ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 06 Jun 2016, 15:14
by neptune
https://news.usni.org/2016/06/06/marines-ch-53k-lifts-20000-pound-external-load-tests-progress-ahead-schedule#more-19995


Marines’ CH-53K Lifts 20,000-Pound External Load As Tests Progress Ahead Of Schedule

By: Megan Eckstein
June 6, 2016 8:11 AM

The Marine Corps is advancing through its test plan for the Sikorsky CH-53K heavy lift helicopter faster than previously planned, with the service successfully carrying a 20,000-pound load externally for the first time on May 26. .During a briefing at the Navy League’s Sea-Air-Space Exposition 2016 in May, Lockheed Martin Vice President of CH-53K Programs Michael Torok said that external load lifts were set to start this month but began early, in April, instead. At least one of two operational tests – a 27,000-pound external lift and carrying 12,000 pounds externally for 110 nautical miles – will begin by the end of the calendar year, Torok and PMA-261 program manager Col. Henry Vanderborght said at the May 16 briefing....
Vanderborght called the helo a “significant step increase in capability for the Marine Corps,” with more than three times the lifting capability in the same sized aircraft. The aircraft will also be more reliable, Torok said, thanks to an automated logistics system that monitors aircraft performance, requests feedback from the pilots and funnels the information to the maintainers to make decisions about ordering spares..In the U.S. Marine Corps, Brown, the NAVAIR spokesman, said that the CH-53K will start replacing the CH-53E in 2019, and the first four fully operational aircraft – complete with logistics, personnel, and training – should be in place later that same year.
:)

As we have learned, the F-35 ALIS program has many apps, the PW engine monitoring is one that comes to mind. Perhaps the LM/ Sikorsky CH-53K ALS program has been able to use some of the ALIS apps at a reduced development cost and a commonality that allows similar future upgrades.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 06 Jun 2016, 15:39
by XanderCrews
As sort of described ALIS is more than just a computer program it's a whole new way of business that is more aligned with how civilian airlines have been doing it.

With the severe maintenence requirements of Ch-53s it's a very smart move. The sea stallions are such maintenance beasts that if the CH-53k was not an improvement in anything but maintenance it would be worth it

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 27 Oct 2016, 23:34
by neptune
https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... ce-430823/

New F-35 software could quell ALIS sovereignty concerns

27 October, 2016
BY: Leigh Giangreco

Lockheed Martin will begin studying options for adding a software filter to the system that tracks maintenance and training data for the F-35 fighter as part of an effort to limit the amount of data that gets shared with US-based contractors over concerns about privacy and sovereignty. The US government intends to award a sole source contract to F-35 prime Lockheed to conduct a trade study for connecting a "sovereign data gateway" (SDG) to the autonomic logistics information system (ALIS), according to a 17 October Federal Business Opportunities website announcement.

Lockheed's ALIS is programmed to keep track of thousands of operational details about the F-35 fleet, including data from health monitoring systems on board the aircraft as well as the training and flight logs for each of the pilots. As the global data hub, ALIS is supposed to order parts and schedule training as they are needed, saving operators the burden of managing and back-filling spare inventories. For the system to work, the jet must automatically transmit information after and even during each flight by an F-35 to Lockheed's ALIS hub in Fort Worth, Texas. But that automated stream of data also worries some of the F-35's international customers.

To address those concerns, the SDG software will remain within the partner country’s central point of entry and will control the flow of data to the Autonomic Logistics Operating Unit (ALOU), the F-35 Joint Program Office says in an emailed response to questions. The software will allow each partner country to inspect and verify data flowing to and from the US hub, the JPO stays. The software will also be able to block, modify or delay sensitive data. One example of sensitive data are details in the pilot's training and flight records, which in some countries are protected by privacy laws.
“Most partners have this inspection requirement as a prerequisite to their own certification and approval of ALIS on their national networks,” he says. “An example of SDG's use could be to enforce regulations in place to protect data containing personally identifiable information, which in some cases is subject to national privacy legislation.”

Now that it is working, they can begin to refine it with these upgrades, common software process.

:)

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 28 Oct 2016, 00:39
by lamoey
I spoke with one of the F-35 tech sergeants at the airshow at Ellington Field outside Houston last Saturday. In contrast to my experience with USAF staffing in the 80's, he told me that there were only two different spesialists on the F-35, Avionics and crew chief. For that to work ALIS must be an impressive tool for fault finding, for one tech to cover all the avionics. As advanced as the aircraft is, with so much more capability than the Viper, I find it absolutely astonishing. Can anybody confirm that I understood this correctly?

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 28 Oct 2016, 01:17
by popcorn
lamoey wrote:I spoke with one of the F-35 tech sergeants at the airshow at Ellington Field outside Houston last Saturday. In contrast to my experience with USAF staffing in the 80's, he told me that there were only two different spesialists on the F-35, Avionics and crew chief. For that to work ALIS must be an impressive tool for fault finding, for one tech to cover all the avionics. As advanced as the aircraft is, with so much more capability than the Viper, I find it absolutely astonishing. Can anybody confirm that I understood this correctly?

What is ghe typical number of crew chiefs for older jets?

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 28 Oct 2016, 03:44
by blindpilot
neptune wrote:https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/new-f-35-software-could-quell-alis-sovereignty-conce-430823/

New F-35 software could quell ALIS sovereignty concerns

27 October, 2016
BY: Leigh Giangreco

.... One example of sensitive data are details in the pilot's training and flight records, which in some countries are protected by privacy laws... “... “An example of SDG's use could be to enforce regulations in place to protect data containing personally identifiable information, which in some cases is subject to national privacy legislation.”


Too bad we didn`t have ALIS back in `75. I could hack/dig into the missing days where I was flying .. somewhere in SE Asia, April 28th ... and then disappeared .. only to have flight hours suddenly reappear in my log records from 1 May forward in the same theatre. The time warp to the Bermuda Triangle for two ...uum.. dark .. days limits my access to `Vietnam Service.` But at least the rest on the Bermuda beaches was good for the fatigue of crew rest violations we didn`t have then. :D

Needless to say, I`m not a big fan of ... purging data .. This new capability seems to bring some risks. I`m not sure I Iike this `data washing`. Be careful what switches you put on your machines ...Just saying ... There can be undesirable impacts, even if they are 40 years later.

BP

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 28 Oct 2016, 04:29
by SpudmanWP
This should help

Image

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 28 Oct 2016, 13:12
by sferrin
"New F-35 software could quell ALIS sovereignty concerns"

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... ce-430823/


From another source:

"The second is ALIS’s dependence on the Internet for communications between user terminals and the main ALIS server in Fort Worth, Texas, which will have absolute control over the F-35 system. "

If this is the case I REALLY hope they have that system secure. The last thing we need is a foreign power compromising it and grounding the fleet for us. :doh: :doh: :doh:

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 28 Oct 2016, 15:32
by SpudmanWP
VPNs, SATCOM, and private (gov) internet feeds will keep it all moving securely.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 28 Oct 2016, 16:33
by spazsinbad
Here is a mention of the secure Internet for ALIS access: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=28905&p=346098&hilit=ALIS+Secure+Internet#p346098

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 28 Oct 2016, 17:24
by mrigdon
Wait, you mean Lockheed knows what they're doing? :shock:

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 21 Nov 2016, 19:55
by spazsinbad
F-35 ALIS 2.0.2 Fielding to Start Early Next Year
18 Nov 2016 Courtney Albon

"F-35 prime contractor Lockheed Martin now anticipates the next software release of the jet's Autonomic Logistics Information System will begin fielding in early 2017 -- at least five months later than the program anticipated. The program announced last year that the next release, ALIS 2.0.2, would miss its August 2016 delivery target by about two months, due largely to challenges integrating propulsion data into the diagnostics system. Lockheed's vice president for F-35 logistics Mary Ann Horter told Inside the Air..." [NO SUBSCRIPTION]

Source: https://insidedefense.com/daily-news/f- ... -next-year

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 26 Apr 2017, 22:13
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Martin Delivers New Capabilities for F-35 Logistics System
26 Apr 2017 LM PR

"Lockheed Martin's next iteration of the F-35's Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS) has been approved for installation at U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy F-35 sites. Along with a number of improvements to the system's baseline, the upgrade delivers significant enhancements for managing forward operations and sustainment.

ALIS is the F-35's fleet management system, reducing the cost of operations and maintenance while increasing aircraft availability. After successful flight testing, upgraded ALIS software – called version 2.0.2 – will be installed at all operational F-35 sites by the end of 2017. The upgrade has performed well in supporting F-35 operations at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, since March 22.

ALIS 2.0.2 now integrates propulsion data, which allows users to manage the F-35 engine from inside ALIS, eliminating the need for multiple maintenance systems and field service representatives to assist with engine diagnostics, analysis and maintenance. ALIS 2.0.2 improves the tracking of life-limited parts and streamlines resource management for deployed operations.

"This upgrade will allow deploying units to predict 'what if' scenarios inside ALIS, removing most of the manual planning that is done today," said Reeves Valentine, vice president of F-35 Logistics. "ALIS 2.0.2 will allow users to forecast and make those decisions. Picking the best jets, support equipment, spare parts and personnel for the deployment and managing resources throughout their lifecycle – that type of data should ultimately translate to better aircraft availability."

The updated software also includes a networking feature to more easily establish connections between deployed locations and home stations. This upgrade offers parent units more versatility in managing the logistics "tail" – the chain of supplies and spares – for a deployed squadron.

As the IT backbone of the F-35, ALIS integrates preventative maintenance, flight scheduling and the mission planning system. Pilots plan and debrief missions, and maintenance professionals sustain the F-35 using ALIS.

Approval for fleet-wide fielding to F-35 sites for the U.S. Marine Corps is expected in the next six weeks. The U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Air Force declared F-35 initial operating capability (IOC) in 2015 and 2016 respectively, and the U.S. Navy is set to declare IOC in 2018. ALIS is operating at more than 20 locations and has supported more than 90,000 F-35 flight hours...."

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/lockhee ... ics-system

F-35 logistics system all set for US Air Force and Navy, not yet for Marines
26 Apr 2017 Valerie Insinna

"...All versions of the joint strike fighter use the same logistics architecture, but the Marine Corps’ F-35B needed a particular update to the engine’s computing system for ALIS 2.0.2, said Mike Beard, who works F-35 logistics strategy and customer engagement for Lockheed. Pratt & Whitney didn’t have that update done in time for testing at Nellis and Edwards Air Force bases, but have since completed it.

“Now that we have that, we’ll be integrating it [with ALIS], and we’ll be able to roll it out to the Marine sites,” he said....

...Because of the delays to ALIS 2.0.2, some of the capability for the next version of the system, ALIS 3.0, has been offloaded to the later version, called ALIS 4.0.

ALIS 3.0 is still planned to be fielded in early 2018 in time to close out the program’s system development and demonstration phase. Valentine said the focus of ALIS 3.0 was including key user enhancements seen as critical for wrapping up the system development and demonstration phase — including improved data transfer software that reduces the time it takes to load large files and tools that filter out redundant information — as well as security updates.

The new ALIS 4.0 version will be completed a year later for an early 2019 fielding, he said. Besides further usability enhancements, it will incorporate new capabilities that address, for example, diminishing material supplies."

Source: http://www.defensenews.com/articles/f-3 ... ags-behind

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 26 Apr 2017, 23:43
by neptune
http://www.defensenews.com/articles/f-3 ... ags-behind

F-35 logistics system all set for US Air Force and Navy, not yet for Marines

By: Valerie Insinna,
April 26, 2017

WASHINGTON — After months of delays, the newest iteration of the F-35’s logistics system is finally ready to be installed on the aircraft, manufacturer Lockheed Martin announced Wednesday......

....just another link....
:)

...must be the fan/gearbox delta held up the Corp version???? :roll:

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 27 Apr 2017, 08:28
by nutshell
SpudmanWP wrote:VPNs, SATCOM, and private (gov) internet feeds will keep it all moving securely.


From my work experience in the IT infrastructure (worked many times for the italian military) i'd feel quite safe about that connection.

Militaries have a very "loose" definition of internet and most of the devices, like the SH cards (p-2-p F.O. )cannot be accessed from the outside.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 28 Apr 2017, 17:45
by spazsinbad
ALIS 2.02 Ready to Go
28 Apr 2017 AFM

"Lockheed Martin announced Wednesday that the newest version of its Autonomic Logistics Information System, or ALIS, which the company calls “the IT backbone of the F-35,” has been approved for installation on Air Force and Navy F-35s. Another version of ALIS, to be fielded by early 2018, will be coming before the F-35 can close out the system design and development phase, according to Lockheed.

The completion of version 2.02 means that “for the first time, the entire F-35 from tip to tail, including the propulsion system, is integrated within ALIS,” vice president of F-35 logistics Reeves Valentine told reporters on a conference call....

...The new system also automates the tracking of parts among variants of the F-35, provides “enhanced networking,” and streamlines “the resource management for deployed operations,” said Valentine. He called ALIS 2.02 “one of the largest incremental steps of development” so far in the F-35 program because it provides “a single system where all of this data is captured and collected,” giving operators “the tools and the data they need in order to economize across the entire fleet.”...

...But 2.02 is not the final version before the F-35 can enter initial operational test and evaluation, a transition that has been delayed by issues with ALIS development. For IOT&E, a 3.0 version will be required. “Fielding will start very early in 2018,” Valentine said. Among other features, ALIS 3.0 will have better security, faster data transfer for large files, and lightning protection.

A follow-on 4.0 version is expected in early 2019.

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pag ... to-Go.aspx

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 29 Apr 2017, 08:45
by popcorn
https://defensesystems.com/articles/2017/04/26/f35.aspx

F-35’s computer now integrates propulsion data

The Pentagon has approved integration of a software upgrade to the F-35’s maintenance computer system, which adds propulsion data and improved networking technology to its range of processing functions... The new software approval includes the Air Force F-35A and Navy F-35C. After successful flight testing, upgraded ALIS software – called version 2.0.2 – will be installed at all operational F-35 sites by the end of 2017, a Lockheed Martin statement said.

ALIS 2.0.2 now integrates propulsion data, which allows users to manage the F-35 engine from inside ALIS, eliminating the need for multiple maintenance systems and field service representatives to assist with engine diagnostics, analysis and maintenance, available Lockheed information stated.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 03 May 2017, 23:06
by spazsinbad
F-35's Logistics System Moves Forward With New Software Upgrade
26 Apr 2017 Stew Magnuson

"...“For the first time, the entire F-35, from tip to tail, including the propulsion system, is integrated within ALIS,” Reeves Valentine, Lockheed Martin’s vice president of F-35 logistics, told reporters April 26.

Pratt & Whitney’s F135 engine comes with its own performance and health monitoring system that also requires software upgrades. It was operating separately from ALIS, but is now fully integrated — with the exception of the Marine Corps’ F-35B version of the aircraft.

There was a lag in software upgrades Pratt & Whitney needed for the F135 short take-off and vertical-landing engine on the F-35B, he said. That is complete
, and will be in place when the Air Force and Navy begin installing the 2.0.2 upgrades, he added.

Source: http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/ ... re-upgrade

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 03 May 2017, 23:12
by steve2267
Will ALIS cross service lines and nationality lines?

For example, if some Marines were flying cross-country across CONUS and had an issue with their aircraft and stopped at an Air Force Base at which F-35s were stationed, would the Air Force guys be able to use ALIS to tend to the Marine aircraft?

Ditto if on some future international, collaborative campaign. If you had Dutch, UK, Norwegian Lightnings mixed in with US Lightnings, will all be able to play with the same ALIS?

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 03 May 2017, 23:16
by SpudmanWP
Most likely but the Guest Base will not have any historical data on the visiting F-35. I'm sure it's com up since all these F-35s flying around are not taking a full ALIS system with them.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 04 May 2017, 02:12
by Dragon029
Each F-35 squadron will have a standard operating unit (SOU), a server on which the unit's data is housed. Each country will have a central point of entry (CPE), which holds all of the data from its fleets. Each country's CPE then transmits data to the single autonomic logistics operating unit (ALOU), which is housed at Lockheed Martin's Forth Worth facility and acts as a global fleet-management storage device. “It is the one place where you can integrate for each service and country information across the fleet,” Mellon says.


http://aviationweek.com/awin/f-35-s-amb ... ent-system

If the Guest Base is some forward deployed thing using satellite comms, then there'll be issues with downloading the aircraft's historic data, but in the case of something like a USAF F-35A visiting a RAF, etc base 5 years from now, it'll just be a matter of requesting the data from the ALOU, which would then be able to be downloaded quite quickly.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 04 May 2017, 03:32
by steve2267
Heck, how much data are we talking here?

When the doctor is done with the patient, why can't the patient take ALL his updated records and complete history with him on a thumb drive? That is to say, why can't an aircraft's complete history and records be stored someplace safe onboard the aircraft. Encrypt the records even. Would serve as a check against the records kept on the ALIS servers from being hacked or corrupted. Cyber warfare and all.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 04 May 2017, 08:33
by neptune
steve2267 wrote:Heck, how much data are we talking here?

When the doctor is done with the patient, why can't the patient take ALL his updated records and complete history with him on a thumb drive? That is to say, why can't an aircraft's complete history and records be stored someplace safe onboard the aircraft. Encrypt the records even. Would serve as a check against the records kept on the ALIS servers from being hacked or corrupted. Cyber warfare and all.


...my doctor is getting away with updating my medical records on my thumb drive but.. the number of systems of on each F-35 would far exceed a thumb drive capacity >1TB from each flight. My monitoring systems architecture for the mega-million dollar machines greatly exceeds that limit, but my historical servers are local for the automatic analysis of trends and events.
:)

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 05 May 2017, 10:25
by spazsinbad
Ensuring Mission Readiness with ALIS 2.0.2 Upgrade
04 May 2017 LM PR

"...“The maintainers like the flexibility of taking a Toughbook [laptop] to the jet and having everything they need at their fingertips, and that’s your next-generation mindset,” said Steve Supachana, the lead field support engineer at Nellis AFB. “They like the ALIS 2.0.2 upgrade and the fact that they have more stats on the aircraft and have more eyes-on, instantaneous information on the status of their aircraft....

...Since completing the ALIS 2.0.2 validation and verification at Nellis AFB, the ALIS team has also completed the upgrade at NAS Lemoore in California.

Over the course of this year, the ALIS 2.0.2 upgrade will continue to roll out across the U.S. F-35 sites at a rate of two per month. After ALIS 2.0.2 has been stood up across all domestic F-35 bases, the team will begin international implementation until the entire enterprise F-35 fleet is flying with the latest software."

Photo: "Steve Supachana, Lockheed Martin lead field support engineer" https://www.f35.com/assets/uploads/images/supa-news.jpg


Source: https://www.f35.com/in-depth/detail/ens ... .2-upgrade

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 01 Jun 2017, 15:32
by spazsinbad
Hill AFB Airmen generate 3,000th F-35A sortie, adopt upgraded ALIS
31 May 2017; 75th Air Base Wing Public Affairs

"HILL AIR FORCE BASE, Utah (AFNS) -- The 3,000th F-35A Lighting II sortie departed Hill Air Force Base generated by maintainers from the active duty 388th Fighter Wing and Air Force Reserve’s 419th FW May 22, 2017. That sortie, and all others flown that day were carried out with the new version of the Autonomic Logistics Information System. Commonly called ALIS, it’s the F-35A’s information technology infrastructure....

...Operationally implementing the upgraded version of ALIS—ALIS 2.0.2.4—is another milestone for the Airmen working in the F-35 program at Hill AFB. “The biggest improvement is the incorporation of the propulsion system within ALIS,” said Senior Master Sgt. Jory Cyr, the 34th Aircraft Maintenance Unit lead production superintendent. “This alleviates the need to have multiple products to manually track time change items and inspection times. This ALIS update combines air vehicle and propulsion system times in one location.”

Cyr said aircraft maintainers here attended classes, which highlighted changes between the previous and current versions of ALIS, and a support team was available in each section to answer questions. “Aircraft maintenance does not stop when we install these new updates so there were numerous man hours spent making sure all the documentation was correct within the new system prior to flying each aircraft,” he said. “The 34th AMU was able to fly 100 percent of our local scheduled sorties after the upgrade showing the outstanding dedication and attention to detail by everyone within the 388th Fighter Wing.”

The successful ALIS upgrade and F-35 milestones are proving that the Air Force’s newest fifth-generation fighter and the Airmen who maintain it are key to America’s defense. “The culmination of the ALIS 2.0.2.4 and our 3,000th sortie is important because it highlights how fast the program at large is moving forward and how locally we are generating sorties at a very high rate—with only 22 aircraft assigned,” Miles said. “For example, in March we flew each of our aircraft an average of 17 times. Our Airmen are out-producing the entire F-35 enterprise and the Hill AFB stand-up of F-35 operations is ahead of schedule.”"

Photo: "Lt. Col. Dave DeAngelis, an F-35 Lightning II pilot assigned to the 419th Operations Group, prepares for flight May 22, 2017, at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The flight in aircraft 5079 was the 3,000th operational F-35 sortie flown at Hill AFB. (U.S. Air Force photo/Paul Holcomb)" https://media.defense.gov/2017/May/30/2 ... 0-0005.JPG (1.1Mb)

Source: http://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display/ ... aded-alis/

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 01 Jun 2017, 21:17
by gideonic

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 01 Jun 2017, 22:50
by nutshell
I'd kill to see, personally, what is in fact text log worth of a ****** terabyte.

Be serious.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 16 Aug 2017, 01:39
by spazsinbad
LM GM F-35 Weekly Update
03 Aug 2017 Jeff Babione

"ALIS 3.0 and TMS 2.0 Reach Critical Milestone
Last week, our RMS partners completed the Formal Functional Test for ALIS 3.0 and the Training Management System
(TMS) 2.0. Testing was completed one week ahead of schedule and the team found no unexpected errors during the test,
achieving a 99.7% pass rate. TMS 2.0 provides user-friendly personnel management and flight scheduling capabilities,
and allows users to define flexible training plans. TMS was developed natively within ALIS. Conducting verification within
ALIS 3.0 demonstrates the strength of TMS in its operational environment. ALIS 3.0 is on track to finish development by
the end of 2017."

Source: https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... 8_3_17.pdf (0.2Mb)

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 22 Feb 2018, 16:50
by SpudmanWP
ALIS 3.0 Testing Complete But Improvements Are Slow
2/21/2018
—JOHN A. TIRPAK

The F-35’s Autonomic Logistics Integration System, or ALIS, completed operational testing on Feb. 19 and fielded units will be updated with this version on a priority basis, based on which units have the most pressing need, Lockheed Martin Vice President and General Manager for Training and Logistics Solutions Amy Gowder told reporters Feb. 21.

Speaking at the unit’s Orlando, Fla., facility, Gowder confirmed that ALIS 3.0 had completed “flight testing” at Nellis AFB, Nev., although this is an in-house company term and the system does not actually fly.

ALIS is a series of mobile servers mounted in two vertical racks—one classified and one not—that gathers and processes the flight experience of all the F-35 jets in a squadron, automatically ordering parts and maintenance actions as required. The 13 or so servers are transportable and go with the unit when it deploys. Lockheed and its F-35 military customers are looking at a somewhat smaller system that could deploy with a detachment of, say, six jets, as the Air Force has said it will be doing more frequently.

A team of installers travels to F-35 operating locations and updates ALIS hardware over a weekend, when missions are typically not flown, Gowder explained. Units receiving the update first will be those that are operational and flying real-world missions, followed by those doing training.

Despite it being the most up-to-date version of the logistics system, Gowder said Lockheed recognizes it must improve ALIS 3.0, as one of the major elements in its sustainment cost reduction efforts.

“One area [that] we do know” needs improvement is in the number of ALIS administrators, Gowder acknowledged. There are eight needed per squadron, and that must come down, she said, because manpower is a “key driver” of sustainment costs. Future versions will be more centralized to reduce the number of people needed to feed and maintain aircraft information.

She said the company is also looking to improve “usability liability” issues, which means that some ALIS functions actually take longer to perform than they do in legacy logistics systems. The Joint Program Office is allowing Lockheed to “roll in fixes” to both earlier versions and 3.0 to “improve usability.”

Another area slow to pay off is in automated test. ALIS performs this function at the unit part level, but not yet for the overall system, which Gowder said is “where the big bang for the buck is.”

The company and JPO are deeply into discussions about version 4.0, which was originally slated to be released in 2019, but Gowder suggested that target won’t be met, because of new requirements being added and the differing needs of international users.

“We may choose to defer some nice-to-have” features from 4.0 to accelerate more urgently needed improvements, such as cybersecurity, she noted. The focus will continue to be on “quality data integrity,” Gowder noted. The propulsion system—the F135 engine and its performance and parts—was added to ALIS in 2017, greatly expanding the amount of data it amasses and tracks. The company is trying to make sure that flaws from “legacy” logistics systems don’t migrate into ALIS when data is ported over to it.

Gowder asserted that the release of 3.0 fixes some of the problems that have led to F-35 sustainment costs taking too long to come down, and as it spreads throughout the fleet in 2018, “I think you’ll see a big improvement” in sustainability this year, she predicted. With a further update in 2019, more progress should be made, she added.


http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pages/2018/February%202018/ALIS-30-Testing-Complete-But-Improvements-Are-Slow.aspx

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 23 Feb 2018, 00:43
by popcorn
Thanks Spud. Good to know ALIS is progressing, slowly but surely. Software impacts on sustainment costs need to be better appreciated. IIRC someone in top leadership once commented that because of it's complexity and importance, perhaps ALIS merited being it's own separate DoD program.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 20 Apr 2018, 00:16
by popcorn
ALIS is getting smarter.

https://washingtontechnology.com/articl ... ffort.aspx

Lockheed, SAS join forces to bring next-gen analytics to F-35 sustainment

Lockheed Martin and SAS are collaborating to bring next generation analytics to a variety of Lockheed-built aircraft including the F-35 and C-130J.

The effort will focus on integrating artificial intelligence and digital transformation into sustainment activities for the F-35, the C-130J and the LM-100J programs.

“SAS analytics will infuse decision-making with new insights derived from advanced machine learning, deep learning and natural language processing,” the companies said in a release.

Data scientists and engineers will develop self-service applications to support predictive maintenance, fleet performance management, intelligent diagnostics and supply chain optimization.

The companies will be using the SAS Viya product.

“These new capabilities will help the F-35 program deliver a total performance-based logistics sustainment solution that meets warfighter needs and significantly reduces total ownership cost," said Tim Matthews, vice president of F-35 sustainment operations at Lockheed in a release.

The companies declined to put a dollar value on the collaboration effort.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 19 Aug 2018, 15:46
by spazsinbad
"Lockheed Martin Corp., Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, is being awarded a $26,127,742 cost-plus-incentive-fee, cost-plus-fixed-fee order (N0001918F2038) against a previously issued basic ordering agreement (N00019-14-G-0020). This order provides for non-recurring engineering activities associated with the F-35 Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS) Security Architecture Phase III design, development, integration and test of the ALIS Sovereign Data Management (SDM) system in support of the Air Force, Marine Corps, Navy and F-35 international partners. This effort provides F-35 international partners the capability to review and block messages to prevent sovereign data loss. Additionally, the effort includes studies and recommendations to improve the security architecture of ALIS...."

Source: https://www.defense.gov/News/Contracts/ ... vDelivery/ 17 Aug 2018

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 20 Aug 2018, 00:11
by popcorn
Some sort of super-duper anti-malware thing-a-ma-jig. :D

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2018, 05:41
by spazsinbad
Lockheed to build ALIS data transfer controls for F-35’s foreign customers
20 Aug 2018 Garrett Reim

"...International development partners and foreign customers of the F-35 have expressed concern that ALIS, which manages and analyses the fighter’s systems, training and flight logs, would automatically transmit information back to Lockheed’s hub in Fort Worth, Texas, possibly giving the company and the USA insight into their military operations.

“This effort provides F-35 international partners the capability to review and block messages to prevent sovereign data loss,” says the contract notice online. “Additionally, the effort includes studies and recommendations to improve the security architecture of ALIS.”

Previously, international development partners and foreign customers of the F-35 had programmed short-term software patches for ALIS that allowed them to control what data was sent back to the USA. Data that F-35 foreign operators could block include the names of pilots, aircraft location and aircraft availability, according the F-35 Joint Program Office....

...The development work for this final fix is funded by the US Air Force, which contributed $10.9 million, the Marine Corps, which contributed $7.9 million, the Navy, which contributed $2 million, and international partners, which [I AM NOT A WHICH GOLDARN IT! WHO ARE YOU WHO WHO - WHO WHO - WHO ARE YOU] contributed $5.5 million....

...The feature is expected to be fielded in the first quarter of 2019, and will improve system speed and performance as well, according to Lockheed Martin.

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... -f-451274/

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2018, 16:07
by SpudmanWP
2019 lines up with either an update to 4.0 or the ALIS 4.1 release.

Image

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 22 Aug 2018, 16:01
by SpudmanWP
Dear Lord... How can The Drive get it so wrong?

The Pentagon announced the deal, which came through the U.S. Navy, the service that is presently in charge of the main F-35 Joint Program Office (JPO), on Aug. 17, 2018. The Maryland-headquartered defense contractor is set to receive more than $26 million – all of which is funding from the program’s international partners – to craft what the U.S. military is calling the Sovereign Data Management (SDM) system for the Joint Strike Fighter’s Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS).


http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/23 ... ir-secrets

Even though they linked to the actual contract announcement, it looks like they neglected to actually read it as the Partner nations are paying only 21%, not 100% of the $26 mil.

This order combines purchases for the Air Force ($10,769,545; 41 percent); Marine Corps ($7,895,656; 30 percent); Navy ($1,988,809; 8 percent), and international partners ($5,473,732; 21 percent).

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 22 Aug 2018, 20:37
by krieger22
The Drive


Found your problem :P

If there's two things they're reliably wrong on, it's anything stealthy and the A-10. Wasn't Rogoway still touting the old $100m per unit figure for the -A?

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 26 Feb 2019, 04:30
by spazsinbad
Here we have the poster child for how not to develop technology [BEST READ at SOURCE!]
24 Feb 2019 Jill Aitoro

"...truly, you might say ALIS is the poster child for the failures within the traditional defense community to understand how best to develop technology. To resurface a tongue-in-cheek comment from Josh Marcuse, director of the Defense Innovation Board, about the Pentagon’s approach to innovation: “It’s OK to fail, you just have to fail very slowly, you have to fail very expensively and you have to fail with a high degree of documentation.” It would appear ALIS met that standard beautifully.

The Air Force is moving forward on a way to fix things — a promising and actually innovative approach called Mad Hatter (clever, right?) that one can only hope will also offer up some better practices for future development.

The F-35 is not your typical tech development program. I get that. One might argue that the sensitivity of the data managed by the logistics systems, combined with the complexity of requirements, prevent commercial practices or open standards from being used. But that argument doesn’t hold water. Smart tech development doesn’t happen in lieu of security.

Did the defense community understand that back in 2001? Maybe not. But let’s hope everyone knows it now."

Graphic: "The acronym for the Autonomic Logistics Information System is pronounced "Alice," and a Mad Hatter initiative is set to fix the system. (John Tenniel via Getty Images)" https://www.armytimes.com/resizer/PWQme ... uality(100)/arc-anglerfish-arc2-prod-mco.s3.amazonaws.com/public/QLGP34ZGKZGYPLMPV6AEK7WYYM.jpg


Source: https://www.defensenews.com/opinion/201 ... echnology/

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2019, 20:20
by spazsinbad
Air Force Tries To Fix F-35’s ALIS — From A Big, Broken Box To the Cloud
06 Mar 2019 Colin Clark

"How bad is the F-35's computerized maintenance system, ALIS? So bad the plane may be better off without it.

[LONG POST WITH STUFF ALREADY KNOWN from DOT&E for example but best read at source then....]
...Pentagon officials have pushed Lockheed to improve ALIS for years. But now, the head of Air Force acquisition, Will Roper, has come up with what sounds like a plan to rebuild ALIS to make it nimbler, faster and smaller. With the wonderful name of Mad Hatter, the plan is to strip the functional software out of the current system and host it on the cloud as a complex of apps, he told reporters here last week. I asked Roper if this meant ALIS would no longer be a big box. He said yes. I spoke with him later and he seems reasonably confident that the code will be stable in the cloud.

So, there’ll be something like a tablet, operating on a highly encrypted wireless network, that will allow the maintainers and pilots to reach back to a huge data set in the cloud for whatever they need. It will be classified and — if the Intelligence Community and others who’ve already embraced cloud computing are correct — moving to the cloud should mean that ALIS data may well be better protected than it is now.

While there were no details in the OTE report, it seems pretty clear from the language that ALIS faces serious cyber vulnerabilities. For example, the report says this:

“According to the JPO, the air vehicle [the F-35 jet itself] is capable of operating for up to 30 days without connectivity to ALIS. In light of current cybersecurity threats and vulnerabilities, along with peer and near-peer threats to bases and communications, the F-35 program and Services should conduct testing of aircraft operations without access to ALIS for extended periods of time.”

In other words, with the current setup, ALIS may be so vulnerable that Robert Behler, the OTE director, thinks the program should be able to operate for a month without hooking up to it at all. Now that’s a bad sign.

To be fair, Roper did say that much of the functional software in ALIS — the stuff that does specific tasks — works well, so they shouldn’t need to start from scratch. But the Mad Hatter team needs to repackage that still-usable code into something military maintainers can actually use to do their jobs, instead of something that makes their jobs much harder."

Source: https://breakingdefense.com/2019/03/air ... the-cloud/

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2019, 22:11
by XanderCrews
spazsinbad wrote:
Air Force Tries To Fix F-35’s ALIS — From A Big, Broken Box To the Cloud
06 Mar 2019 Colin Clark

"How bad is the F-35's computerized maintenance system, ALIS? So bad the plane may be better off without it.

[LONG POST WITH STUFF ALREADY KNOWN from DOT&E for example but best read at source then....]
...Pentagon officials have pushed Lockheed to improve ALIS for years. But now, the head of Air Force acquisition, Will Roper, has come up with what sounds like a plan to rebuild ALIS to make it nimbler, faster and smaller. With the wonderful name of Mad Hatter, the plan is to strip the functional software out of the current system and host it on the cloud as a complex of apps, he told reporters here last week. I asked Roper if this meant ALIS would no longer be a big box. He said yes. I spoke with him later and he seems reasonably confident that the code will be stable in the cloud.

So, there’ll be something like a tablet, operating on a highly encrypted wireless network, that will allow the maintainers and pilots to reach back to a huge data set in the cloud for whatever they need. It will be classified and — if the Intelligence Community and others who’ve already embraced cloud computing are correct — moving to the cloud should mean that ALIS data may well be better protected than it is now.

While there were no details in the OTE report, it seems pretty clear from the language that ALIS faces serious cyber vulnerabilities. For example, the report says this:

“According to the JPO, the air vehicle [the F-35 jet itself] is capable of operating for up to 30 days without connectivity to ALIS. In light of current cybersecurity threats and vulnerabilities, along with peer and near-peer threats to bases and communications, the F-35 program and Services should conduct testing of aircraft operations without access to ALIS for extended periods of time.”

In other words, with the current setup, ALIS may be so vulnerable that Robert Behler, the OTE director, thinks the program should be able to operate for a month without hooking up to it at all. Now that’s a bad sign.

To be fair, Roper did say that much of the functional software in ALIS — the stuff that does specific tasks — works well, so they shouldn’t need to start from scratch. But the Mad Hatter team needs to repackage that still-usable code into something military maintainers can actually use to do their jobs, instead of something that makes their jobs much harder."

Source: https://breakingdefense.com/2019/03/air ... the-cloud/



Its not a matter of "now thats a bad sign" its a matter of everyone starting to respect the nature of Cyber Warfare, and what China and Russia are expected to bring to it.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2019, 23:25
by vilters
Well, over the many years I have read some stupid things.
i have read some very stupid things.
And, I have read some crazy extremely stupid things.

Put Alis or parts of it in the Cloud?

The thing with clouds is that they leak. => In real world it is called rain, or snow.

On the web it means : Here I am, feel free to come and get me.

E V E R Y T H I N G in the cloud is as available and as free as open source. (All you need is some 8 year old that can type)

Professional hackers might take some years but 8 year olds "accidently" do it in minutes.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 08 Mar 2019, 00:15
by XanderCrews
vilters wrote:Well, over the many years I have read some stupid things.
i have read some very stupid things.
And, I have read some crazy extremely stupid things.


yep, watch:


Put Alis or parts of it in the Cloud?

The thing with clouds is that they leak. => In real world it is called rain, or snow.

On the web it means : Here I am, feel free to come and get me.

E V E R Y T H I N G in the cloud is as available and as free as open source. (All you need is some 8 year old that can type)

Professional hackers might take some years but 8 year olds "accidently" do it in minutes.


Vilters always delivers

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 08 Mar 2019, 00:28
by spazsinbad
'vilters' always delivers because of thinking 'outside the box' and in this case 'outside the cloud' in the 'fog of war'. No? :roll:

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 09 Mar 2019, 00:08
by SpudmanWP
lol


I can guarantee that no Air Force maintainer will ever name their daughter, Alice,” Heather Wilson said during her keynote. Wilson characterized ALIS — short for Autonomic Logistics Information System — as “a proprietary system so frustrating to use, maintainers said they were wasting 10-15 hours a week fighting with it … and looking for ways to bypass it to try to make F-35s mission capable.”

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 09 Mar 2019, 00:50
by vilters
Ach, it all depends.

My Facebook was hacked, twice in 5 years.
Twitter? Hacked
PayPal? Hacked
Messenger? Found my messages, but not on Messenger anymore.

Social media? Yep, they are V E R Y social. Something like, everywhere. LOL.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 09 Mar 2019, 02:14
by spazsinbad
Key piece of F-35 logistics system unusable by US Air Force students, instructor pilots [LONG: BEST READ @ URL]
08 Mar 2019 Valerie Insinna

"EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. — The F-35 fighter jet’s logistics backbone has proven so clunky and burdensome to work with that the U.S. Air Force’s instructor pilots, as well as students learning to fly the aircraft, have stopped using the system, Defense News has learned. The Autonomic Logistics Information System, built by F-35 manufacturer Lockheed Martin, was supposed to consolidate training, maintenance and supply chain management functions into a single entity, making it easier for users to input data and oversee the jet’s health and history throughout its life span.

ALIS has been a disappointment to maintainers in the field, with updates coming behind schedule and many workarounds needed so it functions as designed. But the Air Force’s F-35A instructor and student pilots at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, and Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, were so disappointed with the performance of ALIS’ training system that they bailed entirely, confirmed Col. Paul Moga, commander of Eglin’s 33rd Fighter Squadron.

“The functionality in ALIS with regards to TMS — the training management system — was such a source of frustration and a time waste to the instructor pilots and the simulator instructors and the academic instructors that we at [Air Education and Training Command] in coordination with us [at Eglin] and Luke made a call almost a year ago to stop using the program,” Moga said during a Feb. 26 interview....

...Tech. Sgt. Joshua Wells is an ALIS expediter for the 33rd Fighter Squadron. One of two people in the squadron with that title, his entire job revolves around helping maintainers and support personnel use ALIS, and ironing out problems with the system that might occur throughout the day.

Wells takes a pragmatic view on ALIS’ performance. He calls it “a great tool for researching prior maintenance as opposed to digging through hundreds of thousands of pages” of documentation, and said the latest software update in January has led to some positive changes.

The speed of the servers is improving, but only so many ALIS users can use the system simultaneously. At a certain point, a user may have to wait for someone to log off before moving forward, he said.

Certain parts on the aircraft have a time limit at which scheduled maintenance or a replacement must take place. The latest ALIS update has sped up the time taken to process that data, “but we still have hiccups,” Wells acknowledged.

Users also continue to see challenges with gaps in the technical data that follows each part or subsystem, like the ejection seat. A 2018 report by the Pentagon’s director of operational test and evaluation noted that Lockheed’s subcontractors on the F-35 do not always input information into ALIS in a standardized way, as they do not use the system. The Air Force has specifically said this problem can cause missed sorties and is one of the top five drivers of non-mission-capable rates.

“They are way better than where they were,” Wells said of the data gaps, adding that he has to call Lockheed Martin personnel “significantly less” for help getting data than he used to with older versions of the system.

While the Defense Department hasn’t spelled out a cohesive plan for ALIS’ future, there are signs the system could change in significant, fundamental ways in the coming years. Naval Air Systems Command, which manages F-35 contracts across the department, put out a solicitation in January for “ALIS Next,” which it envisions as a Lockheed Martin product that “will re-design ALIS in accordance with current information technology and software development best practices.”

The Air Force is beginning to look at that problem through its Mad Hatter effort, which pairs coders from its Kessel Run software lab with F-35 maintainers at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada.

Currently, Mad Hatter’s developers are building apps that will — hopefully — help to make ALIS more efficient and user-friendly, such as an app to expedite the creation of maintenance schedules. Users at Nellis will then test that app and provide feedback, shaping it into something customized to their needs.

But perhaps even more importantly, the Mad Hatter project has begun the process of hosting ALIS on the cloud, which will allow developers to “triage” code so that what is good and usable is separated from bad code that needs to be reworked, said Will Roper, the Air Force’s top acquisition official.

“There is good code there, but it’s good code in a fairly bad user interface and a bad architecture — bad in the sense that it’s 1990s technology and we’re in 2019,” he told Defense News in February.

“As they go through the code, think of it as apps in a smartphone, knowing that it’s an old phone that needs to improve. So we’re eventually going to ditch the ’90s flip phone, re-host on a modern smartphone, and we want to know what apps are pretty good to use, what apps can be used in part with reuse, and what things we need to recode,” he said. “It’s early, but so far a lot of the code appears reusable down at the app level.”

Despite all the problems, Wells is hopeful that the system will continue to improve. When this reporter asked if ALIS’ problems were just growing pains, he gave a resigned laugh. “Long growing pains, but yes,” he said."

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/air/2019/03 ... or-pilots/

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 09 Mar 2019, 02:40
by spazsinbad
How the US Air Force’s Kessel Run team plans to solve one of the F-35 program’s biggest headaches
27 Feb 2019 Valerie Insinna [ANOTHER LONG ARTICLE BEST READ at URL - Valerie is going to milk this ALIS story...]

"WASHINGTON — Setting the weekly flying and maintenance schedule for an F-35 squadron is a weeklong process. It takes hours for multiple people to download data from the jets and comb through it, paste information into different spreadsheets, and continuously update each system.

With a new app called Kronos, on track to be delivered in early March, the U.S. Air Force is hoping it can trim the amount of time for that process to 15 minutes. Kronos was developed by the Air Force’s Kessel Run software development team as part of a new effort called Mad Hatter, which was established late last year to solve pilot and maintainer gripes with the F-35 fighter jet.

If all goes well, it could lead to a much bigger overhaul of the F-35’s troubled logistics backbone, known as the Autonomic Logistics Information System, or ALIS, said Will Roper, the Air Force’s top acquisition official. “There are many things about ALIS that are very frustrating and time consuming,” Roper told Defense News on Feb. 12 in an exclusive interview. “The goal [of Mad Hatter] is not simply to fix ALIS within the constraints that define it. It is to make the operator — the maintainer — more efficient, to make their user experience more pleasant.”

To build Kronos, the Air Force is relying on a team of developers from Kessel Run; Lockheed Martin, which manufactures the F-35 and ALIS; and Pivotal Software, Inc., which has created software and data analytics applications for the Air Force over the past several years. Those coders are also working with a specialized group of maintainers from Nellis Air Force Base — called the Blended Operational Lightning Technician team or BOLT — who have helped shape the product, will test it and then return feedback to the Mad Hatter team once the first iteration of Kronos has been delivered, Roper said….

...Two other applications will follow closely on the heels of Kronos. Titan will help expeditors determine fleet status, assigning tasks between maintenance teams as the workflow changes. Meanwhile, Athena is built for squadron leadership and will help section chiefs ensure maintainers are trained and performing work to build competency. “We’ll start with the BOLT [aircraft maintenance group] at Nellis — they’re going to be acting as a guinea pig or a petri dish for this code,” Roper said.

“If it works well, then there’s an option for the Air Force and the Navy to move that beyond Nellis and to deploy elsewhere,” he said. “There’s nothing about this tool that is peculiar to F-35s, so we’re thinking beyond just F-35s. Maybe F-22s can be run this way. Maybe even fourth-gen systems.”

And once Mad Hatter has a chance to prove itself with its initial apps, it may move onto a more substantial task: creating an experimental, cloud-based version of ALIS, and then helping build future software drops. The team has begun the process of re-hosting the latest iteration of ALIS, version 3.0.1.2, on Pivotal’s cloud foundry, Roper said.

“That allows you to start breaking the code up into modules and triaging parts of the code that we think can be used as they are, or parts of the code that can be used with modification, or parts of the code that we need to change to make compatible with cloud,” he said. “It also allows us to use cloud development tools, which is a big deal.”...

...So how did a system designed to streamline maintenance processes become such a burden?

ALIS is a proprietary system built to Defense Department standards that existed before the existence of concepts like cloud computing and DevOpps software. In order for the ALIS infrastructure to improve, it may need to move to modern, cloud-based tools, Roper said.

“There is good code there, but it’s good code in a fairly bad user interface and a bad architecture — bad in the sense that it’s 1990s technology and we’re in 2019,” he said. “As they go through the code, think of it as apps in a smartphone, knowing that it’s an old phone that needs to improve. So we’re eventually going to ditch the ’90s flip phone, re-host on a modern smartphone, and we want to know what apps are pretty good to use, what apps can be used in part with reuse, and what things we need to recode,” he said. “It’s early, but so far a lot of the code appears reusable down at the app level.”

Fixing ALIS and moving the F-35 to a more agile software development approach is a stated goal for both Lockheed and the F-35 Joint Program Office. How exactly that happens is not set in stone. While the Mad Hatter effort kicked off in October, teams have only been coding since January. Before that, Lockheed and the Air Force sat at the negotiating table, solidifying how much reach the government would have into ALIS and what data it would own....

...In January, Naval Air Systems Command, which manages F-35 contracts, posted a notice stating its intent to sole-source a contract to Lockheed for “ALIS Next.” That effort “will re-design ALIS in accordance with current information technology and software development best practices,” the solicitation said...."

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/air/2019/02 ... headaches/

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 09 Mar 2019, 03:57
by popcorn
I'm surprised this wasn't addressed earlier in the program. The AF had been touting that Mx personnel were involved in the design process.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 20 Mar 2019, 23:33
by SpudmanWP
Ouch

One F-35 repair depot found 68 percent of parts marked for repair did not need fixing.


https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/p ... on-809465/

I bet most of that is due to lack of ALIS maturity.

Does anyone remember where this came from originally?

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 21 Mar 2019, 01:30
by count_to_10
SpudmanWP wrote:Ouch

One F-35 repair depot found 68 percent of parts marked for repair did not need fixing.


https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/p ... on-809465/

I bet most of that is due to lack of ALIS maturity.

Does anyone remember where this came from originally?

68% sounds about right to me, actually. That means almost a third did need replacement, and you have to figure in that there would be a statistical chance of any of those outright failing in flight.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 21 Mar 2019, 01:57
by steve2267
count_to_10 wrote:
SpudmanWP wrote:
One F-35 repair depot found 68 percent of parts marked for repair did not need fixing.


https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/p ... on-809465/

I bet most of that is due to lack of ALIS maturity.

Does anyone remember where this came from originally?

68% sounds about right to me, actually. That means almost a third did need replacement, and you have to figure in that there would be a statistical chance of any of those outright failing in flight.


Another possible explanation is the plane is broke, and the maintainer shotguns it and replaces a bunch of parts or an entire subsystem without drilling down. All the parts or the entire system is marked as needing repair, but it turns out only 1/3 did.

Not sure if that is an indictment of ALIS, or maintenance practices or what. For all I know, 1/3 is a decent percentage. It's far better than, say, only 1 in 10 parts were actually in need of repair. Would be nice to hear the opinions of a wrench bender, logistician, and maintenance engineer on the matter.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 21 Mar 2019, 02:53
by quicksilver
“Another possible explanation is the plane is broke, and the maintainer shotguns it and replaces a bunch of parts or an entire subsystem without drilling down. All the parts or the entire system is marked as needing repair, but it turns out only 1/3 did.”

Though not outside of the realm of the possible, that would be an extreme that is inconsistent with sound maintenance practice. ALIS is the default blame sponge, but the reality is that troubleshooting is/remains an art form. Fault detection and isolation on F-35 is more nuanced than legacy, and old experience is both an asset and a liability as a consequence. There is a learning curve on the way to ‘jet whisperer.’

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 21 Mar 2019, 05:01
by aussiebloke
SpudmanWP wrote:
One F-35 repair depot found 68 percent of parts marked for repair did not need fixing.


Does anyone remember where this came from originally?


It appears on page 17 of this October 2017 GAO report:

https://www.gao.gov/assets/690/687982.pdf

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2019, 01:53
by spazsinbad
No WONDER users of ALIS have troubles - they are using ALIAS!
US Air Force practices Lockheed Martin F-35A hot crew swap
03 Apr 2019 Garrett Reim

"... In many situations, ALIAS makes maintainers’ work more difficult, said the Office of Director of Operational Test and Evaluation (DOT&E) in a January report...." [poofread, profred, proofread]

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... re-457220/

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 04 May 2019, 18:48
by spazsinbad
Pentagon Needs Hill Help With Software Fixes, Including On F-35
03 May 2019 Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

"Acquisition chief Ellen Lord wants a radically new way of buying software, but appropriators have to approve.

PENTAGON: Congress has to change the law so the Pentagon can fix its broken process for acquiring software, Ellen Lord said today. It would allow her to launch multiple pilot projects next year. One of those pilots would be used to overhaul the F-35 fighter’s notoriously troubled maintenance system, ALIS....

Fixing The F-35?
“Software is different from hardware (and not all software is the same),” the report warns. That means the Pentagon needs not only a separate process for acquiring software differently from hardware, but also needs the flexibility to acquire different kinds of software different. Even on a single program like the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, for example, the code actually embedded in the aircraft, controlling highly classified sensors and weapons, requires a different approach from the mission and threat profiles, which require a different approach from the maintenance and spare parts database.

The F-35’s maintenance and spares software — Lockheed Martin‘s Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS) — has been an unshakeable albatross around the program’s neck for years. Rather than simplifying ground crews’ jobs, Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson has said, ALIS requires them to spend an extra 10 to 15 hours a week finding ways to work around it. The Air Force has unleashed its elite Kessel Run team of in-house coders to fix Lockheed Martin’s mess, but that’s a stopgap.

In the longer run, Lord — who oversees all defense acquisition, not just the Air Force — wants to make the F-35, and particularly ALIS, the subject of one of her first software acquisition pilots next year. While the main application of ALIS is for sustainment, Lord said today, “it has tentacles back into development and operations,” making it a good candidate for the new approach."

Source: https://breakingdefense.com/2019/05/pen ... g-on-f-35/

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 11 May 2019, 22:07
by spazsinbad
Mad Hatter Begins Delivering Apps to F-35 Flightline
10 May 2019 Rachel S. Cohen​

"Mad Hatter, the Air Force-led software coding effort tackling the F-35’s troubled Autonomic Logistics Information System, delivered its initial applications to the flightline at Nellis AFB, Nev., last week, a service official said May 9.

The first two applications that we fielded don’t interact with ALIS,” Steve Wert, the Air Force’s digital program executive officer, said at a National Defense Industrial Association conference. “They are separate applications that help the maintainers do things that they were doing outside of ALIS anyway. They were using Excel spreadsheets and handwritten notes and then having to re-enter those things. … They were pain points.”

Future applications will work directly with ALIS itself, Wert said. The Air Force’s Kessel Run coding team is collaborating on Mad Hatter with fighter jet manufacturer Lockheed Martin, the F-35 Joint Program Office, and Silicon Valley-based Pivotal, which helps the Air Force learn agile software development...." [a few more paras at jump]

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pag ... tline.aspx

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 15 May 2019, 09:52
by spazsinbad
Hanscom AFB software teams decode F-35 maintenance
14 May 2019 Benjamin Newell, 66th Air Base Group Public Affairs

"HANSCOM AIR FORCE BASE, Mass. (AFNS) -- Software teams from Hanscom Air Force Base are fielding applications that help aircraft maintainers at Nellis AFB, Nevada, plan for successful operational testing of the Air Force’s newest fighter, the F-35 Lightning II.

Hanscom AFB’s software teams travel to Nellis AFB to work with customers in the 57th Wing’s Bolt Aircraft Maintenance Unit. Bolt AMU maintains six F-35 operational testing aircraft. The 57th AMU’s maintainers serve as beta testers for programmers and designers who custom-build applications Air Force flight line mechanics use daily.

Maintainers work with the Autonomous Logistics Information System, or ALIS, to track scheduled and unscheduled maintenance issues on specific aircraft and fleet-wide. Hanscom AFB used ALIS (pronounced Alice) as the inspiration for their effort, Mad Hatter, in reference to Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.”

“We’re not necessarily focused on changing ALIS,” said Lt. Col. Aaron Capizzi, Mad Hatter lead. “We’re here to deliver software our Airmen love and help them spend the most amount of time on the flight line, physically fixing the aircraft. We want to provide applications that enable our maintainers to keep the aircraft they have mission-capable.”...

...One of the F-35’s inherent advantages is its ability to self-diagnose and tell maintainers when certain systems need to be inspected, repaired or replaced. Modern auto mechanics reach for a digital interrogator that they plug into a car’s dash, or under the hood, before they ever grab a wrench. F-35 maintainers use similar tools to keep their jets flying, but PEO Digital software experts found they relied on more antiquated processes to augment or replace existing F-35 software.

“When we did initial discovery, we found that a lot of Airmen had augmented maintenance software with spreadsheets and printed schedules to track and plan maintenance,” said Capt. Brian Humphreys, an aircraft maintenance officer who is participating in career broadening as a program manager for the F-35 software design effort. “There’s all this great data the aircraft can give you, but since the existing system didn’t allow maintainers easy access to the data, we needed to build applications maintainers could use to access it.”

The PEO Digital software teams did what agile software developers always do when they encounter a large, complicated system. They isolate it into smaller, modular components that small teams can handle.

Their first success came just last week, in the form of two applications - Kronos and Titan. Kronos serves as an interactive scheduler that maintenance supervisors can use to create short and long-term plans for flight line maintenance. Kronos digitized the Airmen’s maintenance tracking process, eliminating repetitive data entry tasks and helping plan future maintenance by providing calendars that respond to simple inputs. Titan is an application helping to track an aircraft’s health, ensuring every Airman can see and understand an aircraft’s readiness status in a single glance.

Mad Hatter saw a similar opportunity with tracking another vital piece of aircraft maintenance: Airmen themselves.

“When a maintenance supervisor is designing a shift schedule, he doesn’t actually care that much about ranks on each shift,” said David Zemsky, a product designer who came on board during a special one-day hiring event, run by Mad Hatter’s parent unit, Detachment 12. “He cares about the levels of certification each Airman has, and tracking that can be extremely complex.”

Zemsky plied his trade as a user-design expert only three days after joining Detachment 12, also known as Kessel Run. He is working on another application called Athena. This mythologically-inspired application enables certification tracking in maintenance units by asking supervisors to add their Airmen’s certification statuses digitally, feeding into a more complete assignment process.

Putting enough people on duty to tackle every problem that rolls into the hangar is a crucial step for any maintenance unit. Athena could make that a nearly frictionless process.

Another team, Monocle, led by Maj. Jennifer Kannegaard, project manager, is in initial discovery phases for an application that could one day provide technical orders, or TOs, to maintainers in a user-friendly way. Maintainers need TOs any time they touch an aircraft, but the current process for distributing TOs is wasteful and time-intensive and TO viewers are clunky at best.

Each Mad Hatter team has found success by maintaining tight ties with the 57th Wing aircraft maintainers in order to meet customer needs and ensure their final application contributes directly to aircraft readiness.

Kronos and Titan are already helping one Nellis AFB unit, and the Mad Hatter team is eyeing the next step in the Agile development process. Capizzi and the Mad Hatter team of 70 government-led personnel are laying groundwork to scale their work for use in more F-35 maintenance units, possibly to include sister services’ and allied F-35 variants."

Source: https://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display ... intenance/

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 15 May 2019, 11:42
by madrat
I hope they utilize AI to smarten up fleet maintenance. AI doesn't think so well as it can take a heap of information and find trends with complex relationships.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 28 Jun 2019, 09:56
by spazsinbad
F-35 Updates
27 Jun 2019 Marcus Weisgerber

"...Next-gen ALIS.
Formally called the Autonomic Logistics Information System, it manages every F-35 around the world and the plane’s parts. So, it’s kind of a big deal. Like the F-35 itself, ALIS has had its development problems over the years.

The system was designed before modern smartphones and touchscreens were ubiquitous. Lockheed and Air Force engineers are now working to make ALIS more like the devices the airmen using it are more familiar with.

First, this means getting ALIS into the cloud, Ulmer said. Right now, it exists on laptops and computers. If there’s a software update, each machine must be individually updated.

Then there’s the interface. ALIS has “pull-down menu upon pull-down menu,” Ulmer said. “Literally, it’s eight clicks to take a weapon and load it.” An Air Force effort known as Mad Hatter are working to make it more automated using drag-and-drop technology. That is supposed to hit the streets in the “next couple of years,” Ulmer said...."

Source: https://www.defenseone.com/business/201 ... 19/158054/

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 28 Jun 2019, 10:15
by hornetfinn
Getting ALIS to the cloud and having modern GUI will likely help a lot. It definitely shows how technology (including software) advances fast and how it must be taken into account during the very long development timelines of complex military equipment. Next they must give wireless VR/AR goggles to maintainers, so they will not need to use laptops etc. while doing maintenance.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2019, 19:08
by SpudmanWP
US Air Force’s acquisition chief talks {ALIS,} new B-52 engines and the future of battle management

Can you provide an update on Mad Hatter, the Air Force’s project to use agile software development to try to fix some of the problems with the F-35’s logistics system? You said in February that several improvements were to be fielded to the Autonomic Logistics Information System within weeks.

Mad Hatter is doing great. I have to give the team an A+ on being able to get started and start pulling apart the problems that our maintainers had.

They already deployed several apps that are helping maintainers. They fixed problems with the electronic equipment logs that were showing false positives, so those have been fixed, and the maintainers get to focus on things that are actually broken — not things that are reported as broken.

They fixed the scheduler, which had mismatches between the flight line system and ALIS, and they are currently working on things that are going to help maintainers do their own workflow on the flight line. There is a lot more to go for them. They’re putting Wi-Fi out on the line so that you can touch ALIS at the flight line, which currently you can’t. Maintainers have to go do their maintenance and then come back and enter data in the subsequent systems, and it doesn’t make sense to create data once and then replicate it again.

We want maintainers to be able to have ALIS in a protected, secure Wi-Fi network at the flight lines; that data is instantly uploaded. We’ve got work to go to get the accreditation done so that we could reach all the way back into the standard operating unit that touches Lockheed Martin. But we got a great partnership with Lockheed. They’ve been with us every step of the way.

What happens next?

I don’t have the answer yet, but one of the things that I think we should consider is the next variant of ALIS to be delivered. That’s 3.6. It’s currently going through negotiation and we’re approaching it as traditional ALIS, but if we believe in agile development, eventually we need to pull a development module of ALIS out of the traditional and put it into the Mad Hatter process. [Version] 3.6 is a candidate for that. If it’s not 3.6, is it 3.7 or 3.8?

The discussions we’re having now is about where’s the chalk line that we switch to the new methodology. We have to have enough development teams to do it and support the level and scope of the software, but I think we’re ready. We’ve got the team in the Air Force. We have 800 people in Kessel Run, [the Air Force’s software development team], that are currently doing amazing work for us.

With agile software development, you want to have exposure with the user. Once those apps were deployed, what was the feedback like? Did users want to see additional fixes, or were the apps coming out well already?

When final deployment was done, it was software as the users wanted. The users are involved from the beginning. Step one is the coders leaving their coding shop and going out to the flight line in Nellis [Air Force Base, Nevada], and sitting down, walking through how ALIS works and how the rest of the maintenance planning tools work. Understanding the pain points: What do you not like? What takes up your time? What do you want to change? Storyboarding that out to understand how it might be fixed, turning that into a development back log; so what am I going to attack and when? And then having the user touch products before they become final.

What the Mad Hatter team does is continues to iterate during design so that by the time you deploy, it’s in the image of what the operators have requested, not in the image of what the developers expected they wanted, and that’s the secret to “agile.”


https://www.defensenews.com/digital-sho ... anagement/

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 09 Jul 2019, 07:35
by doge
ALIS-Next 8)
From JPO's Facebook https://www.facebook.com/F35JPO/photos/ ... 714517446/
60828123_2423708717850779_7881095092138672128_n.jpg

(Do not know why but) From this month JPO had opened Twitter. (There are only a few tweets.)
https://twitter.com/theF35JPO

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 09 Jul 2019, 13:36
by steve2267
ALIS is a dirty word on the F-35 program. It has given LM a black eye, of sorts.

And while not excusing LM, because they have a degree of responsibility in the product delivered, I doubt ALIS, being as large and as complicated as it is, was a freebie that LM threw together and told the miltary / JPO, "Hey, we've got this great software tool for you to use to maintain the F-35... you'll love it!"

Rather, being as large and as complex as it is, I am guessing the requirements for ALIS are rather detailed, complex, and lengthy in and of themselves. While aerospace companies are not known as stalwarts of software elegance, the military services are not terribly bright either, at writing good requirements, less software requirements that can be terribly complex and tedious. Generally speaking, the US government gets exactly what they specify in a contract.

"Eight clicks to load a weapon"? How much paperwork was involved before ALIS / F-35 came along?

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 08 Sep 2019, 15:57
by doge
ALIS + Mad Hatter is going well...? :roll:
https://breakingdefense.com/2019/09/net ... -progress/
Net Assessment Comes To DNI; Roper Says F-35’s ALIS Makes Progress
By COLIN CLARK on September 05, 2019
NATIONAL HARBOR: A key capability the Defense Department has relied on since the late Andy Marshall invented it — Net Assessment — is coming to the Intelligence Community.

In other news, the head of Air Force acquisition, Will Roper, told me that the attempt to rebuild F-35’s maintenance and mission planning system known as ALIS as a cluster of apps is “going well, actually.”

However, the nascent effort is still an experiment at Nellis AFB run by software team known as Mad Hatter. The next step is, Roper said, for the Navy to decide if Mad Hatter should continue to work on what may become a substantial rebuild of ALIS, which has become perhaps the most troubled part of the F-35 program. That decision will be up to the Navy’s James Geurts, assistant secretary for research, development and acquisition, who now has acquisition authority for the F-35.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 16 Sep 2019, 17:40
by doge
How good is ALIS 3.1.1...? :roll:
https://aviationweek.com/defense/lockhe ... chitecture
Lockheed To Migrate F-35 Backbone To Cloud Architecture
Sep 11, 2019Lee Hudson and Steve Trimble | Aerospace Daily & Defense Report
Lockheed Martin intends to migrate its F-35 digital support backbone, the Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS), to a native-cloud architecture by year’s end and field it in 2020.

A joint government and industry team tested an early version of the new framework in both lab and flight test environments in May, company spokesman Mike Friedman said in a Sept. 11 statement to Aerospace DAILY.

“By moving all ALIS applications to a cloud-native, open architecture, we can rapidly develop and test pieces of ALIS without having to load the entire system for each upgrade,” he said. “And instead of aggregating many fixes over a 12- to 18-month period into a single upgrade, the new approach allows developers to create, test, receive feedback and implement fixes every few weeks while reducing development and fielding costs.”

The new construct still must be tested in an operational environment so that developers can garner user feedback to refine their approach.

Separately, the newest ALIS software release, 3.1.1, is saving pilots an average of 35 min. in report generation and review. The new software release also is saving maintainers 40 min. each day in report generation and several hours weekly in managing fleet directive reports, he added.

“This latest release leverages the development work Lockheed Martin completed in 2018 with its internal investment funding,” Friedman said. “In 2018, Lockheed Martin invested approximately $50 million in ALIS and will continue investing approximately $180 million through 2021 to modernize ALIS and enhance enterprise sustainment systems.”

Extrapolated across the enterprise of more than 425 aircraft flying today, it will save more than 20,000 manhours annually. Lockheed Martin has invested in additional time saving and efficiency ALIS automations and is working with the government on implementation and fielding plans, Friedman said.

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 15 Nov 2019, 05:05
by spazsinbad
The Pentagon plan to save the F-35’s logistics system hinges on whether Lockheed will relinquish data control
14 Nov 2019 David B. Larter & Joe Gould [BEST READ IT ALL AT THE SOURCE]

"WASHINGTON – The Pentagon and Lockheed Martin are at odds over how much data the military can have access to for its own jet, the F-35, and that’s creating renewed friction in the fight to fix longstanding issues with the automated logistics system vital to keeping it flying. The Pentagon and Lockheed say a relaunched version of the Autonomic Logistics Information System, or ALIS, should be ready to start sending to squadrons by September 2020. Both the military’s top acquisition official and the F-35 program manager expressed frustration to lawmakers at a House Armed Services subcommittee hearing Tuesday with how much control Lockheed asserts over crucial data for the system....

...“One of the key elements of coming up with a new ALIS architecture, data standards, and all the other parts that would make a very good system is understanding the data set as it exists today — what all the algorithms are — and we are still in the process of going through that with Lockheed Martin,” said Ellen Lord, the under secretary of defense for acquisition and sustainment. “But understanding where all the intellectual property is and making sure the government has access to what it has paid for is a key part of rearchitecting ALIS.”

The fight over intellectual property stems from the original concept for the program, which gave Lockheed Martin sweeping control over virtually every major aspect of the F-35, from design and fabrication to maintenance, parts and logistics. But in recent years, dissatisfied by rising costs and delays, the Pentagon has sought to wrest more control back from Lockheed. Intellectual property rights and disputes over proprietary data, however, have often tripped up such efforts.

Frustrations
Some of Lockheed’s intellectual property assertions have bordered on ridiculous, according to F-35 Program Executive Officer Lt. Gen. Eric Fick, but getting a handle on what data the military needs to do its job is crucial, he said....

...Lord told lawmakers that the key to getting a successful system was breaking Lockheed’s grip on the logistics data infrastructure and housing more of it in a government cloud. “One of the challenges we have is that fact that a lot of the ALIS data and functionality works back through Lockheed Martin computers,” Lord said. ‘So, what we need to have in a newly rearchitected ALIS to is have that in a government cloud and accessible. So, this deconflicting of Lockheed data and government data will become much more clear.”... [then some good stuff to read at URL]

...Fick, who runs the Joint Program Office, told lawmakers that the latest software release for ALIS is expected this month. He predicted “significant progress” by September 2020 toward four different efforts to improve ALIS, including software upgrades, rearchitecting the system itself and Lockheed’s internal research and development work.

Though the ALIS software release in the fall of 2018 met the required-capabilities threshold for its design and development phase, Fick acknowledged the system needs “significant additional improvements” and noted that combat coded squadrons require 12 system administrators to maintain deployed operations and that training squadrons require eight.... [then stuff about risk & flight hours & availability best read at URL - get the picture? Read it all at URL]

...The U.S. F-35 fleet missed the monthly availability target of 65 percent, missed an 80 percent mission-capable target and missed reliability and maintainability metrics. Behler linked recent improvements in availability and mission capable rates to a greater availability of spare parts ― through the programs efforts to improve maintenance process and depot support.

Fick noted that the mission capable rate of the operational fleet jumped from 54.7 percent in October, 2018, to 72.5 percent in September of 2019.

Parts shortages was the chief contributor to low mission capable rates, Government Accountability Office’s Director of Defense Capabilities and Management Diana Maurer, told lawmakers. Parts were breaking more often than expected, it’s taken twice as long to fix them, and the depots for the repairs won’t be ready until 2024." :x

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/naval/2019/ ... ta-rights/

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 15 Nov 2019, 11:51
by quicksilver
So, last month during the 478 aircraft block buy announcement it was, “...the aircraft are performing exceptionally well...” from DoD acquisition leadership. Hmmm... :whistle:

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 15 Nov 2019, 20:07
by spazsinbad
Further F-35 ALIS Fixes in Progress as Pentagon Tackles Jet Costs [BEST READ AT SOURCE]
13 Nov 2019 Rachel S. Cohen

"The F-35 is making progress but still faces major hurdles with its logistics system, intellectual property, supply chain, and more, officials overseeing the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program told lawmakers on Capitol Hill Nov. 13. Program leadership laid out a path to turn one of the key challenges, the underperforming Autonomic Logistics Information System, into a functional tool for operations and maintenance data as it’s meant to be....

...“Over the past year, the department has delivered three ALIS software updates and we are on track to release quarterly releases to rapidly improve current performance—a vast improvement from the 18 months between software updates in the past,” Lord [Pentagon acquisition chief Ellen Lord] added in written testimony. “Our efforts to stabilize and improve the usability of ALIS has driven trouble reports down 38 percent from their peak. These efforts mitigate risk while the department charts a path to the future of ALIS that will help deliver a more ready fleet at a lower cost."...

...“Upcoming software releases include the capability for centralized administration, bulk administration of Portable Maintenance Aids, and squadron resource sharing,” Fick wrote. “These initiatives will reduce the requirements for on-site administration of the current ALIS system with an estimated decrease in life [cycle] costs of $1.9 billion, nearly a 6.5 percent cost reduction.”

Robert Behler, the Pentagon’s director of operational test and evaluation, noted the data the F-35 sends to the Air Operations Center, which manages sorties overseas, is subpar. He suggested the AOC could use an ALIS terminal or software-defined radios to gather data on the plane in real time. [???]

Officials are working through other areas as well. Intellectual property disputes, an issue that piqued the interest of multiple lawmakers, has slowed the program’s ability to connect to the Pentagon’s Joint Simulation Environment—a major wargaming system the F-35 must work with to complete its initial test phase. Behler said the JSE won’t be ready to start the final phase of operational testing with the F-35 until July 2020.

The initial integration of the JSE and F-35 was held up by an IP dispute between Lockheed and the government, Fick said [ F-35 Program Executive Officer Lt. Gen. Eric Fick]. He told lawmakers that DOD agreed to accept less IP data than it might want, but still reserved the right to challenge Lockheed if it didn’t release certain information the Pentagon wanted. Lockheed protested that arrangement, and its complaint currently sits with the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals. DOD doesn’t necessarily need every piece of IP data, but Fick said the program is still figuring out which information is crucial to making the F-35 a better product.

“One of the key elements of coming up with a new ALIS architecture, and … data standards, and all the other parts that would make a very good system, is understanding the entire data set as it exists today, what all the algorithms are, and we are still in the process of going through that with Lockheed Martin,” Lord added. “Understanding where all of the intellectual property is and making sure the government has access to what it has paid for is a key portion of rearchitecting ALIS.”...

...The F-35 Joint Program Office saw a 9 percent drop in cost per flying hour in 2019 compared to the previous year, according to Fick’s written testimony."

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pag ... Costs.aspx

Re: ALIS and other automated logistics systems

Unread postPosted: 16 Nov 2019, 18:09
by steve2267
spazsinbad wrote:
Further F-35 ALIS Fixes in Progress as Pentagon Tackles Jet Costs [BEST READ AT SOURCE]
13 Nov 2019 Rachel S. Cohen

...but Fick said the program is still figuring out which information is crucial to making the F-35 a better product.

“One of the key elements of coming up with a new ALIS architecture, and … data standards, and all the other parts that would make a very good system, is understanding the entire data set as it exists today, what all the algorithms are, and we are still in the process of going through that with Lockheed Martin,” Lord added. “Understanding where all of the intellectual property is and making sure the government has access to what it has paid for is a key portion of rearchitecting ALIS.”...


Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pag ... Costs.aspx


Sorry... not sorry.

"the program is still figuring out which information is crucial" ... ???

The government doesn't know? Sounds like a major failing of the gummint in not know what they bought.

It's the government's game. They set the rules. Contractors tend to stick to the rules, religiously... usually because the gummint audits the snot out of them (also driving up costs) and the fines for not conforming to contracts can be expen$ive.

While I suspect LM could probably have done a better job with ALIS, it also sounds like the gummint is getting exactly what it specified and paid for. So the government... the same institution that spend $billions on some basic medical insurance website boondoggle, thinks it can save ALIS by creating a better one? :doh: Except it doesn't know what the data and algorithms are? And they're going to wave a magic wand and fix it in 2-3 years? :bang: