What are these vents on the bottom of the wing?

Design and construction
  • Author
  • Message
Offline

dagarkin

Newbie

Newbie

  • Posts: 2
  • Joined: 22 Sep 2013, 00:50

Unread post22 Sep 2013, 00:54

I'm new here so apologies in advance if this is in the wrong section.

Does anyone know what these are though? I've seen them on all versions of the F35, but it seems like random aircraft have them while others don't. Auxillary cooling of some sort?

http://i.imgur.com/Ncg4ngs.jpg
Attachments
Untitled.png
Offline
User avatar

count_to_10

Elite 3K

Elite 3K

  • Posts: 3282
  • Joined: 10 Mar 2012, 15:38

Unread post22 Sep 2013, 01:22

I don't know, but that is a strangely compelling picture. Very Sci-Fi looking.
Einstein got it backward: one cannot prevent a war without preparing for it.

Uncertainty: Learn it, love it, live it.
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 23079
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post22 Sep 2013, 01:40

X to F F-35 Lightning II and its predecessors
"...The F-35 has two scoops located in the wing /fuselage to provide nacelle bay ventilation. The aircraft also has a scoop located on the top of the right wing-glove to provide air to the fuel/air heat exchanger. A deployable scoop is located on the left-aft fuselage to provide air to the IPP and to the avionics. The F-35 minimizes the need for external scoops by using heat exchangers that are integrated in the engine fan duct. These heat exchangers use engine bypass air as a heat sink...."

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=28
OR
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/images/C ... 8_6299.pdf
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
Offline

dagarkin

Newbie

Newbie

  • Posts: 2
  • Joined: 22 Sep 2013, 00:50

Unread post22 Sep 2013, 01:57

count_to_10 wrote:I don't know, but that is a strangely compelling picture. Very Sci-Fi looking.


Here's the unmodified one for a wallpaper or whatever

spazsinbad wrote:X to F F-35 Lightning II and its predecessors
"...The F-35 has two scoops located in the wing /fuselage to provide nacelle bay ventilation. The aircraft also has a scoop located on the top of the right wing-glove to provide air to the fuel/air heat exchanger. A deployable scoop is located on the left-aft fuselage to provide air to the IPP and to the avionics. The F-35 minimizes the need for external scoops by using heat exchangers that are integrated in the engine fan duct. These heat exchangers use engine bypass air as a heat sink...."

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=28
OR
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/images/C ... 8_6299.pdf


Thanks a bunch, looks like I was in the ballpark
Attachments
7552624006_99f1bcbc22_o_zpse7fd39ed.jpg
Offline
User avatar

neptune

Elite 2K

Elite 2K

  • Posts: 2885
  • Joined: 24 Oct 2008, 00:03
  • Location: Houston

Unread post22 Sep 2013, 16:43

Is there a reference for the F-35A primary flight control design that indicates the ailerons and slats are individually controlled to provide this roll? Intuitive but not obvious to me in the flight controls of other fighter jets. Thanks in advance for a reference to other a/c controls. :shock:
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 23079
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post22 Sep 2013, 19:57

Not sure what 'neptune' question is about. Probably watching a few flight videos will help but in the meantime here is an interesting factoid....

Transonic Free-To-Roll Analysis of the F/A-18E and F-35 Configurations 02/2004; Source: NTRS
D. Bruce Owens, Jeffrey K. McConnell, Jay M. Brandon, Robert M. Hall
"ABSTRACT
The free-to-roll technique is used as a tool for predicting areas of uncommanded lateral motions. Recently, the NASA/Navy/Air Force Abrupt Wing Stall Program extended the use of this technique to the transonic speed regime. Using this technique, this paper evaluates various wing configurations on the pre-production F/A-18E aircraft and the Joint Strike Fighter (F-35) aircraft. The configurations investigated include leading and trailing edge flap deflections, fences, leading edge flap gap seals, and vortex generators. These tests were conducted in the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The analysis used a modification of a figure-of-merit developed during the Abrupt Wing Stall Program to discern configuration effects. The results showed how the figure-of-merit can be used to schedule wing flap deflections to avoid areas of uncommanded lateral motion. The analysis also used both static and dynamic wind tunnel data to provide insight into the uncommanded lateral behavior. The dynamic data was extracted from the time history data using parameter identification techniques. In general, modifications to the pre-production F/A-18E resulted in shifts in angle-of-attack where uncommanded lateral activity occurred. Sealing the gap between the inboard and outboard leading-edge flaps on the Navy version of the F-35 eliminated uncommanded lateral activity or delayed the activity to a higher angle-of-attack."

http://www.researchgate.net/publication ... igurations
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/

Return to F-35 Design & Construction

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests