F-35B UK SRVL info - Updated when new/old info available

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quicksilver

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Unread post30 Apr 2019, 02:04

“How usual is the STERN Approach to VL? Is it because darkness afoot? OR just part of the mixture...”

Over-the-stern for night Case I unaided is SOP. Not sure what the current pattern is for F-35B Case I aided. For Harrier, night Case I aided is very much like the day pattern/approach. Night unaided over-the-stern approaches in Harrier were the hardest thing I ever did in the jet, bar none — and they never got easier. Good that nvgs came along, but some nights they weren’t much help. Hard, hard stuff — for everybody. Glide slope, line-up...and closure. Pilot mech of STOVL stuff in the “B” monumentally better.
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Unread post30 Apr 2019, 02:38

Until HMDS 'green glow' fixed for individual HMDS then apparently night stuff done without it but in any individual case I guess no one knows except if the whole embarked F-35B pilots carry out the same SOP. Perhaps all those now have modified 'greenglowless' HMDS? Interesting about Harrier night ops etc. Few people know how BLACK it is out there.

We may have old articles about F-35B 'tyres' on this thread - certainly elsewhere. However GAO info seems OUTdated?
2015 BOGDAN: ...…"Another hiccup in the F-35B have been the tires. An aircraft that takes off from short runways and lands vertically requires tires with enough bounce but also must be sufficiently rugged to maintain their form in 170 mph takeoffs. “We have been working hard to find the right balance between float and durability for vertical takeoff,” Bogdan said. “Our fourth tire is now in test. It appears to be working better than any of the others.” Tire manufacturer Dunlop has had difficulties producing the correct specs, he added, “But we’re moving in the right direction.”..." viewtopic.php?f=61&t=26629&p=288071&hilit=tire+Bogdan#p288071

Of course things are complicated with tyres (tires) and the F-35B:
viewtopic.php?f=22&t=27345&p=291912&hilit=tire+wear#p291912

Good searcharoonie: search.php?st=0&sk=t&sd=d&sr=posts&keywords=tire+wear&fid%5B%5D=65&ch=-1
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post30 Apr 2019, 02:54

spazsinbad wrote:Until HMDS 'green glow' fixed for individual HMDS then apparently night stuff done without it but in any individual case I guess no one knows except if the whole embarked F-35B pilots carry out the same SOP. Perhaps all those now have modified 'greenglowless' HMDS? Interesting about Harrier night ops etc. Few people know how BLACK it is out there.

We may have old articles about F-35B 'tyres' on this thread - certainly elsewhere. However GAO info seems OUTdated?


I don’t believe green glow is a B issue because ball precision (and thus one’s ability to see it with a higher degree of clarity) isn’t as critical in concluding an approach successfully.

Over-the-stern approaches (as opposed to up the side once in-close) are more difficult in a STOVL jet because you don’t ‘see’ closure until much later in the approach. Not unlike running rendezvous on an aircraft with no aspect...
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Unread post30 Apr 2019, 02:57

IIRC one F-35B test pilot said night landings aboard QE were done without the aid of HMDS recently? STOP then LAND eh.

Some comments about 'lights' & HMDS (acceptable): viewtopic.php?f=58&t=15969&p=410018&hilit=night#p410018

Wot I wuz finkin' of: viewtopic.php?f=58&t=15969&p=403420&hilit=night#p403420 however it is in the nature of testing to conduct 'with & without' but read on....
"..."Britain’s biggest warship is currently conducting flight testing off the east coast of the United States and part of that is practicing landing in darkness. These tests were carried out with and without the aid of night-vision technology, with the pilots and aircraft handlers successfully guiding the fast fighter jets onto the flight deck. Pilots initially flew in using only ambient light and the lights on the carrier’s deck before later conducting landings using the night-vision capability in their helmets.… it’s crucial that we understand how suitable they are for the F-35s to operate at night from the carrier. First indications are that they are in good order for both the aided and unaided perspectives.”...

...Using the night-vision technology doesn’t always make landings easy as even the smallest light becomes ultra-bright when it is viewed through the specialist equipment. The lights on a carrier’s deck can look fine to the naked eye but suddenly become very bright when night-vision is switched on. However, HMS Queen Elizabeth has been installed with specially-designed LED lightning on her flight deck, which solves the issue. Even still, it is important for pilots to test their ability to land with and without night-vision assistance.

Andrew Maack, the Chief Test Engineer for the Integrated Test Force – the organisation responsible for analysing the flight trials – added: “In daytime there are cues that tell the pilot’s brain what the relative motion is between the airplane and the ship. “At night, especially very dark night, all those cues go away and you become dependent on exactly what the lights are and what the sight of those lights looks like. It’s something you can’t translate in your mind ahead of time – you don’t know it until you see it.”..." https://www.f35.com/news/detail/f-35-je ... -elizabeth
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post30 Apr 2019, 03:13

spazsinbad wrote:IIRC one F-35B test pilot said night landings aboard QE were done without the aid of HMDS recently? STOP then LAND eh.

Some comments about 'lights' & HMDS (acceptable): viewtopic.php?f=58&t=15969&p=410018&hilit=night#p410018

Wot I wuz finkin' of: viewtopic.php?f=58&t=15969&p=403420&hilit=night#p403420 however it is in the nature of testing to conduct 'with & without' but read on....
"..."Britain’s biggest warship is currently conducting flight testing off the east coast of the United States and part of that is practicing landing in darkness. These tests were carried out with and without the aid of night-vision technology, with the pilots and aircraft handlers successfully guiding the fast fighter jets onto the flight deck. Pilots initially flew in using only ambient light and the lights on the carrier’s deck before later conducting landings using the night-vision capability in their helmets.… it’s crucial that we understand how suitable they are for the F-35s to operate at night from the carrier. First indications are that they are in good order for both the aided and unaided perspectives.”...

...Using the night-vision technology doesn’t always make landings easy as even the smallest light becomes ultra-bright when it is viewed through the specialist equipment. The lights on a carrier’s deck can look fine to the naked eye but suddenly become very bright when night-vision is switched on. However, HMS Queen Elizabeth has been installed with specially-designed LED lightning on her flight deck, which solves the issue. Even still, it is important for pilots to test their ability to land with and without night-vision assistance.

Andrew Maack, the Chief Test Engineer for the Integrated Test Force – the organisation responsible for analysing the flight trials – added: “In daytime there are cues that tell the pilot’s brain what the relative motion is between the airplane and the ship. “At night, especially very dark night, all those cues go away and you become dependent on exactly what the lights are and what the sight of those lights looks like. It’s something you can’t translate in your mind ahead of time – you don’t know it until you see it.”..." https://www.f35.com/news/detail/f-35-je ... -elizabeth


They’re not talking about not using the HMDS. Rather, they were talking about not using the night vision camera in the HMDS. BIG difference. In common parlance, they are flying those approaches ‘ unaided.’ ‘Aided’ (which they also did) is with the use of night vision devices, in the case of F-35B, the night vision camera.
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Unread post30 Apr 2019, 06:10

OK I take that as a 'given' that they still look through the HMDS but not at that 'night vision' stuff. Bear with us plebs not able to 'visualise' what it is like in an F-35 at night. I can only go with the words of pilots published - rite or rong.
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post12 Jun 2019, 12:17

There is a fix for the issue which is important for USMC/others on NON-SRVL capable flat decks so DON'T BE ALARMED!
The Marine Corps’ ‘No. 1 priority’ for the F-35 involves a rough landing in hot environments
12 Jun 2019 Aaron Mehta

"WASHINGTON — It was a hot day aboard the amphibious assault ship Essex when a pilot brought his F-35B in for what is known as a “mode four” flight operation, where the jet enters hover mode near a landing spot, slides over to the target area and then vertically lands onto the ship....

...The pilot got the plane down, but was shaken enough by the situation to write up an incident report that would eventually be marked as “high” concern by the F-35 program office. “May result in unanticipated and uncontrolled sink, leading to hard landing or potential ejection/loss of aircraft, particularly in the presence of HGI [hot gas ingestion],” reads a summary of the issue, which was obtained by Defense News as part of a cache of “for official use only” documents that detail major concerns with the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

The issue could impact future F-35B operations in the Middle East, where temperatures are climbing as summer approaches. This could also be bad news for industry, as F-35 program head Vice Adm. Mat Winter indicated his belief that the fix, which he called the Marine Corps’ “No. 1 priority” for the F-35 program, should be paid for, at least in part, by the big contractors who designed the aircraft.

Still, Winter expressed confidence that the landing issue, which has so far proven to be a one-off incident, will be addressed by a series of fixes that should be in place by April 2020…. Winter said engineers have identified an issue in the design of the control software that the pilot uses to generate demand for thrust from the propulsion system.

“There’s no redesign of the engine [necessary]. The engine is doing what the engine is supposed to do,” Winter emphasized, before acknowledging that in addition to the software fix, the program office has worked with Honeywell to change how the company calibrates the throttle valve on the engine.

“We’ve identified the software fix for the control system, the calibration fix to the throttle valve and some near-term fleet actions that could be taken for very hot days to ensure that the pilot gets the performance he or she needs on those hot days,” he said.

That software fix will be a rolling target, as the first increment of the software release is due in June, followed by another at the end of this year or early next year. “We’ve given them tighter tolerances to tune them more precisely, so that when it goes on the engine it’s no longer not giving the command the way it’s supposed to be,” Winter explained. “It wasn’t tuned correctly for this high-demand phase of flight. Now, we fixed that. That’s fixed. The software is going in to make sure that the pilot can command that thrust and understand the heat and the loading.”

Those fixes won’t be cheap, and when asked who would pay for them, Winter was blunt, saying it is his office’s belief the thrust issue is a “design deficiency” that merits “consideration” from industry. “In this case it doesn’t matter that the design was done back in 2002, it’s still pragmatistic, so you owe consideration because we’re fixing it right now,” Winter said of industry.

Temporary solutions
The real test is going to be how the fixes perform in the field, given the F-35B’s 2018 deployment into the Middle East shows the jet will be used in a region known for lacking cool summer days. When asked if the issue could impact operations in the region, Winter acknowledged it could during “very hot days.”

“I will not go on the record to say that there hasn’t been [an effect on operations]. There has been operational impact — that’s how we found this, and now we are implementing the fix to eliminate that operational impact, and the war fighter right now is mitigating that operational impact through the mechanisms and techniques we’ve provided them,” he [Winter] said.

And until the fix is fully in place, pilots operating the F-35B can do a few things to mitigate the risk of a hard landing. First, make sure to wash the blades on the engine more frequently to avoid the buildup of salt or dirt that can make the system less efficient. Second, the squadron commander will need to think about load management, making sure aircraft aren’t returning too heavy with fuel and weapons.

“It’s wind over the deck. It’s aircraft stores loading. It’s those types of operational activities that a war fighter already takes into account,” Winter explained. Richard Aboulafia, an aviation expert with the Teal Group, agreed weight matters, :doh: saying that high-hot issues can often “be dealt with easily, but often at the expense of weight, which can impact range and payload.”

Grant also noted that Marine pilots will be able to adjust how they land, now that the issue is a known problem, adding that in comparison to the old Harrier Jump Jets, “the F-35B actually does way better than the Harrier in controlling its heat downwash.”"

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/air/2019/06 ... ironments/
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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