Judgment Day [VMFA-121 IOC Declaration] CAM Jul 2015

F-35 unit & base selection, delivery, activation
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sferrin

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Unread post24 Jun 2015, 14:05

The usual suspects will be screeching like burning harpies if it slides to August.
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Unread post24 Jun 2015, 14:07

sferrin wrote:The usual suspects will be screeching like burning harpies if it slides to August.


But can they? after claiming that IOC is a farce and they aren't really doing any inspection, or any serious requirements exist that need to be met before its declared IOC :mrgreen: .... I bet the response now would be something like ;

They didn't want to declare IOC on time to arouse suspicion so now they may do it a couple of weeks later and pretend that they are actually doing something meaningful :mrgreen:
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Unread post24 Jun 2015, 17:53

bring_it_on wrote:
sferrin wrote:The usual suspects will be screeching like burning harpies if it slides to August.


But can they? after claiming that IOC is a farce and they aren't really doing any inspection, or any serious requirements exist that need to be met before its declared IOC :mrgreen: .... I bet the response now would be something like ;

They didn't want to declare IOC on time to arouse suspicion so now they may do it a couple of weeks later and pretend that they are actually doing something meaningful :mrgreen:


You can't reason with these morons. There is no winning

You can watch the fanatical whining about everything being PR and calling any progress fake.

These are not rational people. At best they are agenda driven and selective, at worse they are mentally ill and I'm not kidding there.

luckily they don't matter at all. And its better to have them whining on their little blogs and agreeing with each other than actually out in public.


In other news for VMFA-121, stand by for bombs this week
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Unread post30 Jun 2015, 21:30

F-35 Training System, Logistic System Ready for Operations
30 Jun 2015 LM PR

"The U.S. Marine Corps’ F-35 program took another step forward as two key capabilities were delivered to support the service’s first operational squadron.

Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 121, also known as the "Green Knights", received the latest version of support software for the F-35 and all four of their Full Mission Simulator trainers became ready for operational use with Block 2B Initial Warfighting software, June 22.....

...The F-35 Lightning II Training System consists of academic, live-flight and simulation training. Now, pilots aboard the air station can train together in the same virtual environment with four simulators linked together and running the latest aircraft software, Block 2B. The simulators constantly receive updates to further enhance the training experience for pilots and maintainers.

“The biggest change to the simulator relative to us is the software in the simulator matches what’s in the plane,” said Maj. John Price, an F-35B pilot and executive officer of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 121. “The capabilities I see in the jet every day are the same things I see when I go over to the simulator.”...

...ALIS 2.0.1 is the latest release of the software and has been released to the USMC on new mobile equipment. Aircraft maintenance, mission planning and debrief capabilities continue to be enhanced under an incremental development approach

“[Pilots] create missions that go on hard drives that plug into the jets,” said Gunnery Sgt. Brian Erline, VMFA-121 aviation logistic information management specialist. “Once it’s plugged in, they conduct their missions. That same hard drive that had the mission is capturing required maintenance actions for that jet. This tells the maintainers which parts are reaching their life limit and which [parts] require attention.”

According to Sprang, the latest modular hardware provides rugged durability and mobility. The system is disassembled, transported and re-assembled at the deployed site. Prior to the introduction of this hardware, ALIS consisted of typical stationary ‘server’ racks kept in the computer room.

“With more than two years left to go in the development phase of the program, capabilities continue to be added to ALIS,” said Erline. “However, the Marine Corps has everything it needs today in terms of functionality to have an initial operating capability.”

Similarly, the F-35 Training System’s simulator holds truer to its real-life counterpart, thanks to the latest Block 2B software. The software is used in the actual jets and in the simulators, providing the most accurate information possible.

“It’s very accurate in regards to the visuals and the types of simulations that can be done,” said Capt. John Stuart, an F-35B pilot with VMFA-121. “Getting training in division and sections is something that is a very high value with regards to saving money and getting good, real-time debriefing capabilities from a pilot at the console who is monitoring the simulator.”...

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/f-35-tr ... operations
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post30 Jun 2015, 23:14

Hmmm...an ORI before declaring IOC............ :roll:
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Unread post01 Jul 2015, 01:40

Lockheed Delivers Deployable ALIS For Marine Corps IOC


Lockheed Martin on June 22 delivered the latest iteration of its F-35 Autonomic Logistics Information System to the Marine Corps -- a key component of the service's initial operational capability requirement.
The upgrade, referred to as Deployable ALIS, completed an intense slate of verification and validation tests June 21, according to Lockheed's director for ALIS, Jeff Streznetcky.
"We had a very specific list of criteria that we needed to achieve to declare the system ready for operations and to be able to support the Marines in their operational environment," Streznetcky told InsideDefense.com in a June 30 interview. "It performed very well and it's meeting the needs of the warfighter."
ALIS is a crucial system for F-35 Joint Strike Fighter technicians as it is tasked with performing supply chain and configuration management and providing maintainers with prognostics and step-by-step repair and sustainment instructions. The system is being delivered in iterative upgrades with the deployable version, ALIS 2.0.1, the most capable to date. ALIS has faced fielding delays and technical challenges but Streznetcky said the 2.0.1 release includes all of the required capabilities for Marine Corps IOC.
Deployable ALIS is smaller and more modular than ALIS 2.0, an important feature for the Marine Corps since the service operates the system on a ship.
"What we did building from 2.0 to 2.0.1 is we repackaged the system into two-man, liftable, modular containers that can be easily broken down, relocated and built back up again in a short amount of time in order to be relocated to meet the needs of the warfighter," Streznetcky said.
The first deployable system was delivered to Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, AZ -- the home of the service's first F-35B operational squadron. Streznetcky said Lockheed is now focused on fielding the capability at the remaining locations and expects to complete the installations by the end of September.
The Marine Corps expects to meet its remaining IOC requirements in August. -- Courtney Albon


www.insidedefense.com
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Unread post08 Jul 2015, 01:33

Marine Corps, Navy leaders praise FRC East team for F-35B modification efforts
07 Jul 2015 FRCE Public Affairs

"MARINE CORPS AIR STATION CHERRY POINT, N.C. — On the verge of the Marine Corps achieving initial operational capability (IOC) for the Joint Strike Fighter, Marine Aviation and Navy Air Systems leaders skipped ahead of the formal celebrations to laud the Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) East team for its unrelenting efforts to deliver five modified F-35B aircraft.

FRC East Commander Col. Vincent Clark opened an informal assembly June 18, to recognize the artisans’ success and to acknowledge they met a July 1 commitment to Marine Corps aviation, the Joint Strike Fighter Program Office and Lockheed Martin.

“I never had any doubts that you’d make it and that you’d make it on time. I’m immensely proud of all of you and what you’ve done out here,” said Lt. Gen. Jon M. Davis, deputy commandant for Marine Aviation, calling FRC East a winning team that figured out how to get the job done. “You showed the world the way to get the [modifications] done on the F-35B, and how you can do it on a timeline. The whole world is watching you. They’re watching me. They’re watching us.”

In June 2012, COMFRC made the establishment of the F-35B modification line FRC East’s top priority, with an added stipulation of inducting the first aircraft a year later. Meeting these commitments will keep the Marines on track to reach IOC, which is when the aircraft is ready to be fielded and used in combat missions.

“I’m personally grateful you guys pulled this off, through all the challenges thrown at the depot,” said Dennis J. West, deputy commander of the Fleet Readiness Centers. “FRC East has the best aviation industrial specialists in the world.”

Although the F-35 modifications were a priority, day-to-day responsibilities of operating a Navy depot continued. The FRC team also had to deal with some curve balls thrown its way.

“We took some key leaders out of here to work some national issues; you went through two changes of command; you endured a mandated hiring freeze for almost a year; you had a furlough,” West said. “You had to make some really hard decisions across TMS (or type/model/series) to make this possible.”

Despite the challenges, much was accomplished along the way, West noted.

The readiness center produced 301 aircraft, 415 engines and 57,693 components; achieved competency alignment; and more, all while establishing the F-35 capability — producing 16 modified F-35 aircraft, including the five to meet the Marines need.

According to FRC East leaders and managers, the artisans made an extensive effort to meet the July 1 goal. Those assigned to the project worked 12-hour days, five days of the week and eight hours most Saturdays and many Sundays over the course of the past year.

“The artisans are the real heroes here,” said David Rose, F-35 aircraft production manager. “They were thrown into the fire, learning things for the first time, making a sacrifice to work six to seven days a week. Many did it out of patriotism and a willingness to meet the mission put in front of them.”

“Give you what you need and you’ll turn wrenches and you’ll get it done, and you’ve proven it again here,” West said, speaking specifically to the team of more than 140 integrated product team leaders and JSF-dedicated artisans from all trades and contractors. “You operated like a depot in a depot. The artisans were applying their skill and artistry to building these jets. And you’ve built good solid reliable jets.”

West also expressed gratitude to other partners, such as Lockheed Martin and the JSF Program Office for the different roles each played in the process.

“Their support and help has made all the difference in achieving the milestone,” he said, acknowledging their cooperation and professionalism. “I view Lockheed Martin as a valuable partner in this, and I certainly anticipate more success with them in the future of JSF support.”

This accomplishment is only the beginning, according to leaders. “The JSF program is so big and only getting bigger. We’ll be in the business a long time,” West said, after running down a list of upcoming scheduled modifications and the projected needs of the Navy and Air Force within the next two years.

Davis said the Marines look forward to achieving initial operating capability by the end of July, with additional long-term plans to purchase 420 aircraft and activate about five squadrons at Cherry Point by 2022."

Source: http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=5987
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post12 Jul 2015, 11:26

Marines drop first bombs from F-35B in test runs
11 Jul 2015 James K. Sanborn

"Marine pilots recently dropped dozens of live bombs from the F-35B joint strike fighter for the first time, bringing the aircraft a step closer to its long-anticipated rollout.

Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121 dropped 30 bombs over five days without a hitch in late June near Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Arizona. It was a first for the squadron testing the aircraft's capabilities, and Marines said they can hit targets in little- to no-visibility....

...the new fighter jet far outperformed older aircraft in its ability to deliver GBU-32 munitions in obscured conditions.

"In extreme weather conditions or dirty battlefield conditions, the F-35 still has the ability to target munitions for the guy on the ground with the same warheads legacy aircraft carry today," Trent said.

The key to that new capability is the F-35's synthetic aperture radar, which allows it to paint a three-dimensional map of the ground. That offers pilots enough detail to deliver bombs even in little or no visibility.

In the case of GBU-12 bombs, however, pilots still need clear weather because the system is dependent on a laser's ability to paint a target.

GBU-12 and GBU-32 will be the only two munitions the F-35 initially carries....

...With its now proven ability to put two common bombs on target, the aircraft is on track to reach a declared "initial operations capability" by Marine leaders. That's expected to happen sometime this month...."

Source: http://www.marinecorpstimes.com/story/m ... /29926301/
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post20 Jul 2015, 15:46

JSF Joint Program Office: Future F-35B Retrofits Will Be 'Capability' Based Posted: July 17, 2015

All of the retrofit modifications needed for the Marine Corps to declare the F-35B Joint Strike Fighter operational are complete and all future mods will be "capability modifications," according to an F-35 joint program office official.
Charlie Brown, deputy sustainment director for the F-35 joint program office, told Inside the Navy during a July 16 interview that all of the retrofit modifications, outlined by Lt. Gen. Robert Schmidle when he was deputy commandant for aviation, are finished.

As the JSF program continues development it may identify that a different specification or component is needed. "Those things will happen over time," Brown stated.
For example, the Navy's legacy F/A-18 Hornet has been in the fleet for over 30 years and the program is still performing modifications to the aircraft, he said.
Brown explained the capability mods for the F-35's hardware are similar to a technical refresh for the system's software.
"There are still going to be retrofits for aircraft that haven't been built yet until we reach full-rate production in a final configuration," he said. "I foresee retrofits up through LRIP 10, [for] which we haven't even signed that contract yet."
In the United States retrofit modifications are performed at Fleet Readiness Center-East in Cherry Point, NC, and Ogden Air Logistics Complex at Hill Air Force Base, UT.
"Both of those are mod lines that can work on all of the variants," Brown added.
FRC-East is focusing on B variant modifications and Ogden ALC will focus on the A and C variants. Ogden has performed work on the B variant because FRC-East has limited space, he said.
"Ogden quite frankly, has a lot of space and they have a workforce that they can augment . . . as they downsize the F-16 line," Brown stated. "All of those mod lines [at FRC-East and Ogden] are agnostic of the variant."
FRC-East was chosen to work on the B-variant because of a pressure altitude restriction for the aircraft at Ogden. "But we realized that the four or five emergency procedures you would have to necessitate a vertical landing was OK, so that's why we were able to put four aircraft at Ogden," Brown said.
Having Ogden perform retrofit modifications on B variant aircraft relieved pressure off of FRC-East because the depot was behind in its F-35 work.
ITN reported in February that a decision was made in late January that two F-35Bs would be sent to Ogden ALC for maintenance.
A typical maintenance period is Monday through Friday for eight hours a day. In order for the Marines to meet their July deadline, F-35 maintainers are working 10- or 12-hour shifts, Brown wrote in a February statement to ITN.
"With the learning curve and the amount of validations and verifications it took a little longer," Brown said. "We got to the point where to meet the July 1 PEO's mandate to meet Marine IOC . . . we need to move the last two aircraft into Ogden for Group 1 mods."
Assistant Marine Corps Commandant Gen. John Paxton said Feb. 26 during an industry association breakfast in Washington that the Navy's fleet readiness centers face manpower, resourcing and equipment challenges.
"All three of those combined whether you're fielding a new aircraft or whether you're maintaining and doing mods and SLEPs to old aircraft . . . this is one of the fiscal challenges that we will face," he stated.
Lockheed Martin personnel are available for assistance on site at both Ogden and FRC-East. Mostly the contractors' work revolves around engineering and technical directives, he added.
Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan, F-35 program executive officer, told reporters last September that: "Of all the things that are on the critical path to Marine Corps IOC and Air Force IOC, I would tell you that the mod program of getting 10 airplanes and 12 to 24 Air Force airplanes done in time is the big [obstacle in the] critical path right now." -- Lee Hudson


Source - Insidedefense.com
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Unread post22 Jul 2015, 17:23

U.S. Marines Complete F-35B Readiness Inspection
21 Jul 2015 Amy Butler

"The U.S. Marine Corps has completed an operational readiness inspection (ORI) of its first F-35B squadron, the last major hurdle before the service can assess whether VMFA-121 in Yuma, Arizona, is suitable to declare initial operational capability (IOC).

The operational readiness inspection took place July 13-20, according to Maj. Paul Greenberg, a Marine spokesman....

...The ORI team has until July 22 to compile its report for Davis. A decision on IOC is expected by the end of July, Greenberg says...."

Source: http://aviationweek.com/defense/us-mari ... inspection
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post26 Jul 2015, 08:12

Best read at source for SYRIAN mention...
Marine F-35B simulators get true-to-life upgrades
25 Jul 2015 James K. Sanborn

"Marine F-35B joint strike fighter pilots can now fly realistic training missions without ever leaving the ground thanks to a recent upgrade to their simulators.

Pilots with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121, which is expected to become the first operational F-35B squadron in late July, got Block 2B software upgrades giving their four simulators at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Arizona, the exact same capabilities as their real fighters.

“The software in the simulator now matches what is on the flightline, which is really what you desire," said Maj. Christopher Trent, VMFA-121's pilot training officer. "You don’t wasn’t a software variant older than what is on the flightline,”

Pilots had been using simulators with outdated software since the real aircraft are typically updated before training devices, Trent said. Now the software allows them to train as they fly, with expanded data sets and simulated weapons drops, according to Lockheed Martin....

...The new F-35 simulators are far more accurate and detailed compared to past versions, Trent said. Graphics and targets are so detailed, they pop as if they are in 3-D.

“Legacy platforms are like Nintendo systems of the day and this upgrade is like the latest and greatest XBox with Halo,” he said.

They can also be linked together, allowing four pilots with VMFA-121 to fly together as they would in combat. Or pilots can go up against each other, allowing them to train for possible dog fights, Trent said."

Source: http://www.marinecorpstimes.com/story/m ... /30532123/
Last edited by spazsinbad on 26 Jul 2015, 09:10, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread post26 Jul 2015, 08:44

Shouldn't be a big deal to hook it up into the Navy's fancy NIFC-CA simulation environmemt. With F-35B flying off Gators the Corps finally brings a capability to match AF and Navy.
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
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Unread post26 Jul 2015, 12:33

Navy..
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Unread post30 Jul 2015, 01:06

VMFA-121 moving to Japan by 2017

Pending the confirmation of the F-35B's readiness for military operations, VMFA-121 will be moving permanently to Japan by 2017.
"Beginning on July 13, a team of Marine Corps F-35 experts began the operational readiness inspection (ORI) of the first squadron of 10 F-35B fighter jets at VMFA-121 in Yuma, Arizona," said Maj. Paul Greenberg, public affairs officer for Headquarters U.S. Marine Corps, in an e-mail. "Their mission was to determine if the squadron and their aircraft are ready for initial operating capability."The ORI team has reported the findings of the inspection to Lt. Gen. Jon Davis, Deputy Commandant for Aviation, who provided his assessment and recommendations to the Commandant of the Marine Corps," he continued. "The CMC will make a decision as to whether the F-35B is ready for IOC (initial operations capability - meaning readiness for combat) based on the inspection team's findings and Lt. Gen. Davis' recommendations."
Once that decision is made, VMFA-121 can begin the process of moving to a new permanent home in Asia.
"The F-35B will be ready for future deployments aboard the US Navy's fleet of amphibious carriers following the Marine Corps' F-35B IOC declaration," said Capt. Melanie Salinas, public affairs officer for the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing. "The first deployment is scheduled to take place in 2017, when VMFA-121 will deploy to Iwakuni, Japan."
"The squadron, all their personnel and equipment would be moving," said Greenberg. "It would happen between now and 2017 but not all at once."
While the relocation of VMFA-121 means that they are taking their F-35B's across the Pacific with them, there will still be squadrons with contingents of the aircraft stationed at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma. These include those with VMX-22, an experimental flight squadron whose headquarters just recently moved to the base as part of a three-phase relocation to MCAS Yuma.
In addition, MCAS Yuma will be replacing the F-35Bs leaving with VMFA-121 by converting a unit already stationed there, VMA-311, to VMFA-311 and having them fly the jets.
"VMFA-311 will be standing up in Yuma by Fiscal Year 2018," said Greenberg. "It's not an F-35B Squadron now but it will be.
"It is an AV-8B (Harrier) Squadron now and will turn into VMFA-311," he clarified. "They will be up and running as an F-35B Squadron in F.Y. 2018."
Greenberg said that the Marine Corps is expecting a declaration on the craft's operational capabilities by the end of the month.
The F-35 family of aircraft is expected to replace several of the aircraft types flown by the U.S. Marine Corps, including the AV-8B Harrier and F\A-18s.
"As we modernize Marine fixed-wing aviation assets for the future," said Greenberg, "the continued development and fielding of the short take-off and vertical landing F-35B Lightning II remains the centerpiece of this effort."
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Unread post31 Jul 2015, 09:28

Spare Parts Needed to Ready F-35 for the Pacific, General Says
29 Jul 2015 Brendan McGarry

"The U.S. Marine Corps wants to protect funding for spare parts needed to prepare the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter for eventual deployment to the Asia-Pacific region, a general said.

During a conference call with reporters on Monday afternoon, Lt. Gen. Jon Davis, the service’s deputy commandant for aviation, said if the F-35B is cleared to begin initial operations “soon” as expected, the jump-jet version of the Lockheed Martin Corp.-made plane is slated to deploy to Japan in early 2017....

..."If I want one thing, I want the afloat spares backup and the deployable spares backup,” he said, referring to two separate parts packages. “Bottom line is getting that put together and getting that deployed over there so they fly in and roll in on that. I think that’s the key — making sure they got their parts so they can fly effectively out there in the Pacific area of responsibility.”

The Defense Department has requested $11 billion for the F-35 program in fiscal 2016, beginning Oct. 1. That figure includes about $410 million for spare parts, according to Pentagon budget documents. While the overall Joint Strike Fighter has received robust congressional funding, the line for spares has been targeted amid automatic spending caps known as sequestration.

Funding for spares has a direct impact on how many planes the services can maintain and service so they’re ready to fly, Davis said. The measure is known as the aircraft mission capable rate.

The F-35 is designed to have a mission capable rate of about 74 percent, though the current figure is closer to 60–65 percent for the F-35Bs that flew in a recent operational readiness inspection — and Davis said he wants it to be upwards of 80 percent.

“We’re tracking to what we thought IOC would be,” he said, at about 50 percent. But, he added, “that’s a low bar. We need to be higher than that.”"

Source: http://www.dodbuzz.com/2015/07/29/spare ... eral-says/
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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