The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 12 Jul 2017, 05:30
by neptune
Pentagon officials brief Germany on F-35 fighter jet

Andrea Shalal, July 11, 2017

BERLIN (Reuters) - Pentagon officials briefed German military on the Lockheed Martin Corp F-35 fighter jet this week but Berlin said no procurement decisions have been taken. Germany, which is looking to replace its aging Tornado fighter jets, is due to decide in mid-2018 about whether to start a new fighter development program or buy an existing fighter.
A German Defense Ministry spokesman said the decision will hinge largely on assessments of how long the Tornados can stay in use. "The F-35 is one of many options we are exploring," the spokesman said. Any move to buy a U.S. warplane could run into political resistance in Germany, which has strong labor unions, and given a big push by Europe to develop its own military equipment. The German Air Force asked the U.S. military in May for a classified briefing on the F-35 fighter jet as part of an "in-depth evaluation of market available solutions." Germany's interest in the F-35 took some European defense industry officials by surprise, given a big push by European aerospace giant Airbus and other European defense companies to develop a next-generation European fighter.

Source: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-germ ... SKBN19W16N

Lockheed, which is already building the F-35 fighter for several other NATO allies - the United States, Britain, Italy, Turkey, Norway, the Netherlands and Denmark - also plans to provide the German defense ministry with information about opportunities for German industry to participate in the F-35 program, a source familiar with the matter told Reuters. This week's briefings took place in Bonn, Germany, on Monday and Tuesday and involved a German one-star general, as well as working groups looking at specific weapons requirements and capabilities, according to another source briefed on the matter. "This meeting is consistent with the standard Foreign Military Sales process where we explain the path to F-35 acquisition and provide a top-level F-35 capabilities brief," F-35 program office spokesman Joe DellaVedova said. The German military plans to send Washington a formal "letter of request" for information about the F-35 and Boeing Co's F-15 and F/A-18E/F fighter jets later this summer, the ministry spokesman said. It will also gather information from Airbus about its work on a next-generation weapons system, he added. Experts also see the F-35 as the leading contender in a Belgian fighter competition that includes the Eurofighter Typhoon and the Dassault Aviation Rafale. Sweden's SAAB and Boeing have withdrawn from that tender.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 12 Jul 2017, 06:54
by sunstersun
I'd be a lot more confident in this if relations with Germany weren't so god damn frosty.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 12 Jul 2017, 07:58
by krorvik
It would sure be nice to be able to dial in another F-35 user in Europe - the advantages to common infrastructure (as stated quite clearly by Belgium too) are too big to ignore.

As for German unions - they are an integral part of German worklife. Fortunately - they are note the ones making large policy decisions on defense equipment there, or in any other country with similar systems. I wouldn't put too much emphasis on that.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 12 Jul 2017, 19:04
by talkitron
krorvik wrote:As for German unions - they are an integral part of German worklife. Fortunately - they are note the ones making large policy decisions on defense equipment there, or in any other country with similar systems. I wouldn't put too much emphasis on that.


The focus on labor unions is narrow but the reference to unions stands in for all interest groups who would benefit from domestic design and production of a fighter aircraft. There would be a whole hierarchy of German subcontractors with relationships to Airbus who could work on a fighter program.

Merkel has an 88% chance of being the next chancellor according to the betting-aggregation site below (based on >$240KUS in bets). I have no idea of her relationship to these interest groups. Still, if the goal is to get to 2% defense spending, spending that money to please domestic interest groups rather on real military capability might be seen as smart politics. Still, the monetary cost of developing and producing an F-35 class fighter is huge and the Germans might get sticker shock and just buy F-35s.

https://electionbettingodds.com

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 09:24
by krorvik
Yep, that would be their greatest concern I think. A quick look at the price tag for developing the F-35 should, at least, sober them up a bit...

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 14:32
by bigjku
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-franc ... 9Y1FJ?il=0

No they aren't buying F-35. They will likely do Eurofighter 2.0 and get the same results they got not buying F-15's. Europe will build an F-35/22 hybrid about 3 years before the US is onto the next thing.

In all honesty none of this matters at all until they get the right engine program in place. There are years and billions to be spent just get get to where the US is on combat engines. Let alone to where adaptive cycle engines are about to take the US.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 14:43
by ricnunes
bigjku wrote:http://www.reuters.com/article/us-france-germany-defence-idUSKBN19Y1FJ?il=0

No they aren't buying F-35. They will likely do Eurofighter 2.0 and get the same results they got not buying F-15's. Europe will build an F-35/22 hybrid about 3 years before the US is onto the next thing.

In all honesty none of this matters at all until they get the right engine program in place. There are years and billions to be spent just get get to where the US is on combat engines. Let alone to where adaptive cycle engines are about to take the US.


LoL! By 2060 (not a typo, two thousand and sixty) France/Germany should have their future fighter aircraft which will have similar capabilities as the F-35 but it a timeframe where the F-35 will probably starting to get replaced by something else. :roll:

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 17:31
by talkitron
ricnunes wrote:LoL! By 2060 (not a typo, two thousand and sixty) France/Germany should have their future fighter aircraft which will have similar capabilities as the F-35 but it a timeframe where the F-35 will probably starting to get replaced by something else. :roll:


Yeah, the Eurofighter Typhoon is just now getting ground attack capabilities like the F-15E had in 1989 and the air-to-air performance is competitive to the F-15E with equal munitions. So the Eurofighter took 30 years to equal the F-15E. The US should screw Israeli objections and aggressively export the F-35 to the Persian Gulf states to cut down on the financial viability of the Turkish, South Korean/Indonesian, Japanese, and now French/German fighter projects. Just like the Rafale and Typhoon added little to the F-15E in terms of military capability, these other projects will add little military capability to the F-35.

Maybe the UK will chip in some money for Penetrating Counter Air?

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 18:59
by durahawk
talkitron wrote:
ricnunes wrote:LoL! By 2060 (not a typo, two thousand and sixty) France/Germany should have their future fighter aircraft which will have similar capabilities as the F-35 but it a timeframe where the F-35 will probably starting to get replaced by something else. :roll:


Yeah, the Eurofighter Typhoon is just now getting ground attack capabilities like the F-15E had in 1989 and the air-to-air performance is competitive to the F-15E with equal munitions. So the Eurofighter took 30 years to equal the F-15E. The US should screw Israeli objections and aggressively export the F-35 to the Persian Gulf states to cut down on the financial viability of the Turkish, South Korean/Indonesian, Japanese, and now French/German fighter projects. Just like the Rafale and Typhoon added little to the F-15E in terms of military capability, these other projects will add little military capability to the F-35.

Maybe the UK will chip in some money for Penetrating Counter Air?


You guys are looking at it all wrong. The prime objective for the Typhoon project was to create a large scale pan-European Government funded workshare stimulus program. Creating an effective combat aircraft in line with western peers was merely a secondary objective. True, an egregious amount of capital was spent, but since most of it stayed within the EU, objective accomplished!

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 19:17
by Tiger05
bigjku wrote:http://www.reuters.com/article/us-france-germany-defence-idUSKBN19Y1FJ?il=0

No they aren't buying F-35. They will likely do Eurofighter 2.0 and get the same results they got not buying F-15's. Europe will build an F-35/22 hybrid about 3 years before the US is onto the next thing.


They were looking at the F-35 to replace the Tornado in the 2020s. This new program is to replace Eurofighters/Rafales in the longer term (2030s-2040s). I dont exclude the possibility that they will still procure the F-35 and at the same time pursue that new fighter development but we will see.

Btw why should Germany have bought F-15s??

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 19:28
by bigjku
Tiger05 wrote:
bigjku wrote:http://www.reuters.com/article/us-france-germany-defence-idUSKBN19Y1FJ?il=0

No they aren't buying F-35. They will likely do Eurofighter 2.0 and get the same results they got not buying F-15's. Europe will build an F-35/22 hybrid about 3 years before the US is onto the next thing.


They were looking at the F-35 to replace the Tornado in the 2020s. This new program is to replace Eurofighters/Rafales in the longer term (2030s-2040s). I dont exclude the possibility that they will still procure the F-35 and at the same time pursue that new fighter development but we will see.

Btw why should Germany have bought F-15s??


To replace their F-4's frankly.

The main concept is that the Eurofighter has no real reason to exist. We are getting some percentage improvement over the F-15 for a huge investment. The program as someone else stated is basically at its core a jobs program. It is what it is. Nothing against it but as an aircraft it really doesn't bring a lot new to the table that couldn't have been bought off the shelf. Any improvements on the F-15 are in the margins.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 19:38
by botsing
bigjku wrote:The main concept is that the Eurofighter has no real reason to exist. We are getting some percentage improvement over the F-15 for a huge investment. The program as someone else stated is basically at its core a jobs program.

I would say it is a job and technology investment/program for Europe. I would not be surprised with the economics involved if this actually has a profit on the grander scale (jobs, R&D and education).

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 21:02
by Tiger05
talkitron wrote:
ricnunes wrote:LoL! By 2060 (not a typo, two thousand and sixty) France/Germany should have their future fighter aircraft which will have similar capabilities as the F-35 but it a timeframe where the F-35 will probably starting to get replaced by something else. :roll:


Yeah, the Eurofighter Typhoon is just now getting ground attack capabilities like the F-15E had in 1989 and the air-to-air performance is competitive to the F-15E with equal munitions. So the Eurofighter took 30 years to equal the F-15E. The US should screw Israeli objections and aggressively export the F-35 to the Persian Gulf states to cut down on the financial viability of the Turkish, South Korean/Indonesian, Japanese, and now French/German fighter projects. Just like the Rafale and Typhoon added little to the F-15E in terms of military capability, these other projects will add little military capability to the F-35.


Why even compare the Typhoon to the F-15E? One was conceived as a pure interceptor with A2G capabilities added later as an afterthought while the other is a mud-mover. Apples and oranges really.

bigjku wrote:
Tiger05 wrote:
bigjku wrote:http://www.reuters.com/article/us-france-germany-defence-idUSKBN19Y1FJ?il=0

No they aren't buying F-35. They will likely do Eurofighter 2.0 and get the same results they got not buying F-15's. Europe will build an F-35/22 hybrid about 3 years before the US is onto the next thing.


They were looking at the F-35 to replace the Tornado in the 2020s. This new program is to replace Eurofighters/Rafales in the longer term (2030s-2040s). I dont exclude the possibility that they will still procure the F-35 and at the same time pursue that new fighter development but we will see.

Btw why should Germany have bought F-15s??


To replace their F-4's frankly.

The main concept is that the Eurofighter has no real reason to exist. We are getting some percentage improvement over the F-15 for a huge investment. The program as someone else stated is basically at its core a jobs program. It is what it is. Nothing against it but as an aircraft it really doesn't bring a lot new to the table that couldn't have been bought off the shelf. Any improvements on the F-15 are in the margins.


Thats a very US-centric point of view there... Europeans have their own aerospace industry. Its understable that they tend to favor a "home-made" solution as much as possible. Nothing wrong with that. Buying F-15s off-the shelf from the US would have provided next to no benefits for European aerospace companies, not to mention no R&D work as well thus making them lag behind, etc.

And i think you guys are being too harsh on the Typhoon. Yes, the program was a mess (largely due to the end of the Cold War which caused a lot of delays) but the aircraft itself turned out to be a fine jet. Pilots love it. I disagree that it is barely an improvement over the F-15. It has phenomenal pure 'raw' performances and climb rate, is more technology advanced, has more advanced sensors (IRST, sensor fusion...) and weapons (Meteor), has more growth potential, etc. FWIW the jet performed very well against F-15C/E during joint exercices.

OTOH i admit that the latest Eagle versions (F-15SG/SA, etc) are very impressive but keep in mind that they werent an option when the Typhoon was designed in the late 1980s/early 90s. F-15C was already out of production at that time and the F-15E was just coming online. Hindsight is 20/20.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 21:09
by bigjku
Europe is caught between two chairs. You don't spend enough to support a really cutting edge military industry buy you don't want to buy everything overseas either. You can't even really agree to buy the same things from Europe. At the present budgets Europe can do one of two things.

One field a credible force by minimizing R&D expenses.

Two support the industrial complex but have large capability gaps that go unfilled.

Because of a diminished threat Europe has been able to do number 2 and rely on the US to provide SEAD or tankers or whatever it is that Europe is missing.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 21:16
by SpudmanWP
Why even compare the Typhoon to the F-15E? One was conceived as a pure interceptor with A2G capabilities added later as an afterthought while the other is a mud-mover. Apples and oranges really.


Calling the F-15E a "mud-mover" is like calling the F-11 and dogfighter.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 22:33
by talkitron
Tiger05 wrote:Why even compare the Typhoon to the F-15E? One was conceived as a pure interceptor with A2G capabilities added later as an afterthought while the other is a mud-mover. Apples and oranges really.


The F-15C is the premiere A2A aircraft of its generation and the F-15E is the same airframe with some additions for air to ground. Both the F-15 series the Typhoon are high end airframes: two engines and high performance. Both are part of the fourth generation. Both can have comparable avionics installed and the Typhoon program was certainly not mainly motivated by avionics upgrades.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 22:36
by vilters
EUROPE?
What Europe, where Europe?

We need at least 10 years of political discussions to find out we disagree more then we agreed to agree.

Europe is a political mess, with all main countries having their own industrial priorities.
- The Tornado mess.
- The Typhoon mess.
- The A-400 mess.
- Take ALL helicopters build after the 80's. ALL of them......

Ya, ya, ya, they all look good on paper, but when you dig a bit below the surface?
Nobody is satisfied.

Oh, did I mention the helicopter mess? Now , "that's what I call a monster fuck-up". Europe? Must be a Joke, right?

Europe; lots of public discussions to satisfy each countries voters, but when the money has to come on the table? Everybody protects its own industry.

And this poison sits even in the F-35.
Because each participant country wants, no => no => no, => NEEDS its own share of the workload to "protect" choosing the F-35 to its own population.

Come on,
without all this, each aviation program (including the F-35) would cost half of what it costs now.

Europe? An paper collection of individual protective countries. Nothing more, nothing less.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 23:33
by Tiger05
talkitron wrote:
Tiger05 wrote:Why even compare the Typhoon to the F-15E? One was conceived as a pure interceptor with A2G capabilities added later as an afterthought while the other is a mud-mover. Apples and oranges really.


The F-15C is the premiere A2A aircraft of its generation and the F-15E is the same airframe with some additions for air to ground. Both the F-15 series the Typhoon are high end airframes: two engines and high performance. Both are part of the fourth generation. Both can have comparable avionics installed and the Typhoon program was certainly not mainly motivated by avionics upgrades.


The F-15E is a strike-optimized version of the F-15 so yes it is mainly a mud-mover. The USAF certainly use it as a mud-mover in any case. I doubt that they would ever be used to fly classic air superiority missions. That is the task of the F-22 and F-15C. Note that they Saudis who bought both Typhoons and F-15S use the former primarily for A2A and the latter for A2G...

Typhoon is 4.5 gen btw.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2017, 23:50
by wrightwing
The E models while primarily used for A2G, are equally adept at A2A. They train for both missions. As for generations, the upgrades the Es are receiving will ensure that they're in no way inferior to Typhoons, with regard to avionics/sensors.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 00:02
by Tiger05
vilters wrote:- The Tornado mess.
- The Typhoon mess.
- The A-400 mess.
- Take ALL helicopters build after the 80's. ALL of them......

Ya, ya, ya, they all look good on paper, but when you dig a bit below the surface?
Nobody is satisfied.

Oh, did I mention the helicopter mess? Now , "that's what I call a monster fuck-up


Nice exaggeration. You make the classic error of mistaking a program's troubled development for the end product. Were the Typhoon and A400 programs mismanaged? Absolutely. Does that mean they are underperforming junks that failed to live to their promises? No. Most F-35 critics make the same mistake btw.

"Nobody is satisfied". Really? :roll: That is a laughable statement. Especially regarding the helicopters since Airbus Helicopters is a global leader in terms of market share. I guess they must do something right after all. :lmao:

And btw, what is wrong with the Tornado? Not to the first time i see you bashing the plane. I dont recall it having a troubled development or underperforming. It has now been 35 years since it entered service and it is still going strong today so what is the issue here? Please do tell us.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 01:17
by gc
Tiger05 wrote:
vilters wrote:- The Tornado mess.
- The Typhoon mess.
- The A-400 mess.
- Take ALL helicopters build after the 80's. ALL of them......

Ya, ya, ya, they all look good on paper, but when you dig a bit below the surface?
Nobody is satisfied.

Oh, did I mention the helicopter mess? Now , "that's what I call a monster fuck-up


Nice exaggeration. You make the classic error of mistaking a program's troubled development for the end product. Were the Typhoon and A400 programs mismanaged? Absolutely. Does that mean they are underperforming junks that failed to live to their promises? No. Most F-35 critics make the same mistake btw.

"Nobody is satisfied". Really? :roll: That is a laughable statement. Especially regarding the helicopters since Airbus Helicopters is a global leader in terms of market share. I guess they must do something right after all. :lmao:

And btw, what is wrong with the Tornado? Not to the first time i see you bashing the plane. I dont recall it having a troubled development or underperforming. It has now been 35 years since it entered service and it is still going strong today so what is the issue here? Please do tell us.


No doubt the Typhoon, A400M and Eurocopter Tiger are great products, but their overall capabilities and flexibility are still significantly limited compared to platforms like the F15E, F-16, F-18E/F, Rafale, C-17, C-130J and AH-64s. Sadly till now the Typhoon has pretty limited air to ground capabilities and weapon choices.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 02:26
by sferrin
Tiger05 wrote:I doubt that they would ever be used to fly classic air superiority missions.


Tell that to South Korea, Singapore, Israel. . .

What a pig of a mudmover:


Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 02:28
by SpudmanWP
The F-15E is the core of the F-15I, F-15K, F-15SG, F-15S, F-15SA, F-15QA, etc.

In all of these instances, the F-15 is the most advanced A2A fighter in their force with the possible exception of the Saudi Eurofighters.

The are multirole fighters with a strong A2A heritage, pure and simple.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 10:02
by optimist
Tiger05 wrote:
vilters wrote:- The Tornado mess.
- The Typhoon mess.
- The A-400 mess.
- Take ALL helicopters build after the 80's. ALL of them......

Ya, ya, ya, they all look good on paper, but when you dig a bit below the surface?
Nobody is satisfied.

Oh, did I mention the helicopter mess? Now , "that's what I call a monster fuck-up


Nice exaggeration. You make the classic error of mistaking a program's troubled development for the end product. Were the Typhoon and A400 programs mismanaged? Absolutely. Does that mean they are underperforming junks that failed to live to their promises? No. Most F-35 critics make the same mistake btw.

"Nobody is satisfied". Really? :roll: That is a laughable statement. Especially regarding the helicopters since Airbus Helicopters is a global leader in terms of market share. I guess they must do something right after all. :lmao:

And btw, what is wrong with the Tornado? Not to the first time i see you bashing the plane. I dont recall it having a troubled development or underperforming. It has now been 35 years since it entered service and it is still going strong today so what is the issue here? Please do tell us.

Tell that to the aussies who are dumping the tiger and not doing a MLU, as it would be throwing good money after bad.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 16:16
by Prinz_Eugn
Tiger05 wrote:And btw, what is wrong with the Tornado? Not to the first time i see you bashing the plane. I dont recall it having a troubled development or underperforming. It has now been 35 years since it entered service and it is still going strong today so what is the issue here? Please do tell us.


Tornado ADV maybe? Delays with the Foxhunter radar, not initially having the capability to do mid-course updates for AMRAAMs which made them worse than the Skyflash they replaced, just being a really weird decision to turn a low-level strike aircraft into an interceptor. Basically Industrial Base: the Airplane.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 19:04
by talkitron
Prinz_Eugn wrote:Tornado ADV maybe? Delays with the Foxhunter radar, not initially having the capability to do mid-course updates for AMRAAMs which made them worse than the Skyflash they replaced, just being a really weird decision to turn a low-level strike aircraft into an interceptor. Basically Industrial Base: the Airplane.


If you are interested in issues with the Tornado F3/ADV, read David Gledhill's Tornado F3: A Navigator's Eye on Britain's Last Interceptor. He admits the plane was a disappointment compared to the F-15 and F-16, both in terms of its handling and its avionics. Also, the UK government did not lavish the F3/ADV with expensive upgrades until maybe the 1990s. Here is a one sentence quote:

"My personal view is that the F3 was a step forward but not the major leap which had been made with the latest generation US fighters which I had flown as a NATO Tactical Evaluator."

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 20:45
by ricnunes
optimist wrote:
Tiger05 wrote:Nice exaggeration. You make the classic error of mistaking a program's troubled development for the end product. Were the Typhoon and A400 programs mismanaged? Absolutely. Does that mean they are underperforming junks that failed to live to their promises? No. Most F-35 critics make the same mistake btw.

"Nobody is satisfied". Really? :roll: That is a laughable statement. Especially regarding the helicopters since Airbus Helicopters is a global leader in terms of market share. I guess they must do something right after all. :lmao:

And btw, what is wrong with the Tornado? Not to the first time i see you bashing the plane. I dont recall it having a troubled development or underperforming. It has now been 35 years since it entered service and it is still going strong today so what is the issue here? Please do tell us.


Tell that to the aussies who are dumping the tiger and not doing a MLU, as it would be throwing good money after bad.


optimist, you beat me at this! :wink:

But just to complement:
The Tiger program was not only messed up during "development" but it was/is also messed up big time during "concept".
Who in it's right and sane mind would develop two very different helicopter version (of the same baseline helicopter) where one is a version for Close Air Support (CAS) intended to be armed with rockets and Air-to-Air missiles while the other version is for Anti-Tank roles and meant to be equipped with Guided Anti-Tank missiles?? Why didn't they develop a single version for both CAS and Anti-Tank?? Well, only in Europe... :roll:
This concept is almost "as good" (sarcasm) as the Soviet/Russian Single-Seat gunship helicopter concept, a.k.a. the KA-50! :roll:

The only ones smart enough to put the roles of CAS and Anti-Tank into a single Tiger helicopter variant were actually the Australians and look how it turned up for them?? A Tiger variant (ARH) which is basically a different/new helicopter compared to the other existing variants of the Tiger helicopter and thus it became an orphan helicopter (Tiger) fleet :roll:

Oh, and last time I checked the A-400M wasn't doing any better!

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 20:56
by SpudmanWP
Shouldn't this thread be in the "Program & Politics" or "General" section?

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 22:59
by vilters
The "bright" idea that got us all under the table from laughing, crying, tears flowing, enfin, you get the picture.

The A-400.
Where on earth did they "re-invent" the long abandoned idea that a "T" tail is/was a good idea for a supposedly all terrain cargo/support aircraft.

How, somewhere in their deepest darkest minds could they forget that a "T" tail is and never will be a good idea for a military "all terrain" aircraft because structural fatigue will shorten A/C life drastically.

A "T" tail on a C-5, OK.
A "T" tail on a C-17, OK. They are never supposed to land in the dirt anyway.

But on a cargo A/C that is "supposed" to compete with a C-130? Only twisted minds can come up with pfffft a "T" tail. :bang: :bang: :bang:

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 23:03
by vilters
Oh, and the helicopters?

Grounded in Australia and many other countries.

Twisted versions, just to increase costs and reduce sales. Who invents those things?

That newer thing??? Euh, N-90 or something?
Well, they are so overweight they might as well be build from concrete, and that wiring... :devil:
Is there wiring or are the electrons just flowing around in good luck.

And again, so many versions that there is ABSOLUTELY no sensible standard to be found. Result? Increasing costs.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 23:11
by vilters
Ach, I forgot the Tornado.

Whaw , what a wonderful peace time flying club machine.

The first day in battle, they had to call the Bucaneer out of retirement to laser for them. Good Job guys. :P Got at least a medal for that one huh? :P

Oeps. . . . . . . . . . . . Somebody forgot some details...
Or?
The cost ran so out of control that, well, who is ever gonna laser anyway.. We"ll get away with it. :roll:
Until they had to go to battle. :bang: :devil: :bang:

Also : The Tornado was build for???? A mission that never came??
Then we got stuck with the thing so lets convert it to the ADF version.
Ja-ja-ja, my grandpa can chase cows with a leaveblower too.

Use the right tool for the Job.

The Tornado was a compromise between many countries desires, and politically correct as we are, everybody got something, but the sum was never really outstanding at anything else but to go low and fast. Something NOBODY actually needed.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 23:13
by ricnunes
vilters wrote:The "bright" idea that got us all under the table from laughing, crying, tears flowing, enfin, you get the picture.

The A-400.
Where on earth did they "re-invent" the long abandoned idea that a "T" tail is/was a good idea for a supposedly all terrain cargo/support aircraft.

How, somewhere in their deepest darkest minds could they forget that a "T" tail is and never will be a good idea for a military "all terrain" aircraft because structural fatigue will shorten A/C life drastically.

A "T" tail on a C-5, OK.
A "T" tail on a C-17, OK. They are never supposed to land in the dirt anyway.

But on a cargo A/C that is "supposed" to compete with a C-130? Only twisted minds can come up with pfffft a "T" tail. :bang: :bang: :bang:


What you say about the "T" tail makes sense.
Another manufacturer doing the same mistake is Embraer with its KC-390.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 23:19
by ricnunes
vilters wrote:Ach, I forgot the Tornado.

Whaw , what a wonderful peace time flying club machine.

The first day in battle, they had to call the Bucaneer out of retirement to laser for them. Good Job guys. :P Got at least a medal for that one huh? :P


Yup!
And wasn't also the Tornado the combat aircraft that suffered the highest number of loses to enemy (Iraqi) air defences during Desert Storm 1991?

They (Tornados) only stop suffering high loses when they changed the tactics from low-level ("nap-pf-the-earth") attacks from high altitude attacks with LGBs (designated by the Buccaneers) which basically eliminated the purpose and concept which the Tornado was designed around! :roll:

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 23:22
by vilters
The problem these modern days is that everybody is so focused on fuel consumption that structural long time integrity goes way down the priority list.

Do with an A-400 what you can do with a C-130, (all terrain cargo), and structure life goes bananas.

Inspection and maintenance costs will go through the roof with those "T" tails.
We still can not believe it when we see one.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2017, 23:24
by vilters
@ ricnunes

Completely correct. :P Oef, I am not the only one paying attention in aviation history. :P

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2017, 00:27
by neptune
....IMHO, one concern is the ongoing interest in Germany and France co-developing their own 5th gen. which will likely take a huge sum of money and time (generating jobs) and probably, ultimately will not interface with the NATO F-35 fleet.
I am all for competition but the distraction from adding that financial contribution to the advancement of the established F-35 base is disheartening. Even, if they took Israel's position and insisted on their avionics?/ engine?/ tires?, whatever?; as long as it supported the basic F-35 that could be produced in Italy??

....locally, we call these "lookee Louie's", with no intent to buy!
:)

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2017, 01:32
by ricnunes
neptune wrote:....IMHO, one concern is the ongoing interest in Germany and France co-developing their own 5th gen. which will likely take a huge sum of money and time (generating jobs) and probably, ultimately will not interface with the NATO F-35 fleet.


I don't think that this situation will be of any concern to anyone, specially of any concern to the F-35 program.
For starters when France and Germany finally manage to field a fighter aircraft with capabilities that remotely resembles the F-35 capabilities, the F-35 successor (whatever that might be) is already being developed or even nearing the end of its development and thus close to starting to being fielded or who knows maybe already reached IOC.
Then, I believe that before this unexpected news of "Germany being supposedly interested in the F-35" (at least unexpected to me) that nobody or hardly anyone would believe that both Germany and specially France would ever buy the F-35 (due to some nationalistic pride coupled protectionism of their national aerospace industry). What will happen is that France and Germany will probably have their orphan and somehow outdated fleet of homemade future fighter aircraft while the rest of Europe will go with the F-35.
Being too pride or too much protective has its consequences and these will be the consequences for both France and Germany which for them will probably be acceptable because of the reasons already pointed out by some here (Jobs, R&D, etc...) but also because France doesn't like to work closely with NATO and Germany doesn't seem to work with NATO in terms of airpower, at least anymore (and the only time it did was during Cold War to protect their own "Fatherland").

If there's someone who should be concerned about this decision, those would be the French and German taxpayers but again their "nationalistic pride" would prevent them of such concerns.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 17 Jul 2017, 20:17
by botsing
vilters wrote:The "bright" idea that got us all under the table from laughing, crying, tears flowing, enfin, you get the picture.

The A-400.
Where on earth did they "re-invent" the long abandoned idea that a "T" tail is/was a good idea for a supposedly all terrain cargo/support aircraft.

How, somewhere in their deepest darkest minds could they forget that a "T" tail is and never will be a good idea for a military "all terrain" aircraft because structural fatigue will shorten A/C life drastically.

A "T" tail on a C-5, OK.
A "T" tail on a C-17, OK. They are never supposed to land in the dirt anyway.

But on a cargo A/C that is "supposed" to compete with a C-130? Only twisted minds can come up with pfffft a "T" tail.

Every design is a compromise.

The A400 has shoulder wings so the engines are higher above the ground to make them less likely to catch FOD. Maybe the airstreams from this shoulder wing makes a strengthened T-tail more favored?

In the past with the C-130 there were several incidents where the tail was damaged during loading/unloading. Having the horizontal tail higher might prevent this kind of damage and maybe makes the loading/unloading a bit faster due to less regulations?

These are just hypothetical examples that show us that without knowing the details it makes no sense to simply dismiss a design choice as "coming from a twisted mind".

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 20 Jul 2017, 14:10
by XanderCrews
vilters wrote:A "T" tail on a C-17, OK. They are never supposed to land in the dirt anyway.
:



Really?

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/2pSSdjgQ5Lc/maxresdefault.jpg

Because one of their first requirements was operating from small and improvised strips.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 20 Jul 2017, 19:01
by ricnunes
XanderCrews wrote:
vilters wrote:A "T" tail on a C-17, OK. They are never supposed to land in the dirt anyway.
:



Really?

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/2pSSdjgQ5Lc/maxresdefault.jpg

Because one of their first requirements was operating from small and improvised strips.


Yes indeed the C-17 can technically operate on the same/similar environments as even the C-130.
However it doesn't seem that the C-17 usually operates in such environments or resuming operations on such environments (small and improvised strips) are more of an exception than a rule when it comes to the C-17.

However I must point out that the C-17 (which in my opinion is the world's most impressive airlifter) is a Strategical Airlifter so low fuel consumption with very high altitude are huge and vital requirements for such an aircraft.

Also in my opinion is that one the things that's wrong with the A-400M is that this aircraft is a "Transvestite" between a Strategical and a Tactical Airlifter. With it's maximum 40 tons of payload/cargo it can't carry a Main Battle Tank (MBT) like the C-17 or C-5 can while it doesn't seem to be rugged enough to operate in environments where the C-130 can and usually operates in.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 20 Jul 2017, 19:52
by spazsinbad

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 20 Jul 2017, 22:39
by XanderCrews
ricnunes wrote:
XanderCrews wrote:
vilters wrote:A "T" tail on a C-17, OK. They are never supposed to land in the dirt anyway.
:



Really?

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/2pSSdjgQ5Lc/maxresdefault.jpg

Because one of their first requirements was operating from small and improvised strips.


Yes indeed the C-17 can technically operate on the same/similar environments as even the C-130.
However it doesn't seem that the C-17 usually operates in such environments or resuming operations on such environments (small and improvised strips) are more of an exception than a rule when it comes to the C-17.

.



What's the comparison for rough/short landing vs conventional on a400 vs c-17??

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 21 Jul 2017, 11:28
by ricnunes
XanderCrews wrote:What's the comparison for rough/short landing vs conventional on a400 vs c-17??


Basically and from I could gather they (C-17 and A-400M) have the same or similar capabilities in terms of rough/short landings.

However the C-17 is an extremely useful (and excellent) Strategical Airlifter while the A-400M is (in my opinion) very limited in the Strategical Airlifter role. For example and while both C-17 and A-400M have similar rough/short landing capability the C-17 can carry more than 80 tons of cargo (it can carry a heavy MBT like the M-1 Abrams or Leopard 2) while the A-400M can only carry 40 tons (it can not carry MBTs or other very heavy hardware).

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 21 Jul 2017, 14:03
by vilters
A carefully prepared sand beach to do a test-flight can hardly be called rough terrain.

The A-400 is a wannabe C-17 but fails.
It is also a wannabe C-130 but fails again.

I also wanna see the servicability of that fleet and the maintenance cost in 10-20 years from now.
Most will (or are already regretting) that they did not buy C-130.

The A-400 is just a "wanted to be" aircraft.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 21 Jul 2017, 14:44
by spazsinbad
'vilters' said: "carefully prepared sand beach to do a test-flight can hardly be called rough terrain": where did you get this information? The flights were tests so I'll guess it was what it was.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 21 Jul 2017, 15:25
by ricnunes
Independently of that will be the actual A-400M fleet availability and maintenance cost in 10-20 years from now and whether or not the A-400M is capable of sustained rough terrain operations, I fully agree with the following that vilters have said (which he said better and in a more resumed way than I could):

vilters wrote:The A-400 is a wannabe C-17 but fails.
It is also a wannabe C-130 but fails again.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 21 Jul 2017, 15:26
by Prinz_Eugn
ricnunes wrote:
XanderCrews wrote:
vilters wrote:A "T" tail on a C-17, OK. They are never supposed to land in the dirt anyway.
:



Really?

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/2pSSdjgQ5Lc/maxresdefault.jpg

Because one of their first requirements was operating from small and improvised strips.


Yes indeed the C-17 can technically operate on the same/similar environments as even the C-130.
However it doesn't seem that the C-17 usually operates in such environments or resuming operations on such environments (small and improvised strips) are more of an exception than a rule when it comes to the C-17.


I don't know about that, my unscientific survey of YouTube (search "C-17 dirt") seems to indicate using improvised strips is something they train for and actually do reasonably often, which is pretty impressive.

And yeah, the A400M always seemed like a bizarre compromise aircraft, the in-between that nobody really asked for.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 21 Jul 2017, 15:40
by ricnunes
Prinz_Eugn wrote:I don't know about that, my unscientific survey of YouTube (search "C-17 dirt") seems to indicate using improvised strips is something they train for and actually do reasonably often, which is pretty impressive.


Do I think or believe that the C-17 aircrews train "reasonably often" on improvised/rough airstrips?
- Yes, absolutely.
Do I think or believe that the C-17 aircrews operate "reasonably often" (operationally) on improvised/rough airstrips?
- No, I don't think so. But I could be wrong thou...

Prinz_Eugn wrote:And yeah, the A400M always seemed like a bizarre compromise aircraft, the in-between that nobody really asked for.


Yeap, "amen" to that.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 21 Jul 2017, 16:01
by sferrin
C-17s have flown to Antarctica and landed on snow runways. Re: the A400, they should have just built the YC-14. Better than the A400 in almost every regard. (Though if we'd built that we might not have the C-17 so. . . :shrug: )

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 21 Jul 2017, 18:44
by durahawk
ricnunes wrote:
If there's someone who should be concerned about this decision, those would be the French and German taxpayers but again their "nationalistic pride" would prevent them of such concerns.


The thing about that German "nationalistic pride" is that it doesn't seem to extend to the military itself. The pathetic level of funding and attention it is given sure makes it seem like many Germans would rather forget they have a military, let alone maintain an effective fighting force.

I think a German F-35 could represent a signal to its allies that intends to turn a corner and get serious on defense, but I suspect industrial base protection and offset considerations will ultimately win the day. I don't think we will ever be seeing F-35's in Luftwaffe livery.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 22 Jul 2017, 11:44
by ricnunes
durahawk wrote:
ricnunes wrote:
If there's someone who should be concerned about this decision, those would be the French and German taxpayers but again their "nationalistic pride" would prevent them of such concerns.


The thing about that German "nationalistic pride" is that it doesn't seem to extend to the military itself. The pathetic level of funding and attention it is given sure makes it seem like many Germans would rather forget they have a military, let alone maintain an effective fighting force.


Yes, you're absolutely right.
The German "nationalistic pride" that I mentioned about was related with their (German) Industrial capability and the perception of what such Industrial capability can manufacture (including military equipment) and not so much about their (German) Military capability itself.


durahawk wrote:...but I suspect industrial base protection and offset considerations will ultimately win the day. I don't think we will ever be seeing F-35's in Luftwaffe livery.


To be honest this is the part that I don't get or that I "don't buy".
I'm sure that if Germany would select the F-35 that the industrial offsets for the German industry would certainly be very good and probably in level with those of that proposed future Franco-German fighter aircraft - Just look at the Japanese case for example - And here I'm strictly speaking of Industrial and Technological Benefits alone.
If we add the "Economics dimension" then the difference/advantage of what the German industry would gain versus the money that Germany would need to invest if Germany decided to buy the F-35 would be far more advantageous than going this future Franco-German fighter aircraft "route".

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 22 Jul 2017, 12:08
by citanon
I was joking in another thread that Germany will probably end up renting F35s by the flight hour from neighbors like Austria. With this resurgent post-brexit European defense force that German politicians fantasize about, that might not end up far from the truth.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 22 Jul 2017, 19:52
by neptune
citanon wrote:I was joking in another thread that Germany will probably end up renting F35s by the flight hour from neighbors like Austria. With this resurgent post-brexit European defense force that German politicians fantasize about, that might not end up far from the truth.


...with Brexit, the Germans will not have to look over their shoulders at the Brits when advancing their interests in the EU; especially with the potential offsets (Euros in the pocket) that the F-35 selection will bring them, as others have said about Japan. The French will be left holding the bag, as usual; left behind (sad).
:)

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 30 Sep 2017, 06:32
by neptune
http://www.stltoday.com/business/local/ ... 7a474.html

Germany asks for Boeing fighter data as weighs order options

By Andrea Shalal
Reuters


BERLIN •
Germany has asked the U.S. military for classified data on two Boeing fighter jets as it looks to replace its aging (85) Tornado warplanes, giving a potential boost to the U.S. company locked in a trade dispute with Canada and Britain. A letter sent by the German defense ministry's planning division, reviewed by Reuters, said it had identified Boeing's F-15 and F/A-18E/F fighters as potential candidates to replace the Tornado jets, which entered service in 1981. Both fighters are made in St. Louis. A classified briefing is expected to take place in mid-November, following a similar briefing provided by U.S. officials about the Lockheed Martin Corp. F-35 fighter jet in July.

The ministry has said it is also seeking information from European aerospace giant Airbus, which builds the Eurofighter Typhoon along with Britain's BAE Systems and Italy's Leonardo. The development is a boost for Boeing at a time when it is under fire from Canada and Britain after its complaint prompted the United States to impose a preliminary 220-percent duty on CSeries jets built by Bombardier. Boeing said it was working with the U.S. government to provide the information that Germany had requested. Germany, due to decide in mid-2018 about how to replace the (85) Tornado planes, announced plans in July to build a European fighter jet together with France. But the new jet is unlikely to be available by 2025, when Germany's fleet of Tornado fighters are slated to start going out of service. Sources familiar with the process said Germany was pursuing a two-pronged approach under which it would buy an existing fighter to replace the Tornado, while working with France on a new European jet to replace its Eurofighters at a later point. Analysts said the Tornado replacement order could be worth tens of billions of dollars, although Germany is still reviewing how many jets to buy and at what pace. The letter said a formal request for information about the pricing and availability of all three U.S. fighter jets was being compiled and would be issued by the end of the month.

Boeing under fire

Britain told Boeing this week that future defense contracts could be in jeopardy because of its trade dispute with Canada's Bombardier, noting that U.S. tariffs would put up to 4,200 jobs at risk at a plant in the British province of Northern Ireland that makes the CSeries jet's carbon wings. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has also said he will not go ahead with plans to buy 18 Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet jets unless the dispute is dropped. Any move by Germany to buy a U.S. warplane could run into political resistance from strong labor unions and Airbus, which has also raised concerns about the ministry's plans to choose between two U.S. helicopters for its heavy lift program. Britain, the Netherlands, Norway, Turkey and Italy — key NATO allies of Germany — are already buying the F-35 fighter jet to replace their current aircraft, and other European countries such as Switzerland, Belgium and Finland are also looking at purchasing the fifth-generation warplane at time when tensions with Russia are running high. Military sources say buying a U.S. jet could make sense for Germany given technical challenges with the Eurofighter.
:)

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 30 Sep 2017, 22:16
by madrat
The German operate neutered fighters due to treaty limitations. Seems silly if they bought F-15's when they could just as easily opted for keeping Tornado in service. Which one do you want flying nap of the earth in Germany's terrain? Only sentimental types would insist F-15.

I also think if Germany had decided to go a medium role they would have opted for a single EF200-powered design resembling the X-31 project they co-opted, rather than going Mirage, Gripen, or F-16. I'm pretty sure they floated all sorts of options before settling on Typhoon as good enough to replace everything.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 09 Jan 2018, 03:31
by neptune
http://www.iiss.org/en/militarybalanceb ... erlin-ecf0

Dogfight over Berlin: Germany’s Tornado replacement aspirations


By Douglas Barrie, Senior Fellow for Military Aerospace
Date: 21 December 2017

Germany’s selection of a future combat aircraft for the air force may not be a binary choice. Senior Luftwaffe officials and the German defence ministry appear at loggerheads over whether a European or US combat aircraft should replace the air force’s Tornado, with the former preferring the F-35 Lightning II and the latter in favor of the Typhoon. However, some of them could perhaps be asking the wrong question.

Rather than asking what aircraft type is needed, greater clarity may be achieved by asking what roles the aircraft will be required to carry out. In Luftwaffe service, the Tornado provides the ability to deliver both conventional and nuclear payloads. The latter role is part of NATO’s dual-capable aircraft capability, with the Tornado equipped to carry the B61 gravity bomb. If Germany intends to continue to fulfill this mission, whichever type is selected to replace the Tornado will also need to be able to meet this role.

The other combat aircraft in the Luftwaffe’s fleet, the Eurofighter Typhoon, is presently not ‘wired’ to carry nuclear weapons. There was some consideration given to this in the early days of the development program, but was not pursued. Introducing a nuclear-assurance and -release system for Typhoon is possible, but at a cost. European industrialists suggest prices ranging from €300–500 million, while there is the likelihood that the US would require very detailed access to the aircraft’s design and systems. Furthermore, officials estimate that the necessary certification process would take upwards of seven years. Even if certification were to start straightaway, this makes it challenging to meet the Luftwaffe’s timeline, since it wants to begin replacing its Tornados in 2025, with the fleet to be fully withdrawn likely by 2030.

Germany’s dual-capable Tornado aircraft are part of NATO’s nuclear-deterrence strategy; for this to be effective, it also has to be credible. If the weapon to be delivered remains a nuclear free-fall bomb, the challenge of hitting a target through airspace defended by capable combat aircraft and advanced surface-to-air missiles is considerable. In other words, where long-range stand-off strike is not an option, a low-observable combat aircraft offers the best chance of at least reaching the target.

However, one possible solution could be that the nuclear and conventional roles now both met by the Tornado could be split between a relatively small F-35 fleet and a larger Typhoon fleet, thereby reconciling Luftwaffe and German defense-ministry aspirations. The former aircraft would meet the nuclear-delivery requirement with the B61-12 bomb and provide a low-observable platform capable of conventional weapons delivery, while a proportion of the air-to-surface missions now addressed by the Tornado could be migrated to the Typhoon.

Nevertheless, the Luftwaffe is presently not only working on how to replace the Tornado, but in the longer term, also the Typhoon. Under its Future Combat Air System (FCAS) work, it had initially looked to introduce a new combat aircraft into service from 2035, with the emphasis on the air-to-surface role, as a Tornado replacement. As thinking has developed during the course of 2017, and the F-35 has found increasing favor, Germany’s longer-term combat-aircraft requirement has placed greater emphasis on the air-to-air role for the Typhoon’s successor. The notional entry into service date has also moved to 2045.

The FCAS study work is now being carried out in collaboration with France. Moving back the entry into service date aligns more closely with France’s requirement for a Rafale successor, while also providing a more palatable gap between the cost of the possible introduction of the F-35 and the acquisition of a new fighter aircraft.
:)

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 09 Jan 2018, 04:00
by madrat
Let them eat <del>cake</del> Rafale

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 09 Jan 2018, 04:10
by Corsair1963
neptune wrote:http://www.iiss.org/en/militarybalanceblog/blogsections/2017-edcc/december-d13d/dogfight-over-berlin-ecf0

Dogfight over Berlin: Germany’s Tornado replacement aspirations


By Douglas Barrie, Senior Fellow for Military Aerospace
Date: 21 December 2017

Germany’s selection of a future combat aircraft for the air force may not be a binary choice. Senior Luftwaffe officials and the German defence ministry appear at loggerheads over whether a European or US combat aircraft should replace the air force’s Tornado, with the former preferring the F-35 Lightning II and the latter in favor of the Typhoon. However, some of them could perhaps be asking the wrong question.

Rather than asking what aircraft type is needed, greater clarity may be achieved by asking what roles the aircraft will be required to carry out. In Luftwaffe service, the Tornado provides the ability to deliver both conventional and nuclear payloads. The latter role is part of NATO’s dual-capable aircraft capability, with the Tornado equipped to carry the B61 gravity bomb. If Germany intends to continue to fulfill this mission, whichever type is selected to replace the Tornado will also need to be able to meet this role.

The other combat aircraft in the Luftwaffe’s fleet, the Eurofighter Typhoon, is presently not ‘wired’ to carry nuclear weapons. There was some consideration given to this in the early days of the development program, but was not pursued. Introducing a nuclear-assurance and -release system for Typhoon is possible, but at a cost. European industrialists suggest prices ranging from €300–500 million, while there is the likelihood that the US would require very detailed access to the aircraft’s design and systems. Furthermore, officials estimate that the necessary certification process would take upwards of seven years. Even if certification were to start straightaway, this makes it challenging to meet the Luftwaffe’s timeline, since it wants to begin replacing its Tornados in 2025, with the fleet to be fully withdrawn likely by 2030.

Germany’s dual-capable Tornado aircraft are part of NATO’s nuclear-deterrence strategy; for this to be effective, it also has to be credible. If the weapon to be delivered remains a nuclear free-fall bomb, the challenge of hitting a target through airspace defended by capable combat aircraft and advanced surface-to-air missiles is considerable. In other words, where long-range stand-off strike is not an option, a low-observable combat aircraft offers the best chance of at least reaching the target.

However, one possible solution could be that the nuclear and conventional roles now both met by the Tornado could be split between a relatively small F-35 fleet and a larger Typhoon fleet, thereby reconciling Luftwaffe and German defense-ministry aspirations. The former aircraft would meet the nuclear-delivery requirement with the B61-12 bomb and provide a low-observable platform capable of conventional weapons delivery, while a proportion of the air-to-surface missions now addressed by the Tornado could be migrated to the Typhoon.

Nevertheless, the Luftwaffe is presently not only working on how to replace the Tornado, but in the longer term, also the Typhoon. Under its Future Combat Air System (FCAS) work, it had initially looked to introduce a new combat aircraft into service from 2035, with the emphasis on the air-to-surface role, as a Tornado replacement. As thinking has developed during the course of 2017, and the F-35 has found increasing favor, Germany’s longer-term combat-aircraft requirement has placed greater emphasis on the air-to-air role for the Typhoon’s successor. The notional entry into service date has also moved to 2045.

The FCAS study work is now being carried out in collaboration with France. Moving back the entry into service date aligns more closely with France’s requirement for a Rafale successor, while also providing a more palatable gap between the cost of the possible introduction of the F-35 and the acquisition of a new fighter aircraft.
:)


Honestly, simple fact is the Typhoon will be nearly obsolete by 2030. (if not before) So, to acquire more would be a complete waste of time and resources. A far better plan would be to acquire a modest number of F-35A's in the short-term to replace the Tornado's. While, jointly developing a future 6th Generation Fighter with France long-term.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 09 Jan 2018, 08:35
by mas
However, one possible solution could be that the nuclear and conventional roles now both met by the Tornado could be split between a relatively small F-35 fleet and a larger Typhoon fleet, thereby reconciling Luftwaffe and German defense-ministry aspirations. The former aircraft would meet the nuclear-delivery requirement with the B61-12 bomb and provide a low-observable platform capable of conventional weapons delivery, while a proportion of the air-to-surface missions now addressed by the Tornado could be migrated to the Typhoon


Sounds like the best plan. Say buy about 40-60 F-35A to become your premier strike aircraft. Put CFTs and AESA on your Tranche 2/3 Typhoons to act as their non-stealthy but heavy load carrying rear backup. Finally keep your Tranche 1s as your hot-rod interceptors, job done ! Then the Luftwaffe would be set until the FCAS is ready.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 09 Jan 2018, 09:06
by Corsair1963
mas wrote:
However, one possible solution could be that the nuclear and conventional roles now both met by the Tornado could be split between a relatively small F-35 fleet and a larger Typhoon fleet, thereby reconciling Luftwaffe and German defense-ministry aspirations. The former aircraft would meet the nuclear-delivery requirement with the B61-12 bomb and provide a low-observable platform capable of conventional weapons delivery, while a proportion of the air-to-surface missions now addressed by the Tornado could be migrated to the Typhoon


Sounds like the best plan. Say buy about 40-60 F-35A to become your premier strike aircraft. Put CFTs and AESA on your Tranche 2/3 Typhoons to act as their non-stealthy but heavy load carrying rear backup. Finally keep your Tranche 1s as your hot-rod interceptors, job done ! Then the Luftwaffe would be set until the FCAS is ready.



Plus, the 40-60 F-35's would help Germany get closer to the 2% of GDP on Defense Spending. Which, would make NATO and the US (i.e. Trump) happy! :wink:

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 09 Jan 2018, 10:54
by mas
More importantly it will help alleviate the US-German trade imbalance that Trump does not like having with any nation.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 09 Jan 2018, 22:29
by loke
Since it seems they have decided to develop their own 5. gen fighter with France it would probably be cheaper to skip the F-35 alltogether and make do without nuclear bombs until the new 5. gen fighter is ready.

Some of the same thinking that was behind the UK's decision to drop carrier aviation for several years until the F-35B is ready (and the new carriers of course).

To NATO a few F-35 more or less would not make a big difference. How many F-35 will NATO countries have by 2030?

There will also be non-NATO countries that are nevertheless close allies of NATO countries that will also have quite significant numbers of F-35; in Europe there will be Finland (perhaps 64 F-35, one of the largest F-35 operators in Europe!?) and of course in Asia-pacific there will be Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Australia, etc., in the ME of course Israel will have a huge F-35 fleet in 2030...

Germany could build a few extra subs instead, small subs are currently in high demand, and few of them exist in NATO!

Another wet dream is that European NATO countries pull their act together and build a 5. gen tank, the Leo2 is becoming a joke.

So much to do and so little money to spend...

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2018, 00:11
by ricnunes
loke wrote:... the Leo2 is becoming a joke.


Why?? May I ask? :-?

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2018, 01:22
by XanderCrews
SpudmanWP wrote:
Why even compare the Typhoon to the F-15E? One was conceived as a pure interceptor with A2G capabilities added later as an afterthought while the other is a mud-mover. Apples and oranges really.


Calling the F-15E a "mud-mover" is like calling the F-11 and dogfighter.


Pretty sure the F-15 was conceived with not a pound for air to ground and got the A2G as an afterthought as well. It's just a split of variant e vs C Vs a split in capability

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2018, 12:50
by loke
ricnunes wrote:
loke wrote:... the Leo2 is becoming a joke.


Why?? May I ask? :-?

Nothing wrong with it, just that it's getting rather old.

A next generation tank is needed. Something with stealth features. A lot has happened in material science the last few years, so one could in the near future build something that could be quite revolutionary. One may also consider to replace the diesel engine with a hydrogen fuel cell, for audio stealth, but also for easy access to massive amounts of electricity to feed the laser and potentially a rail gun (to replace the old gun systems). It should also have space for drones that can be released and recovered. It should be fully networked with LPI datalinks. Etc, etc.

Leo is becoming outdated, just like the F-16 is becoming outdated.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2018, 15:27
by steve2267
loke wrote:A next generation tank is needed. Something with stealth features. A lot has happened in material science the last few years, so one could in the near future build something that could be quite revolutionary. One may also consider to replace the diesel engine with a hydrogen fuel cell, for audio stealth, but also for easy access to massive amounts of electricity to feed the laser and potentially a rail gun (to replace the old gun systems). It should also have space for drones that can be released and recovered. It should be fully networked with LPI datalinks. Etc, etc.

Leo is becoming outdated, just like the F-16 is becoming outdated.


Technology for technology's sake rarely works out well. Rather it usually ends up in very expensive programs that do not produce a useful product that then end up getting canceled.

Some of the things you mention, e.g. audio stealth, or drones, are worthwhile goals or features that could have a real tactical impact on a battlespace. Better, IMO, to implement some spiral, technology development programs to develop the technology first. Once the technology reaches a certain maturity level, then consider a product development program to develop a real product; but FIRST define realistic requirements your new gizmo must reach or achieve.

This is how the propulsion system on the F-35 was created. Perhaps if the sensor fusion and HMDS had been developed similarly the F-35 would have come on line much faster and at a far lower cost. (Shoulda coulda woulda - hindsight is usually 20-20.)

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2018, 15:46
by mtrman
loke wrote:....

To NATO a few F-35 more or less would not make a big difference. How many F-35 will NATO countries have by 2030?

There will also be non-NATO countries that are nevertheless close allies of NATO countries that will also have quite significant numbers of F-35; in Europe there will be Finland (perhaps 64 F-35, one of the largest F-35 operators in Europe!?) and of course in Asia-pacific there will be Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Australia, etc., in the ME of course Israel will have a huge F-35 fleet in 2030...

...



@loke, why don't you count possible 100+ F-35s of Turkey?

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2018, 16:00
by mas
mtrman, the Turkmen have been very naughty in Syria droning the Russian Base. Is Erdogan going to run back to the US and play the NATO card again against an angry Putin ? Erdogan makes Trump look calm and collected ;).

https://www.rt.com/news/415454-drone-at ... ia-turkey/

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2018, 18:01
by ricnunes
loke wrote:Nothing wrong with it, just that it's getting rather old.


And what's better than the Leopard 2 either currently fielded or under development??

I would say that currently the top 3 MBTs in the world are precisely the Leopard 2, the M1 Abrams and the Challenger 2 (and not by any particular order).

The French Leclerc is a 50 ton class MBT while all the 3 above (including the Leo2) are 60 ton class tanks so it likely not so well protected (armour wise).
The Israeli Merkava IV is a good contender but in the end this is a different beast - it can carry 4 soldiers plus the usual crew - so it's a bit of a mixture of a MBT with very limited IFV capabilities.

The Leopard 2A6 has the best gun of all MBTs, namely compared to all of the above.

The only new MBT that's being currently under development (that I know of) is the Russian Armata but at a 40 ton class, I have my reservations how it would fare against all the MBTs above, specially in terms or protection (armour).
Anyway, the Armata was not designed to be the best MBT but instead to be a modular common design which can be used as a "MBT", APC, IFV or if I'm not mistaken as a Mobile Howitzer.

The fact is that there isn't anything which is superior (or clearly superior) to the Leopard 2 either fielded, in development or planned in the foreseeable future.

loke wrote:A next generation tank is needed.


Again why? The Leopard 2 fits and surpasses the requirements needed to carry out all and every role currently needed and required for a MBT.
I can't see anything to be developed with current and near future technology that could match the survivability and the mobility of a MBT like the Leopard 2, M1 Abrams or Challenger 2.

And by the way, the Leopard2 is being constantly updated, with the latest variant being the Leopard 2A7 which seems to have some considerably technological advances (namely sensor and communications wise).

loke wrote:Something with stealth features.


Initially I would ask why but here I prefer to ask: How?


loke wrote:One may also consider to replace the diesel engine with a hydrogen fuel cell, for audio stealth,


Here I ask which one "explodes better" if hit by an incoming shell or missile? My bet is on the hydrogen fuel cell :wink:

(again hydrogen fuel cells may "grant" a lower survivability than a Diesel engine for example when hit by enemy fire)

loke wrote:but also for easy access to massive amounts of electricity to feed the laser and potentially a rail gun (to replace the old gun systems).


Don't get me wrong but this seems a bit similar as saying that we should replace the current assault rifles with Laser or Plasma Rifles.
I believe that this will be something that will eventually happen but just not in the foreseeable future.

loke wrote:It should also have space for drones that can be released and recovered. It should be fully networked with LPI datalinks. Etc, etc.


I don't see any reason why you couldn't fit such technologies in the Leopard 2 or in any other MBTs that I mentioned above.


loke wrote:Leo is becoming outdated, just like the F-16 is becoming outdated.


Just because something was designed decades ago doesn't mean that this same something is obsolete and needs replacement. For example is the M-16 or M-4 Assault Rifles becoming outdated? I don't think so!

This just means that nothing newer and better has come.
Not all technologies evolves at the same pace. Just because current fighter aircraft are becoming obsolete doesn't mean that current MBTs (or Assault Rifles) are obsolete as well.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2018, 19:06
by SpudmanWP
Speaking as an M1 tanker, the tracks make more noise than my turbine engine. The turbo diesel on my old M60A3 was MUCH louder than my tracks however.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2018, 19:23
by steve2267
SpudmanWP wrote:Speaking as an M1 tanker, the tracks make more noise than my turbine engine. The turbo diesel on my old M60A3 was MUCH louder than my tracks however.


Wasn't whispering death one of the nicknames given the M1?

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2018, 19:33
by ricnunes
SpudmanWP wrote:Speaking as an M1 tanker, the tracks make more noise than my turbine engine. The turbo diesel on my old M60A3 was MUCH louder than my tracks however.


Cool!
By the way Tanks are among my favourite military equipment alongside with fighter aircraft and what you mentioned is very interesting indeed, which prompts me to ask you the following question:
- There are Rubber Pads that can be fitted to the tracks, this are mostly used when traveling by road (so as not to damage to road pavement), is this correct? And also about Rubber Pads, do or can they somehow reduce the track noise that you mentioned?

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2018, 20:15
by SpudmanWP
The tracks always had the rubber pads and they (M60 but not M1 pads) can be replaced when damaged.

Most of the track noise came from the metal on metal grinding between the drive/idle gears and from all of the track retention pins(4)/bolts(6 & 9)/connectors(7, 10, & 11).

This is a breakdown of the M1 (T156) track shoe assembly

Image

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2018, 20:23
by ricnunes
Thanks Spudman :thumb:

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 11 Jan 2018, 00:52
by popcorn
Didn't they develop a super quiet hybrid electric drive for Crusader?

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 11 Jan 2018, 01:17
by sferrin
ricnunes wrote:
loke wrote:Nothing wrong with it, just that it's getting rather old.


And what's better than the Leopard 2 either currently fielded or under development??

I would say that currently the top 3 MBTs in the world are precisely the Leopard 2, the M1 Abrams and the Challenger 2 (and not by any particular order).

The French Leclerc is a 50 ton class MBT while all the 3 above (including the Leo2) are 60 ton class tanks so it likely not so well protected (armour wise).
The Israeli Merkava IV is a good contender but in the end this is a different beast - it can carry 4 soldiers plus the usual crew - so it's a bit of a mixture of a MBT with very limited IFV capabilities.

The Leopard 2A6 has the best gun of all MBTs, namely compared to all of the above.


But the Abrams has the best ammo. If they could fire the M829A3 through an L55. . .

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 11 Jan 2018, 01:19
by sferrin
SpudmanWP wrote:Speaking as an M1 tanker, the tracks make more noise than my turbine engine. The turbo diesel on my old M60A3 was MUCH louder than my tracks however.


My all time favorite Abrams vid:

:lmao:

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 11 Jan 2018, 02:13
by count_to_10
sferrin wrote:
SpudmanWP wrote:Speaking as an M1 tanker, the tracks make more noise than my turbine engine. The turbo diesel on my old M60A3 was MUCH louder than my tracks however.


My all time favorite Abrams vid :lmao:

You know, I don’t think the mud was the important part; it was more th at it was stuck in a rut.

Anyway, I look at the tank issue this way: when was the last “generation” of long haul trucks? Has anything fundamental changed in the last three decades, or has it just been upgrading features on the same basic design?

MBTs are a mature technology, and about all you can do is switch up the weight class you are aiming for or tinker around the edges. If you plan to design a new one from the ground up, it better be because you really need a feature that can’t fit into the old one.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 11 Jan 2018, 05:00
by wrightwing
The M1A2 SEP3 is pretty much state of the art at the moment, and the SEP4 will be even more lethal/survivable.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 11 Jan 2018, 05:16
by steve2267
wrightwing wrote:The M1A2 SEP3 is pretty much state of the art at the moment, and the SEP4 will be even more lethal/survivable.


After googling M1A2 SEP3, I could find no mention of any sort of active anti-missile defense system similar to the Israeli Trophy system. Does SEPv3 include such a system? Or is one planned for SEPv4? Or...?

ETA: Found this story:
Missile Defense For Tanks: Raytheon Quick Kill Vs. Israeli Trophy
Sydney J. Freedberg Jr. on March 09, 2016 at 2:07 PM

WASHINGTON: After two decades of dithering and delay, the Army wants to give its armored vehicles the ability to shoot down incoming anti-tank missiles. What’s more, while the service will continue its own long-term, in-house research program, the Army is now willing to accept something “not invented here” so it can get an interim Active Protection System (APS) fielded in two years.

... blah blah blah < read it at the jump > ...

https://breakingdefense.com/2016/03/missile-defense-for-tanks-raytheon-quick-kill-vs-israeli-trophy/


Sounds like the USArmy has been creaping forward on this technology at its usual glacial pace and they are hoping to field something this year.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 11 Jan 2018, 12:12
by ricnunes
sferrin wrote:
ricnunes wrote:
loke wrote:Nothing wrong with it, just that it's getting rather old.


And what's better than the Leopard 2 either currently fielded or under development??

I would say that currently the top 3 MBTs in the world are precisely the Leopard 2, the M1 Abrams and the Challenger 2 (and not by any particular order).

The French Leclerc is a 50 ton class MBT while all the 3 above (including the Leo2) are 60 ton class tanks so it likely not so well protected (armour wise).
The Israeli Merkava IV is a good contender but in the end this is a different beast - it can carry 4 soldiers plus the usual crew - so it's a bit of a mixture of a MBT with very limited IFV capabilities.

The Leopard 2A6 has the best gun of all MBTs, namely compared to all of the above.


But the Abrams has the best ammo. If they could fire the M829A3 through an L55. . .


I can't see any reason why the L55 (Leopard 2A6 gun) couldn't fire the M829A3 round. The L55 is just a long barrel version of the L44 gun which is the same gun found on the M1 Abrams or the Leopard 2A4 and 2A5.
I would say that the only reason why the Leopard 2 doesn't use the M829A3 is political - their users don't want to use Depleted Uranium (DU) rounds on their tanks.
But yes, I agree that the M829A3 is the best Anti-Tank/Penetrating round.

And please note that when I said that the 3 best tanks in the world are the "Leopard 2, the M1 Abrams and the Challenger 2", I didn't say this in any particular order. If one of you said that the latest version of the M1 Abrams is slightly better than the latest version of the Leopard 2, I likely wouldn't dispute that.
I would say that Leopard 2, the M1 Abrams and the Challenger 2 may have some advantages between each others but overall they are basically on the same/similar level.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 11 Jan 2018, 16:07
by hythelday
This isn't tank-net.com

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 12 Jan 2018, 09:46
by loke
mtrman wrote:
loke wrote:....

To NATO a few F-35 more or less would not make a big difference. How many F-35 will NATO countries have by 2030?

There will also be non-NATO countries that are nevertheless close allies of NATO countries that will also have quite significant numbers of F-35; in Europe there will be Finland (perhaps 64 F-35, one of the largest F-35 operators in Europe!?) and of course in Asia-pacific there will be Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Australia, etc., in the ME of course Israel will have a huge F-35 fleet in 2030...

...



@loke, why don't you count possible 100+ F-35s of Turkey?


What do you mean?

I referred to all NATO F-35 in one line, and then I mentioned some specific non-NATO F-35 countries that are close allies of NATO.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 12 Jan 2018, 09:57
by loke
ricnunes wrote:Just because something was designed decades ago doesn't mean that this same something is obsolete and needs replacement. For example is the M-16 or M-4 Assault Rifles becoming outdated? I don't think so!

This just means that nothing newer and better has come.
Not all technologies evolves at the same pace. Just because current fighter aircraft are becoming obsolete doesn't mean that current MBTs (or Assault Rifles) are obsolete as well.

This is not tank.net and I am definitely not an expert however I would just refer to recent developments in the ME.

Air superiority may not exist in the future while until recently it was taken for granted; even terrorists in the ME are able to build drones that can attack Russian airbases.

What do you think a real country with resources will be able to do in the future?

If you consider that already today technology for "self-driving" cars is becoming widely available, how many years do you think it will take before countries like Iran (not to mention Russia and China) will be capable of developing drones with simple sensors and a neural network on a chip trained to recognize tanks, F-35 and whatnot on the ground, and just fire away when they see something? Cheap, mass-produced drones not in the hundreds but in the thousands that just fly around ready to attack. Not all countries will insist on "man-in-the-loop".

F-35 is great but on the ground it is very vulnerable. So is a Leo2 or Abrams, when the opponent can drop cheap bombs from cheap, autonomous drones with neural network chips.

Clearly we need lasers not just on the F-35s but also on the ground. Lots of lasers. And perhaps something to fry electronics. We also need more stealth and mobility.

If you want to plan for the future you have to make predictions of what the future will look like, and not just look at how it was yesterday or today....

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jan 2018, 02:42
by ricnunes
@loke

I don't want to turn this into a tank.net thread/forum but I believe that your points need addressing:

You say that a modern MBT like the Leopard 2 or the M1 Abrams is vulnerable to airstrikes, being it fighter aircraft (like the F-35) or armed UAVs. But guess what? So is "your future stealth tank"!
And moreover, in order for your "future stealth tank" to be lets say more and effectively harder to find by opposing air assets (resuming, stealthier) you probably need a much lighter kind of vehicle which by its turn would make it much more vulnerable to enemy ground forces which are the tanks main threat since afterall tanks are designed to fight enemy GROUND forces and NOT enemy AIR forces.

Moreover and I don't think that on NATO perspective Tanks (being it lighter stealthier ones or current heavier ones) would never be sent if Air Superiority or something that resembles it still wasn't achieved.

So I would say that that "light stealth tank" would probably be quite vulnerable against even an enemy soldier armed with an RPG or a similar weapons. Now as opposed a modern tanks can withstand with literally dozens of RPGs and still continue fighting - for example at least one US M1 Abrams was known to be hit at least 18 times with RPGs during the Iraq invasion in 2003 and the tank just kept fighting with no harm to the crewman. Another example was, if my memory doesn't fail me, another M1 Abrams this time in 1991 during Desert Storm with took a direct hot from a SABOT round (with DU penetrator) and the crew survived and the tank was apparently put back into service quite soon afterwards. This is a level of protection that simply NO OTHER kind of armored vehicle can provide.

So, I believe that a short answer to why current MBTs such as Leopard 2, M1 Abrams, Challenger 2 will likely continue to be in service for many years to come and likely nothing in the foreseeable future will likely replace them is IMO this:
- Current MBTs have an almost perfect balance between survivability and mobility.

So it's very, very hard to design something which is as resistant to enemy fire but at the same time as mobile as current MBTs (and at the same time "stealth"). I'm not saying that something won't come along in the far future but it will take quite some time, IMO.
Moreover, current MBTs have shown to have a tremendous upgrade capability, including modular kind of upgrades. The Leopard 2 in particular has shown how a modern MBT can easily be vastly upgraded. For example this, the basic Leopard 2A4:
Image

Compared in the next two pictures alongside with upgraded 2A4:
Image

Image

And to this (more upgraded Leopard 2A4):
Image

And this (more upgraded Leopard 2A4):
Image

And the above are all upgrades to a rather earlier variant of the Leopard 2, the AA4. Imagine the newer variants like the 2A5, 2A6 and 2A7!

I wonder if your future stealth vehicle/tank would be:
1- Just as upgradable as MBT (Leopard 2) above?
2- Just as resistant to enemy heavy fire as the above (namely the upgraded ones)?
3- Have a better balance between resistance to enemy fire and mobility (namely on rough terrain)?

By the way, you never wondered why a new MBT isn't being developed?
Perhaps because of the reasons above but again this is only my humble opinion :wink:

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jan 2018, 07:45
by neptune
loke wrote:Since it seems they have decided to develop their own 5. gen fighter with France it would probably be cheaper to skip the F-35 alltogether and make do without nuclear bombs until the new 5. gen fighter is ready.

Some of the same thinking that was behind the UK's decision to drop carrier aviation for several years until the F-35B is ready (and the new carriers of course).

To NATO a few F-35 more or less would not make a big difference. How many F-35 will NATO countries have by 2030?

So much to do and so little money to spend...



....I'm not seeing a technological step up from the EU to get to Gen5. The F-35 is their technology "booster shot" to get them on to whatever they chase next. I personally like several of their missiles and sensor systems.
:)

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jan 2018, 15:48
by count_to_10
hythelday wrote:This isn't tank-net.com

Well, more to the point, this is the F-35 Units board, while a discussion of tanks probably belongs in the Technology board.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 13 Jan 2018, 23:19
by popcorn
Technology subforum is for aviation stuff.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jan 2018, 00:15
by spazsinbad
8) :roll: Tanks for the memory [Dean Martin]. Where are the German F-35 units? viewtopic.php?f=22&t=53630 :doh: :devil: :twisted:

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jan 2018, 00:17
by count_to_10
popcorn wrote:Technology subforum is for aviation stuff.

I suppose that’s true, but it has been a catch all for non aviation topics that no one complains about. The moderators have been known to drop the hammer on such discussions in the 5th gen boards.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jan 2018, 01:12
by hythelday
I've said in some thread before, but I'll repeat it:

The hang-up is in B61s.

F-35A will carry it - fact.
The Netherlands has got F-35A (replacing nuke capable F-16)
Italy has got F-35A (replacing nuke capable Tornado)
Turkey is still poised to get F-35A.
Belgium is still deciding, but IMO it is super certain they are going to get F-35A.
This leaves Germany at the crossroads: get F-35A as per Luftwaffe requests and because retaining B61 lets slack on conventional armed forces OR pick EF2000 because it's good for the industry and reap political benefits from expelling B61from Büchel AB.
I am willing to bet six-pack worth of money Germans won't pay for/won't allow nuke integration on Typhoon. Which means that by choosing either jet we'll get a hint on what their standing on dual key bombs is.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jan 2018, 04:09
by nutshell
hythelday wrote:I've said in some thread before, but I'll repeat it:

The hang-up is in B61s.

Italy has got F-35A (replacing nuke capable Tornado)
.


We don't have nukes tho.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jan 2018, 04:48
by h-bomb
nutshell wrote:
hythelday wrote:I've said in some thread before, but I'll repeat it:

The hang-up is in B61s.

Italy has got F-35A (replacing nuke capable Tornado)
.


We don't have nukes tho.


Odd per your former Prime Minister and President you do have some US nukes. Both Aviano and Ghedi have B61', estimated to be 70 to 90 in country.

https://www.google.com/search?q=Frances ... e&ie=UTF-8

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 14 Jan 2018, 14:47
by nutshell
h-bomb wrote:
nutshell wrote:
hythelday wrote:I've said in some thread before, but I'll repeat it:

The hang-up is in B61s.

Italy has got F-35A (replacing nuke capable Tornado)
.


We don't have nukes tho.


Odd per your former Prime Minister and President you do have some US nukes. Both Aviano and Ghedi have B61', estimated to be 70 to 90 in country.

https://www.google.com/search?q=Frances ... e&ie=UTF-8


Around 70s, but it's US stuff operated by US personnel.

We technically banned the "atom" in 1986.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 15 Jan 2018, 01:14
by h-bomb
Ok Nutshell, you claim Italy is nuclear free, but your press does not agree with you...

2007: http://www.lastampa.it/2007/09/15/itali ... agina.html
2013: https://www.panorama.it/news/oltrefront ... ri-italia/

I have references to Italy getting rid of its "Native" weapons programs. The weapons in Italy are under US control and security, even at Ghedi where the US has no aircraft. This way the weapons are NPT compliant, as the US owns and controls the weapons still.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 16 Jan 2018, 01:35
by nutshell
h-bomb wrote:Ok Nutshell, you claim Italy is nuclear free, but your press does not agree with you...

2007: http://www.lastampa.it/2007/09/15/itali ... agina.html
2013: https://www.panorama.it/news/oltrefront ... ri-italia/

I have references to Italy getting rid of its "Native" weapons programs. The weapons in Italy are under US control and security, even at Ghedi where the US has no aircraft. This way the weapons are NPT compliant, as the US owns and controls the weapons still.


I know we host nuclear weapons, peaking around 95 warheads at some point, but it's still US owned weapons that we might not be able to operate anymore and god knows if we really could back in the cold war era.

We opted in the JSF program because it's an exceptional machine, the presence of b61 warheads is irrelevant when the bird is so much much much better then anything you got.

Btw if the m5s wins the election, chances are we will withdraw from the nuclear sharing initiative.

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 24 Jan 2018, 04:24
by neptune
https://www.defensenews.com/air/2017/12 ... n-germany/

Spat over the F-35 bubbles up in Germany


By: Sebastian Sprenger  
December 12, 2017

COLOGNE, Germany ―
German Defence Ministry leaders have distanced themselves from their Air Force chief, Lt. Gen. Karl Muellner, over his appetite for the F-35, as at least one lawmaker suspects intrigue seeping into the debate. Deputy Defence Minister Ralf Brauksiepe clarified Monday that the government views the Eurofighter as the “primary” option for replacing the country’s fleet of Tornado jets in 2025. The U.S.-made F-15E, the F/A-18E/F and the F-35 are considered only as “secondary” choices, he wrote in a letter. The missive, first reported by Reuters on Monday and independently obtained by Defense News, comes after Muellner said last month he prefers the stealthy F-35 because of its advertised capability to attack targets from so far away that pilots can stay out of the danger of combat.

A review of all aircraft options would be made in a “wholistic context,” Brauksiepe added, a likely nod to the expectation that political and cost considerations could end up trumping operational capabilities. Brauksiepe’s response is consistent with previous statements by ministry officials, often made privately, who have cringed at Muellner’s outspoken support for the Lockheed Martin-made F-35. Exactly how much sway the Air Force will have in a final decision remains to be seen. Those here opposed to choosing the F-35 argue that the advent of that aircraft in Germany could endanger German-French plans for an entirely new plane, announced to much fanfare in July. Leaders from both countries consider that project an important part of the vision for greater military prowess of the European Union.
:)

....and the beat goes on!
:roll:

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 24 Jan 2018, 04:32
by steve2267
By the time the FrancoHessians cobble together a 5th gen demonstrator, if their relationship doesn't splinter into an ugly divorce, the US will probably have already produced a 6th gen PACA (or whatever) and be moving on towards a 7th gen...

but hey, JOBS!!!

At least they are not claiming they are shovel ready! :roll:

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 24 Jan 2018, 04:57
by neptune
steve2267 wrote:By the time the FrancoHessians cobble together a 5th gen demonstrator, if their relationship doesn't splinter into an ugly divorce, the US will probably have already produced a 6th gen PACA (or whatever) and be moving on towards a 7th gen...but hey, JOBS!!! At least they are not claiming they are shovel ready! :roll:


....one would hope that somehow the UE folks could come to terms with a jobs swap?? thingee for the Italian FACO to crank out the required Tornado replacements! trading VAT or carbon credits or whatever economic BS that motivates pols. I could see France and Germany getting into the high-tech F-35 subsytems that could lead them to future international aviation contributions. I doubt we will see in the near future any sole French or German a/c, muchless anything they would attempt to joint venture! IMHO
:)

Re: The Germans are coming!

Unread postPosted: 25 Jan 2018, 19:49
by hythelday
A prime example is the decision that Berlin needs to take soon on the succession of its Tornado aircraft, ... The Tornado succession is likely to lead to a debate about nuclear deterrence, including calls to abandon nuclear sharing. This rather technical issue is likely to turn political and risks unsettling the new German government, which is likely to be a fragile grand coalition and not at all comfortable in dealing with such issues.


http://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurop ... 9jRkNkdSJ9