Navy: F-35C Will Be Eyes and Ears of the Fleet

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Unread post25 Jun 2016, 01:31

US Fleet Forces Will Focus Training, Fleet Experimentation on Distributed Operations
24 Jun 2016 Megan Eckstein

"U.S. Fleet Forces Command will push its fleet experimentation and training towards a new distributed operations concept, in which deployed forces – surface ships, submarines, aircraft and more – are sufficiently linked together so that they can support theater-wide needs regardless of their physical location, the commander said today.

USFF Commander Adm. Phil Davidson said the Navy can no longer conduct disaggregated operations, in which distinct groups of ships train for and conduct missions in a silo. Instead, those forces within a geographical combatant command must be synchronized and netted together to support whatever the numbered fleet commander may need, he said at an event co-hosted by the Center for Strategic and International Studies and the U.S. Naval Institute.

Davidson cited three concepts that support his idea of distributed operations. First, he said, the surface force’s recent push towards distributed lethality has yielded positive results that could be applied throughout the rest of the fleet.

“When we have a more lethal force, more widely distributed … our commanders are much more confident,” he said.
“And when we game it with potential … adversaries, our adversaries are much more conservative. That’s a wonderful place to be.”

Second, the Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air architecture of netting together sensors and shooters has proven successful, and “as we think about other assets coming to this structure … it is very very important to understand that people need to be contributing to this network. And if it can’t come to this network, its value is going to be a little less.” He highlighted an upcoming test to integrate the F-35 into the NIFC-CA construct as an example of how the fleet should be thinking.

And third, he said, the Navy’s ability to maneuver in physical space and the electromagnetic spectrum will remain important in countering near-peer and peer adversaries that seek to deny the U.S. sea control...."

Source: https://news.usni.org/2016/06/24/20355
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Unread post22 Feb 2017, 06:34

Will the F-35C be the Eyes and Ears of the Fleet & ARMY?! OMG. A few years off; however they need to talk to each other.
Link Army, Navy Missile Defense Nets: Adm. Harris
21 Feb 2017 Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

"SAN DIEGO: The Army and Navy must link their missile defense systems into a single network so Navy weapons can hit targets spotted by Army radars and vice versa, the chief of Pacific Command said today. That’s a daunting technical task but, if surmounted, it could dramatically improve defense against North Korean, Chinese, or Russian missile salvos.

“I believe that Army missileers should incorporate their air defense systems into the Navy’s integrated fire control – counter-air, or NIFC-CA, architecture,” Adm. Harry Harris told the AFCEA West convention here....

...The Navy is further along, having already developed what Harris calls the “unbelievably powerful” NIFC-CA. That system lets high-flying, far-seeing aerial sensors like the E-2 Hawkeye or, in future, the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter pass targeting data back to destroyers and cruisers. That lets surface ships shoot down incoming missiles before their own mast-mounted sensors could spot them. But NIFC-CA is specifically designed to communicate over a Navy network called CEC (Cooperative Engagement Capability), which then feeds data to the Aegis fire control system on Navy ships. Connecting NIFC-CA to the not-yet-complete Army IBCS network will be a very different challenge.

“These two systems ought to be talking to each other,” Harris said. “I’ll be the first to tell you that I’m not a technical guy, so I don’t know how to make it work…How they do it, that’s my challenge to my components, to Adm. Swift (Adm. Scott Swift, commander of Pacific Fleet) and to Gen. Brown (Gen. Robert Brown, commander of US Army Pacific).”...

...Harris is equally excited about other applications of computer networks to warfare, particularly robotics. At the Super Bowl, “300 quad copters put on light show as an opening act for Lady Gaga — who was terrific by the way,” Harris told AFCEA. “What interests me in these examples is not the drones per se, or even Lady Gaga, for that matter. What interests me is the network that allows a hundred drones or more to fly in formation, to receive new orders, and to report back. That, said there’s a dark side(:) As soon as we figure out how to do this, someone else will try to hack into it.”..."

Source: http://breakingdefense.com/2017/02/link ... dm-harris/


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Unread post22 Feb 2017, 07:52

“I believe that Army missileers should incorporate their air defense systems into the Navy’s integrated fire control – counter-air, or NIFC-CA, architecture,” Adm. Harry Harris told the AFCEA West convention here....

...The Navy is further along, having already developed what Harris calls the “unbelievably powerful” NIFC-CA.


The Army's JLENS was part of NIFC-CA!
In fact, the Army and Navy conducted a joint test where the FCR JLENS orbit cued an SM-6 via CEC
all the way to terminal seeker handover.
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Unread post23 Feb 2017, 05:17

NIFC-CA Advances Could Allow The Navy To Use Cheaper ‘Dumb’ Weapons [BEST READ AT SOURCE]
22 Feb 2017 Megan Eckstein

"SAN DIEGO, Calif. – An expanded fire control network could help the Navy leverage lower-cost “dumb” weapons instead of sophisticated missiles that can help find their own targets, several officials said today.

The Navy Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air (NIFC-CA) architecture is currently changing itself – as engineers find ways to bring in new airplanes, new data links and new weapons to work with the Aegis Combat System – but at a certain point a strong enough NIFC-CA network could allow the Navy to begin changing what weapons it buys, they said during a panel presentation at the WEST 2017 conference.

Though there are many challenges associated with integrated new systems into NIFC-CA, director for integration and interoperability at the warfare integration directorate (OPNAV N9I) Cmdr. David Snee said that if the ability to see over the horizon and share information quickly and accurately were to be achieved, “then I have a world where I could have a very sophisticated high-tech weapon, or not.”...

...Still, he [Program Executive Office for Integrated Warfare Systems (PEO IWS) principal assistant program manager for Aegis development Cmdr. Andrew Thomson] said, if the Navy could expand NIFC-CA to be long-range enough and reliable enough, it could keep the “smarts” in the aircraft and ships in the network and save money on the actual munitions.

During the panel discussion, PEO IWS major program manager for future combat systems Anant Patel said the Navy had had success integrating the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye, F-35B Joint Strike Fighter and the Army’s Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System (JLENS) into NIFC-CA and that PEO IWS would look to integrate the F-35C, F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and EA-18G Growler in the future.

As NIFC-CA inevitably grows and evolves, Snee said the Navy wants to see it grow in a way that supports fighting in other domains.

“The last part of NIFC-CA is counter air, so it’s very limited in that domain,” he said. “I think back in the [Pentagon] we’re broadening that aperture to look at naval integrated fires in all the domains. And so kind of addressing the problem from that aspect is what we’re doing going forward. This is the first chapter of [NIFC-CA]. … One of the things we’re really tackling back in D.C. is really to come up with an integration campaign plan for the Navy of how we’re going to stitch this together” and use the NIFC-CA concept to eventually go after surface or subsurface threats, for example."

Source: https://news.usni.org/2017/02/22/nifc-c ... mb-weapons
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Unread post24 Feb 2017, 22:15

We CAN Tie Army, Navy Missile Defense Networks: Navy Experts [BEST READ IT ALL AT SOURCE I RECKON]
24 Feb 2017 Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

"...On Tuesday, the chief of US Pacific Command had told the AFCEA-USNI West 2017 conference here that he wanted the two services’ systems to interconnect. “I believe that Army missileers should incorporate their air defense systems into the Navy’s integrated fire control – counter-air, or NIFC-CA, architecture,” Adm. Harry Harris said. “I’ll be the first to tell you that I’m not a technical guy, so I don’t know how to make it work.”

We can make it work, the expert panel said the next day when asked about Harris’s idea. “It’s not hard,” said Anant Patel, a senior program manager in the Navy’s Program Executive Office – Integrated Warfare Systems (PEO-IEWS). “We’ve cracked the nut on how to integrate systems together, we understand what quality of service we need to engage a specific threat, so I think that’s the easy part to go work on with Army.”

The hard part, Patel continued, is “connectivity(:) That’s a tough, tough question because it all depends on the latencies and accuracies of the networks, so you have to look at a specific threat, what kind of reaction time do you have (and therefore what kind of network lag you can afford). It’s not as easy as, I’ll just give you the data.”

Missile defense requires exquisitely accurate data on the target, because you’re trying to hit one missile moving at hundreds of miles an hour with another missile moving at hundreds of missiles an hour. A tiny error can mean a miss. The worst mass casualty incident in the 1991 Gulf War, a Scud strike on a Dhahran barracks that killed 28 Americans and wounded another 98, occurred because a software glitch made a Patriot missile’s timing 0.3433 seconds off.

So before you add a new sensor to your missile defense system, you need to know how accurate that sensor’s data is and how quickly your network will transmit that data from sensor to weapon. Accurate data that’s delayed by a slow connection is as bad as inaccurate data that arrives at once. Adding more sensors of different types and from different locations gives you more perspectives on your target and can improve accuracy, but you’d better understand those sensors first.

That takes testing, said Cmdr. Andrew Thomson, who also works for PEO-IWS. “That takes time to really take that sensor to sea or wherever it is and understand it, make sure that it’s delivering the quality of service that you need, what the latencies are and what the accuracies are in the networks you’re using, and then what the weapon system is going to be able to do with that,” Thomson said. “Every time when you bring in a new sensor or you bring in a new weapon or sensor, you’ve got to kind of work through flow.”

“I don’t think we’re going to get to a place where we’re quite plug and play,” Thomson said. “It’s always going to take that engineering.”NIFC-CA has already made some progress with the Army. In a 2012 test, the Army’s now notorious blimp-mounted JLENS — “a great radar,” said Patel — provided targeting data via NIFC-CA to a Navy SM-6 Standard missile. In another test, the Aegis destroyer Hopper connected to Army AN/TPY-2 radars — normally used for THAAD missile defense batteries — and shared track data back and forth, said Capt. David Snee, then commander of the Hopper but now director of integration and interoperability on the Navy staff (OPNAV N9I). The Hopper’s success, in turn, built on close Army-Navy cooperation during THAAD’s development to ensure it would be interoperable with Aegis, said retired Rear Adm. Brad Hicks, now with Lockheed Martin....

...In the longer run, NIFC-CA could even evolve beyond the “counter-air” focus embodied in its name and become an offensive fire control network, not just a defensive one. The Navy and the Pentagon’s Strategic Capabilities Office have worked together to modify the SM-6 version of the Standard Missile, a high-performance interceptor designed to shoot down incoming missiles and planes, and make it capable of striking surface ships as well. The targeting data for the successful test was relayed via NIFC-CA network, which didn’t require any modifications to do that mission, Patel said.

If NIFC-CA can similarly bring in other surface-to-surface missiles, like the Army’s ATACMS, it might evolve into an all-purpose, all-service system of fire control that can either shoot down enemy missiles in flight or blow them up preemptively on the launcher."
'
Source: http://breakingdefense.com/2017/02/we-c ... y-experts/
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Unread post02 Mar 2017, 09:40

The Arrival of the F-35C for the Carrier Fleet [Best read all the one sentence paragraphs at the jump]
27 Feb 2017 SLDinfo

"...The F-35s coming to the fleet will add significantly to this process. It is about rapid combat learning in a dynamic warfighting environment. We are shaping the foundation for “learning airplanes” to engage the enemy.

LVC will enable us to train in a more robust environment than we are on our current ranges that are geographically constrained, and currently do not have the full high end threat replicated. LVC will allow us to train to the full capabilities of our platforms across a variety of security environments and do so without exposing our training process to an interested adversary.

Question: What you are talking about is shaping real time combat forensics against an active and dynamic threat?
Rear Admiral Manazir: That is a great way to put it. And this capability is crucial going forward.

We’re back into a scenario where lots of threats around the world require us to react to enemy learning. Then, when they act in accordance to our reaction, we react again and so on. The enemy morphs to do X. We have to react and we now do Y.

What is not widely realized is that the evolving air wing on the carrier and on the large deck amphibious ships, is being shaped for a dynamic learning process. The F-35s will play a key role in this evolving process, but we are already underway with this process as you mentioned with regard to Fallon.

With regard to the air war, where it’s either air-to-ground missions or air-to-air missions, we can share that information and bring in more people into the discussion with our long-range information and communication systems....

...There is a constant effort to enhance the ability to get intel to the warfighter so he can act on it.

Question: What you are describing is the fighter wing as sortieing of information, and not only weapons?
Rear Admiral Manazir: That is a good way to put it.

We are doing what Bayesian theory talks about, namely we are providing more and more information to get closer to the truth in targeting or combat situation. One can reduce that fog of war by increased understanding of what actual truth is, you’re going to have better effects.

This is why the technology that the F-35 brings to the fight is so crucial. You have decision-makers in the cockpit managing all of this information. With Block 3F software in the airplane, we will have data fusion where you transform data information to knowledge enabling greater wisdom about the combat situation.

The processing machines in the F-35 provide enough of the fusion so that the pilot can now add his piece to the effort. This enables the ships to enhance their ability to operate in the networks and to engage with the air fleet in dynamic targeting at much greater distance. It is about reach not range for the honeycomb enabled expeditionary strike group. The F-35 is a key enabler of this shift, but it is part of an overall effort to operate in the expanded battlespace....

...Across the force we carefully manage aircraft utilization, and I would rather not expend precious 5th generation fatigue life doing missions that can be performed by other, 3rd or 4th generation platforms.

This is why CNO said we will supplement Lighting II with a healthy cadre of Super Hornets. This “high-low” mix is essential to sustainable, cost effective, combat lethality now and in the future.

Also, the requirement for our pilots to execute high-end missions that only F-35C can do, as well as those missions it could potentially do, would quickly make the training syllabus and the hours required to be current and proficient in all mission areas, unexecutable. Therefore, we will focus and tailor F-35C training where its design and capabilities add most value to our integrated carrier air wing. The Navy is in a unique position to do just that, and we plan to keep that advantage and capitalize on the synergy of our 5th generation Lightning IIs and 4th generation Super Hornets.

In other discussions with flight line leadership in Lemoore, I assured them that recovering readiness in our Super Hornet fleet, sustaining it through mid-life upgrades and smartly modernizing it, will ensure that fleet remains the lethal, warfighting partner to the remarkable F-35C platforms that just arrived. And as the home for our new F-35C fleet as well as our west coast Super Hornets, we need to ensure NAS Lemoore continues to grow in capacity and services to support both our warfighters and their families, well in to the future...." [This last section will be repeated elsewhere erewhon]
viewtopic.php?f=58&t=52254&p=363659&hilit=utilization#p363659

Source: http://www.sldinfo.com/the-arrival-of-t ... ier-fleet/
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Unread post03 Mar 2017, 03:43

USAF playing catchup? "Everyones a winner baby dats de truth - dats de truth." C2 to beat all C2 and throw in SPACE!
C2 Will Be the Edge
03 Mar 2017 John A. Tirpak

"​Command and control is “what will keep us ahead” as China, Russia, and other potential adversaries catch up in aerospace technology and imitate the US Air Force, Air Combat Command chief Gen. Hawk Carlisle asserted at AWS17 Thursday. The key to prevailing in future conflicts will be knowing the situation “faster, better” than an opponent, and the ability to continually assess and act inside his ability to do so. The Air Force’s Combined Air Operations Centers are the envy of the world, Carlisle said, but USAF is working to make them better, and is dedicating itself to making sure every platform feeds the “combat cloud.” In the future, “everything in the battlespace has to be an information collector and disseminator,” Carlisle said. The F-22 will be a key to that effort, although USAF hasn’t “figured out … yet” how to pass that what it collects to the rest of the force automatically, due to its stealthy communications technology.

Carlisle said C2 is really the key when USAF may not have numerical superiority, and its technology will not be generations ahead of any competitor. Observing that the US had a monopoly on stealth when the F-117 was introduced, Carlisle noted, “we’ll never have an advantage like that again.” The technology pushes, he said, will be in “autonomy and semi-autonomy” of both platforms and the means to interpret what they collect, as well as “manned and unmanned teaming” and “machine-to-machine” communications and collaboration. Unable to be specific due to secrecy, Carlisle promised “we’re truly on the edge of some big moves” in all these areas, and in connecting “all the disparate parts” of the combat enterprise.

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/DRArchive/Pa ... -Edge.aspx

Space is the DNA of Fusion
03 Mar 2017 Wilson Brissett

"​Air Force Space Command boss Gen. Jay Raymond called space "the DNA of fusion," noting space is a part of everything the US military does today. Speaking at AWS17 Thursday, Raymond said Space Command has worked hard “to integrate those space and now cyber capabilities into the fight,” but the Air Force now needs to address the threat posed by adversaries who are “actively developing capabilities” to thwart the US in space. “We must be able to protect and defend” our space assets, Raymond said. To do so, AFSPC is working on a “concept of operations with the National Reconnaissance Office” for the defense of space. That concept of operations sets two goals: ensuring “the ability to command and control” in space and developing better “situational awareness” of all space assets, both US and foreign. In taking intermediate steps toward achieving these goals, Raymond said, AFSPC has “overhauled our training programs” and is working on “developing tactics, techniques, and procedures” for an operational space environment.​"

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/DRArchive/Pa ... usion.aspx
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Unread post03 Mar 2017, 03:56

Don't need to let the USMC feel left out of the network TRON goodness - so here 'tis.
Visiting the Prowler: USMC Electronic Warfare Capabilities in Transition
22 Mar 2017 Todd Miller

"...By 2020, the USMC will have adopted a revolutionary change in how they address electronic warfare. Rather than replace the Prowler with a dedicated platform, the USMC has adopted a distributed strategy, where “every platform is a sensor, shooter and sharer.” This new paradigm brings together both electronic warfare and cyber capability with the Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) in a structure called the (MAGTF EW).

USMC Captain Sarah Burns explains, “Under MAGTF EW the Marine Corps is leveraging emerging technologies and integrating multiple aviation platforms [unmanned, fixed-wing, tilt-rotor, and rotary-wing assets]; payloads; ground-based EW nodes; and cyber capabilities to provide commanders with an organic and persistent EW capability – for every MAGTF – large and small…”

Within the MAGTF EW each USMC aviation platform will have the capability to carry its own pods packed with sensors / jammer payloads (such as the Intrepid Tiger II).

2nd Lt. Samuel Stephenson indicates:
“This integration of manned and unmanned airborne and ground EW capabilities will provide the MAGTF commander with greater flexibility and control of the electromagnetic spectrum and, in many cases, giving the commander a capability where previously they had none.

“MAGTF EW assets will be modular, scalable and networked, utilizing an open architecture that is rapidly adaptable and remotely re-programmable at the tactical level to support future Marine Corps warfighting requirements.”


The US Navy EA-18G Growler will continue the Prowlers dedicated EW mission. The USMC F-35B & C (replacing the AV-8B, F/A-18A-D and EA-6B) will provide the tactical aviation requirements of the USMC while offering a very robust EW capability. Combined, the two aircraft (EA-18G & F-35B/C) will bring immense EW capability to the Joint Force.

As Stephenson indicates, “These aircraft, combined with the assets available in the MAGTF EW, will ensure the Marine Corps will be able to quickly innovate and adapt to the changing EW mission set and the battlefield of tomorrow.”..."

Source: http://www.sldinfo.com/visiting-the-pro ... ransition/
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Unread post03 Mar 2017, 06:04

[quote="spazsinbad"]Don't need to let the USMC feel left out of the network TRON goodness - so here 'tis. [quote] .....

The US Navy EA-18G Growler will continue the Prowlers dedicated EW mission. The USMC F-35B & C (replacing the AV-8B, F/A-18A-D and EA-6B) will provide the tactical aviation requirements of the USMC while offering a very robust EW capability. Combined, the two aircraft (EA-18G & F-35B/C) will bring immense EW capability to the Joint Force....quote]

...not to create an argument but to simply ask a question.....do CVNs and Amphibs swim together..ever??

..if not, then the Harriers (LHA/ LHD), not being allowed near a CVN, would probably "NEVER" see a Growler....ever..., while the Prowler would escort the F/A-18A-D Hornets (soon to be "Seas"/ Corp) from the carrier decks/ runways for the Corp.... or not???

...so...that being said, the "Bee" (relative of the Harrier (LHA/ LHD), ) also will not be allowed near a CVN/ Growlers....

....the EA/EW capability of the 4 group of Bee's will be "NOT" supplemented by the far distant CVN Growlers....

..or am I on a tangent, here on my soap box?..

IMHO,
:)
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Unread post03 Mar 2017, 11:19

neptune wrote:
...not to create an argument but to simply ask a question.....do CVNs and Amphibs swim together..ever??



The participants in BOLD ALLIGATOR 2012...
- Enterprise Carrier Strike Group (CSG)
- Expeditionary Strike Group 2 (ESG-2)
- 2d Marine Expeditionary Brigade (MEB)
- Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group (ARG)
-24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU)
- Naval Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) as well as various other ships and units
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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Unread post04 Mar 2017, 00:12

F-35 is more like a "mini-AWACS" but "fighting in the dark with little or no tech at all". WUT! BVR in the DARK! WUT?!
Fusion Training for Fusion Warfare
03 Mar 2017 Wilson Brissett

"Training airmen for the battlespace of the future will require fusion training environments that use fifth generation capabilities of the F-35 and T-X trainer, top Air Force generals said at AW​S17 Thursday. Fusion warfare will require “agile airmen, highly trained in their primary duty,” but also ready to “synergize” across the force, said Lt. Gen. Darryl Roberson, chief of Air Education and Training Command. One way to achieve this goal is to get young airmen more time in air operations centers “to expose more airmen to the network infused environment.” This sort of experience can help “unleash that thought potential,” which Air Combat Command boss Gen. Hawk Carlisle said is the greatest advantage of the US military. The challenge is daunting, however. Roberson said the Air Force ultimately needs airmen who are “proficient at fighting in the dark with little or no technology at all.” [QUE?]

New capabilities will help too. Roberson singled out the F-35 and the T-X trainer. The fifth generation fighter is “a difference-maker in how we can carry out command and control and fuse all components of warfighting in future conflicts,” he said. “In these future conflicts, the fifth-generation fighter aircraft is our key to mature air superiority for the United States.” He said the F-35 operates “more like an AWACS than an individual fighter,” bringing additional command capabilities to the battlespace. And the T-X will be necessary for “bridging the technological gap between our current trainers and that fifth-generation capability.” The continued development of the T-X trainer is “central to our ability to transition, to bring in more of this networked warfare and fusion, and start training our students from the very beginning what they’re going to see when they get out and operational.”

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/DRArchive/Pa ... rfare.aspx
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Unread post04 Mar 2017, 00:33

Navy Starts Up Cyber ‘Top Gun’ School: Information Warfare Development Center
03 Mar 2017 Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

"This month, the Navy will launch the cyber equivalent of its famous TOPGUN course for fighter pilots. The school will teach selected cyber specialists the best tactics to keep hackers [out of] our Navy networks.

Much like TOPGUN, which is now part of the Naval Aviation Warfighting Development Center (NAWDC) in Fallon, Nevada, the new Information Warfare Development Center (IWDC) will bring top-notch specialists together to train on and refine the latest tactics, then send them back to the fleet to teach those best practices to the rest of the force. (Kelly McGinnis and homoerotic volleyball are, sadly, not on the real-life curriculum)....

...One innovation already spreading across the fleet is the position of information warfare commander. Just as a carrier strike group will have one senior officer orchestrating all air operations, another hunting submarines, and so on, admirals now often appoint an information warfare chief to oversee cyber/electronic warfare, intelligence, and so on. The problem is it’s currently done ad hoc, without the established procedures and trained professionals of other “warfare areas.” Sometimes a strike group’s information warfare commander is the most senior IW officer on the staff, but sometimes it’s just an additional duty for the already overworked skipper of the aircraft carrier.

“Five to 10 to 15 years ago, in a more relatively benign environment, that kind of approach might have been okay, (but) you cannot do that now,” Kohler said. “Frankly, it is way too demanding of a position to put someone other than an information warfare professional into the job.” So NAVIFOR is now developing specialized training for a carrier strike group information warfare commander, Kohler said, and it’s looking at training for Amphibious Ready Group staffs as well.

Indeed, across the entire Navy, there’s a move towards new concepts of command and control that depend on long-range communications networks. These range from the NIFC-CA system for detecting and shooting down incoming missiles and bombers to the distributed lethality concept for coordinating attacks from widely dispersed ships. “That kind of distributed operations… cannot be done without the kind of capabilities that we provide,” Kohler said. “It is bringing us to the very forefront of warfighting.”"

Source: http://breakingdefense.com/2017/03/navy ... nt-center/
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
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Unread post04 Mar 2017, 01:27

spazsinbad wrote:
Navy Starts Up Cyber ‘Top Gun’ School: Information Warfare Development Center
03 Mar 2017 Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

"This month, the Navy will launch the cyber equivalent of its famous TOPGUN course for fighter pilots. The school will teach selected cyber specialists the best tactics to keep hackers [out of] our Navy networks.

Much like TOPGUN, which is now part of the Naval Aviation Warfighting Development Center (NAWDC) in Fallon, Nevada, the new Information Warfare Development Center (IWDC) will bring top-notch specialists together to train on and refine the latest tactics, then send them back to the fleet to teach those best practices to the rest of the force. (Kelly McGinnis and homoerotic volleyball are, sadly, not on the real-life curriculum)....

...One innovation already spreading across the fleet is the position of information warfare commander. Just as a carrier strike group will have one senior officer orchestrating all air operations, another hunting submarines, and so on, admirals now often appoint an information warfare chief to oversee cyber/electronic warfare, intelligence, and so on. The problem is it’s currently done ad hoc, without the established procedures and trained professionals of other “warfare areas.” Sometimes a strike group’s information warfare commander is the most senior IW officer on the staff, but sometimes it’s just an additional duty for the already overworked skipper of the aircraft carrier.

“Five to 10 to 15 years ago, in a more relatively benign environment, that kind of approach might have been okay, (but) you cannot do that now,” Kohler said. “Frankly, it is way too demanding of a position to put someone other than an information warfare professional into the job.” So NAVIFOR is now developing specialized training for a carrier strike group information warfare commander, Kohler said, and it’s looking at training for Amphibious Ready Group staffs as well.

Indeed, across the entire Navy, there’s a move towards new concepts of command and control that depend on long-range communications networks. These range from the NIFC-CA system for detecting and shooting down incoming missiles and bombers to the distributed lethality concept for coordinating attacks from widely dispersed ships. “That kind of distributed operations… cannot be done without the kind of capabilities that we provide,” Kohler said. “It is bringing us to the very forefront of warfighting.”"

Source: http://breakingdefense.com/2017/03/navy ... nt-center/


....it also helps to know to "stick them with the pointy end!" :)
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Unread post17 Jan 2018, 19:43

https://news.usni.org/2018/01/16/30631

Surface Navy Working to Bring Firepower Over the Horizon Through Networking, F-35 Integration


By: Ben Werner
January 16, 2018

The surface Navy is looking to capitalize on recent successes increasing ships’ offensive range and lethality, with the next task being added sensing and targeting capabilities to support its new weaponry. Rear Adm. Ronald Boxall, the Navy’s director of surface warfare (N96), said the Navy is looking for ways to do long-range intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance, and targeting (ISR-T) as a next step following recent advances in implementing the distributed lethality concept — where surface ships are better armed and conduct disaggregated operations to complicate the enemy’s targeting. “We used to be able to say, ‘hey, we’d target out to the range of our helicopters,’” Boxall said at last week’s Surface Navy Association annual symposium. “Now we’re looking, as our weapons’ range gets very long, the next order of effect is how do we target out to those very long ranges?”

Combinations of surface ships, unmanned systems, submarines, and aircraft are all being tried to determine how best expand range, Boxall’s counterpart, director of expeditionary warfare Marine Corps Maj. Gen. David Coffman (OPNAV N95) said, citing recent technology improvements such as the SPY-6 Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) and maritime strike Tomahawk missiles as enablers of this new range. Boxall cited as examples the Littoral Combat Ship, which has already tested an over-the-horizon missile that the service plans to field “over the summer,” and the Maritime Strike Tomahawk, which “we’re going to continue to field that going forward. Everybody who has vertical cell, if you have that you can field this.”

A key enabler going forward will be the Marine Corps’ Lockheed Martin F-35B Lighting II Joint Strike Fighters (JSF), which will be integrated into amphibious ready group (ARG) operations this year , 2018. Amphibious assault ships’ flight decks have already been upgraded to support F-35B operations, Coffman said, and now the operators will learn to use the planes to help the Navy and Marine Corps team fight farther inland. Coffman said he wants to get away from the idea Navy ships are just buses that transport Marines. Instead, he wants Marines embarked on the ships to be an integrated part of the what he said was the “fight to get to the fight.” He cited the new USS America (LHA-6), an amphibious assault ship that does not have a well deck to deliver Marines ashore via surface connector. Instead, the ship can carry more F-35B aircraft and the offensive firepower and computing power they bring, and more rotary wing aircraft to bring Marines ashore from further distances away from threats in the sea or on land. “No one else on the planet can do what we can do in scope and scale in the littoral battlespace or in warfighting from the sea,” Coffman said. “That’s just the facts.”
:)

....the interesting part of this is that "Rear Adm. Ronald Boxall, the Navy’s director of surface warfare (N96)
is obviously not part of Naval Aviation (N98) but has the influence over "all that floats"! Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) a basic component of NIFC-CA is about sensors. N96 only sees the F-35B/C as a CEC sensor, regardless if it launches from a CVN or an LHA/D. The data integration of a flight of F-35B/Cs streamed to either a E-2D or direct to an Aegis Baseline 9 CG/DDG provides remote sensing and targeting that presently can't be provided by another aircraft. "Sensors on the F-35 include the Active Electronically Scanned Array, or AESA, radar as well as a system called Distributed Aperture System, or DAS, which combines input from as many as six different electro-optical cameras on the aircraft. The aircraft also draws upon a technology called Electro-optical Targeting System, or EOTS, which helps identify and pinpoint targets. EOTS, which does both air-to-air and air-to-ground targeting, is able to combine forward-looking infrared and infrared search and track technology." https://www.military.com/defensetech/2015/01/22/navy-to-integrate-f-35-with-beyond-the-horizon-technology

...NIFC-CA/Link 16 was recently validated with NavAir by the USS Desert Ship LLS-1/MADL Aegis Baseline 9.C1 with the launch of a SM-6 and the targeting by a VMX-1 F-35B/MADL to LLS-1 for a target at <260+ mile range. "This test (12Sep16) was a great opportunity to assess the Navy's ability to take unrelated technologies and successfully close the fire control loop as well as merge anti-surface and anti-air weapons into a single kill web that shares common sensors, links and weapons,".
:wink:
Last edited by neptune on 17 Jan 2018, 22:34, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread post17 Jan 2018, 20:40

Surface navy not concerned with the super bug vs C urine contest
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