Marine Aviation Plan 2016

Variants for different customers or mission profiles
  • Author
  • Message
Offline

SpudmanWP

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 8385
  • Joined: 12 Oct 2006, 19:18
  • Location: California

Unread post08 Jan 2017, 23:37

Image
"The early bird gets the worm but the second mouse gets the cheese."
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 23159
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post09 Jan 2017, 00:48

A version of BURBAGE Tailhook 2007 F-35 Brief (made from original .PPT file) is here and above graphic remade again:

download/file.php?id=12219 (PDF 2.73Mb)
Attachments
F-35extraordinaryRangeComparisonOthers2007burbageTailhook2007pdfTIF.gif
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 23159
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post13 Jan 2017, 15:16

I am forbidden by forum moderators to create my own headlines (I must use unaltered original headlines) so I cannot start a USMC 2017 Mission Plan thread - and so 2016 mellows into 2017.
Neller: ‘We Need a Fifth-Generation Marine Corps’
12 Jan 2017 OTTO KREISHER

"...“The world has changed. In some ways, our Marine Corps is OK. In others, it’s not. Things have to change,” he said. “There’s always risk in change. But there is a bigger risk if we don’t change,” he added later.

There is a lot of talk about fifth-generation aircraft, such as the F-35, Neller said. “We need a fifth-generation Marine Corps” that will not look the same as the current Corps. “Every Marine is a rifleman, but not every Marine is in infantry.”

Whether the Corps is able to grow back to 185,000 Marines, as Trump has proposed, or stay at the current force of 182,000, Neller said service leaders would need to shift Marines from the traditional specialties to the more technical fields needed for the emerging environment.

“We can quickly build infantry, artillery, armor Marines. How long will it take to build an electronic warfare Marine?” Or Marines who can do cyber, intelligence collection and analysis, and information ops, he said.

The commandant restated some of the changes he has warned his Marines are coming, including the need to train how to operate in a network- and electronic-denied environment by using old-fashioned tools like paper charts and nondigital communications. And they will need to win the “battle of signatures” by reducing electronic emissions, he said. That will mean Marines will go into the field without their cell phones.

“How do you mask your signature, make your adversary raise his? If your signature can be detected, you can be killed,” he said.

Neller also emphasized how the Marines are working with their Navy partners to return to amphibious exercises and training. “We’re going to get after the ability to project power from the sea,” he said. But to do that in the new contested environment, the Corps will have to develop ways to help protect the amphibious force.

“The green side [Marines] recognizes that if we want to get from A to B, we can’t do that without helping,” he said. “That may mean using Marine air to defend the task force” or landing forces seizing territory to prevent land-based attacks on the amphibious force. “It’s totally a team game.”..."

Source: http://seapowermagazine.org/stories/201 ... eller.html
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
Offline
User avatar

popcorn

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 7697
  • Joined: 24 Sep 2008, 08:55

Unread post11 Mar 2017, 02:26

Hopefully Cong. Tsongas' balance has been restored.

https://news.usni.org/2017/03/10/lawmak ... more-24545

House Armed Services tactical air and land forces subcommittee ranking member Rep. Niki Tsongas (D-Mass.) asked during a Marine Corps modernization hearing today whether too much priority had gone to aviation in recent years instead of ground vehicles and equipment...

Lt. Gen. Gary Thomas, deputy commandant for programs and resources, said the Marines had not invested as much money into modernization overall as the service would have liked, due to spending caps and near-term readiness challenges, but he said in terms of the aviation versus ground force spending “we do feel like we are balanced.”

“We are a light general purpose force. One of the things that gives the Marine Corps an advantage on the battlefield is its mobility and its fires. Much of that comes from aviation,” he said.
“The ground side, in terms of fires, mobility – those are equally as important, but if we were just to look relatively how we’re investing across aviation and ground, without looking at the cost – although there are significant differences there – but in terms of capability and capacity, we think we’re balanced.”
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 23159
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post14 Mar 2017, 02:32

:roll: GYRENES to the Rescue Agin.... Get on with it USN. :doh: Yes I know I know they'll do it in their own time - commence!
House Hearing Sets Up Debate on Current Navy Platforms in Future Fight
13 Mar 2017 Megan Eckstein

"...Finally, there was some debate over how today’s aircraft carrier would fit into operational concepts for tomorrow’s high-end fight.

Werchado [deputy director of the Navy’s assessments division (OPNAV N81)] suggested that the carrier would be best leveraged when combined with a Wasp-class or America-class amphibious assault ship with fifth-generation F-35Bs onboard. He noted the Marines are using their Joint Strike Fighters now, while the Navy is still several years away from initial operational capability with its F-35C variant. If a big-deck amphib came to the fight with an all-F-35 loadout of 20 or more, and teamed up with an aircraft carrier with the EA-18G Growler for electronic attack and the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye airborne early warning aircraft, “now the carrier air wing has fifth-gen squadrons earlier, and the L-class ship affords the protection from the E-2s and the Growlers on the carrier.”

Beyond that, he said, the pairing would create twice as many nodes in the distributed lethality construct as carriers operating alone. The Navy sends carriers to war in pairs, to create 24-hour flight operations between the two ships. That means the Navy only has carriers in half as many places. With the support of F-35Bs on a big-deck, Werchado said, the Navy would essentially double how many places from which it could launch aircraft at sea.

Clark [ senior fellow at CSBA], however, saw a different future for carriers in high-end combat. He said putting carriers in the immediate conflict area suppressed their warfighting capabilities in CSBA studies because the crews spent their time driving around avoiding enemy missiles instead of launching airplanes for offensive operations. Instead, he said, a future high-end fight would not involve the carriers for the first day or two. Distributed surface and subsurface forces would fire a high volume of missiles very quickly for the first two days until they ran out of ammunition, and when those ships had to retreat from the fight to resupply, the aircraft carrier would come in and continue the fight against a presumably weakened enemy."

Source: https://news.usni.org/2017/03/13/sets-u ... y-platform
Last edited by spazsinbad on 14 Mar 2017, 21:13, edited 1 time in total.
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
Offline
User avatar

neptune

Elite 2K

Elite 2K

  • Posts: 2885
  • Joined: 24 Oct 2008, 00:03
  • Location: Houston

Unread post14 Mar 2017, 18:25

[quote="spazsinbad..."today’s aircraft carrier would fit into operational concepts for tomorrow’s high-end fight....... forces would fire a high volume of missiles very quickly for the first two days until they ran out of ammunition...[/quote]

...dumb, dumb, dumb...classic coldwar antique tactics....while the F-35B is dropping precision (dumb?) bombs on the SAM targets with minimal collateral damage, while attacking the enema command and control with Electronic Attack/ Electronic Warfare (cyber) and collecting ISR secure linked to the fleet ships. Preparing for beachhead operations for the 1,600+ marines via MV-22B /MH-53 with M-777 155mm (6.1") artillery with CAP support from the same F-35B now operating from temporary Marine FOBs.

What part of the scenario does the "short legged" attack/ jamming aircraft with no refueling capability and vulnerable E-2s radiating "Here we are, Here we are!" to the enema....play???.....oops, slipped off my soapbox... :oops:
Online
User avatar

XanderCrews

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 5941
  • Joined: 16 Oct 2012, 19:42

Unread post14 Mar 2017, 19:13

Lol wow. So after years of hearing people b1tch about the marines not needing a STOVL aircraft to support themselves because the navy would always be there with the CVNs we get this lol
Choose Crews
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 23159
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post14 Mar 2017, 21:12

:doh: Good point 'XanaDew' :mrgreen:
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 23159
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post22 Mar 2017, 22:11

For sure having adequate spare parts in the supply pipeline is really important - for sake of the statistics - for the F-35s.
Industry Advocates Fully Funding F-35 Spares Accounts Despite ‘Broken Budget Process’
22 Mar 2017 Megan Eckstein

"ARLINGTON, Va. — Lockheed Martin is working closely with the military services to keep new and old airplane types alike in good material condition, but a broken budgeting process and difficulty in fully funding spare parts have made that a challenge, the company’s vice president of sustainment operations said.Bruce Litchfield told USNI News on March 21 at Lockheed Martin’s annual media day that the company is working with the services and the Joint Strike Fighter Joint Program Office on “getting behind the power curve” on spare parts acquisition to avoid falling into the same readiness deficit that many other platforms have today.

Saying that F-35 stability is his business’s top priority today, Litchfield said that “the readiness business is hard. Sustainment readiness is not rocket science, but it takes an incredible effort, and you can’t ignore any aspects of it. And once you start to slope down, it’s a fast slope down and it’s a slow pull out of the problem area because parts take two to three years, depending on the complexity of the part, to go purchase. So if you didn’t buy them or you didn’t spare for them, you’re way behind. So what we’re, I think, doing in a way is raising the visibility of what we need, and now we have to work with the services, work with the JPO and work with Congress to make sure we adequately fund and provide for the spare parts that we need to sustain it.”

The Marine Corps has been particularly vocal about facing readiness challenges due to lack of spare parts. Deputy Commandant for Aviation Lt. Gen. Jon Davis told reporters last month that “not mission capable-supply” is the biggest challenge for every type/model/series in the Marine Corps, where spare parts are not available and therefore the plane cannot be fixed and put back on the flight line. Trying to catch up on parts procurement is a challenge for the older planes, where in some cases original manufacturers are no longer in business, and the Marine Corps is eager to avoid a spare parts deficit with its new F-35Bs as it builds the fleet out.

“Right now, the only thing I would say is we need to keep our procurement of spares on track,” Davis told USNI News in November 2015, after the first squadron of F-35Bs reached initial operational capability.
“If we don’t do that we could be in jeopardy. So that’s something we fight for all the time. The logistics part of this is not particularly sexy, but it is to me, it’s about making sure we have a platform we can sustain and generate the combat power we need.

Litchfield said Lockheed Martin is working with the JPO and the services to understand the proper level of sparing for each of the three variants, develop partnerships with aviation depots that will conduct repairs and modifications throughout the life of the airplane, and mature diagnostics and prognostics to ensure the health of the F-35 fleet is sustained.

But, he said, there’s only so much the company – or even the services – can do in this budget environment. Litchfield said the Defense Department is operating under a “broken budgeting process” today, and Davis and the other services’ aviation heads are forced to rely on Overseas Contingency Operations funding instead of the base budget to pay for spares.

“He’s being forced into a position to buy parts (in the OCO budget) because it’s not planned for, it’s not budgeted for, (in sufficient quantity) to make up for what the wartime commitment is,” Litchfield said.
“And if we’re a nation at war we ought to be operating like a nation at war.”

Asked if he was seeing enough money overall being put towards buying spare parts, Litchfield replied, “no. I think we have to adequately fund spare parts, and spare parts are typically not funded at 100 percent. And if you’re not funded at 100 percent, you’re playing a shell game and a chess game with the parts that you have available to optimize it. Could we have increased investments in that area? I think the answer is yes. However, I do recognize the fact that there’s going to be more requirements than dollars available, and so you’re going to have to make those decisions. So could there be more? Yes.”

Luckily, he said, the F-35 is showing high readiness levels in its early operations, which could help the services avoid falling into a readiness deficit with the planes. Litchfield said the Joint Strike Fighter went to the Air Force’s Red Flag exercise and performed with a 90-percent readiness rate, which “has got to give you great confidence in the aircraft.”..."

Source; https://news.usni.org/2017/03/22/lockhe ... et-process
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
Offline

weasel1962

Elite 1K

Elite 1K

  • Posts: 1654
  • Joined: 07 Jun 2012, 02:41
  • Location: Singapore

Unread post23 Mar 2017, 08:13

Isnt that the point of ALIS?
Offline
User avatar

blindpilot

Elite 1K

Elite 1K

  • Posts: 1215
  • Joined: 01 Mar 2013, 18:21
  • Location: Colorado

Unread post23 Mar 2017, 17:14

weasel1962 wrote:Isnt that the point of ALIS?


ALIS can only buy what Congress puts enough quarters into her to spend.
:D :wink:

BP
Previous

Return to F-35 Variants and Missions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests