Initial F-35 training cadre starts JSF transition

Discuss the F-35 Lightning II
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Unread post24 May 2012, 16:02

http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... on-372258/

Initial F-35 training cadre starts JSF transition

By: Dave Majumdar Washington DC

Initial training cadre pilots at the US Air Force's 33rd Fighter Wing at Eglin AFB, Florida, have started converting over to the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II. Previously, only two test pilots, US Marine Corps Maj Joseph Bachmann and USAF Lt Col Eric Smith, were flying at the sea-side base.

The first pilot to be "checked out" on the F-35 is USMC Col Arthur Tomassetti, vice commander of the 33rd FW. Tomassetti was one of the original test pilots for the X-35B concept demonstrator in 2000. "The X-35 was a prototype with a very basic cockpit and avionics. The F-35 is a lot more sophisticated," he says. "Family resemblance in the airplanes is most definitely there and they share excellent basic flying qualities. But that is about where the similarities end."

Tomassetti started his academics to fly the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) at Eglin but then continued training at Naval Air Station Patuxent River in Maryland, where the F-35B and F-35C are being put through their paces.
...
With the US Naval Air Systems Command giving the go ahead for the F-35B to start local area flights, Bachmann started flying the STOVL jet on 22 May. Bachmann flew again on 23 May to complete the aircraft's functional check flight. Tomassetti is scheduled for his first F-35B local sortie later in the day, but that is contingent upon the weather and aircraft availability.

Another pilot, USAF Lt Col Lee Kloos, commander of the 58th Fighter Squadron, is the first non-test pilot to start his transition over to the stealthy fifth-generation machine. Kloos, a former 2000 hour F-16 pilot and Weapons School graduate, has already completed four out of six cadre checkout flights needed to qualify him to fly the F-35A.

......
Currently, pilots are flying with a very limited envelope of only 450 knots and 5G. The focus of most of the training is on practicing basic airmanship-take-offs and landings, formation flights and handling characteristics. Given that the aircraft has very limited tactical employment capabilities at this early stage, pilots are spending much of their flight time practicing emergency procedures. Kloos says that it is important for the new instructors to hone those basic skills so that they can pass those on to less experienced aviators as they begin flying the F-35.

Once enough of the initial cadre of instructor pilots is fully trained, the 33rd FW will embark upon an Operational Utility Evaluation (OUE) later in the year. The OUE will evaluate the training syllabus and jets at Eglin to ensure that both are ready for regular usage. The "students" will be two highly experienced Eglin initial cadre pilots and two operational test pilots, both of whom are veteran aviators.
....
Once the OUE proves to Air Education and Training Command (AETC) chief Gen Edward Rice that the 33rd FW is ready to start regular training operations, he will give his approval to do so.

:)
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Unread post24 May 2012, 17:41

The "Bee" has flown! With the arrival of the latest Bees and the completion of the Eglin Dozen the School House can now concentrate on students. These first four students will set the corner-stone of aviation training for 3,000+ aircraft in three US services and several partner nations. :)
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Unread post24 May 2012, 17:51

Same + more info on this thread.... Scroll down.

Finally ... First F-35B Flight out of Eglin

http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-19169.html
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Unread post24 May 2012, 17:59

Great! now we have a thread for training. Soon we should hear from Edwards and the 31st on EW testing, or not! :)
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Unread post25 May 2012, 02:00

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-d ... rthur.html


What a routine (for now) F-35 training sortie at Eglin AFB looks like...

By Dave Majumdar on May 24, 2012

US Marine Corps Col Arthur Tomassetti, 33rd Fighter Wing vice-commander, had his first local area F-35B flight scrubbed yesterday due to weather. Today, however, the weather was good and he managed to log 1.5 hours on the jet--which returned home with zero discrepancies.

Most of the flight was out over the Gulf of Mexico and consisted of basic aircraft handling maneuvers such as turns, climbs, descents. But Tomassetti also did some formation flying with the two Boeing F/A-18s that are visiting from Marine Corps Reserve Squadron VMFA-112 based at Fort Worth, Texas. Returning to base, he did some touch and goes around the Eglin pattern.

As Tomassetti describes it, flying at Eglin without having to hit specific test points is far less stressful than a full-up test sortie would be at NAS Patuxent River or Edwards AFB.
.....

I continue to be impressed how easy it is to fly the F-35 and how well it performs. For the last two years I only flew in the back seat of the F-16s at Eglin. Today's flight is one of the first steps in building VMFAT-501's capability to train F-35 pilots. I was happy to be able to contribute to that effort."
....

"We were able to incorporate Lockheed Martin Contracted Logistics Support procedures accomplished with the Air Force F-35A to streamline operations for the first week of flying the F-35B variant," says USMC Gunnery Sergeant Matthew Smith, a VMFAT-501 maintainer. "So we were scheduled to fly three days and the F-35B flew all three days on our first week of flying operations."
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Unread post26 May 2012, 06:33

33rd Fighter Wing steps up F-35 flights (SLIDESHOW) May 25, 2012 JUSTIN HEINZE / Daily News

http://www.nwfdailynews.com/articles/su ... eshow.html

"EGLIN AFB — The 33rd Fighter Wing has been going through a “surge week” of increased F-35A flights in preparation of an inspection sometime at the end of this year.

Col. Andrew Toth, commander of the wing, said that 12 sorties would occur this week. He hoped that at least eight “effective missions” would result from the surge, citing weather as a limiting factor.

“We’re really trying to maximize the number of sorties so that we can perfect our processes here,” Toth said. “We want all our men and women ready to go for the (operational utility evaluation).”

This week the wing has completed two “two turn twos,” meaning two F-35s took off, landed, were checked and then took off again. That exercise had not yet been done by the F-35, and 33rd spokeswoman Maj. Karen Roganov said it was a “big deal” to both maintainers and pilots.

The evaluation will be used by Gen. Edward Rice, commander of the Air Education and Training Command, to determine whether the wing is ready to begin formal training operations.

It is the wing’s first surge ever....

...All told, the F-35 variants have completed 65 flight hours during 55 sorties at Eglin."

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Unread post26 May 2012, 15:50

Salute!

Yep, they are slowly ramping up here.

I apologize for not sitting at the end of the runway all day to report visual sightings, as i have been on the road last few weeks.

I can see two-ships flying a lot in the next week or so, using one 35 to chase the newbie in the other jet. This versus using a Hornet for the marines or a Viper for USAF and the Brit jet. in fact, I forecast using a 35 to chase the first Brit jet here.

For history, the initial 2 turn 2 seems anemic. But you must consider the concurrency aspect. We flew a lot more in the early Viper days, but the jet was not nearly as "new" and had a less-complicated avionics suite. That being said, our first ORI "surge" day was able to generate over 100 sorties with the initial 24 jets. Lost a few up front, but remaining jets flew time and again. In fact, the ORI team ran outta targets and last few hours we flew just to show our capability. Only other plane that did that was the A-37 during the Combat Dragon test phase in 1967.

I'll be out of town for a few months, so don't expect any PIREPS until September.

Gums sends...
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Unread post01 Jun 2012, 03:35

http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... 35-372540/

US DOD first non-test pilot qualifies on F-35


By: Dave Majumdar Washington DC

The US Department of Defense's first non-test pilot finished his qualification to fly the Lockheed Martin F-35 Joint Strike Fighter on 31 May.

"I was excited not only to complete my flight to become an F-35 instructor pilot, but also for the rest of the initial cadre since this opens the door for them to also become qualified in the F-35," says US Air Force Lt Col Lee Kloos, commander of the 58th Fighter Squadron (FS).

To qualify as an F-35 pilot, Kloos had to fly a transition course that consisted of six flights in the jet. As part of the first batch of instructors for the new fifth-generation fighter, Kloos will help train the rest of the initial cadre of F-35 pilots at the seaside base.

The 33rd Fighter Wing (FW), the 58th FS's parent unit, needs to have four instructor pilots trained in order to start the F-35's Operational Utility Evaluation (OUE) in the summer. The OUE will determine if the 33rd FW and the F-35 are the ready to train new pilots to fly the F-35. If the OUE is successful, Air Education and Training Command will approve the unit to formally start training.

The USAF currently only has two F-35 instructors at the base, Kloos and his director of operations, test pilot Lt Col Eric Smith. Smith was Kloos's instructor pilot having long ago qualified to fly the aircraft at Edwards AFB, California.

The USAF says there are additional two pilots who are awaiting approval to start their flight training. Once those two additional instructors are qualified to fly the F-35, they will teach four new "students" for the OUE.

Student, however, is a relative term. The four students are highly experienced fighter pilots who are transitioning to the F-35. Two are 33rd FW initial cadre pilots while two are from the elite 31st Test and Evaluation Squadron.

:wink: AF-17/18 have the OT tail flash for the 31st T&E Squadron.

"These four students have not flown an F-35 before and this will count as their check-out," the USAF says. "The OUE will evaluate our ability to qualify these four individuals."
:D
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Unread post04 Jun 2012, 21:55

F-35A surpasses sortie goal 04 May 2012 by Barry Graff

http://whythef35.blogspot.com.au/2012/0 ... -goal.html

Monday, June 4, 2012F-35A surpasses sortie goal
The F-35 A recently reached and surpassed its sortie goal (Inside the Air force – subscription required: http://insidedefense.com/index.php?opti ... 04Mi5odG1s )

"Col. Andrew Toth, commander of the 33rd Fighter Wing at Eglin AFB, told ITAF that last week, the wing conducted a successful "surge" in an attempt to carry out as many F-35A flights as it would need to launch during the OUE. Toth said the evaluation requires at least eight flights per week to complete the analysis in its scheduled 65-day window. Between May 21 and May 24, his command scheduled 12 CTOL flights with the intention of getting eight off the ground, and in the end, 11 of the 12 went off as planned, well above the required rate. The one remaining flight was aborted on the ground on May 21....

...Asked what aspects of the F-35A have required frequent maintenance, Burkhart said program personnel have not had to deal with any in-depth problems. Instead, he mentioned "normal" procedures like changing tires, relieving wear on aircraft brakes and touching up the low-observable materials on the fighter jet's wings as the simple types of repairs needed to keep the wing's sortie-generation rate high...."

Much more at the URL.
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Unread post08 Jun 2012, 00:06

F-35 training center begins formal training By Maj. Karen Roganov | Team Eglin Public Affairs | Friday, April 20, 2012 | THE EGLIN DISPATCH | Page 3

http://www.eglindispatch.com/pdf/2012/04-20-2012.pdf (6Mb)
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Unread post13 Jun 2012, 22:28

DiSTI's Technology Enables F-35 Training at Eglin Air Force Base DiSTI — June 13, 2012

http://mil-embedded.com/news-id/?33674

"The DiSTI Corporation, a leading developer of interactive 3D software and customized training solutions, enabled early training for the Academic Training Center (ATC) at Eglin Air Force Base through advanced virtual maintenance training technology. DiSTI was selected by AAI Services Corporation for development of the F?35 Lightning II Aircraft Systems Maintenance Trainer (ASMT), as one part of the F?35 training system that was developed by Lockheed Martin. The ASMT gives the ATC an innovative training method and increases student throughput prior to the aircraft being fielded.


The ASMT provides training for student maintainers with curriculum covering ground operation, maintenance, and testing procedures. Through its latest software tools and processes, DiSTI streamlined the conversion of Computer Aided Design (CAD) data provided by Lockheed Martin to produce a high fidelity and interactive virtual maintenance environment for the ASMT. By creating a life?like virtual representation of the actual F?35 jet and its components, DiSTI worked with AAI to produce a training application that immerses students in a compelling 3D virtual environment.

“The desktop trainers such as the Aircraft Systems Maintenance Trainer, requires each student to follow the procedures of checking out virtual tools, reading the maintenance checklist, and individually performing each task,” said Brian Vohl, Lockheed Martin’s Weapons Instructor.

The 33rd Fighter Wing at Eglin has eight basic familiarization courses in session where the students have access to the computer simulators. Student maintainers now have a way to become familiarized with the F?35 byworking on a virtual aircraft before the actual aircraft is delivered. This comprehensive training solution aided the Air Force students at Eglin to gain their first certificate of completion in the F?35 courses for structures, avionics, weapons and crew chief career fields.

“This is hugely significant for all services because we are getting our maintainers prepped for when we are fully stood?up for F?35 training in the near future,” said Col. Andrew Toth, 33rd FW Commander. “The classes are another exciting step forward in the 2012 execution year for F?35 training.”...

...Since its delivery to the ATC at Eglin Air Force base, the ASMT has become an integral part of the training curriculum. In March, approximately 100 maintenance students from three branches of service began the inaugural classes for the F?35 basic familiarization courses at Eglin AFB...."

SOME LINKS to INFO:
http://www.disti.com/Services/instructo ... index.html
&
http://www.disti.com/Services/maintenan ... index.html
&
http://www.aaicorp.com/pdfs/aai_f-351109.pdf (1.1Mb)
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Unread post13 Jun 2012, 23:03

F-35 training center begins formal training Apr/11/2012 by Maj. Karen Roganov | Team Eglin Public Affairs

http://www.eglin.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123297561

"4/11/2012 - EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. -- While celebrating each F-35 Lightning II arrival, the integrated joint strike fighter training team also opened the doors for the first Air Force certification courses on the logistical support behind the nation's newest weapons platform.

The 33rd Fighter Wing have eight basic familiarization courses now in session at the academic training center with courses currently scheduled through early next year. Approximately 100 maintenance students from three branches of service began the inaugural classes March 19.

"This is hugely significant for all services because we are getting our maintainers prepped for when we are fully stood-up for F-35 training in the near future," said Col. Andrew Toth, 33rd FW commander. "The classes are another exciting step forward in the 2012 execution year for F-35 training."

Every step has an effect on the future of these new programs.

"What we do now hinges on the progress of joint technical data verification for the F-35's maintenance procedures, virtual-reality trainer software validations and upgrades as well as course delivery methods coming online," said Senior Master Sgt. Richard Brown, F-35 ATC superintendent. "Up until this point, we've been conducting small group try outs with the integrated maintenance team here to verify the system is meeting the requirements needed."

After the team's try out process was completed, ATC personnel were able to offer Air Force students their first certificate of completion in F-35 courses for structures, avionics, weapons and crew chief career fields. Crew chiefs assigned to the wing already gained familiarization of flight line tasks and performed duties on the flight line associated with generating sorties.
Seasoned maintainers crossing over to the new aircraft platform were selected to attend the first classes. Marine Corps students hail from careers in ordnance, avionics, power line and airframes. To share the resources of instructors and trainers, the ATC runs two class shifts with schedules occasionally ending as late as 1 a.m.

"The pipleline students, those learning to be maintainers, are anticipated to train at the ATC early 2014," said Brown. "Most of the students going through will be instructors when they stand up field training detachments."

At the ATC, students have access to computer simulators touting near-realistic interaction with the jet aided by a digital "avatar." Additionally, virtual training is provided on life-size mock-ups of F-35 components.

Lockheed Martin's F-35 platform includes the aircraft itself as well as the logistics and sustainment support systems, designed to keep each plane in the air and fully operational. Courseware is built using a flexible modular design, making it possible to train war fighters from three different services and eight international partners on three F-35 variants without creating multiple training suites of variant-specific hardware and software, according to Lockheed Martin's website. This total training solution lets trainees get immersed in the virtual experience before moving to the real thing.

Students currently enrolled are going through the phases of training designed by ATC personnel.

"The first week of training for all specialties is basically the same," said Brian Vohl, Lockheed Martin weapons instructor. "The desktop trainers such as the Aircraft Systems Maintenance Trainer, requires each student to follow the procedures of checking out virtual tools, reading the maintenance checklists and individually performing each task."

After ASMT training, the students break off into their specific disciplines to train virtually at the ATC before heading out to the operational side of the wing where the fifth generation fighter jet is housed with each service's flying squadron.

"You can read about it all day, but you actually need a feel for the aircraft, work environment and know how the parts of the jet move," said student Staff Sgt. Frantavious Dooley, a weapons crew chief with the 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev.

The classroom experience combined with flight line operations are beneficial for learning about aircraft safety, in particular the warnings and precautions outlined in the joint technical, he said.

Classmates from Air Force flight test units will take lessons learned at Eglin home to stand up F-35 sustainment at their units. Hill Air Force Base is slated to be a depot maintenance site and Nellis and Edwards are operational test sites.

"I like the process; the new approach is 100 percent compliant with learning tasks," according to Tech. Sgt. Johnathan Meyer, an F-35 weapons instructor at the 359th Training Squadron here. "Finishing off the comprehensive approach to training, the student gets aircraft hands-on training at an active flight line."

Meyer said he attended the ATC weapons class to evaluate and lend feedback of the overall training program based on his five-year expertise as an instructor for Air Force maintenance technical training.

"When training is in full swing, approximately 2,100 maintainers and 100 pilot students can be processed through the ATC annually, with 900 people at any given time on campus," said Toth. "Classes last from one to three months depending upon the course."

Caption for HiRez Pic below:
"Airmen from Eglin’s 96th Logistics Readiness Squadron; and three F-35 units, the Air Force’s 33rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron; the Navy’s Strike Fighter Squadron 101, and the Marine Corps, Fighter Attack Training Squadron 501, take an Autonomic Logistics Information System Supply Course at the F-35 Academic Training Center. The four-day familiarization class was the first-ever ALIS supply course completed since the ATC began commencement of formal training Mar 19. The students were introduced to the main tools they will learn more about in ALIS. (U.S. Air Force photo/Maj. Karen Roganov)"

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Unread post13 Jun 2012, 23:15

Maintenance Trainers | F-35 Lightning II Aircraft Systems Maintenance Trainer (ASMT)

http://www.aaicorp.com/products/trainin ... nance.html

"...The ASMT is configured to include one instructor operator station (IOS) and 12 student stations. The IOS offers real-time status of all student activities and automatically raises an alert if a student is performing below expectations. Responding to the alert, the instructor receives a representation of the student’s monitors, audio, and status relative to the training task process steps. The instructor can monitor the student, communicate with the student over the intercom, or even take control remotely of the student’s PC if desired. The sophisticated ASMT IOS allows the instructor to effectively monitor a large number of students, increasing training throughput and quality.

Student stations offer a realistic, 3-D virtual vehicle environment, as well as 2-D panels and displays. The student can navigate throughout the F-35 aircraft during maintenance training and select the virtual support equipment and tools required. A real F-35 portable maintenance aid is connected at each student station, allowing the student to monitor the virtual aircraft functions, run diagnostics, and display technical and task documentation.

Also, the instructor can enable different training modes for guided practice, free play, and graded testing of the students’ newly acquired skills. The students perform virtual system maintenance tasks with the added advantage of fault isolation for skill improvement...."

Another brochure: http://www.disti.com/Corporate/literatu ... LowRes.pdf (1.6Mb)

SEE classroom layout graphic edited below & also original here: http://www.aaicorp.com/images/train_f35 ... ssroom.jpg (1.5Mb)
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Unread post14 Jun 2012, 00:01

A very informative website (with some conclusions IMHO about F-35 topics elsewhere not always mainstream - but whatever)... :-) AND much much muchos MORE at the JUMP!

The JSF training | Training for the Joint Strike Fighter Dec 8, 2011 Pubblicato da Gabriele

http://ukarmedforcescommentary.blogspot ... ining.html

"The Full Mission Simulator is an incredibly high-fidelity simulator capable to prepare pilots for flying complex operational scenarios. A complete FMS costs 20 million dollars, according to 2012 US DoD budget figures: the US armed forces have so far ordered a total of 10 FMSs.

The FMS is destined to be used with two distinct rooms, one for Briefing and one for Debriefing, and the system can run in Training mode, from the Briefing room to the actual simulator, while also supporting debriefing for the precedent training sortie.

Key feature of the FMS is the simulator dome, which pushes technology to the current limit, with visual display contractor Rockwell Collins having succeeded in developing and building a totally smooth dome giving 360° degrees all around visibility and simulation of the complete environment around the plane. The FMS has a 2m (6.5ft)-diameter dome surrounded by a frame mounting the 25 liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCoS) projectors.

The FMS delivers the visual quality needed to undertake the simulation of aerial refueling and emergency procedures, particularly enabling the pilot to realistically react to an engine flameout, where one needs as much visibility as possible.

The FMS display will be further enhanced when simulated infrared imagery from the F-35's Distributed Aperture System will be fed into the pilot's helmet. This feature is currently not yet ready, but this is understandable, especially considering that, unfortunately, the Helmet Mounted Display with integrated infrared imagery capability is a source of issues still, with the original contractor having proven unable to meet the requirements, and BAE recently selected to develop an alternative, based on the Striker HMD used on the Typhoon.

The simulation is highly realistic because the F-35 FMS use the real aircraft's Operational Flight Program (OFP), but more than that, it employs all the actual computer models from the aircraft's sensor manufacturers and integrates that data, which means that the pilot flies the simulator just as he’d fly the actual plane, including the “behavior” of the engine, which runs on the very same software present on the F35.

The training simulation is controlled from the Instructor Operating Station, and the simulator can replicate the tactical environment that a pilot and his wingmen would face in combat. The FMSs can be networked to allow pilots to experience flying in a multiship environment against a vast array of air and surface threats. Eventually, FMSs dispensed on bases across the US will be linked, to allow large-scale simulations that will be almost as effective as flying air wars such the huge Red Flag exercises. It might be possible to network the simulators on a multinational basis, as well: UK pilots might train in a simulator based in the UK, flying alongside other F35s, simulated from bases in the US and flown by American personnel.

The Mission Rehearsal Trainer (MRT), is a smaller-scale variant of the FMSs, low cost and simplified. It has not the full-360° dome display, replaced by a narrow vision one. The software, however, is exactly the same.

The Deployable Mission Rehearsal Trainer puts the whole MRT package into a single shipping container ISO which can be deployed on a forward operating base or embarked on an aircraft carrier. It is expected that one will go on the Strike Carrier, in fact. The container includes two cockpits simulators and an Instructor Operating Station controlling the system.

The ASMT will allow maintenance engineers to practice fault-location procedures, replacement of line-items and parts of the plane and other maintenance operations. The ESMT will include a mock-up of the front of the F35, and will allow technicians to train in the removal of the cockpit’s canopy and complete installation/removal procedures of the ejector seat and all related systems.

Finally, the Weapons Loading Trainer will provide ground crews with a functional mock up of the plane, designed to allow them to practice the procedures for loading and unloading weaponry, on both the internal and external hard points.

UK company EDM is heavily involved in the simulators, being under contract to build and provide the ejection-seats and weapons-loading hardware trainers.

Actual flying training will of course remain necessary, but the number of flying hours needed to prepare crews for F35 operations will be slashed and brought down to much smaller levels. The current target is to achieve a 50/50 balance between simulator and flying exercises. Simulator “events”, at least at the beginning, will take more hours than exercise done actually flying the machine, so that effectively the pilots will have more simulator hours than flown hours, training-wise. There will also be an embedded simulation capability in the aircraft itself, and the F-35 is to be compatible with the P5 rangeless air-to-air and air-to-ground combat training system, enabling complex mission simulation when in flight, much as with the latest model of Hawk trainer of the RAF. The full extent of capabilities in this sense is being developed.

The US have been in these years building an integrated training centre (ITC) at Eglin AFB, in Florida, fitting it with 10 full-mission simulators plus six maintenance training devices, classrooms and the training system support centre...."
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Unread post14 Jun 2012, 01:21

For some software GEEKs (not me) a perhaps interesting old 2003 PDF which has this graphic about multiple uses of softare (amongst other things) in relation to sim training etc.

JSF OVERVIEW 28 April 2003 Lloyd Huff

http://sstc-online.org/2003/PDFFiles/Huff.pdf (12Mb)
Attachments
F-35softwareMultiUse.gif
RAN FAA A4G: http://tinyurl.com/ctfwb3t http://tinyurl.com/ccmlenr http://www.youtube.com/user/bengello/videos
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