Helmet-mounted displays

Cockpit, radar, helmet-mounted display, and other avionics
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spazsinbad

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Unread post28 Jan 2018, 08:53

Bit of HMDS CGI in this short LM PR Clip.

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RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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rheonomic

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Unread post28 Jan 2018, 18:24

ricnunes wrote:Interesting rheonomic.

By the way, what does the "q" and "p" variables stand for?


The formula is for getting the Mach number from a pitot-static tube (which measures total and static pressures). I got the equation image from Wikipedia. In their notation, p is the static pressure and qc is the impact pressure (equivalent to dynamic pressure at subsonic speeds). For supersonic speeds the impact pressure is measured behind a shock wave.

Essentially that equation is part of what the air data system solves in real time to provide data to the FLCS and pilot displays.

spazsinbad wrote:Bit of HMDS CGI in this short LM PR Clip.


They let the art guys get a bit carried away on that one.
"You could do that, but it would be wrong."
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Unread post23 Feb 2018, 08:24

Perhaps 'odd' to post this here however first paragraph says it all....
Guyette earns Marine Corps Test Pilot of the Year award
22 Feb 2018 PEO(JSF) Integrated Test Facility Public Affairs

"NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND, PATUXENT RIVER, Md. – Maj. Robert Guyette, the test pilot who last year led the team of engineers in resolving mission critical deficiencies with the F-35 helmet mounted display, was honored as the Test Pilot of the Year during a ceremony Feb. 8....

...In addition to helping resolve the helmet display issue—which is now with industry partners for final production—his efforts helped to bring the F-35 closer to completing the system development and demonstration phase having served as the project officer for 10 test teams, the pilot for nearly 100 F-35 test plans, and completing more than 600 test points in 2017 for the B and C variants.

Guyette’s missions were dedicated to testing the flying and handling of both the F-35B and F-35C in “the most dynamic and challenging environments,” Lt. Col. Gary Shill, Pax River ITF deputy director, penned in Guyette’s award package. As a short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) weapons expert, Guyette not only conducted high risk tests at high Mach numbers and dynamic pressures, he also executed high risk STOVL mode tests close to the ground.

“His tenacity enabled expansion of the flight envelope for current and future blocks of all F-35B/C aircraft,” Shill wrote....

...Taking it to the fleet, Guyette developed the foundations for the F-35 basic fighter maneuvers tactics; his flight test results were used for mission planning of the first operational deployment of the F-35B earlier this year and will also be used for the F-35C operational test and evaluation period later this year.

The U.S. Naval Academy graduate said he’s been fascinated with aviation and technology since childhood.

“I have always been curious about flight, and more broadly, technology,” Guyette said. “I am constantly taking things apart and wondering about how machines and computers do what they do. This predisposition led me to pursue an Aerospace Engineering degree while at the U.S. Naval Academy, where many of the military instructors are experienced test pilots.”

Even with dozens of “firsts” under his belt as a test pilot developing the fifth generation fighter, Guyette said his most memorable is landing an F-35B vertically on a ship for the first time.

“Despite all of the training, preparation and practice, there is something magical about hovering a fixed-wing airplane over a moving ship,” he said. “It breaks through the stoicism and generates an emotional response. The capability that a hovering F-35B brings to the Marine Corps is not evolutionary, but revolutionary, and when you touch down on the deck for the first time, you realize that the airplane will make a lasting contribution to securing our way of life. “The airplane's performance is truly a testament to the talent, vision, dedication and hard work of our engineers,” he added...."

Source: http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=6741
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post29 Mar 2018, 12:44

Took me a long time earlier to GROK the virtual HUD but thanks to 'QS' eventually I got it - here is a succinct description:
An Australian Update on the F-35 and the RAAF Getting Ready for Its Incorporation Into the Force
27 Mar 2018 SLDinfo

"...[Wing Commander Darren Clare] The F-35A is a lot more powerful, especially at low level. The ‘Helmet Mounted Display’ takes a little bit of getting used to. It’s similar to the one used in the Hornet and Super Hornet [‘Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System’]. [QUE?]

If looking out the side of your cockpit, however, you need to physically face the front to see the [virtual] Head-Up Display for flight vector information, which in the Hornet is presented on a physical HUD...." [and with a flick of a switch (when facing the front) one can see the REAR VIEW through that same 'VIRTUOUS' HUD!] :mrgreen:

Source: http://sldinfo.com/an-australian-update ... the-force/
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post02 Apr 2018, 12:04

Any news from the legal dispute with Thales/avionix?
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blindpilot

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Unread post02 Apr 2018, 17:38

monkeypilot wrote:Any news from the legal dispute with Thales/avionix?


Only that a year ago, the circuit reversed the dismissal by the judge on a technicality ... off again ... on again ... but that just means the wheels turn slowly.
https://www.law360.com/articles/899585/ ... elmet-case
and last month ..
The Federal Circuit rejected Elbit’s arguments as to what a person of ordinary skill in the art would understand as mere attorney argument that cannot rebut the testimony of Thales’s expert and the PTAB’s reliance on that testimony.

https://www.lexology.com/library/detail ... 64a61d35bf

Personally, I think that abstract/mathematic ideas will likely find their roots in some video game from the '90's. But then courts are not exactly known as dispensers of reality ... who knows ... the wheels just keep turning.

FWIW,
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Unread post02 Apr 2018, 18:24

blindpilot wrote:....
Personally, I think that abstract/mathematic ideas will likely find their roots in some video game from the '90's. But then courts are not exactly known as dispensers of reality ... who knows ... the wheels just keep turning.

FWIW,
BP


Only partially snarking here. If you recall from "Hidden Figures," Johnson's using Euler's integration method reached back to the 1700's for the math. That is not unusual. The trick is connecting a "new and creative" application of such old ideas. That one claims genius from doing what their professor hoped they learned is silly.

Now I will wax, old man whining, and note what I see today. When we only had 4 MHz chips and 64 k of memory, the machine language code was extremely tight. Today's hardware seems to have encouraged sloppiness in high level language programming. If and when it works, I am not always a fan of the modern methods of getting there. It just seems to be very dependent on having all the hardware you need to just brute force what could be an elegant solution with some serious work. But hey, if the kids want to fight over who has come up with some genius answers that someone had a century ago, more power to them. I just think that there is more truth than not in the Hidden Figures anecdote.

MHO,
BP
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Unread post02 Apr 2018, 23:03

F-35 ‘Green Glow’ And Carrier Launch Problems Solved
Landing a fighter on an aircraft carrier in the dead of night is a challenging feat even for the most experienced aviators. But for pilots flying the U.S. Navy F-35C carrier variant, nighttime carrier operations have been made even more difficult by a “green glow” that obscures their ...

Rest behind the paywall.

http://aviationweek.com/awindefense/f-3 ... ems-solved
"The early bird gets the worm but the second mouse gets the cheese."
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Unread post02 Apr 2018, 23:52

GREEN GLOW can only be tested on a moonless night at sea. I wonder if this is how 'they' know? Anyway some kind soul will bring us the text perhaps - maybe AvWEAK will unlock it soon? I've not seen THIS OLD story before now but may be elsewhere on forum (have searched this thread - no joy). Anyhoo description good... SPOKE TOO SOON... It would be nice to have the AUTHOR named so searching on that name can be successful but then I searched on SKEWERS (which probably should be 'SKEWED' but HEY I'M NOT AMERICUN) viewtopic.php?f=62&t=16223&p=350731&hilit=skewers#p350731
Pilots to Test Fix for F-35 Helmet 'Green Glow' Problem
16 Aug 2016 Hope Hodge Seck

"..."You could describe it as looking through a dirty window," Briggs said. "It's not so bad on a really bright night. On a dark night it skewers outside light references for pilots. A pilot cannot pick up the lights on the carrier as well as he'd like to, he doesn't necessarily pick up non-lighted signals on the ship as he's taxiing around, he has a harder time picking out aircraft that are flying around."...

...Capt. James Christie, commanding officer of Strike Fighter Squadron-101, which had 12 pilot-instructors complete daytime carrier qualifications on the F-35C this week, said he hoped software updates would be approved and close to being retrofitted to all F-35 helmets by the end of the year.

Christie said the decreased contrast setting is likely to help all pilots who operate in especially dark environments, without aid from the 'cultural light' of nearby cities. But on carriers out in the middle of the ocean, it was crucial. "I think we just kind of stomped our feet and said, ''we need to have this to be safe around the ship,'" he said.

Briggs said nighttime helmet tests were expected to kick off Aug. 20, during the darkest phase of the moon.
"So we're going to go out on a really dark night and we're going to do our final evaluation on the green glow," he said. "And we think that that problem is solved."..."

Source: https://www.military.com/defensetech/20 ... ow-problem
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post13 Apr 2018, 19:56

blindpilot wrote:
blindpilot wrote:....
Personally, I think that abstract/mathematic ideas will likely find their roots in some video game from the '90's. But then courts are not exactly known as dispensers of reality ... who knows ... the wheels just keep turning.

FWIW,
BP


Only partially snarking here. If you recall from "Hidden Figures," Johnson's using Euler's integration method reached back to the 1700's for the math. That is not unusual. The trick is connecting a "new and creative" application of such old ideas. That one claims genius from doing what their professor hoped they learned is silly.

Now I will wax, old man whining, and note what I see today. When we only had 4 MHz chips and 64 k of memory, the machine language code was extremely tight. Today's hardware seems to have encouraged sloppiness in high level language programming. If and when it works, I am not always a fan of the modern methods of getting there. It just seems to be very dependent on having all the hardware you need to just brute force what could be an elegant solution with some serious work. But hey, if the kids want to fight over who has come up with some genius answers that someone had a century ago, more power to them. I just think that there is more truth than not in the Hidden Figures anecdote.

MHO,
BP


One of my friends was head engineer for Atlantique II weapon system. At the time noone wanted a HDD in a plane... So yes they had a tight amount of memory for the whole system (13 operators contractual 20msec to take in account any order from any console)... Think it was something like 128 Kb... Code had to be clean!
:P
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