and are posted to the 34th Fighter Squadron (the first F-35A unit in the USAF) at Hill Air Force Base in Utah.”

With its unparalleled sensors, network and stealth technology, the F-35A will meet Australia’s future air combat and strike needs, providing a networked force-multiplier effect in terms of situational awareness and combat effectiveness.
SQNLDR Bell said the big step forwards for Air Force was the information-gathering capability of the F-35A.

“It can also share the information with other aircraft, including the EA-18G Growler, P-8A Poseidon and the E-7A Wedgetail, as well as integrating with Navy and Army units,” he said.
“It means if someone sees something I can’t see they can share it with me and vice versa. Everybody’s level of situational awareness will increase as quality information is received in a timely fashion allowing us to make quick and better-informed decisions.

“The challenge I am looking forward to when we bring the jets back to Australia and put them through their paces is to make sure they can operate with our other platforms.”
More Australians will soon be learning to fly the jet in the US and maintainers and engineers are already learning new skills.

When the first F-35As begin to arrive in Australia permanently in 2018 they will be assigned to No. 3 Squadron at RAAF Base Williamtown.
Their initial task will be to ensure the logistics supply chain has been established to operate the aircraft on a daily basis, and to integrate the new aircraft into Air Force and the ADF.

By December 2020 the F-35A will have its initial operational capability with enough aircraft and pilot instructors to train all Australian pilots on home soil, as well as the ability to be employed in combat scenarios.
F-35A for the future The F-35A is part of Air Force’s evolution to a fifth-generation networked force.

Australia’s first F-35A pilot, SQNLDR Andrew Jackson, said it was easy to fall into the trap of thinking the F35 was just another aircraft.
“The shell of the aircraft gets it to the fight but it’s so much more than an F/A-18 Hornet replacement,” he said.

“We haven’t begun to scratch the surface of the F-35 capability. There’s more information, better information, faster information. It’s a real force multiplier.”
Australia’s F-35A chief engineer, WGCDR Vince Palmeri, was excited to see the aircraft fly.

“It’s such a capable aircraft and it will become even more capable in the future through its upgrade program,” he said.
“The aircraft itself is being built through low-rate initial production (LRIP). Our first two aircraft were in LRIP6 back in 2014 and our next eight aircraft will be in LRIP10 in 2018.

“This means the F-35A continues to advance as it’s built. As part of our purchase agreement our LRIP6 aircraft will be updated to LRIP10 standards before they arrive in Australia for their RAAF service.
“We are already planning for some of these hardware modifications, which will occur early next year.

“The upgrade will take about four months for each aircraft and will include upgrades to increase the aircraft’s resistance to lightning, providing an equivalent level of safety to other combat aircraft.”
It was the threat of thunderstorms that prevented the F-35As’ fly-over at Avalon on March 5.

WGCDR Palmeri said it was great to see the aircraft fly on Friday and Saturday, but due to the thunderstorm forecasts, “we didn’t want to take any unnecessary risks with safety on Sunday”.
Air Force also cancelled an F/A18F Super Hornet fly-past over Tamworth and Peak on the same day, due to the same weather forecast.

The F-35A deployment was exceptionally smooth with no technical issues throughout either of the 20-hour transit flights. The aircraft will also be upgraded with software modifications throughout its life.
“Our first two F-35A aircraft are currently using software Block 3i, which was loaded in September last year,” WGCDR Palmeri said.

“The next upgrade will be to the Block 3F software by the end of this year, which will provide further capability.”
Written by CPL Mark Doran and Leigh Watson


https://www.airforce.gov.au/technology/ ... ke-fighter
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Unread post15 Aug 2019, 18:52

Australian-trained F-35A pilots take to the air
Sep 2019 AFM

"THE INITIAL Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) pilots to complete the F-35A transition course in Australia have flown the aircraft for the first time. Two pilots conducted debut training missions on the Lightning II at RAAF Base Williamtown, New South Wales, on July 15 after undertaking an intensive two-month academic and simulator programme at the base’s Integrated Training Centre. The aviators will be posted to No 3 Squadron on completing their tuition.

The commander of No 3 Squadron, WGCDR Darren Clare, explained: “Although we currently still send pilots to the US for training, this shows Australia is quickly becoming self-sufficient and it all contributes to our F-35A squadrons reaching combat readiness as planned.”

Australia’s fleet of ten F-35As is based at Williamtown, and Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. To date, the Joint Strike Fighters have achieved in excess of 2,900 hours across more than 1,750 sorties since 2014. The RAAF aims to achieve initial operating capability on the F-35A in December next year."

Source: AirForces Monthly Magazine September 2019 No.378
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post04 Sep 2019, 13:50

This is one big external store indeedy…
First Next Gen Jammer Mid-Band arrives for test prep
03 Sep 2019 NavAir PR

"The first Next Generation Jammer Mid-Band Engineering Development Model pod arrived at Naval Air Station Patuxent River after a trek across America late July. Members of the combined Airborne Electronic Attack Systems Program Office (PMA-234), Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 and industry partner test teams navigate the newly arrived pod to its temporary home at the VX-23 squadron. The pod will start various verification and test procedures in preparation for the second pod delivery early fall. (U.S. Navy photo)" http://www.navair.navy.mil/sites/g/file ... 33-045.JPG

Source: http://www.navair.navy.mil/news/First-N ... 32019-0930
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Unread post04 Sep 2019, 14:24

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Unread post05 Sep 2019, 13:08

optimist wrote:If you want to keep things in their threads, I would suggest you quote what you want and repost it in the thread you think it belongs. Then If seen, answers would have posted here. It's a bit funny doing and continuing the exchange till you are headbanging. Doing the same thing you are criticising others about on the Norway thread
viewtopic.php?f=58&t=27952&start=300

spazsinbad wrote:Properly this segue about 'F-22 for Australia' belongs on the Australian thread where it has been made clear the RAAF NEVER required the F-22. They wanted the all singing all dancing STRIKE FIGHTER wot is F-35A. Nobody offered the F-22 to Australia. It was perhaps mentioned BUT NEVER OFFERED and Oz NEVER WANTED IT. I'll provide reference to go there:

http://www.defence.gov.au/dmo/ceo/record/21FEB.pdf [probably no longer there so go here:]

viewtopic.php?f=58&t=23043&p=307623&hilit=Harvey#p307623 [one of 3 references in thread]

download/file.php?id=21995 21FEB 2007 no F-22 for OZ original.pdf (10Kb)

spazsinbad wrote: :bang: :roll: :doh: This thread is now back to NORWAY (or the HIGHWAY?!) :devil: 8) :shock:


Let's be honest: APA wanted the F-22 for Australia. Oh, how they railed against the F-35 claiming it stood no chance against late model Flankers. Wish they were around today, to do a piece on what their Air Force/pilots thought about the F-35...
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