Bold Alligator 2012: The USN-USMC Team Shapes the Future

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spazsinbad

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Unread post03 Jan 2012, 22:23

Bold Alligator 2012: The USN-USMC Team Shapes the Future Jan/03/2012 by Robbin Laird

http://www.sldinfo.com/bold-alligator-2 ... he-future/

"...Although an amphibious exercise, the capabilities being exercised are really those of leveraging the sea base to insert and withdraw forces. The key effort is to take a combined force (both combat as well as a humanitarian) and support that force ashore from the sea. Such a force is really a test of what we have called the agile response group, even more than the amphibious response group....

Third, the F-35 combat systems will be part of the exercise as well. The BACH1-11 aircraft carrying the F-35 radar, distributed aperture system as well as other systems will provide contributions to the exercise in anticipation to the arrival of the F-35B as a core element of the newly enabled ARG. During the exercise, the BACH1-11 will perform as a big wing ISR platform in support of the forces....

...The ARG will be able to feature as many as 19 F-35Bs off of an amphibious ship, which will provide unprecedented combat power projected from the Gator Navy...."

As always best to JUMP via URL to read the entire article.
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Unread post04 Jan 2012, 01:10

What we saw in Libya is being continued in Bold Alligator 2012. The new and the old are being combined in shaping a very flexible force able to operate across the spectrum of warfare. And a force able to be augmented by scalable forces which can provide for re-enforced capabilities as the case requires.

The agile response group is built around an economy of force whereby what is needed to meet the mission is applied, and make it possible NOT to deploy a very large force package (such as a Carrier Battle Group) when not required. But at the same time, like a Lego block set, the forces can be augmented to ensure strategic superiority.


The scheduling of this exercise couldn't be more timely, given the ongoing DoD budget cuts in the offing. The ability to project force in a scalable manner is going to be an important advantage as the US attempts to meet its global security commitments on a restricted fiscal diet. Exploring innovative operational concepts made possible by the new technologies complementing legacy capabilities will hopefully help create a deeper appreciation and support for the DoD's force modernization programs.
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maus92

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Unread post04 Jan 2012, 02:02

I'm curious if they use the HMDS in the BAC aircraft, and if it experiences the same issues as the HMDS installed in F-35s. Again, we have the "as many as 19 F-35Bs off of an amphibious ship." A dubious contention as explained previously, but maybe you could sustain that if you lashed that T-AKE to the gator. The author repeatedly uses the VM-22 designation for the MV-22. Is the designation for the Osprey changing?
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Unread post04 Jan 2012, 02:11

maus92 wrote:I'm curious if they use the HMDS in the BAC aircraft, and if it experiences the same issues as the HMDS installed in F-35s. Again, we have the "as many as 19 F-35Bs off of an amphibious ship." A dubious contention as explained previously, but maybe you could sustain that if you lashed that T-AKE to the gator. The author repeatedly uses the VM-22 designation for the MV-22. Is the designation for the Osprey changing?


Probably using the panoramic display in the meantime.
VM is a USMC designation.
V - Fixed Wing
M - Marine
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maus92

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Unread post04 Jan 2012, 02:32

popcorn wrote:
maus92 wrote:I'm curious if they use the HMDS in the BAC aircraft, and if it experiences the same issues as the HMDS installed in F-35s. Again, we have the "as many as 19 F-35Bs off of an amphibious ship." A dubious contention as explained previously, but maybe you could sustain that if you lashed that T-AKE to the gator. The author repeatedly uses the VM-22 designation for the MV-22. Is the designation for the Osprey changing?


Probably using the panoramic display in the meantime.
VM is a USMC designation.
V - Fixed Wing
M - Marine


VMM-xxx is an official squadron designation template, but VM-22 for MV-22? I don't think that it is a MDS designation as defined by the DoD. I guess it is another example of the Marines striving to be different.
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Unread post04 Jan 2012, 03:10

maus92 wrote:
popcorn wrote:
maus92 wrote:I'm curious if they use the HMDS in the BAC aircraft, and if it experiences the same issues as the HMDS installed in F-35s. Again, we have the "as many as 19 F-35Bs off of an amphibious ship." A dubious contention as explained previously, but maybe you could sustain that if you lashed that T-AKE to the gator. The author repeatedly uses the VM-22 designation for the MV-22. Is the designation for the Osprey changing?


Probably using the panoramic display in the meantime.
VM is a USMC designation.
V - Fixed Wing
M - Marine


VMM-xxx is an official squadron designation template, but VM-22 for MV-22? I don't think that it is a MDS designation as defined by the DoD. I guess it is another example of the Marines striving to be different.


It seems to be a convenient term to use in lieu of "USMC MV-22"..
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Unread post04 Jan 2012, 04:01

The Navy also seems to be exploring the Sea Base idea that was discussed here recently. That is, make the ship the base, then ferry in supplies as needed. That's probably fine for marines near the beach, but as troops get farther inland and tangled up into towns, mountains, valleys, etc, the logistics tail starts to look long and fragile.

That said, it's good to see them thinking, experimenting, testing concepts with the new equipment, training with allies, all that. Good for everyone involved.
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Unread post07 Feb 2012, 02:59

Guess what? Enterprise CSG is part of Bold Alligator 2012.

"The addition of the carrier group to Bold Alligator, which Marine Corps leaders have touted as a touchstone event in the service's effort to get back to the shoreline, comes at an interesting time. A number of top service brass, including Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos, has been pushing the Pentagon to add more amphibs to the Navy fleet. The ships, he argued, can compliment or -- to a certain extent -- replicate a carrier's capabilities at a much lower cost [debatable]. They are also key to the service's return to its amphibious roots. For its part, the Navy argues that carriers, including the new Ford-class, will be critical to supporting the department's pivot from Southwest Asia to the Western Pacific."


It seems that aircraft embarked on gators is not sufficient to protect the amphib fleet while supporting the landing force:

"The carrier group's ships were used to protect the amphib ships supporting the assault, Pastoor said. The air assets on the Enterprise could also be used to lighten the load of the Marine Corps helos and fighters, letting them concentrate on supporting ground forces as they push inland from the beach, said 2nd MEB chief of staff Col. Scott Aiken."

Which is not really surprising considering the relatively few sorties an ARG/ESU can generate on its own.

http://defense.aol.com/2012/02/06/carri ... -exercise/
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Unread post07 Feb 2012, 03:31

Iit's a matter of scalability. BOLD ALLIGATOR 2012 is not a monolithic exercise, it is conducted in phases. The ARG will respond to a scenario where 16 Harriers deployed aboard the USS Kearsarge to provide a gauge on what that force level is capable of providing.
Another scenario is designed to explore the intricacies and potential of a CSG being partnered with the ARG.
Why assume that all conflicts will require a CSG? The USMC and USN obviously don't and are restructuring to project the appropriate force level required.
Last edited by popcorn on 07 Feb 2012, 15:30, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread post07 Feb 2012, 14:57

These last two paragraphs from above 'maus92' AOL article cited above are telling:

"...Specifically, the Navy F/A-18s were used to help Marine air units to "shape the battlespace", Col. Scott Jensen, commander of the 2nd Marine Air Wing told reporters aboard the USS Kearsarge yesterday. Once the beach assault began, Marine airpower shifted from those ops to providing overwatch for landing forces, he added. "There has been a handoff at this point," Jensen said regarding the shift. That type of cooperation is the true hallmark of the Bold Alligator exercise, a top Navy official said.

Sharing air, land and sea capabilities that "cut across all [service] lanes" is a major goal of the combat drill, Rear Adm. Kevin Scott, ESG2 chief, said. If the U.S. is to be able to fight and win wars from the shoreline, the services have to look at all the warfighting capabilities on the table, according to Scott. "We are not just in our own amphibious cocoon," he said."
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Unread post07 Feb 2012, 16:30

Marines train for water-based assaults, return to amphibious roots by storming US beaches
Article by: BROCK VERGAKIS and MICHAEL FELBERBAUM , Associated Press Updated: February 7,

http://www.startribune.com/nation/13884 ... y#continue

"...Military officials say the operation being conducted in Virginia and North Carolina is the largest amphibious training exercise they've attempted in at least a decade. Marines have been fighting wars in landlocked countries like Iraq and Afghanistan for years, and many have never even set foot on a Navy ship. That's of particular concern as the military shifts its strategic focus toward the coastal regions of the Middle East, such as Iran, and the Pacific, where North Korea and China are drawing increasing attention from the U.S.

"Sooner or later, the nation is going to require a sizeable force to go somewhere where folks don't want us to go. So, no, the image is not Iwo Jima, Tarawa and so forth, but nevertheless, when we go to shore someplace where we're not wanted ashore, we have to be ready to defend force to accomplish the mission and then to sustain the force once it's ashore," said Brig. Gen. Christopher Owens, deputy commanding general of 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force....

...All told, more than two dozen Navy ships and more than 20,000 service members are participating in the exercise along with allies from eight countries. That is at least twice the number of personnel that were involved in a similar West Coast training exercise two years ago, and it provides a more realistic scenario for how the U.S. would likely conduct amphibious landings in the future.

The amphibious invasions of the past, when the U.S. took thousands of casualties in a single battle, are not likely to be repeated. The new approach military leaders are using in the exercise known as Bold Alligator involves a more nuanced approach that relies on allies and friendly countries. That means relying on multi-nation coalitions and deciding whether to stage ships in port or out to sea because it could disrupt the host nation's economy. Navy leaders prefer to operate out of a "sea base" away from shore.

This week's exercise has been in the planning stages for several years,..."
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Unread post08 Feb 2012, 00:57

To answer 'maus92' question above: "...I'm curious if they use the HMDS in the BAC aircraft, and if it experiences the same issues as the HMDS installed in F-35s...."

Press release from Grumman and two old Code One? Photos. Probably 'smooth as silk' flying anyway for aircraft [similar to how the F-35 might be flown :-) ] with standup crews [because they are 'stand up guys] monitoring all the blinking lights as shown. And a CATbird nose photo from the outside added.

Northrop Grumman Participating in Bold Alligator Maritime Exercise With F-35 Sensors

http://www.irconnect.com/noc/press/page ... l?d=244896

"LINTHICUM, Md., Feb. 6, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) is participating in U.S. Fleet Forces Command's Joint/Coalition Amphibious Exercise Bold Alligator 2012, employing the company's BAC1-11 test aircraft to provide F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) sensor capabilities.
During Bold Alligator 2012, the BAC1-11 is being configured with the F-35's AN/APG-81 active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar and the AN/AAQ-37 infrared distributed aperture system (DAS). Systems will operate with future software blocks undergoing test as well as those delivered in current F-35 jets.

Bold Alligator is a large-scale, multinational Navy-Marine Corps amphibious exercise conducted by U.S. Fleet Forces and Marine Forces Command. It will be the Atlantic Fleet's largest amphibious exercise in 10 years. The 2012 exercise is centralizing planning and execution of a brigade-sized amphibious assault from a seabase in a medium threat environment. Following a decade of ground war, this event is intended to revitalize, refine and strengthen core amphibious competencies of the Navy and Marine Corps.

"With JSF being delivered to training commands in 2012, the Navy-Marine Corps team is poised to start using our radar and DAS in an operational context, much like U.S. Pacific Command did during Northern Edge 2011. Northrop Grumman's commitment to deliver new capabilities to the war fighter remains a priority. This exercise is another opportunity to demonstrate operational utility to the fleet," said Jeff Leavitt, Northrop Grumman's vice president of Combat Avionics Systems. "F-35 sensor capabilities are unprecedented. Their performance continues to meet or exceed expectations."

Building upon successful F-35 sensor deployments during Exercise Northern Edge in 2009 and 2011 in Alaska, Northrop Grumman's BAC1-11 test aircraft is flying air-to-air and air-to-ground reconnaissance missions during Bold Alligator's large naval and ground force maneuvers on the Atlantic coast. Participating naval forces include an aircraft carrier strike group, amphibious ready group, NATO alliance ships from eight partner nations, and Marine landing forces.

The F-35 AN/APG-81 AESA radar and AN/AAQ-37 DAS have demonstrated exceptional maturity well in advance of formal operational testing timelines. Participation in Bold Alligator is integrating these advanced capabilities in the maritime domain.

The AN/APG-81 AESA radar is a multifunction aperture capable of the full range of air-to-air and air-to-surface functions complemented by significant electronic warfare and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. The AN/AAQ-37 DAS provides passive spherical awareness for the F-35, simultaneously detecting and tracking aircraft and missiles in every direction, and providing visual imagery for day/night navigation and targeting purposes. The F-35 JSF's role as an invaluable future component of the Navy, Marine Corps and international defense team is being demonstrated in all phases of amphibious operations as exercised in Bold Alligator...."

http://codeonemagazine.dialogs.com/imag ... 7_3936.jpg
http://www.codeonemagazine.com./images/ ... 7_1876.jpg

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-SbxXod_1vrY/T ... 5-test.jpg
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Last edited by spazsinbad on 08 Feb 2012, 01:56, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread post08 Feb 2012, 01:54

CNO Drops in on Bold Alligator 2012 February 07, 2012
(Source: Chief of Naval Operations Public Affairs)

http://www.marinelink.com/news/alligato ... 42436.aspx

"...BA12 is the culmination of years of individual unit training from various fleet assets brought together to accomplish various littoral missions and assess overall readiness. Assets involved include two submarines, 25 ships, 120 aircraft and 20,000 Sailors and Marines covering the full spectrum of subsurface, surface, ground and air capabilities....

...The areas being tested and evaluated by BA12 are the proficiency and efficiency of the amphibious fleet on forward presence, deterrence, sea control, power projection, maritime security, and humanitarian assistance and disaster response. Greenert said due to the ever-changing battle environments and mission requirements of our nation's military, amphibious forces are receiving more attention and resources to meet those challenges.

"We're putting in place a support ship called a mobile landing platform," Greenert said, which would augment the aging Marine transport grey-hulls currently in service. "We are supporting the next LHA (America-class), so we're all in for these big decks... We're all in for amphibious operations."

Greenert said amphibious operations are a high priority of the Navy-Marine Corps team and continue to gain importance...."
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Unread post08 Feb 2012, 04:27

Even more important - the P-8A T-6 shows up.

http://www.navytimes.com/news/2012/02/d ... se-020712/
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Unread post09 Feb 2012, 07:31

popcorn wrote:
maus92 wrote:I'm curious if they use the HMDS in the BAC aircraft, and if it experiences the same issues as the HMDS installed in F-35s. Again, we have the "as many as 19 F-35Bs off of an amphibious ship." A dubious contention as explained previously, but maybe you could sustain that if you lashed that T-AKE to the gator. The author repeatedly uses the VM-22 designation for the MV-22. Is the designation for the Osprey changing?


Probably using the panoramic display in the meantime.
VM is a USMC designation.
V - Fixed Wing
M - Marine


Probably froms some mistaking the squadrons from the aircraft.

MV-22 is short takeoff aircraft -22, multimission variant.
They come from VMM squadrons: fixed wing marine medium lift.
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