Gripen News

Military aircraft - Post cold war aircraft, including for example B-2, Gripen, F-18E/F Super Hornet, Rafale, and Typhoon.
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loke

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Unread post22 Apr 2019, 21:22

In a lot of scenarios, a next-gen system vs a standard “show where the sensor fused enemies are on the map” – can make a 5 to 1 difference. That’s huge, and comparable to the gap between aircraft generations. Gripen E/F will come with an even larger wide area display (WAD) and the possibilities for software upgrades becomes endless. Nowadays my company creates decision support systems for military aircraft and C2-systems, and without large high-fidelity screens to show it on, it wouldn’t be possible. Artificial Intelligence really makes a difference here, but perhaps not in the way many people think of it.

“The pilot is still in-the-loop with our AI though, and makes the tactical decisions, but is being presented with information that is richer and more pre-calculated to how the pilot is thinking.

Was there any upgrades or equipment you wanted when you were on the Gripen?
“Lots! But that might be because I have been an inventor and innovator in this field for the two years. Many of the things are also now in the Gripen E.
[...]
When it comes to software, I’m probably most excited about the increased survivability our new optimal evasive manoeuvre AI algorithm HUMAN would give. It takes an incoming missile and calculates an optimal trajectory for the aircraft, given any number of overlapping priorities, like staying in doppler-zero* , aiming your Electronic Warfare System antennas towards it or just physically be as far away from the incoming missile as possible. Few pilots react perfectly when you might have seconds to live and an automated or semi-automated system might do a lot for pilot survival. Would it be too self-serving to also ask for our AI decision support system Rattlesnake? It keeps track of all known enemies and their history, our own capability and conduct massive parallel simulations (now off-line due to our patented AI) to be able to show the pilot (or fighter controller) how to fly to stay away from enemy missiles and how to manoeuvre for an optimal shot. I honestly want it as it would make me almost invincible in a BVR environment. I could go on and on here, but maybe we should save that for a specific innovation interview?”


Would you be confident facing an F-16?

“Absolutely. I can’t think of anything the F-16 would be better at, if we don’t count ease of refuelling (F-16 is refuelled with a boom and the boom operator does much of the job).


https://hushkit.net/2019/04/15/flying-f ... rce-pilot/
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XanderCrews

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Unread post23 Apr 2019, 03:14

loke wrote:
In a lot of scenarios, a next-gen system vs a standard “show where the sensor fused enemies are on the map” – can make a 5 to 1 difference. That’s huge, and comparable to the gap between aircraft generations. Gripen E/F will come with an even larger wide area display (WAD) and the possibilities for software upgrades becomes endless. Nowadays my company creates decision support systems for military aircraft and C2-systems, and without large high-fidelity screens to show it on, it wouldn’t be possible. Artificial Intelligence really makes a difference here, but perhaps not in the way many people think of it.

“The pilot is still in-the-loop with our AI though, and makes the tactical decisions, but is being presented with information that is richer and more pre-calculated to how the pilot is thinking.

Was there any upgrades or equipment you wanted when you were on the Gripen?
“Lots! But that might be because I have been an inventor and innovator in this field for the two years. Many of the things are also now in the Gripen E.
[...]
When it comes to software, I’m probably most excited about the increased survivability our new optimal evasive manoeuvre AI algorithm HUMAN would give. It takes an incoming missile and calculates an optimal trajectory for the aircraft, given any number of overlapping priorities, like staying in doppler-zero* , aiming your Electronic Warfare System antennas towards it or just physically be as far away from the incoming missile as possible. Few pilots react perfectly when you might have seconds to live and an automated or semi-automated system might do a lot for pilot survival. Would it be too self-serving to also ask for our AI decision support system Rattlesnake? It keeps track of all known enemies and their history, our own capability and conduct massive parallel simulations (now off-line due to our patented AI) to be able to show the pilot (or fighter controller) how to fly to stay away from enemy missiles and how to manoeuvre for an optimal shot. I honestly want it as it would make me almost invincible in a BVR environment. I could go on and on here, but maybe we should save that for a specific innovation interview?”


Would you be confident facing an F-16?

“Absolutely. I can’t think of anything the F-16 would be better at, if we don’t count ease of refuelling (F-16 is refuelled with a boom and the boom operator does much of the job).


https://hushkit.net/2019/04/15/flying-f ... rce-pilot/



a massive upgrade to be better than the F-16 again? :mrgreen:
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XanderCrews

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Unread post23 Apr 2019, 03:32

marsavian wrote:Swedish taxpayers paid for 14 JAS-39C/D unused airframes in order to keep Gripen’s production line open

https://theaviationgeekclub.com/swedish ... line-open/

Ten of those are C models while the rest are two-seaters. The government had hoped that the fighters could be exported to overseas customers but the orders never came in. These aircraft in fact were ordered to maintain the skills to manufacture fighter aircraft, as the production of Gripens for Sweden’s Air Force and other export customers, such as Thailand, South Africa and the Czech Republic, almost ceased, and a substantial break was looming. The extra Gripens were therefore ordered to keep the assembly line running before the production of JAS-39E.

One possibility is to use these extra 14 aircraft as a replacement for crashed Gripen jets. According to Sputnik News previously, parliament decided that the Swedish Air Force should have 100 Gripen C/Ds. Today, there are 95. No such decision has been made so far.


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White tails?
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Corsair1963

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Unread post23 Apr 2019, 05:36

Well, the airframes are already paid for. So, somebody should get a good deal for at least 14 Gripens. Surprising somebody hasn't already picked them up???
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loke

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Unread post23 Apr 2019, 18:46

Using artificial intelligence, additive manufacturing (3D printing), and mixed reality (augmented reality) for the development and production of Gripen, and virtual reality for training purposes, are some of the ongoing technological implementations at Saab for Gripen. During the Gripen Seminar 2019, Lisa Åbom, Chief Technology Officer, Business Area, Aeronautics at Saab, gave a detailed presentation on how these latest technologies are implemented in the making of Gripen today.

Artificial Intelligence
According to Lisa, the basic function of AI is that it takes large amount of data, processes it through an algorithm to give you an answer. Saab uses AI during both design and production phase. AI is also suitable for image recognition and can provide tactical support to pilots to make right decisions. “For instance, we collected information from different sensors that we have in the aircraft, ran it through an algorithm, and were able to predict the fuel level in one of the tanks (without using a fuel sensor). This way, with the help of AI, we can use different kinds of information to deduce the information that we’re interested in,” Lisa says.

Additive manufacturing
Additive manufacturing, popularly known as 3D printing today, is used to produce the most basic as well as the more complicated parts of Gripen. For example, 3D printing can be used to optimize the design to take away the weight from certain structure part or to make specific small changes. What is really cool about additives is that you can add functionalities to the material. For example, a structure may be combined with a load-bank part that has electrical or optical properties. “We’re already flying Gripen E with parts that are produced using additive manufacturing,” adds Lisa.

Mixed reality or augmented reality
Operators at Saab use augmented reality to get a step by step production or operation instructions in goggles. These goggles are also helpful for “remote guidance” where operators can sometimes seek remote help from other operators whenever necessary.

Virtual reality
Virtual reality can be used to enhance the training experience. When the pilots run a simulation during training, virtual reality helps to get a much more realistic training scenario.
“We are on an exciting journey for the future. There’s so much new technology, both in our area and also the outside world, and it’s going to be important for us to keep an eye on them as well as to develop them with our customers, suppliers, and partners,” concludes Lisa.


https://gripenblogs.com/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=2109
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marsavian

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Unread post03 May 2019, 04:26

Sweden weighs extending Gripen C/D operations by a decade

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... -d-457836/

“If Sweden will continue to fly the [Gripen] C/D much longer than 2025-2026 – maybe to 2035 – it’s good for our system, because we can share development on the C/D with the E/F, and the other way around,” says Saab chief executive Hakan Buskhe.

The Swedish air force currently maintains an active fleet of 100 Gripens, but its chief of staff has previously voiced a desire to increase this to a 120-unit total. Saab is currently under contract to produce 60 new-generation E-model fighters for the service, with operations to commence early in the next decade.
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loke

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Unread post16 May 2019, 20:03

Lockheed Martin and RAFAEL have signed a cooperation agreement to jointly develop, manufacture, market and support RAFAEL’s Smart, Precise Impact and Cost-Effective (SPICE) missile guidance kits to Lockheed Martin’s platforms. RAFAEL already subcontracts about 80 percent of SPICE subassemblies to US manufacturers in eight states.

SPICE has also been integrated with the Saab Gripen E, and has already been selected to equip the new Brazilian Gripen NG fighters. RAFAEL also develops the SPICE 250 unitary guided munitions. The bigger SPICEs are designed as guidance kits added to standard bombs.

SPICE is a family of stand-off, autonomous, air-to-surface weapon systems, capable of destroying targets with pinpoint accuracy and at high attack volumes in a GPS-denied environment. Combat-proven and in service with the Israeli Air Force and several international customers, SPICE employs a state-of-the-art electro-optical seeker with unique scene-matching algorithms, navigation guidance and homing techniques to achieve operational missions in adverse weather without GPS. The MOU covers the SPICE 1000 (453 kilogram / 1,000 pound weight class) and SPICE 2000 (907 kilogram / 2,000 pound weight class) precision-guided missile kit variants. The SPICE extends the aircraft strike range to 100 km, thus enabling attack from standoff range.

https://defense-update.com/20190516_spice-2.html

SPICE is both potent and cost-effective.
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krieger22

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Unread post13 Jun 2019, 11:31

https://saabgroup.com/media/news-press/ ... ght-tests/

Gripen E will not be attending Swiss Air 2030 tests

The Swiss defence procurement agency, armasuisse, has formally recommended to Saab not to participate with Gripen E in the upcoming flight tests in Switzerland. The reason is that the flight tests have been designed to only evaluate aircraft that are operationally ready in 2019. The flight tests are part of the fighter evaluation process that foresees aircraft deliveries in 2025. Gripen E will enter into operational service years before Switzerland has scheduled deliveries and will meet all its defined capabilities. However, the Gripen E development plan does not match the Swiss plan to perform flight tests with aircraft that are operationally ready in 2019. Therefore, Saab has decided not to attend the Swiss flight tests in Payerne 24-28 June.


EDIT: https://www.vtg.admin.ch/content/vtg-in ... 75390.html

And she is done! Non attendance means it is out of the Swiss Air 2030 running
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mixelflick

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Unread post13 Jun 2019, 14:04

So who's going to buy Gripen E now?

If the Swiss aren't looking at it, who will??
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Unread post02 Nov 2019, 14:01

Most detailed report on Gripen E EW I've seen so far, with some interesting details how it came to be (TDLR: partly because of Norway selecting F-35).

https://www.jed-digital.com/jedm/1119_n ... eId1533269
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marsavian

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Unread post02 Nov 2019, 15:42

MFS-EW will jam low frequency radars too, fore/aft transmitters in fin, mid-band transmitters in wingtips.

"On Gripen C/D, the RWR system is based on amplitude monopulse direction finding techniques," said Bedoire. "But on Gripen E we have gone for an interferometric approach in order to achieve fully-spherical precision DF even when performing high-g maneuvers"

In terms of self-protection, the single biggest innovation in MFS-EW is the adoption of GaN-based AESA transmitters for the jamming subsystem. Mid-band transmitters are located in the wing tip "quadrant" stations, while the low-band transmitters are positioned atop the fin to cover the fore and aft sectors.


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loke

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Unread post11 Nov 2019, 22:31

Saab flew its Electronic Attack Jammer Pod (EAJP) on the Gripen combat aircraft for the first time on 4 November, the company announced.

According to Saab, the pod's interfaces with the aircraft's hardware and software, as well as cockpit control and monitoring, were tested during the flight. "The purpose of Saab's new EAJP pod is to protect aircraft against radars by sophisticated jamming functions, thereby blocking the opponent's ability to attack them," the company added.
The EAJP is part of Saab's Arexis family of electronic warfare (EW) systems, and the test marked the latest milestone since the system was first briefed to reporters earlier in the year.

Speaking at the company's production facility in Linköping in late May, Petter Bedoire, Saab's head of marketing and sales for EW, said that the podded system that is aimed at affording the Gripen E/F (or any other modern combat aircraft) an electronic attack (EA) capability analogous to the Boeing EA-18G Growler aircraft.

The Arexis EA Jammer Pod provides forward and aft coverage to support the ingress, strike, and egress of a package of strike aircraft. It utilises a VHF/UHF surveillance and acquisition radar in the L and S bands that incorporates gallium nitride (GaN) AESA technology.

With flight trials of the pod now underway, Saab has noted a 12-month lead time for any customer wishing to adopt it.
This podded system is part of a wider EW capability that has been developed for the Gripen E/F, and that is so far delivering highly positive result in test.

Read more: https://www.janes.com/article/92416/saa ... first-time
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