F-35s Grounded Luke AFB Pilots Report Hypoxia-Like Symptoms

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spazsinbad

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Unread post19 Jul 2017, 21:59

Well to be fair Megan/Meagan is in the movie the only female nugget (last) in the F-14 Tomcat Brood and it is NOT her first cat shot - it is her FIRST TOMCAT catshot - because one would assume she has gained her 'wings of gold' earlier by qualifying in the T-45C day arrests & cats. She is a plain speaking young lady as one would assume any fighter pilot to be.
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post20 Jul 2017, 11:18

Lara is for sure a 'story milker' (evidence the previous ongoing F-35 ejection seat hoohas) so here we go with every single OXY incident written up with lots of supporting old news and round and round we go until I guess the FIX IS IN! (sigh) :roll:
Fix Elusive As Another F-35 Pilot Reports Trouble Breathing [QUICKLY FOUND TO BE A FAULTY VALVE THOUGH]
19 Jun 2017 Lara Seligman [don't be so breathless]

"...An instructor pilot from the 56th Fighter Wing at Luke noticed he was lightheaded and short of breath during a local training flight on July 10, according to spokeswoman Maj. Becky Heyse. The pilot activated his backup oxygen system and returned to base safely, she said....

...A post-flight analysis of the July 10 incident indicated the symptoms were due to a faulty valve on the pilot’s mask, Heyse said. After the valve was replaced, the pilot flew again without any incident.

“We are classifying it as a physiological event but we are under the working assumption that it had to do with the irregularity on the valve on the mask, whereas the other five we had we have no idea still,” Heyse said.... [AW SHUCKS! What a letdown]

...Schiff [JPO spokeswoman Brandi Schiff] declined a request from Aviation Week to provide a detailed list of possible root causes the team is currently investigating.

The program office also is taking steps to refine the Obogs oxygen concentration algorithm, which meters the appropriate oxygen concentration of the air being supplied to pilots at various altitudes (as humans ascend and the air thins, they need more oxygen to breathe properly). However, this may be a bandaid solution, as there is no indication that delivered concentration was a contributor to any of the recent events."

Source: http://aviationweek.com/defense/fix-elu ... -breathing
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post22 Jul 2017, 13:24

F-35 Program Office Planning Oxygen System Update Following Luke Issues
21 Jul 2017 Brian Everstine

“The F-35 Joint Program Office will update the jet’s onboard oxygen generation system to better flow air to pilots in the wake of physiological incidents in training at Luke AFB, Ariz. The OBOGS firmware update will include an algorithm change linked to oxygen concentration, Joint Program Office spokeswoman Brandi Schiff said in email. Honeywell will design the update, and find a way to retrofit all F-35s with the changes. Cost estimates are not yet developed.

The current schedule is about 24 months, but the program office is pushing to accelerate that timeline, the report states. Luke in June temporarily grounded its F-35s after five pilots reported hypoxia-like incidents during flight. The Luke F-35s returned to limited flight, while other bases were not affected. The initiative was first reported by Defense News.”

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/DRArchive/Pa ... Corps.aspx
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post26 Jul 2017, 16:51

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE
The Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson will hunt for answers to determine if on-board oxygen generation equipment on the nation’s newest multi-million dollar stealth fighter caused pilots to experience a loss of oxygen in flight.

Researchers expected to start work today at the 711th Human Performance Wing’s $1.5 million On-Board Oxygen Generation System Laboratory to investigate four “OBOGS” units taken off F-35A Lightning II stealth fighter jets based at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz.

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http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/wri ... pwUCz3ynI/
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Unread post27 Jul 2017, 01:54

SpudmanWP wrote:
WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE
The Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson will hunt for answers to determine if on-board oxygen generation equipment on the nation’s newest multi-million dollar stealth fighter caused pilots to experience a loss of oxygen in flight.

Researchers expected to start work today at the 711th Human Performance Wing’s $1.5 million On-Board Oxygen Generation System Laboratory to investigate four “OBOGS” units taken off F-35A Lightning II stealth fighter jets based at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz.

Image



Much more at the Jump

http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/wri ... pwUCz3ynI/


Interesting, I wonder if the US Navy will borrow Wright Patterson's OBOGS lab to further investigate their T-45 and F/A 18 hypoxia issues. This useful laboratory should have been set up a long time ago!
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Unread post27 Jul 2017, 02:27

IIRC recent articles indicate that USN & USAF will co-operate investigating this/these OBOGS issues. I'll assume USAF will investigate the 'upgraded F-35 Honeywell OBOGS' also? This kind of major investigation has been a long time getting going.
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post04 Aug 2017, 02:04

Navy Unit Joins USAF Human Performance Wing for Hypoxia Research
04 Aug 2017 Brian Everstine

"A Navy research unit has joined the Air Force’s 711th Human Performance Wing to help research what is causing “hypoxia-like” symptoms during flight. The Naval Medical Research Unit-Dayton is working with the wing at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, to solve the problem. USAF F-35 pilots at Luke AFB, Ariz., have experienced physiological episodes during flight and the Navy is dealing with similar instances in its T-45 aircraft, along with some F-18 Hornets.

The two agencies are working together to focus on the “most complex aeromedical, environmental health, and human performances challenges” the military faces, according to a Wright-Patterson release. The Navy unit previously worked with the Air Force when the F-22 fleet was suffering hypoxia-like incidents back in 2012. That work included the development of a Real-Time Air Quality Sensor, which is being installed on T-45s and F-18s."

Photo: "Navy Lt. Todd Seech, an aerospace experimental psychologist with the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory at Naval Medical Research Unit-Dayton, breathes through an oxygen mask in a reduced breathing environment used to examine the interaction of hypoxia and fatigue effects to determine the likelihood of mishaps. USAF photo by Bryan Ripple." http://www.airforcemag.com/DRArchive/Pu ... 08-004.JPG


Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/DRArchive/Pa ... ssues.aspx
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Unread post11 Aug 2017, 23:24

Any subscribers?

Psychology May Factor Into F-35 Oxygen Mystery, General Says

HOLLOMAN AFB, New Mexico—After weeks of digging, the Pentagon is no closer to determining what caused a recent spate of hypoxia-like cockpit incidents on the F-35As at an Arizona U.S. Air Force ...

http://aviationweek.com/awindefense/psy ... neral-says
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Unread post15 Aug 2017, 05:00

Air Force looks toward lessening F-35 flight restrictions at Luke AFB [best read at source]
15 Aug 2017 Valerie Insinna

"HOLLOMAN AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. — Air Force officials remain stumped about the causes of hypoxia-like symptoms that affected F-35 pilots at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, earlier this summer, but the service is beginning to carve out a plan for removing certain flight restrictions, a general said Wednesday.

Pilots at Luke have been required to fly at altitudes lower than 25,000 feet since June, when Brig. Gen. Brook Leonard, the 56th Fighter Wing commander, approved a return to flight F-35 operations after a week-long grounding of jets at Luke AFB. Leonard ordered the pause in flight ops following five incidents at the base where pilots reported they had experienced symptoms similar to hypoxia, or oxygen deprivation.

Leonard, who spoke to Defense News Aug. 9 at Holloman AFB in New Mexico, said there has been no new information from any of these efforts pointing to a single root cause....

...“We have looked at the carbon monoxide issue on the ramp because it’s fairly congested,” he said. “We’ve actually found that the fuel that we use in our aircraft actually burns a lot cleaner than even car exhaust. So while I wish I could start to find substantive things that were wrong, that one ended up not being a problem.”...

...Additionally, Luke AFB made other immediate changes to its F-35 flight operations, including improving pilot training on how to breathe in the physiological taxing conditions regularly encountered in fighter jets, how to recognize symptoms of oxygen deprivation and react accordingly.

We keep our mask up, [DUH] making sure we park the jets in certain places to reduce the carbon monoxide,” he said. “We’ve looked at the valves in our mask to make sure that they’re all working.”

Over the next month or so, Luke AFB will receive its first F-35 configured with the 3F software iteration that gives the jet its full combat capability. The 3F aircraft are able to reach 9G and have an expanded flight envelope, however, Leonard said he didn’t believe there was any increased danger of oxygen deprivation."

Source: http://www.defensenews.com/air/2017/08/ ... -luke-afb/
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post24 Aug 2017, 14:32

Flight Doctors Key To Cracking Hypoxia Mystery
23 Aug 2017 Lara Seligman

"...The Air Force, along with the JPO’s physiological episode (PE) team, took steps to rebuild the Luke pilots’ confidence in the aircraft, including briefing them on all the incidents that occurred and the actions taken to safely recover the aircraft. They also mandated that the pilots get ROBD training within a 30-day window to refamiliarize them with their unique hypoxia symptoms, and eventually had pilots fly with pulse oximeters to measure their oxygen levels during flight, Flottmann said.

The team also is investigating possible equipment failures, but so far has found no smoking gun, Flottmann said. All data indicate that the F-35 Obogs is by and large operating as designed—although the Air Force has tweaked the algorithm that meters oxygen concentration at various altitudes, he noted...."

Source: http://aviationweek.com/defense/flight- ... ia-mystery
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post30 Aug 2017, 19:32

Last altitude restriction lifted at Luke but no root cause found.

WASHINGTON — Luke Air Force Base on Wednesday lifted altitude restrictions on the F-35, but Air Force officials are no closer to understanding what prompted five physiological incidents earlier this summer.

Between May 2 and June 8, five different pilots experienced symptoms similar to hypoxia, or oxygen deprivation, while conducting F-35A training flights at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. Brig. Gen. Brook Leonard, 56th Fighter Wing commander, ordered a pause in flight operations in June while officials from the Air Force and F-35 Joint Program Executive Office analyzed each incident, hoping to find a common thread, but no root cause explaining all five incidents has emerged.

Flight operations resumed June 21 with a number of restrictions in place, including a base-wide ban on flying the F-35 in altitudes higher than 25,000 feet. Leonard announced that restriction has been removed as of Aug. 30.

“We have learned a lot over the past two months and while we have yet to identify a singular cause we have reduced potential causes for labored breathing, carbon monoxide ingestion, and refined our procedures and training,” he said in a statement. “We have great confidence in the F-35A and the ability and training of our pilots. We will continue to closely monitor operations and work with the Joint Program Office and the Human Performance Wing on future improvements as we move forward building the future of airpower.”

Earlier this month, Leonard told Defense News that he was considering reopening the F-35’s flight envelope at Luke AFB, signaling that the removal of flight restrictions could be imminent.

“Once we kind of sit back down with the instructor pilots, once we sit back down with the experts and kind of analyze the data that we have, if we really haven’t found anything that pops out as causal — or if we have, and we can fix it with the mitigation [actions] that we’ve put in place and what we’ve learned so far — we’ll probably go and eliminate the 25,000-foot restriction,” he said then. “But that one needs to be determined based on the data that we still have to analyze.”

That decision was based on several factors, Maj. Rebecca Heyse, spokeswoman for the 56th fighter wing, told Defense News. Teams at Luke AFB completed heat stress and chemical exposure testing — basically, an evaluation of whether pilots were exposed to excessive heat or carbon monoxide on the ramp — but initial assessments showed no strong evidence of chemical factors causing contamination in the air.

Leonard also developed increased confidence as F-35 operators flew regularly over two months with only one additional incident of hypoxia-like symptoms occurring due to a faulty valve on a pilot’s mask. That event is not connected to the series of five unexplained incidents that occurred during May and June, Air Force officials have said.

The base also found success with updated pilot training and pre-flight procedures, including increasing the minimum levels for the backup oxygen system and having pilots mask up as soon as they get to the jet, Heyse said.
https://www.defensenews.com/air/2017/08 ... orce-base/
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Unread post30 Aug 2017, 19:52

....and having pilots mask up as soon as they get to the jet, Heyse said.


you mean like this guy?
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Unread post30 Aug 2017, 19:57

I'm an old 'pure oxygen under pressure' using pilot from 40 odd years ago now and I'm aghast at some of the pilot safety practices I see in photos/videos today. For sure putting on the mask once entering the cockpit was REQUIRED, none of this TOPGUN inspired 'I'll leave my mask off so I can look good' (but I admit it would be for the fillum so we can see "acting").
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Unread post30 Aug 2017, 20:02

Next thing you know they'll make 'em roll their sleeves down and wear gloves
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Unread post06 Sep 2017, 04:29

US Air Force anticipates F-35 OBOGS testing through end of 2017

Key Points
The US Air Force anticipates F-35 oxygen system testing to last through the end of 2017
The service, earlier this year, restricted the aircraft’s flight envelope after physiological issues
The US Air Force (USAF) anticipates testing for the on-board oxygen generation system (OBOGS) on the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) to last through the end of 2017, according to a service spokesperson.

USAF spokesperson Brian Ripple told Jane’s on 5 September that test planning started immediately following events at Luke Air Force Base in Arizona. Five F-35 pilots at Luke AFB suffered five unknown physiological incidents between 2 May and 8 June.

http://www.janes.com/article/73561/us-a ... nd-of-2017
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