Hostage: Virtual training needed to address limits Red Flag

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Unread post10 Aug 2014, 18:49

Best read at source with only some excerpts below...
Hostage: Virtual training needed to address limits of Red Flag
10 Aug 2014 Brian Everstine

"As fifth-generation fighters outgrow the Air Force’s premiere combat training exercise, the service should look to virtual training for pilots to test the limits of the F-22 and F-35, the outgoing head of Air Combat Command said....

...Gen. Mike Hostage said a shift from live combat training to virtual training would expose pilots to real-life scenarios that can’t be practiced in the Nevada skies.

“The fifth generation brought us capabilities and lethalities that are straining my abilities at Red Flag to produce that same realistic combat environment,” Hostage said last month at an Air Force Association speech in Arlington, Virginia. “I can’t turn on every bell and whistle on my new fifth-generation platforms because, A, they’re too destructive, and B, I don’t want the bad guys to know what I’m able to do.”...

...the newest generation of aircraft, such as F-22s and F-35s, cannot practice all of their capabilities at Red Flag, Hostage said....

...Virtual reality still cannot replicate the “kinesthetic environment” or the sensory inputs that are felt in real combat. Until simulators can realistically emulate combat flight, the service should hold on to its large-scale training exercises, Hostage said.

“The last thing you want to do is put someone in a [virtual] world and they get negative training,” said Maj. Gen. Jack Shanahan, commander of the Air Force Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Agency, said at the C4ISR & Networks annual conference in May. “It has to be realistic training, and having seen some [virtual] flag exercises in the past, we’ve come a long way, and to me that’s where we need to put some of our future investments.”

There will be other challenges, Hostage said, such as protecting networks from outside hackers.

Another limitation of Red Flag is that it is just training. Pilots can’t fire live missiles, and no one blows up in the skies over Nevada.

“That fundamentally changes the dynamics of the fight,” Hostage said. “You go into real life when people really blow up, it looks different and you react differently. You can’t really get that in the Nellis fight but you can see that in the virtual constructive arena.”

Red Flag wouldn’t go away if virtual reality training becomes a reality, but its focus would change.

“I will still do Red Flags, I will still do live training in live platforms,” Hostage said. “But the place where I will be able to take the gloves off, the place where I can turn on all the bells and whistles and get full capability is going to be in the virtual constructive arena.”...

...At Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, maintainers use virtual reality to practice maintenance on the fifth-generation F-35 before stepping foot on the flightline....”

Source: http://www.airforcetimes.com/article/20 ... /308100029
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
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Unread post19 Aug 2014, 07:06

http://www.airforcemag.com/DRArchive/Pa ... ation.aspx
Live Fly Versus Simulation
—MARC V. SCHANZ8/19/2014

​With the Air Force retooling its Weapons School curriculum and other training programs, service leaders are working to balance "live-fly" exercise opportunities with "virtual and constructive" simulated events. Both types of training pay unique dividends, said Maj. Gen. Jay Silveria, commander of the Air Force Warfare Center at Nellis AFB, Nev. "We'll always need live fly, for training for flight operations, for live decision-making, and other skills," he told Air Force Magazine in a mid-August interview. But virtual and constructive training allows the Air Force to introduce capability that is not possible to have in live-fly scenarios. For example, the threats that the Air Force replicates in live-fly events are not really representative of potential real-world threats, said Silveria. In the virtual environment, exercise overseers can readily mix and match threats ranging from air defenses to cyber attacks. "I can dial a threat up to the highest level … without restraint or concern," he said. "Even in an unconstrained [budget] environment, I have to go to the sim for that," he added. There's another advantage: The Air Force wants airmen to be able train with capability that it is "not going to put on display," said Silveria. "We don't want … to show others what we can do," he said.
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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Unread post16 Sep 2014, 00:34

The Embedded Training capability planned for the F-35 should eventually encompass F-22 and legacy platforms. Virtual Red Flag makes sense.

http://www.defensenews.com/article/2014 ... RONTPAGE|p


Lockheed Successfully Links Live, Virtual F-16 For Training Exercises

WASHINGTON — Lockheed Martin has taken a major step forward in advancing live, virtual and constructive (LVC) technologies with a training exercise that linked a pilot flying an F-16 in the air with a “wingman” flying an F-16 on the ground, fighting against computer-generated adversaries... When the test pilot took off in his F-16, he could look down at his radar and see not only his wingman — in the simulator down below — but potential adversaries, all digitally put forth by operators at a ground station. Olinto said the t..est went smoothly, in part because of the preparation that went on months in advance.

Getting LVC capabilities to their highest potential is particularly important for the F-35, which require high-end threats to train against in order to make sure pilots can become familiar with the full capabilities of the jet. But it will take some time before the technologies tested this summer can be integrated into a joint strike fighter training operation.
“It’s not a situation where we can jump immediately to an F-35 solution,” Olinto said. “There is technology we are maturing and we did that on the F-16 with intention of applying that to 5th gen.”
If that works out, Lockheed wants to do trials with an F-35 in the 2016 timeframe. Olinto added that costs of these test flights is being absorbed by the company.■
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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Unread post22 Sep 2014, 03:20

Some tantalizing comments in the same vein... what has the AF got hidden up it‘s sleeves? Lots of classified capabilities implied. We can only speculate but probably not squadrons of Growlers.  
Daily Report
USAF’s Got Cyber Game
—JOHN A. TIRPAK9/22/2014
comment
The Air Force’s space and cyber capabilities in combat are so lethal that it’s not safe to practice with them in wargames, said Air Combat Command chief Gen. Mike Hostage. Speaking at AFA's Air & Space Conference last week, Hostage told reporters he has to limit the role played by space and cyber forces during exercises. If they were allowed to play for the whole drill, “somebody’s going to get hurt,” Hostage said. “They are so effective that they would negate the red air’s ability to do much of anything” in a Red Flag-type exercise, “and we wouldn’t get the air training that we’re spending a lot of money to get.” Unleashed, cyber warriors can “blind the adversary, … make them run together,” and reduce the number of enemies the physical forces have to fight. His push toward more simulated Red Flag-type wargames will “let the aviators learn the impact, the strength of what (space and cyber) can do,” he said.
Last edited by popcorn on 22 Sep 2014, 03:57, edited 1 time in total.
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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spazsinbad

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Unread post22 Sep 2014, 03:36

I have heard of the lethal 'Khyber Pass' - I guess this is the 'Cyber No Pass'? Here is an URLy C(L)ue:

http://www.airforcemag.com/DRArchive/Pa ... -Game.aspx
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Unread post05 Oct 2014, 00:00

Red Flag will soon become Virtual Flag. An informative article on the new training paradigm.

http://www.airforcemag.com/MagazineArch ... uture.aspx



High-Low Mix
By the fourth Red Flag of next year, “Virtual Flag,” traditionally a separate event, will become part of the live-fly wargame.

“It will be the first time at the Flag that we’ll have live, virtual, and constructive happening all at the same time,” Weed said. While a Red Flag of this year is 20 percent live and 80 percent constructive, “during Red Flag 15-4, I expect it to be 20 percent live, 40 percent constructive, and 40 percent virtual through sims. ... The virtual
sims will be flying a constructive adversary at the same time the live-fly is going on.”
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh

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