New Photos: Chilled Lightning

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spazsinbad

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Unread post24 Jan 2015, 06:57

New Photos: Chilled Lightning
26 Jan 2015 Amy Butler

"...BF-05, was ferried to Eglin AFB, Florida, last fall for the trials. The aircraft is in the McKinley Climatic Laboratory on the base, which is designed to simulate nearly every possible weather condition on Earth. The lab is designed to produce temperatures from -40 degrees to 120 degrees. The lab can also produce various conditions including rain, ice, fog, snow and varying humidity levels...."

"BF-05 is on an icing cloud test calibration fixture at the McKinley Climatic Lab (above). PICs by Andy Wolfe": http://aviationweek.com/site-files/avia ... FCOLD1.jpg

Source: http://aviationweek.com/blog/new-photos ... -lightning
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Unread post27 Jan 2015, 02:35

Following on from another forum discussion, the pitot tube looks pretty iced up. No "caution hot" there! :o
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Unread post27 Jan 2015, 03:58

Heheh, I guess the supersonic wind of CANCEL CANCEL CANCEL (in other cases SUSPEND SUSPEND SUSPEND) will be generated in the hot air online naysayer forums everywhere. At last they will be of some use then eh - looks so cold.
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Unread post30 Jan 2015, 02:08

ORIGINAL: http://alert5.com/wp-content/uploads/20 ... est_1a.jpg

ZOOMed below...
Photos: F-35 all-weather climatic testing
30 Jan 2015 Alert 5

"The F-35 Patuxent River Integrated Test Force in Maryland ferried aircraft BF-05 to Eglin Air Force Base, Florida to undergo climatic testing at the 96th Test Wing’s McKinley Climatic Laboratory. During the six-month test, the F-35s will be exposed to extreme wind, solar radiation, fog, humidity, rain intrusion/ingestion, freezing rain, icing cloud, icing build-up, vortex icing and snow.

Climatic Testing; Solar Array hoist, set up and lighting test over BF-05. Photo by Michael D. Jackson, F-35 Integrated Test Force"

Source: http://alert5.com/2015/01/30/photos-f-3 ... c-testing/
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Unread post30 Jan 2015, 15:10

Here is a wind to help with the climate testin':
Photo Caption: "An icing cloud test calibration fixture is shown in front of an F-35B Lightning II aircraft as it undergoes cold weather testing at the 96th Test Wing's McKinley Climatic Laboratory at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. (Photo by Michael D. Jackson, F-35 Integrated Test Force)" http://www.intelligent-aerospace.com/co ... est_2a.jpg

AND... a SUPERchill NOwind Wun: "An F-35B Lightning II undergoes ice evaluation testing at the 96th Test Wing's McKinley Climatic Laboratory at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. (Photo by Michael D. Jackson, F-35 Integrated Test Force)" http://www.intelligent-aerospace.com/co ... est_3a.jpg

F-35 Lightning II undergoes extensive all-weather climatic testing
30 Jan 2015 Courtney Howard

"EGLIN AFB, Fla., 30 Jan. 2014. Personnel at the U.S. Air Force 96th Test Wing’s McKinley Climatic Laboratory located at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., have subjected the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II -- a single-seat and single-engine, all-weather stealth multirole fighter jet – rigorous climatic testing over the past four months.

An F-35B military aircraft from the F-35 Patuxent River Integrated Test Force in Maryland has endured extreme weather temperatures during tests designed to certify the fleet for deployment in any corner of the world.

With 13 countries currently involved with the program, the F-35 must be tested in meteorological conditions representative of those locations from which it will operate -- ranging from the heat of the Australian Outback to the bitter cold of the Arctic Circle above Canada and Norway. The McKinley Climatic Laboratory at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida supports all-weather testing of weapon systems to ensure they function regardless of climatic conditions.

“We’ve designed an environment at the chamber where we can simulate virtually any weather condition—all while flying the jet at full power in either conventional or vertical takeoff mode,” affirms Dwayne Bell, McKinley Climatic Laboratory technical chief.

The F-35B Lightning II was ferried to Eglin AFB in September 2014 to begin a six-month assessment of the aircraft’s performance under a variety of environmental conditions, including: wind, solar radiation, fog, humidity, rain intrusion/ingestion, freezing rain, icing cloud, icing build-up, vortex icing, and snow.

“While we are testing in the world’s largest climatic testing chamber, we’re pushing the F-35 to its environmental limits — ranging from 120 degrees Fahrenheit to negative 40 degrees, and every possible weather condition in between,” explains F-35 test pilot Billie Flynn, who performed extreme cold testing on the aircraft.

“To this point, the aircraft’s performance is meeting expectations,” Flynn adds. “It has flown in more than 100 degree heat while also flying in bitter subzero temperatures. In its final days of testing, it will fly through ice and other conditions such as driving rain with hurricane force winds...."

Source: http://www.intelligent-aerospace.com/ar ... sting.html
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lamoey

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Unread post30 Jan 2015, 15:51

In the picture the F-35B only has the rear intake doors open, while the intake door for the lift fan is closed.

I can see a use this configuration for the ability to use a "dirty" runway in this way. Lets say the lift fan can't be activated for some reason or other, but the aircraft is in the air and has to land and a runway that has sustain attacks. The larger debris and tire busters have been removed, but there is not enough time to run the "hoover", so plenty of FOD may still remain on the runway. I'm not aware of any ability to close the main, front facing air intakes, but can the F-35B reduce the suction from the main engine intake by using the top, rear intake in this way?

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Unread post30 Jan 2015, 16:17

There is mention in an article about the testing of the Bee in many inflight door/mode failure conditions. I gathered from this article that some modes would NOT be intentional - only coming about due failures of some kind or caused by damage from whatever source FOD/combat. The unusual configurations in STOVL mode (which would not be allowed by computer in ordinary Mode 4) are possible because some test Bees have switches which allow the computer to be overridden to mimic these failure/damage modes. So perhaps this is what we see in the picture - an out of the ordinary mode - rather than an expected ordinary STOVL flying mode (otherwise NOT allowed by flight computer).

The situation described DOES not include an estimate for runway length or length of runway that is FOD free. Any ideas? I think the flexibility of the Bee to land from an ordinary landing to a VL to a backwards landing at 30 knots really helps a lot with any situation imaginable. So best to be more specific. As to your question about 'the door' etc.: I have no idea. :doh:
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Unread post30 Jan 2015, 17:30

spazsinbad wrote:There is mention in an article about the testing of the Bee in many inflight door/mode failure conditions. I gathered from this article that some modes would NOT be intentional - only coming about due failures of some kind or caused by damage from whatever source FOD/combat. The unusual configurations in STOVL mode (which would not be allowed by computer in ordinary Mode 4) are possible because some test Bees have switches which allow the computer to be overridden to mimic these failure/damage modes. So perhaps this is what we see in the picture - an out of the ordinary mode - rather than an expected ordinary STOVL flying mode (otherwise NOT allowed by flight computer).

The situation described DOES not include an estimate for runway length or length of runway that is FOD free. Any ideas? I think the flexibility of the Bee to land from an ordinary landing to a VL to a backwards landing at 30 knots really helps a lot with any situation imaginable. So best to be more specific. As to your question about 'the door' etc.: I have no idea. :doh:


Thanks Spaz. For runway length it would have to be whatever needed to do a conventional landing, but with high risk of FOD on all or only the part of the runway where the aircraft roles slow enough to vacuum up debris. Personally I would not know what length that would be.
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Unread post30 Jan 2015, 21:42

As Spaz suggests, gotta believe that they're playing with FTAs (flight test aids) to create certain conditions that might exist as a consequence of a failure mode.

If you go to videos of transitions from STOVL Mode 1 to Mode 4, you'll notice that the AAI doors and the LLF doors sequence open before the ULF door. In the pic, either the ULF door hasn't yet sequenced, or they failed it closed to see what the main engine might do with all of that mass flow and high volume water ingestion but no lift fan thrust demand.
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Unread post30 Jan 2015, 21:57

During a conventional landing by the Bee (same as any variant) the engine could be at idle before touchdown OR - even just before touchdown be at flight idle with a higher approach speed - to allow for the flare with the engine already at idle. We have seen plenty of flared conventional landings by both the Bee & Cee on videos, with especially then long aero braking sequences. So where is the problem with the engine intake?
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Unread post30 Jan 2015, 23:25

To whom might your question be directed Spaz?
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Unread post31 Jan 2015, 00:48

'lamoey' asked this question above: "... can the F-35B reduce the suction from the main engine intake..." and at first it was not clear to me the circumstances of the question. When 'lamoey' made the situation clear then an answer from me could be more forthcoming. Then I hope it is clear that an ordinary landing with an aerobrake manuever at first (engine is at idle) will be the best way to reduce any FODdings on the runway described. One could imagine all kinds of details for the runway but whatever - I'll go with what I have in mind - as described. On the first page of another recent thread there is a video with a good clip of this 'aerobreakdancing stuff with the A': [already on this forum there are several videos of F-35Bs carrying out aerobraking on landing at various desert/dry strips - usually - I recall the Bee visit to MCAS Miramar being onesuch].

Now BELOW is a combined video of clips of TWO F-35Bs aerobrake landing at MCAS Miramar late last year, then the arrival of the F-35C at Eglin AFB; then the arrival of the F-35A at Nellis recently [there are plenty of examples in videos of the F-35A aero brakin' because that is what it do: [the F-35C has a flashing red light on the nosewheel to indicate that the HOOK is NOT down - when FCLPing (ashore without hook down) a switch will be made to 'switch off' this flashing red light (probably known as the 'hook bypass switch' or similar). However when going to the carrier for practice then this switch is NOT made so that the LSO will see any touch and go HOOK UP aircraft with this flashing RED light - when HOOK DOWN then on the STEADY AoA indexer lights will be seen ( Orange for On Speed/correct AoA; Green for SLOW & the (non flashing) RED for FAST). It is likely this 'flashing red' will NOT be seen if the video is viewed in this page - best to click on the 'youtube' icon to go there to view the video in the best available resolution at full screen - which are: 720pHD [NOT 1080] OR use this URL to go directly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAfz6sdjC2U

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Unread post31 Jan 2015, 06:13

spazsinbad wrote:During a conventional landing by the Bee (same as any variant) the engine could be at idle before touchdown OR - even just before touchdown be at flight idle with a higher approach speed - to allow for the flare with the engine already at idle. We have seen plenty of flared conventional landings by both the Bee & Cee on videos, with especially then long aero braking sequences. So where is the problem with the engine intake?


The Viper can such stuff, like water, snow or ice, of the ground in idle. Mig-29s seem to have auxiliary doors on top of their intake for dirty run or taxi ways.
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Unread post31 Jan 2015, 07:29

How high are F-16 intakes and what is the suction at ground idle? The Skyhawk was fortunate to have intakes HIGH off the deck. :-)
Tradeoffs in Jet Inlet Design: A Historical Perspective
JOURNAL OF AIRCRAFT Vol. 44, No. 3, May–June 2007 András Sóbester, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ Hampshire, United Kingdom

"...G. Ground Crew Safety, Surface Clearance, and Foreign Object Damage
The first documented example of a crew member being sucked into an inlet is almost as old as jet aviation itself. According to Moult, in the spring of 1941 a Gloster E28/39’s engine was being tested when “...Michael Daunt, the test pilot, was strolling around dressed in a rather floppy coat. Suddenly he appeared to spin on his heels, lost his balance and took a dive into the intake of the engine.” (He was unharmed, apart from a few bruises.) There have been a number of such accidents since then, though not numerous enough to warrant the installation of permanent protective grills to cover the intakes. Such a design feature would involve significant weight and cost penalties, as well as potential pressure recovery deterioration and severe distortion caused by the flow separating over the grill, particularly at high angles of attack. Nonetheless, flow straighteners and swirl-reduction devices seen on some designs have the serendipitous effect of improving ground crew safety.

A similar risk that sometimes can be designed against is the ingestion of foreign objects. In extreme conditions (for example, taking off from semiprepared strips) a door might be necessary that seals the (main) intake while taxiing. We have seen this feature earlier on the MiG-29, where a set of top-mounted louvres supply the necessary air while the foreign object door is closed. Short of such complex measures, placing the intake ahead of the nose gear reduces the risk of foreign objects being picked up and sucked into the intake (as, for example, on the F-16)....."

Source: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/46202/1/AIAA-26830-529.pdf (22Mb)
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Unread post04 Feb 2015, 22:25

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