Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 02 Aug 2012, 07:43
by boff180
72 aircraft to be stationed to conduct USAF and some international type conversion training.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wire ... -training/

Andy

RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 02 Aug 2012, 08:50
by spazsinbad
You read the news now see/hear the video:

Video: F-35A ROD Press Conference RAW 56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs
Video by Airman 1st Class Kate Vaugh

http://www.dvidshub.net/video/150825/f- ... erence-raw

RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 02 Aug 2012, 14:15
by SpudmanWP
OMG... Reporter fail at 4:30:
How concerned are you guys that these are going to come out and start crashing into neighborhoods?
Even worse, it was the FIRST question!

Dumba$$

RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 03 Aug 2012, 16:28
by archeman
Does anyone have an explanation about why Eglin was chosen only as an INTERIM training location and they didn't just pick the permanent location right off the bat? Seems like for a program that is trying to look fiscally smart that wasn't smart at all.

RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 03 Aug 2012, 17:01
by SpudmanWP
Eglin was the initial and International training site. Luke it for USAF and continued training.

Also, due to the EIS and community concerns, Eglin AFB will not be as large as was planned (number of training squadrons).

The USAF reduced they Eglin contingent from the original 78 to 59. I am not sure fi the USN has mad any similar reductions.

http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2010/ ... 5s_072810/

The original plan at Eglin was to train 186 pilots per year, which is not enough considering the US and international training requirements.

RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 03 Aug 2012, 17:29
by archeman
So it is safe to say that one single base could never have worked to fulfill all the needs of the various services?

RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 03 Aug 2012, 17:41
by SpudmanWP
No, and I do not think Eglin was supposed to be the end-all, be-all in terms of training, just the Primary/first.

RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 04 Aug 2012, 13:43
by spazsinbad
F-35 Comes to Luke AFB VIDEO

http://vimeo.com/46925526

"by SldInfo.com 03 August 2012
This video from the USAF highlights the decision to build a training center for the F-35 at Luke AFB. The commander of the base discusses the beginning of construction of the facility in October 2012."

Re: RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 04 Aug 2012, 14:10
by quicksilver
SpudmanWP wrote:Eglin was the initial and International training site. Luke it for USAF and continued training.

Also, due to the EIS and community concerns, Eglin AFB will not be as large as was planned (number of training squadrons).

The USAF reduced they Eglin contingent from the original 78 to 59. I am not sure fi the USN has mad any similar reductions.

http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2010/ ... 5s_072810/

The original plan at Eglin was to train 186 pilots per year, which is not enough considering the US and international training requirements.


Spud is correct. But, to clarify for those unfamiliar with such things --

The EIS capped the total F-35 capacity at Eglin at 59 jets (a reduction from 103), thereby limiting the amount of sorties they could generate. Going forward, at some point 'sorties available' falls short of 'sorties required' and more capacity is required -- somewhere other than Eglin.

RE: Re: RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 05 Aug 2012, 20:35
by neptune
LRIPs 5,6&7 would provide the 70+ a/c for Luke starting in 2014-16. These would include 13 a/c for Italy, Turkey, Norway and Australia. :)

RE: Re: RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 07 Aug 2012, 21:44
by spazsinbad
I'm on dialup speed again :-( so just guessing that this video is good. Anyhoo....

Around the Air Force: F-35 Training Center

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VuPIKr0s ... tube_gdata

"Published on Aug 6, 2012 by 3rdID8487

"The F-35a has a new training center at Luke AFB, Arizona. Available in High Definition.
This is the LARGEST military videos channel on YouTube! Over 1 Million views a month. Use the channel search bar or look through the playlist, or just browse to see more of the types of videos you like. More video posted almost every day."
___________________

F-35A ROD Press Conference

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=br3eal08 ... tube_gdata

"Published on Aug 6, 2012 by 3rdID8487
It's official, the F-35 is coming to Luke. Air Force Secretary Michael Donley announced today that Luke AFB has been chosen as the location of the Air Force's F-35A Lightning II pilot training center. Produced by Airman 1st Class Kate Vaughn. Also available in High Definition."

RE: Re: RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 08 Aug 2012, 19:09
by marksengineer
Why would you send 72 jets to Luke plus the 59 at Eglin before starting an operational squadron? Do you need 131 jets devoted to training with the current production schedule? Wouldn't it make more sense to equip and operational unit?

RE: Re: RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 08 Aug 2012, 19:59
by SpudmanWP
The Initial Luke jets are Pre Blk3 F-35s. The operational F-35s will come from the first batch of Blk3 F-35s.

Another thing to consider is that they did not say they were getting all 72 before any IOC jets either.

Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 09 Aug 2012, 01:01
by neptune
neptune wrote:LRIPs 5,6&7 would provide the 70+ a/c for Luke starting in 2014-16. These would include 13 a/c for Italy, Turkey, Norway and Australia. :)


Sorry, not "would provide" but "could provide". I've not seen any resource dispositions for a/c to squadrons, released to the public. :oops:

As "Spud" has indicated force dispositions would be as available and required for force strengths. As of today, we are only flying the first 42 F-35s and any force allocations would only be "educated?" guesses.

I agree with his comments. :)

Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 09 Aug 2012, 01:39
by SpudmanWP
neptune wrote:LRIPs 5,6&7 would provide the 70+ a/c for Luke starting in 2014-16. These would include 13 a/c for Italy, Turkey, Norway and Australia. :)
Something is not right with those numbers. The entire USAF production run for F-35As for LRIP5-7 is only 62. As far as for foreign F-35s, I am not sure what commitments have been made.

I'll have to watch that i hour presser again to look for details.

Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 09 Aug 2012, 04:01
by neptune
SpudmanWP wrote:
neptune wrote:LRIPs 5,6&7 would provide the 70+ a/c for Luke starting in 2014-16. These would include 13 a/c for Italy, Turkey, Norway and Australia. :)
Something is not right with those numbers. The entire USAF production run for F-35As for LRIP5-7 is only 62. As far as for foreign F-35s, I am not sure what commitments have been made.

I'll have to watch that i hour presser again to look for details.


- I only reference the published contracts to LM by DOD.

http://www.defense.gov/contracts/contra ... actid=4816

- My latest F-35 contract is 0n 20Jun12 for LRIP7 N00019-12-C-0004 Mod. 1

- LRIPS 5,6,7 (Revised)
LRIP5 CTOL-USAF 21+1
LRIP6 CTOL-USAF 19, ITAF 4, RAAF 2
LRIP7 CTOL-USAF 19, ITAF 3, TUAF 2, NOAF 2
Totals: USAF 60, ITAF 7, RAAF 2, TUAF 2, NOAF 2
ALL 73

Please provide a reference where I may be able to improve the accuracy of the data.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training ba

Unread postPosted: 09 Aug 2012, 14:18
by SpudmanWP
Luke is for USAF only, not F-35B/C jets.

I went off the FY2013 budget docs for my totals.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training ba

Unread postPosted: 17 May 2013, 06:23
by Fox1
So what happens to Eglin and the 33rd once Luke becomes fully operational as a training location? Will it continue to serve as a second training unit? Will it become an operational F-35 base/unit? Or will the 33rd be deactivated and its assets transferred to Luke? I am a bit confused about how this is all suppose to play out.

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A trainin

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 08:12
by Corsair1963
Fox1 wrote:So what happens to Eglin and the 33rd once Luke becomes fully operational as a training location? Will it continue to serve as a second training unit? Will it become an operational F-35 base/unit? Or will the 33rd be deactivated and its assets transferred to Luke? I am a bit confused about how this is all suppose to play out.


That makes two of us...... :?:

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A tra

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 08:59
by spazsinbad
This excerpt may explain....

The F-35 Readies For Takeoff Gabe Starosta 2013 Apr AIR FORCE MAG'N
"...Pilots and maintainers from the Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and the F-35 program’s international partners all will go through initial training at Eglin before moving on to more advanced, service-specific training at other locations. For the Air Force, that site is Luke AFB, Ariz.

“There’s about a two-year process to stand up a training base, and within that two years, the large majority of it is all of the construction that has to be done,” Dunlop said. According to the current Air Combat Command beddown plans, the first F-35s will arrive at Luke in January 2014. “It’s not terribly far away,” Dunlop noted...."

http://www.airforcemag.com/MagazineArch ... akeoff.pdf (0.7Mb)

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selected for USAF F-35A

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 09:20
by Corsair1963
spazsinbad wrote:This excerpt may explain....

The F-35 Readies For Takeoff Gabe Starosta 2013 Apr AIR FORCE MAG'N
"...Pilots and maintainers from the Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and the F-35 program’s international partners all will go through initial training at Eglin before moving on to more advanced, service-specific training at other locations. For the Air Force, that site is Luke AFB, Ariz.

“There’s about a two-year process to stand up a training base, and within that two years, the large majority of it is all of the construction that has to be done,” Dunlop said. According to the current Air Combat Command beddown plans, the first F-35s will arrive at Luke in January 2014. “It’s not terribly far away,” Dunlop noted...."

http://www.airforcemag.com/MagazineArch ... akeoff.pdf (0.7Mb)


So, USN/USMC Pilots will leave Eglin and go where???

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selected for USAF F

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 09:32
by spazsinbad
To Advanced F-35B/C training bases. One on each coast at least for the USN probably (they are still figuring out EISs and squadrons at moment AFAIK). USMC bases have been identified but I don't recall those exact details at moment (why? because it has nothing to do with me chief). Other threads will have these details.

BEAUFORT is one USMC East Coast Training and Operational Squadron Base as per:

http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ing#255246
____________

Good info about USN doing it all initially in VFA-101 (because they lag behind the rest):

http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ing#254419

Will be the RAG: http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ing#254205
_________________

Selected Acquisition Report (SAR)
F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Aircraft (F-35) As of December 31, 2012

"...Over the course of 2013, the training wing at Eglin AFB will prepare pilots for operational test, operational implementation and the stand-up of future training sites at Luke AFB and MCAS Beaufort in 2014...."

http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ing#252755

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selected for US

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 09:55
by Corsair1963
spazsinbad wrote:To Advanced F-35B/C training bases. One on each coast at least for the USN probably (they are still figuring out EISs and squadrons at moment AFAIK). USMC bases have been identified but I don't recall those exact details at moment (why? because it has nothing to do with me chief). Other threads will have these details.

BEAUFORT is one USMC East Coast Training and Operational Squadron Base as per:

http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ing#255246
____________

Good info about USN doing it all initially in VFA-101 (because they lag behind the rest):

http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ing#254419

Will be the RAG: http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ing#254205
_________________

Selected Acquisition Report (SAR)
F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Aircraft (F-35) As of December 31, 2012

"...Over the course of 2013, the training wing at Eglin AFB will prepare pilots for operational test, operational implementation and the stand-up of future training sites at Luke AFB and MCAS Beaufort in 2014...."

http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ing#252755


Sorry, but thanks for the information.........

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selected fo

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 10:08
by spazsinbad
US Navy Program Guide 2013 13 Mar 2013
"...STOVL Initial Operational Capability (IOC) is planned in 2015, and CV IOC is planned in 2018. By the end of 2014, the Navy plans to procure 50 STOVL (with 34 delivered) and 26 CV aircraft (with 13 delivered). The first USMC STOVL transition of a legacy F/A-18 squadron took place in November 2012. The first Navy CV transition of a legacy F/A-18 squadron is scheduled for 2016...."

http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ing#250948
OR
http://www.navy.mil/navydata/policy/sea ... -npg13.pdf (9.7Mb)

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selected fo

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 11:16
by neptune
All,

USN basing structure for fighter/ attack squadrons is rather simple; Atlantic Squadron ships are supported by the CV Wings from NAS Oceana at Virginia Beach, Virginia. Fleet Replacement Squadron Aviators are trained by VFA-106 (Gladiators) F/A-18A,B,C,D,E,F and the F-35C, when future F-35C a/c are available as a squadron. Likewise, Pacific Squadrons are from NAS Lemoore near Fresno, California. FRS Aviators are trained by VFA-122 (Flying Eagles) F/A-18A,B,C,D,E,F and future F-35C. :)

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selected fo

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 11:42
by spazsinbad
I do not believe all of the above is correct. For example there is a toss up between Lemoore and the other place (El Centro?) about where F-35Cs should go. I do not really follow it all because (NMC=NotMeChief) it is still up in the air anyway and a long way off as noted - first CV transition for a legacy Hornet squadron in 2016.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selected fo

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 12:09
by spazsinbad
Navy selects Lemoore for F35 fighter base 14 Feb 2013 John Lindt
"The U.S. Navy has given a preliminary nod to basing the West Coast squadron of the next generation of stealth fighters at Naval Air Station, Lemoore, rather than El Centro near San Diego.

The F-35C has been developed as the Navy’s next strike-fighter aircraft as a replacement to FA-18C Hornet.

"Beginning in 2016, seven Navy Pacific Fleet FA-18 squadrons (70 total aircraft) currently based at NAS Lemoore would progressively transition to the new F-35C aircraft, with the transition to be complete by 2028," said a Navy news release. "In the 2017 timeframe, the West Coast F-35C training squadron (also known as Fleet Replacement Squadron, or FRS), consisting of approximately 30 aircraft, will be established to meet the requirements for training Navy pilots."

The Navy has set March 19 for a public meeting in Lemoore to discuss the findings of the two-year impact study. In January 2011, the Navy narrowed down its list of potential home bases from 134 military air facilities in the continental U.S. and found that Lemoore and El Centro “best meet Navy F-35C requirements.”

If the Navy had picked El Centro, locals feared the impact would hit Kings County hard.

A 2008 economic assessment study found the Lemoore base contributed $161 million in labor income annually to the local economy and has a total economic impact of just under $1 billion every year. The total population associated with the local base that straddles Kings and Fresno Counties is around 44,000, the study showed.

That will grow with the basing of the new fighters here. The Navy established the Kings County base in 1961 — the newest West Coast base. NAS Lemoore now hosts the Navy’s entire West Coast fighter/attack capability.

The Navy has released a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) and a Draft General Air Conformity Determination to evaluate the potential environmental effects that may result from home basing the Navy F-35C in Lemoore or El Centro.

"Although both alternatives are considered viable, the Navy has identified NAS Lemoore as the preferred alternative in this DEIS. No basing decisions have yet been made. Following public comment on the DEIS and the publication of the Final EIS, the Secretary of the Navy or his designee will publish a Record of Decision outlining the basing decision," according to the news release...."

http://www.thebusinessjournal.com/news/ ... ghter-base

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selecte

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 22:44
by neptune
[quote="spazsinbad"][b]Navy selects....quote]

Tut, tut.....:) The thing a Washington politician hates worst, is a plan. :D

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selecte

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 22:45
by neptune
OMG another Pop Corn :)

deleted

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke sel

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 22:48
by spazsinbad
PLAN? Sequestration was supposed to be the PLAN that would NEVER eventuate. Yep. Plan for the Plan. :devil:

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke sel

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 23:04
by spazsinbad
Additional F-35s coming to Luke AFB 16 Jul 2013 by Capt. Tristan Hinderliter 56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs
"7/16/2013 - LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. (AFNS) -- Air Force officials announced June 27 that Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., has been chosen as the location for 72 additional F-35A Lightning IIs, bringing the eventual total number of the fifth-generation fighters expected here to 144.

The Air Force's initial decision to establish an F-35 pilot training center here was announced in August 2012, following a three-year process that included an extensive environmental impact analysis....

...Aircraft are expected to begin arriving at Luke AFB in spring 2014, although exact timing will depend on production schedules. Construction on base to prepare for the aircraft is currently underway, with about $10 million of $57 million in projects already completed.

The 2012 Record of Decision cited several reasons why Luke AFB was the service's top choice for F-35A basing, including facility and ramp capacity, range access, weather and capacity for future growth....

...In addition to training U.S. pilots, Luke will also serve as an F-35A International Partner Training site."

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123356004

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke selecte

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 23:41
by neptune
spazsinbad wrote:US Navy Program Guide 2013 13 Mar 2013
"...STOVL Initial Operational Capability (IOC) is planned in 2015, and CV IOC is planned in 2018. By the end of 2014, the Navy plans to procure 50 STOVL (with 34 delivered) and 26 CV aircraft (with 13 delivered). The first USMC STOVL transition of a legacy F/A-18 squadron took place in November 2012. The first Navy CV transition of a legacy F/A-18 squadron is scheduled for 2016...."

http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ing#250948
OR
http://www.navy.mil/navydata/policy/sea ... -npg13.pdf (9.7Mb)


Please note the USN purchases all a/c for the USMC; thus...the Canoe Club is not going into the STOVL business (at this time) :lol:

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke sel

Unread postPosted: 24 Jul 2013, 21:31
by spazsinbad
Some parts of this article had to be NOT excerpted so it was the 'maintainer' bits - sorry about that so go to the URL to read it all. :D

Luke busy preparing for arrival of F-35s 24 Jul 2013 Paul Giblin (Phoenix) Arizona Republic
"With the arrival of the first wave of F-35 Lightning II fighter jets at Luke Air Force Base just months away, construction is under way on facilities where pilots will be trained and the planes will be maintained.

In all, Air Force executives have projected a $265 million, seven-year construction program specifically to accommodate the F-35 pilot-training program at the base in west Glendale.

The build-up will allow Luke to serve as the permanent training base for 144 of the single-engine stealth jets that military analysts say will be crucial to U.S. air-defense operations for the next 40 years.

The construction is scheduled to be completed in six major phases to coincide with the arrival of six squadrons of F-35s and the departure of six squadrons of older F-16 fighter jets that are relocating elsewhere....

...The first F-35 assigned to Luke is expected to arrive between January and March.

Luke’s first F-35 also is expected to be the 100th production F-35 manufactured by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., in Fort Worth, Texas, ticking off two important milestones for the F-35 program simultaneously, Fredrick said.

The rest of the planes in Luke’s first 24-plane squadron are expected to be delivered in groups of one to four throughout 2014, said Lockheed Martin spokesman Michael Rein. Each plane takes about two years to assemble and costs $65 million, he said....

...The classroom building eventually will be used by all six squadrons of pilots-in-training, but each of the six squadrons will get their own operations and maintenance buildings.

The Academic Training Center alone is budgeted for $54 million. The L-shaped building will house classrooms, an auditorium, administrative offices and perhaps most importantly, a dozen F-35 cockpit simulators.

The structure is scheduled to open with two simulators in August 2014; the remaining simulators will be added as additional squadrons arrive later, Fredrick said.

The simulators essentially are life-size, three-dimensional video games that allow student pilots to get time behind the controls of an F-35 without leaving the ground.

The simulators are especially valuable for teaching beginning skills, such as how to start the aircraft and how to handle preflight communications with ground crews and tower personnel without burning through hours and hours worth of jet fuel, Fredrick said.

In addition, instructors can prepare trainees for a variety of flight situations by programming an array of weather conditions, in-flight mechanical malfunctions and attacks by enemy combatants, all without the risk of losing lives or property.

“That’s exactly where you want young pilots to make their mistakes,” Fredrick said.

The $10 million Squadron Operations building will be the primary place where pilots prepare for flights. The building will feature a theater-style briefing room and space for pilots to program their planes’ computer systems before takeoff.

“You put 30 guys in the room who are going to fly at 10 o’clock today and you tell them what the weather is, what the restrictions are, and out they go,” Fredrick said.

The most sensitive equipment in the operations building will be housed in “the vault,” a densely constructed high-security section that’s designed to keep inquiring minds inquiring indefinitely, he said....

...Foreign military pilots also will train at Luke. The first F-35 squadron will be comprised of U.S. and Australian pilots. Italian, Turkish and Norwegian pilots are scheduled to join the mix in 2015."

http://www.airforcetimes.com/article/20 ... /307240038

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke sel

Unread postPosted: 25 Jul 2013, 03:24
by Corsair1963
So, foreign pilots go to Eglin and then Luke for more advance training???

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke sel

Unread postPosted: 25 Jul 2013, 03:28
by spazsinbad
Yep.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke sel

Unread postPosted: 25 Jul 2013, 19:11
by spazsinbad
First of two F-35 training facilities at Luke set to open mid-October By CAROLYN DRYER, FCP Visions EDITOR summer 2013
"Sequestration is not affecting construction of two F-35 training facilities at Luke Air Force Base. Although sequestration, which involved civilian personnel furloughs, resulted in cancellation of the spring open house and air show at the base, it has no effect on the F-35 program.

Lt. Col. Scott Fredrick, F-35 Division Chief in the F-35 integration office at Luke AFB, said the money was programmed a few years ago for construction of the facilities.

“So, all F-35 buildings are as programmed right now,” he said.

Fredrick said as he walks through the project, he sees “quite a few folks out there wearing hardhats,” and construction is right on schedule.

In fact, the first building, what is called Ops 1, the squadron building for pilots, should be up and operational in mid-October. Half of this structure is the building that housed the 62nd Fighter Squadron operations unit. It is 100 feet from the aircraft maintenance unit.

The other large project, the academic training center, is where pilots and maintainers will learn about aircraft, how to fly and fix it. Pilots who will be coming to this center are instructor pilots in various aircraft who will be transitioning to the F-35.

Fredrick said, "Ops #1, or Operations Building #1, will have 14 offices in the unclassified side and eight briefing rooms and another eight offices in the vault area for pilot briefings.

Ops 1 building is 22,000 square feet at a cost of $13 million.

The academic center, set to open in mid- to late-2014, is what Fredrick called “a huge building.” At a cost of $54 million, this 145,000-square-foot center will house 12 flight simulators, have multiple classrooms for academics and maintainers.

Contractor for design of both buildings is Burns & McDonnell. Army Corps of Engineers is monitoring construction, Fredrick said.

An F-16 instructor pilot himself, Fredrick said four other F-16 instructor pilots will be part of his office, “to make sure future F-35 pilots are up for success.”

Once the first building is completed, Fredrick said there would likely be notification to the public. And, citizens will also be notified when the first F-35A Lightning II touches down at its home training base on the Luke AFB runway. Fredrick said that landing is expected in January."

http://7d6e9e7658da9784db93-14213a79f70 ... r-2013.pdf (20Mb)

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke sel

Unread postPosted: 25 Jul 2013, 19:19
by spazsinbad
Construction began shortly after Luke selection for F-35 training By CAROLYN DRYER, FCP Visions EDITOR summer 2013
"...Webb praised the F-35’s capabilities to those who questioned its safety. He said it would replace the F16s and A10s now being flown by the military. In addition to U.S. pilots, Webb said there would be seven F-35A partners on site....

...In a written statement, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz said, “The Air Force is committed to training our U.S. and partner nation pilots on this fifth-generation fighter aircraft. Collaborative training on aircraft designed with stealth, maneuverability and integrated avionics will better prepare our combined forces to assume multi-role missions for the future of tactical aviation.”

http://7d6e9e7658da9784db93-14213a79f70 ... r-2013.pdf (20Mb)

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke sel

Unread postPosted: 26 Jul 2013, 01:24
by spazsinbad
Posted already on the forum but repeated here.... Note RAAF F-35A training to 2020 Stateside.

RAAA Convention - Oct 2012 AVM Osley

www.raaa.com.au/convention/2012/present ... y-RAAF.pdf (5.3Mb)

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Luke sel

Unread postPosted: 15 Sep 2013, 20:34
by neptune
http://www.airforcetimes.com/article/20 ... adron-fall

AF expects F-35 upgrade, 2nd training squadron in the fall

Sep. 13, 2013

By Brian Everstine

The Air Force’s F-35 program is expected to reach two major milestones this fall: the adoption of an advanced software and weapons system on the single-engine jet, and the beginning of major pilot training at the service’s second base for the fighter.

As of early September, 36 Air Force instructor pilots had finished training on the 14 conventional takeoff models that have been delivered to Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The base in August surpassed more than 2,000 combined sorties on Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy variants.

“We are safely operating the aircraft and continuing to increase operations because we have well-trained maintainers and well-trained pilots,” said Col. Stephen Jost, commander of the 33rd Operations Group at Eglin.

Also in late August, maintenance crews at Eglin performed the first weapons load verification on the Air Force variant, loading and unloading laser-guided and GPS-guided bombs and air-to-air missiles. The verification will help officials write the training manuals for loading weapons on F-35s.

“We’re refining technical data that’s already written,” said Tech. Sgt. Lance Murphy, a crew chief in the 58th Maintenance Squadron. “Going in the proper sequence ... walking through an actual, physical load. Engaging munitions in the aircraft and making sure that everything is good to go. Everything works as advertised.”

This will set the standards for operations of live munitions in operational testing, which will then be refined and used for F-35 maintainer training back at Eglin.

The training program at Eglin is expected to begin operating the next software upgrade of the aircraft beginning in November, Block 2B. The software upgrade will include support for internal weapons, such as the AIM-120C missile and GBU-32/31 and GBU-21 bombs, according to the Defense Department.

The upgrade to Block 2B is the “biggest milestone” that Eglin officials are working toward. Once training begins on the new software system, pilots will need to fly three additional training sorties, along with additional academic sessions and time in flight simulators.

The Air Force earlier this year announced that it expects initial operating capability of the F-35A in December 2016, meaning at least 12 pilots trained on the Block 2B upgrade. The final software suite for full combat capability, Block 3F, is expected in 2017.

In June, Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan, head of the Joint Fighter Program, said he is “less than confident” that the final 2017 capability will be met on time due to delays.

In addition to the software upgrade this fall, the Air Force is expected to stand up pilot training at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., in November. Last month, two instructor pilots and six crew chiefs transferred to the base to get the program started.

The squadron, the 61st Fighter Squadron, will start flying operations in the spring or early summer, Jost said. The Air Force expects 144 F-35s to eventually be assigned to the training center.

The base is currently the training center for F-16 pilots but will transfer its Falcons to Holloman Air Force Base, N.M., as the F-35s arrive.

The Air Force also is expected to stand up the F-35A maintenance depot at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, at the end of the year. Around that time, the service will announce its primary and preferred bases outside of the continental United States.

Last month, Gen. Herbert Carlisle, commander of Pacific Air Forces, said Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, is the front-runner for the assignment.

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 12 Mar 2014, 18:10
by neptune
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/index.html

First Luke Lightning II

The first F-35A Lightning II assigned to the 56th Fighter Wing at Luke AFB, Arizona, was delivered 10 March 2014. Col. Roderick Cregier, a US Air Force test pilot stationed at Edwards AFB, California, flew the aircraft from the Lockheed Martin facility in Fort Worth, Texas, to the base near Phoenix. The aircraft is the first of 144 that will eventually be assigned to Luke. Approximately sixteen aircraft are expected by the end of 2014, and the full contingent of aircraft, including those for international operators, should arrive incrementally over the next decade.

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 15 Mar 2014, 22:56
by neptune
First Luke F-35A Formally Delivered

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/f35_news ... em_id=1239

The first F-35A Lightning II assigned to the 56th Fighter Wing was formally delivered in ceremonies at Luke AFB, Arizona, on 14 March 2014. Several hundred dignitaries, local civic leaders, wing military and civilian personnel attended the ceremony. The F-35A (Air Force serial number 11-5030) is the first of 144 F-35As scheduled for delivery to the base in Phoenix. Today’s official welcoming ceremony marks the delivery of the thirty-fifth F-35 to the US Air Force and the stand-up of the eighth F-35 base. In 2015, Luke AFB will begin training U.S. Air Force pilots and eventually pilots from international air forces.

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2014, 00:14
by spazsinbad
From Inside Da Fence NewsTand:
Air Force, LM And Partners Hashing Out Details Of F-35 Training At Luke 12 Apr 2014
Government and industry Joint Strike Fighter program officials are stepping up preparations for the first-of-its-kind integrated and pooled pilot training system set to open at Luke Air Force Base, AZ, next year, with the base preparing to grow its F-35 fleet and welcome the first internationally owned jets to the desert...."

SOURCE: http://defensenewsstand.com/index.php?o ... J0aWNsZS8=

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 14 May 2014, 03:18
by neptune
http://www.af.mil/News/ArticleDisplay/t ... e-afb.aspx

F-35 flies first training sortie at Luke AFB


.. An F-35 Lightning II took to the sky over the West Valley here, May 5, in what was the first local training sortie for the fifth-generation fighter jet.

The jet is currently the only F-35 at Luke Air Force Base with additional jets expected to arrive within the next few weeks.

"....Lt. Col. Michael Ebner, the 61st Fighter Squadron commander. "Our first sortie this week represents a significant milestone in the F-35 program at Luke (AFB)."

... currently six F-35 pilots assigned to the 61st FS. ... eventually be approximately 30 pilots by the time the squadron is up to full capacity.

The 61st FS coordinates .. to fly the jet when it is available -- which, as of this week, is approximately 1-2 times per day. That number could increase to 2-4 sorties a day by next month, when more jets are expected at Luke AFB, Ebner said.

Construction, ... for the arrival of additional F-35s.
The Academic Training Center, which will house classrooms and 12 F-35 simulators, is under construction to be completed in late September.

Construction is also underway on the combined Operations/AMU building for the second F-35 squadron.

Other projects, ..
third Operations/AMU building,
a maintainer training facility and
a four-bay F-35 hangar are also in planning stages.

:)

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 06 Aug 2014, 08:09
by spazsinbad
Fleet takes shape with arrival of fifth F-35 at Luke
05 Aug 2014 Paul Giblin, The Republic | azcentral.com

"F-35 pilot Lt. Col. Michael "Jeb" Ebner made a low, slow circle above Luke Air Force Base on Tuesday morning, allowing the new plane's rumble to announce its arrival to anyone and everyone within earshot.

Minutes later, Ebner landed the $131.9 million stealth jet to cheers and high-fives by ground crew members who will service and maintain the military's most sophisticated and expensive jet.

The new aircraft, bearing the tail number LF 5035, brings the number of F-35 Lightning IIs at Luke to five. Two other F-35s arrived at the base in Glendale last week.

Five down; 139 to go...."

Source: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/loc ... /13657545/

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 14 Oct 2014, 07:27
by spazsinbad
All about LUKE and what they'll do - for YOU!
Luke opens training center for F-35 pilots
13 Oct 2014 Paul Giblin

"Select fighter jet pilots will transition from a gleaming new building at Luke Air Force Base in Glendale to some of the grittiest locations on Earth, according Air Force Gen. Robin Rand, who visited the base to mark the completion of the $47 million Academic Training Center building late last week.

The building essentially is the Air Force's F-35 flight school.

U.S. and foreign military pilots are expected train side by side at the building for decades to come. Air Force brass, elected officials, aerospace- industry executives, current and future pilots and support personnel previewed the building Thursday during an outdoor ceremony under clear skies....

...Inside, there are classrooms, auditoriums, administration space and bays for 12 computerized flight simulators. It's outfitted with infrastructure to accommodate communication systems. Classified high-tech training equipment will be installed later.

Two flight simulators are scheduled to be delivered within weeks and two more during the summer of 2015, said Art Cameron, a Lockheed Martin executive who serves as the company's site coordinator at Luke. The remaining eight simulators will come online in years to come....

...Q: Why do F-35 pilot trainees need such a sophisticated building?

A: They need training equipment equal to the planes they'll fly. The F-35 is the most advanced fighter plane ever built. It is projected to replace a variety of older planes and to serve as the mainstay of the U.S. air defense system for decades.

It combines superior acceleration, agility and maneuverability with unprecedented and integrated sensor, targeting and communications systems, according to the Pentagon.

The key component of the training center is that it will house flight simulators that trainees will use before climbing into cockpits of actual F-35s. The simulators look, feel and react like fighter jets. Trainees will be able contend with simulated weather conditions, equipment failures and enemy attacks without ever leaving the ground.

"Those are critical for us to be prepared," said Rand, a four-star general. "This is a single-seat airplane, a single-engine airplane. Their first ride in this airplane will be by themselves, so we're going to be wringing out everyone here in this building before they go out and fly."

Q: When is the first class of trainees expected to begin?

A: Cameron, the Lockheed Martin exec, assured Air Force officials that the simulators and related equipment will be installed, checked out and ready to go for a full class by May 4, 2015.

The first wave of F-35 trainees will be drawn from experienced pilots already certified on F-15s, F-16s and A-10s, said Lt. Col. Matthew "Rip" Hayden, who will oversee operations in the building.

Those pilots will need about three months to become certified on the F-35.

Starting around 2016, new pilots will train on the F-35. Their training period will take longer. In addition, the jet is still undergoing testing. Once its full portfolio of capabilities is determined, the training program will be expanded accordingly, Hayden said...."

Source: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/loc ... /17236851/

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 01 Sep 2015, 05:17
by spazsinbad
The link on the F-35 LM PR page does not work so probably only part of the article is available at URL below:
Training the World’s Greatest F-35 Fighter Pilots
31 Aug 2015 Luke AFB

"...Training Process
So what does it look like to train the world’s greatest F-35 fighter pilots?

This year, Luke has a goal to train 45 F-35 pilots, all of whom are experienced fighter pilots and will transition to the F-35 after a rigorous training program that lasts about 90 days. Training for new fighter pilots (those who are trained pilots, but new to fighter jets) is scheduled to begin next year and will be closer to nine months in duration.

The training for experienced fighter pilots starts with academic instruction before digital training using a pilot training aid, which is similar to a desktop simulator with a joystick and a throttle. After a few weeks of digital training, pilots proceed to the all-encompassing 360-degree full mission simulator. Finally, pilots take to the jet and complete various training exercises.

Lt. Col. Sean “Hooligan” Holahan, who flew F-16s for more than 15 years, is a member of the first class of pilots going through the training program at Luke.

“I think it’s been fantastic,” he said of his training experience. “If I didn’t know any better, I wouldn’t know I was in the first class—things are running that smoothly.”"

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/trainin ... ter-pilots

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 22 Oct 2015, 18:17
by spazsinbad
Lots of details for various countries training at LUKE AFB so posted all of it here. UPDATED hence two dates for article. As an aside I note LUKE has been using 'll' instead of 'II' for 'Lightning II' - at least they are not using 'Lightening ll'. :mrgreen:
F-35 mission continues to evolve [20 Oct 2015]
10 & 20 Oct 2015 Staff Sgt. Staci Miller; 56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

"10/10/2015 - LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. -- As the world's premiere F-35 training base, Luke Air Force Base is constantly growing and improving to provide state-of-the-art training for F-35 Lightning II pilots and maintainers.

The F-35 is an aircraft with an international footprint unlike any other in history. Currently, Luke has two F-35 squadrons but will eventually be home to six squadrons, all housing partner nations.

The 61st Fighter Squadron became fully operational in June and the 62nd Fighter Squadron received its first primarily assigned aircraft in August.

"The 61st FS is up, running and fully operational," said Lt. Col. David Lercher, 56th Fighter Wing F-35 division chief. "In order to be considered fully operational the squadron must have 24 primarily assigned aircraft."

At the moment, the 61st FS is home to two Australian jets and will receive many more. "The Australians will have 12 jets here by the middle of 2019," Lercher said.

The 62nd FS is on track to have eight F-35s by the end of 2015 and be fully operational by the end of 2017. They will be home to Norwegian and Italian jets.

"The two Norwegian jets are expected to arrive before the end of the year," Lercher said. "We should expect the first Italian jets to arrive this spring. Eventually, the 62nd FS will have seven Norwegian jets and five Italian jets."

Construction on the 63rd Fighter Squadron is in the works and should be open by the end of 2016.

"The 63rd should get their first airplane by March of 2017," Lercher said. "Turkey will eventually flow into the squadron with their first aircraft arriving mid-2018."

Luke should expect the fourth squadron, which includes the Netherlands and Denmark, early 2019. The fifth squadron will be home to Canada and also open in 2019. The sixth, and final, squadron will open in 2022.


"Luke will eventually be home to seven partner nation pilots and aircraft and house a total of 144 F-35s," Lercher said.

As advanced as the F-35 is, it still doesn't fly itself.

The F-35 Lightning II Academic Training Center will welcome two Italian student pilots, two Norwegian student pilots and a U.S. Marine Corps student pilot Sept. 21. The Marine is here as part of an inter-service pilot exchange program. The goal of the program is to gain a better understanding and appreciation of each service's capabilities and limitations.

A Norwegian student pilot will be the first at Luke to be issued the Generation 3 Helmet-Mounted Display System. Eventually all F-35 pilots will transition to the new helmet. The helmet will be created and issued at the new Luke Pilot Fit Facility.

The PFF opened in March and is operated by Lockheed Martin. All Luke F-35 student pilots receive gear from the PFF and that gear is then used indefinitely, regardless of the service or country the pilot belongs to.

"All the pilots who are flying the F-35 are all wearing the exact same gear," said Keith Geltz, Survitec Group senior field engineer. "The only difference is the number of items each service or country requests."

Some changes are obvious and involve bright orange construction, while other changes are more behind the scenes. Recently the first nine F-35s to arrive at Luke were updated with software to match the more recent aircraft.

"The update was done to give the first aircraft essentially the same capabilities as the rest of the newer jets," said Leslie Flores, Lockheed Martin field support engineer.

Overall, Luke, just like the aircraft it supports, will continue to change.

"The F-35 is a new weapons system, so it's constantly evolving and improving," Lercher said. "I've been working this program for over two years and things are always changing for the better."

Source: http://www.luke.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123461321

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 11 Nov 2015, 02:41
by spazsinbad
Difficult to know where to put this one - someone is hanging out for a video.... anyhoo it'll turn up.
Norway’s First F-35 Sortie, Jets Arrive on Air Force’s Birthday
10 Nov 2015 Senior Airman Grace Lee; 56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

"11/10/2015 - LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Arizona -- The first two Norwegian F-35s arrived today at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. Shortly after, a Norwegian pilot flew the F-35 Lightning II for the first time today, in conjunction with the Royal Norwegian air force's birthday....

...Luke currently has 32 F-35s and by 2024, Luke is scheduled to have six fighter squadrons and 144 F-35s. Norway will have seven F-35s stationed at Luke."

"A formation of U.S. and Norwegian F-35 Lightning II soar over Luke Air Force Base, Arizona November 10, 2015. Today was the scheduled arrival of two F-35s for the Royal Norwegian air force while simultaneously celebrating the Norwegian air force’s birthday. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Marcy Copeland)" 7 x PHOTOs at URL below this one. http://www.luke.af.mil/shared/media/pho ... 01-325.JPG (2Mb)

"The second Norwegian F-35 Lightning II lands at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, November 10, 2015. The jet marks the scheduled arrival of the first of two F-35s for the Royal Norwegian air force making Norway the newest partner in the international F-35 joint-partnership program here at Luke. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Marcy Copeland) "http://www.luke.af.mil/shared/media/photodb/photos/2015/11/151110-F-LC301-463.JPG (2Mb)


Source: http://www.luke.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123463115

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 13 Nov 2015, 01:18
by Jon
Hi

Here are two photos of the same F-35 taken a few months apart. appears to me that 13-5065 has moved from 61st FS to 62nd FS. Or was painted for the 61st FS and then assigned to the 62nd FS just before deliver?

USAF F-35A #13-5065 from the 62nd FS on final for Luke AFB on November 10th, 2015. [Photo by Chris Kennedy]


USAF F-35A #13-5065, destined for the 61st FS at Luke AFB, is spotted during a test flight at NAS Fort Worth on July 24th, 2015. [Photo by Keith Snyder]

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 13 Nov 2015, 23:20
by spazsinbad
How the Military Prepares Airmen for Battle
Whenever WP BrandStudio/LM PR

"...Constructive training environments like the F-35 training system merge elements of the physical real world with virtual computer-generated imagery for greater situational awareness.

Today’s improved flight simulators are more crucial than ever to train pilots and help keep their skills fresh. F-35 pilots complete 45-55 percent of their training flights in a full mission simulator, compared to a past figure of 40 percent in F-16 simulators. Not all fighter pilots will experience combat during their careers, but these airborne warriors still must be trained and ready to anticipate any battle scenario.

According to Billie Flynn, a Lockheed Martin F-35 test pilot, pilots spend about as much time in these simulators as in the actual aircraft.

The F-35 simulator duplicates the jet’s cockpit and handling qualities, allowing pilots to practice techniques like aerial refueling and missile employment. The F-35 simulator is key to helping pilots “quickly transition into the jet and begin their flying operations,” said Mike Luntz, F-35 training system director.

In fact, simulation is more effective than flying the aircraft in some training scenarios since the F-35’s capabilities are so powerful. Some combat scenarios would be difficult and expensive to set up for live flying, given the range space available and the numerous aircraft needed to act like ‘bad guys.’

“In the simulator, we turn on all of the bells and whistles to provide pilots with the range of experience they need to maximize the advanced capabilities of the F-35,” Luntz said.

Augmented reality technology is also being used across the spectrum of military operations. Lockheed Martin’s Human Immersive Lab helped train maintainers who will work on the F-35 – avoiding over $100 million in additional costs by using immersive engineering and digital mockups in the early design and development stages of the F-35 program. And Skunk Works’ virtual prototyping group has created a “deployable” large format display on wheels designed specifically for military virtual reality applications...."

Source: http://lockheedmartin.com/us/news/featu ... stF35.html

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 02:51
by spazsinbad
:devil: SUCK IT UP CANADA - YOU ARE EXPECTED TO :mrgreen: TRAIN (CHOO CHOOS?) :mrgreen: HERE - "POSSIBLY"! :doh:
F-35 training at Luke AFB gathers pace with 34 jets
13 Jan 2016 James Drew

"The multinational pilot training centre at Luke AFB in Arizona has grown exponentially since receiving its first Lockheed Martin F-35 in March 2014, and that pace won’t let up in 2016 as the 56th Fighter Wing zips past 3,000 Lightning II sorties.

In an interview today, wing commander Brig Gen Scott Pleus says Luke AFB now counts 34 pooled fifth-generation F-35As in American, Australian and Norwegian livery. The wing also continues to produce 95% of the US air force’s F-16 pilots from the base in Phoenix and its two satellite squadrons at Holloman AFB in New Mexico.

As the world’s premier conventional F-35 training base, Luke is currently training pilots and instructors for the USA, Australia, Norway, Italy – and soon F-35 foreign military sales customers Japan and Israel. Other programme partners – the Netherlands, Turkey and possibly Denmark and Canada – will also join the pooling arrangement, where they share aircraft and instructors.

Luke will grow to six F-35 training squadrons, and will soon reactivate its third unit – the 63rd Fighter Squadron, which trained F-16C/D pilots until it disbanded in 2009.

As its former commander, Pleus is looking forward to the 63rd's return, and he expects one squadron to covert to F-35 each year after that. Eventually, Luke will house 144 jets and 12 full-mission simulators....

...FMS customers including South Korea will fly their own jets, and have instructors assigned to their units. The first Israeli F-35I “Adir” is in final assembly, but flight training is being done in Israel.

“Right now, Israel is just doing academic and simulator training only. Japan will bring their own aircraft here, and will go through the academics, the simulators and we will have instructor pilots assigned to them.”

One of the lingering curses of concurrent development and fielding of the F-35 is that the 34 aircraft based at Luke are in various stages of upgrade, and will be continuously improved as new hardware and software modifications become available. That means maintainers are working overtime to bring the aircraft and simulators up the latest configuration.

That should smooth out as Lockheed enters full-rate production in the standardised Block 3F and Block 4 configurations in 2017 and beyond.

Until recently, Luke has been growing its pilot instructor base, but in April students will adopt a new syllabus focused on full combat training, and eventually weapons employment.

That new focus comes as Hill AFB in Utah stands up its first combat-coded F-35 squadron for IOC in August, and as Luke prepares to receive its first undergraduate pilots in November.

Those basic course, or “B-course,” pilots will have limited exposure to combat jets, having operated the T-6, T-38 and AT-38 prior to taking control of a $100 million F-35. Until then, pilots have come across from older airframes like the A-10, F-16 and F-15...."

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... ts-420797/

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 06 Feb 2016, 01:03
by spazsinbad
Luke pilot flies 500th hour in F-35
04 Feb 2016 Airman 1st Class Ridge Shan, 56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

"LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. (AFNS) -- A 61st Fighter Squadron pilot made history Feb. 2 as the first Luke Air Force Base pilot to achieve 500 flight hours in an F-35 Lightning II.

Lt. Col. Matthew Hayden, also the 56th Fighter Wing chief of safety, achieved this milestone flying his 270th sortie, a routine training mission....

...“The (61st FS) Top Dogs are incredibly lucky to have an F-35 instructor pilot who has been with the program since the beginning flying with us on a daily basis,” said Lt. Col. Aaron Jelinek, the 61st FS director of operations. “Lt. Col. Hayden's depth of knowledge when it comes to both F-35 systems and tactics add incredible value to squadron operations each and every day.”...

...“When our most experienced instructor pilot only has 500 hours in the plane, it goes to show the F-35 program is still young,” Jelinek said. “However, it also shows that we are reaching a point where operations are normalizing, and we are able to transition our syllabus from training initial cadre to training less experienced fighter pilots.”

Luke Airmen are among the first in a global generation of pilots to fly the F-35, and will continue to reach milestones such as this for the duration of the aircraft’s development.

“The fabulous thing about this is that there are a lot of guys who are right behind me, who are really close to getting the same kind of milestone in their flying experience,” Hayden said.

As today’s pilots become more experienced with the F-35 platform, they position themselves to become the instructors and mentors of future generations of pilots flying more advanced versions of the fighter jet as they are developed and produced.

“As we build our cadre of instructors here, they’ll be able to look back at their experience flying the airplane and have credibility and a solid background that they can use to teach their students,” Hayden said."

Source: http://www.af.mil/News/ArticleDisplay/t ... -f-35.aspx

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 14 Feb 2016, 05:00
by spazsinbad
SIMULATED LIGHTNING [5 page PDF of article attached]
The capabilities of Lockheed Martin’s F-35 and the threats it may face in combat are so advanced that th only place to fully prepare pilots is on the ground
16 Feb 2016 JAMES DREW LUKE AFB

"...Not only does the F-35’s full-mission simulator provide greater fidelity than previous generations of fighter trainers, it also compensates for the fact it is too expensive to equip every test and training range with the full complement of threats it would be likely to go up against. The only places an F-35 can truly wreak havoc with every kinetic and non-kinetic tool in its beyond-visual-range arsenal will be in the virtual simulator – or in combat.

It is not just belt-tightening that has Lightning II pilots completing 45% to 55% of their initial qualification flights in the simulator – it is the next-generation fidelity and risk-free exposure to the full range of failures or threats, particularly on the electromagnetic spectrum.

Each simulator carries the most recent software load, or operational flight programme, so it can most accurately replicate the capabilities and handling qualities of the aircraft as it is concurrently developed, tested and fielded through various block upgrades.

The simulators arrive in groups of two or four, and will all eventually be plugged into the vast network of US and allied training simulators at air bases and training centres around the world, bringing F-35s into the same virtual environment as Lockheed F-16s, Boeing F-15s, C-17s and others.

According to one air force official, the “Holy Grail” of simulator training will come with the introduction of live, virtual and constructive networking between training devices and aircraft, with blue forces going against aggressors at every level for full-spectrum combat training....

'''Lockheed’s mission systems and training division has contracts for 87 full-mission simulators plus two options, out of 239 that will be required under the current programme plan. It also has orders for 31 maintenance trainers.

Lockheed will install full-mission simulators at every major F-35 operating location domestically and abroad, and seven sites have already been established across the USA....

...As of 19 January [2016], 24 simulators had been delivered to seven locations, with 63 more on contract through the ninth low-rate initial production lot. For Lightning II maintainer training, the company has delivered 13 aircraft systems maintenance and part-task trainers, with 18 more on order....

...It takes about a year to establish a training centre. For instance, Lockheed will begin installing simulators at Israel’s Nevatim air base in 2017 ahead of F-35I IOC later that year. In 2018, pilot and maintenance training systems will be installed in Japan, Norway, the UK and Australia.

“We’ll be installing the equipment in 2018, to start training activities in 2019,” says Luntz.

FULL-MISSION SIMULATION
To date, there are 251 qualified F-35 pilots, including 15 internationals. On the maintainer side, 2,445 personnel have been qualified to sustain and repair the aircraft, including 2,217 from the US military services and 228 from international forces. As an original programme partner, the UK has made the most headway, with four pilots and 135 maintainers trained and ready....

...“There is more training being done in the simulators than any other legacy aircraft,” says Luntz. “More than 50% of the initial qualification flights actually take place in the simulator.”

Former F-16 pilot and commander of the 56th Fighter Wing at Luke AFB, Brig Gen Scott Pleus, says there’s “nothing lost” by shifting from legacy “full-motion” simulators to the new “full-mission” simulator, except the jacks and hydraulic actuators. It allows for improved 360° visual displays that incorporate the helmet-mounted display and cueing system and distributed aperture system cameras that give the F-35 unparalleled spherical situational awareness.

“It’s by far the most accurate fighter simulator I’ve seen in my career,” says Pleus. “We will rely even more heavily on simulator usage on F-35 because of the level of classification the simulators can give. We
won’t have a lot of capability to do that in live-fly training....

...FOUR-SHIP TACTICS
When the F-35 goes to war, it won’t go alone. As explained by USAF vice chief of staff Gen David Goldfein in a recent televised interview:
“Unlike the [Lockheed] F-117, where I would close off the world, the F-35 opens up into the network. It’s a networked approach to how we do [the] warfare of the future.”


This joint approach to warfare is replicated in the simulators, starting with basic “fourship” F-35 training at the unit level, and scaling up as those simulators are connected to live and virtual training networks...."

Pilots Qualified: As of 4 January 2016
■ USAF: 147
■ USMC: 60
■ USN: 29
■ UK: 4
■ The Netherlands: 4
■ Australia: 3
■ Italy: 2
■ Norway: 2
Total: 251

Maintainers Qualified: As of 4 January 2016
■ USMC: 924
■ USAF: 852
■ USN: 441
■ UK: 135
■ The Netherlands: 52
■ Norway: 19
■ Italy: 16
■ Australia: 6
Total: 2,445


Source: Flight International Magazine 16-22 February 2016

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 27 Aug 2016, 19:34
by spazsinbad
Luke receives Air Force’s 100th F-35 on heels of IOC announcement, unit activation
27 Aug 2016 Tech. Sgt. Timothy Boyer, 56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

"LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. (AFNS) -- The F-35 Lightning II program took another huge step forward Aug. 26 when the Air Force’s 100th F-35, designated AF-100, arrived here following the recent announcement of the fifth-generation jet fighter’s initial operational capability....

...Luke Air Force Base received its first F-35 in March 2014 and developed the training and tactics for the program. The fleet has since grown to more than 40 F-35s at the base, including those of partner nations such as Australia and Norway. The base also recently activated its third F-35 unit -- the 63rd Fighter Squadron.

“A lot of people put the blood, sweat and tears into making sure we could have an agreement with the community that would allow us to train and continue to produce the future of airpower,” Leonard said. “Standing up the third squadron marks the halfway point as we grow up to six squadrons. It also comes with the heritage of the 63rd, which is incredible, and to be able to see that take new form in the shape of a Lightning aircraft is phenomenal.”...

...With the reception of the 100th F-35, Luke AFB is quickly transitioning to the only active-duty Air Force F-35 training base, providing the world’s greatest F-35 fighter pilots to the new operational squadrons and eventually to combat...."

PHOTO: http://media.defense.gov/2016/Aug/26/20 ... 01-075.JPG (233Kb) "The Air Force’s 100th F-35 Lightning II lands at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., Aug. 26, 2016. The aircraft, designated AF-100, marks a milestone for the F-35 program as it continues to grow, progress and support initial operational capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Marcy Copeland)"


Source: http://www.af.mil/News/ArticleDisplay/t ... ation.aspx [quote]

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 28 Aug 2016, 00:15
by neptune
spazsinbad wrote:
Luke receives Air Force’s 100th F-35 on heels of IOC announcement, unit activation
27 Aug 2016 Tech. Sgt. Timothy Boyer, 56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

"LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. (AFNS) -- The F-35 Lightning II program took another huge step forward Aug. 26 when the Air Force’s 100th F-35, designated AF-100, arrived here following the recent announcement of the fifth-generation jet fighter’s initial operational capability....

...Luke Air Force Base received its first F-35 in March 2014 and developed the training and tactics for the program. The fleet has since grown to more than 40 F-35s at the base, including those of partner nations such as Australia and Norway. The base also recently activated its third F-35 unit -- the 63rd Fighter Squadron....]


..F-35A Lightning II Completes First Trans-Atlantic Crossing -February 08, 2016
AL-1 will join the F-35 international pilot training fleet at Luke Air Force Base in May.

..F-35: Second Flight from Cameri to the USA -May 19, 2016
Two Italian Air Force F35A Lightning II have taken off today from Cameri Air Base. After a stop-over in Lajes (Azores) they will land at Luke AFB, Arizona ... (ps? anyone know what the a/c number of these two; AL-2/3??)
:)

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 28 Aug 2016, 01:25
by yeswepromise
spazsinbad wrote:
Luke receives Air Force’s 100th F-35 on heels of IOC announcement, unit activation
27 Aug 2016 Tech. Sgt. Timothy Boyer, 56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

"LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. (AFNS) -- The F-35 Lightning II program took another huge step forward Aug. 26 when the Air Force’s 100th F-35, designated AF-100, arrived here following the recent announcement of the fifth-generation jet fighter’s initial operational capability....


Oh yeah!? Does that account for AF-5? :lmao:

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 29 Aug 2016, 05:52
by spazsinbad
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... uadron.png
62d_Fighter_Squadron.png
"The U.S. Air Force’s 100th F-35, designated AF-100, arrived at Luke Air Force Base Aug. 26 and will be assigned to the 62nd Fighter Squadron. U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Luther Mitchell Jr." http://alert5.com/wp-content/uploads/20 ... 0-0301.jpg

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2017, 02:29
by spazsinbad
SomeFink is rong in the telling of this tail I wrekon and it ain't da spelun.... mebbee it is just april foolishness....?
Luke AFB’s 10,000th F-35 Sortie
01 Apr 2017 Luke AFB, 56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

"Photo Caption: Lt. Col. Robert Miller, 62nd Fighter Squadron pilot, lands the 10,000th F-35 Lightning II training sortie at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz March 29, 2017. The 5,000th training sortie was flown in May 2015 marking more than 5,000 sorties flown in 10 months as Luke continues to build the future of air power. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexander Cook)" https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... __main.jpg (30Kb)

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/luke-af ... -35-sortie

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2017, 06:18
by Corsair1963
FS-62-1106-A.jpg

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 06 May 2017, 02:12
by spazsinbad
Top of this page first paragraph hints at NINE months duration for newbie newbies to F-35 training - so anyways....
What It’s Like Training Brand-New Air Force Pilots on the F-35A
04 May 2017 Oriana Pawlyk

"The Air Force is training its youngest pilots on its newest and most combat-capable aircraft: the F-35A Joint Strike Fighter.

Six airmen, ranging from first to second lieutenants, are going through the F-35 “B-Course,” or the service’s basic flight class, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. The only platform these pilots have known in their brief Air Force careers is the Lightning II.

“It’s helpful to have a new student with no previous background, so they’re a fresh plate, a brand-new sponge … ready to absorb all the tactics that we’re going to teach them because it’s the future,” said Capt. Ian Osterreicher, F-35 B-Course flight commander at the 61st Fighter Squadron.

“Our goal is to get them through the eight-month training course, combat ready so they can … go to an operational squadron,” Osterreicher said in a recent interview with Military.com....

...After a year of routine training, the new pilots arrived at Luke in December to begin basic systems, simulation and weapons training to familiarize themselves with the avionics. In February, the students took to the skies for the first time.

During the 141-day training course, the pilots will rack up 300 hours of academics; 46 simulator exercises, amounting to 80 hours; and 48 flights in the F-35, also roughly 80 hours, Osterreicher said....

...The 62nd Fighter Squadron, the 61st’s sister squadron, began training a six-person class this week, officials at Luke said. The 61st will get its next batch of airmen in September.

Within five years, the squadrons hope to produce about 60 pilots between them, Osterreicher said.

The last few weeks of training have focused on tactical air intercepts, combat maneuvering and dogfighting — “more into the challenging tactical intercepts while incorporating the mission systems,” he said.

Osterreicher said that there’s not a heavy emphasis on dogfighting, but if the F-35 were ever in that scenario, “we have to be able to give them the skill-set to survive.”

Toward the end of the course, pilots get into “beyond visual range” training — something they could also encounter in an anti-access aerial denial, or A2AD, environment.

“They’ll start working on air-to-ground support, air interdiction and suppression of enemy air defense, which is really the highlight of the course,” he said, including air-to-air training with F-16 Fighting Falcons.

After completing the course, the plan is for the pilots — so far there haven’t been any female students — to report to Hill AFB before another operational squadron is stood up.

One challenge, Osterreicher said, has been the students’ lack of previous experience on other aircraft, so they’re learning “as they go.” Still, it’s manageable. It’s been a step-by-step approach every day, he said.

“Still fly the F-35 safely, but execute the missions that we’re trying to do — that’s been the biggest challenge,” he said.

Safety concerns are the primary reason a pilot might be disqualified from the course, he said.

For example, if “they couldn’t take off or land properly, not safe — their landings were just too hard,” Osterreicher said. Or if a pilot repeatedly burst the “training bubble,” which mandates pilots cannot get within 1,000 feet of another training aircraft. “You’re getting too close to the instructor, so you’re breaking a training rule.”

The student pilots have until their August graduation to prove their worth...."

Source: https://www.defensetech.org/2017/05/04/ ... the-f-35a/

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 07 Aug 2017, 00:31
by zerion
Luke graduates first F-35A initial qualification course

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. -- Class 17-ABL from the 61st Fighter Squadron made history graduating the first F-35A Lightning II initial qualification course Aug. 5. After eight months of tremendous teamwork from across the 56th Fighter Wing, Team Luke produced six F-35A fighter pilots ready for the combat Air Force.

During the ceremony, Lt. Gen. Darryl Roberson, Air Education and Training Command commander, spoke to the graduates.

“This is a history making moment,” said Roberson. “From my perspective there will be people 20 to 30 years from now who will remember that you were in the first [F-35A Lightning II initial qualification course]. It is really important for you to know that the F-35 is the future.”

During the course, Lockheed Martin instructor pilots taught the academic phase of training consisting of more than 156 events totaling 308 hours. Academics focuses on pilots learning the basic aircraft systems, emergency procedures, local area procedures, mission systems, weapons and tactical employment.

Prior to the first flight in the Lightning II, each student completes 16 simulator events and over the course of the program 46 simulator events occur. The F-35 simulator provides a highly realistic and immersive experience that prepares each pilot for their first sortie in an aircraft.

“Each student flew at least 48 sorties totaling 77 hours,” said Lt. Col. Rhett Hierlmeier, 61st FS commander. “Starting with the basics of taking off and landing, continuing across the full spectrum mission sets, and culminating in our Capstone phase of high-end employment. Along the way, our students dropped inert and live laser-guided GBU-12s, refueled from a KC-135 day and night, and flew low-altitude step-down training.”

During the graduation, the six pilots were presented several awards including the Academic Award, presented to 1st Lt. Brett Burnside. The Academic Award is presented to the student with the highest average test score over five tests taken throughout the course.

“For B-Course graduates, you are going to be the one that everyone turns to,” said Roberson. “It won’t be long for the B-Course group to turn to you to find the answers about that airplane. You need to be the ones that step up and know the answers on a higher level. Don’t be shy, we need you to push the envelope on how to fly the F-35. We are teaching you everything we know about the F-35, you’re going to take us to another level.”

These six pilots will go down in history having completed the first eight-month F-35A Lighting II initial qualification course.

“Congratulations 17-ABL,” said Hierlmeier. “I salute you for your hard work and commitment to excellence. You have earned the title ‘F-35 fighter pilot,’ and you make us proud.” You represent the hard work of the 56th Fighter Wing and Team Luke. Continue to learn and sharpen your sword, for there will likely be a day, sooner rather than later, when you will be tested. As you move on to your operational assignments remember that you wear our brand. Stay humble, fly, fight and win! Bring it on!”

http://www.luke.af.mil/News/Article-Dis ... on-course/

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 18 Aug 2017, 00:59
by zerion
Long article

Peeking into the Air Force's F-35 Training Course

1st Lt. Brett Burnside soared at Mach 1.4 -- 1,075 miles per hour -- supersonic in the dead of night over the desert, inverted over his wingman.

As a brand-new pilot, such a feat gave Burnside a burst of adrenaline. What's more, he was pulling the move in the centerpiece of Air Force's future fleet: the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

"You can practice and practice and practice as much as you want, but when it comes to flying the jet, whether it's in a train or combat scenario, you have to have the ability to execute," Burnside told Military.com in a recent interview.

"Not to say that all of us are perfect, because we are not by any means perfect at all times," he said. "We're always going to have minor errors here and there, but your goal is to limit the impact and frequency of errors every time you go out there."

Burnside, who's racked up roughly 90 flight hours, and five other F-35A pilots graduated the service's eight-month "B-course," or basic flight class, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, on Aug. 5. They were a part of the 61st Fighter Squadron.

The only platform these pilots have known in their brief Air Force careers is the Lightning II.

While acknowledging that he's low on the totem pole in terms of what his role has been thus far, Burnside said F-35 pilots must all be the best of the best...

http://www.military.com/daily-news/2017 ... mobile.amp


Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 21 Sep 2017, 03:00
by spazsinbad

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 03 May 2018, 15:41
by spazsinbad
6 page PDF 'Building the future of AIR POWER' about aircraft at Luke AFB from COMBAT AIRCRAFT June 2018 Vol.19 No.6.

Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 12 Jul 2018, 14:26
by doge
:salute:
http://www.luke.af.mil/News/Article-Dis ... intenance/
Lightning Integrated Technicians reinvent F-35 maintenance
By Airman 1st Class Caroline Burnett and Senior Airman Ridge Shan, 56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs / Published July 11, 2018
LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. --

As part of an effort to increase F-35A Lightning II maintenance effectiveness and efficiency at Luke Air Force Base, the 62nd Aircraft Maintenance Unit created a team of unified maintenance Air Force specialties called Lightning Integrated Technicians.

Maintainers from independent career fields, including crew chiefs, avionics technicians, weapons technicians, and low-observable technicians, who all operate separately in traditional maintenance, were integrated into a single coordinated team using cross utilization training and shared work procedures.

After a one week nose-to-tail classroom training and two weeks of on the job training by senior enlisted members, a student to instructor model is employed to ensure LIT members were reinforcing training they received.

Finally, enlisted leaders undertook the huge task of merging four Career Field Education Training Plans. All redundancies were eliminated, leaving a 1,225-task CFEPT. Though large in breadth, the team leveraged high frequency tasks for upgrade training and derived a 71-task 5-level upgrade and a 21-task 7-level upgrade. These tasks currently represent almost 80 percent of the maintenance performed on the F-35 on a routine basis.

The LIT team currently has 34 personnel, maintaining six aircraft.

“As the program has grown, we realize we need to have dedicated teams on each aircraft, not just dedicated crew chiefs,” said Senior Master Sgt. Lonnie Gore, 62nd AMU LIT superintendent. “In the legacy world, dedicated crew chiefs only did maintenance, but now we are asking more of Airmen to be better [non-commissioned officers] and to train them for their next job when they get off the flight line.”

Traditional maintenance operations have sections perform career-specific tasks with minimal coordination with other sections. Aircraft can be delayed while undergoing certain types of maintenance as other sections wait to receive them, resulting in fewer sorties and reduced utilization of manpower.

With the LIT team, multiple components of the aircraft can be worked simultaneously. Additionally, each maintainer learns proficiency in the work of the other sections.

“Coming straight out of [technical training] into the LIT program has definitely been a curve ball,” said Airman 1st Class Nathan Lakey, LIT F-35 crew chief. “Being trained as far as crew chief tasks only [at technical training] and now jumping into learning every other AFSC involved with the F-35 has been a lot to take on, but I feel like it’s better for you as a maintainer to see how everybody else is involved.”

Additionally, pilots have increased confidence in their maintenance crew who, because of their supplemental knowledge in each aspect of the aircraft, take greater pride in their work. LIT team members work consistently on the same jet, making it easier for them to track and plan all maintenance performed.

“We are confident when we walk out to the jet and see the individual [who] has been working on it [all day],” said Lt. Col. Dean Miller, Director of Operations for the 62nd Fighter Squadron. “They not only understand the aircraft but are also very concerned about the safety of the pilot.”

To date, the LIT teams have produced more than 172 sorties and over 265 flying hours with fewer technicians than traditional manpower constructs. Their low 7 percent abort rate and 5 percent break rate has given way to a 72.5 percent mission capable rate which has exceeded the 60 percent Air Education and Training Command standard while maintaining a sortie utilization rate of 16.

The LIT program will be expanded throughout the 62nd AMU and each aircraft in the 62nd FS will have its own dedicated LIT team by the end of 2018. The program will then be submitted for evaluation and review by Air Force and Department of Defense leadership, who will determine its potential applicability across the Air Force, DoD and F-35 partner nations.

“What this program is going to do is provide the stability for the AMU to produce a consistent turn-patter of aircraft,” Miller said. “We can rely on the fact that the systems are going to work, and we are able to produce more pilots, more efficiently, with a higher quality of training.”


Re: Luke selected for USAF F-35A training base.

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2018, 13:35
by mixelflick
Mach 1.4, inverted? Wonder how long he held that...

I keep hearing pilots say, "she's fast". Yet we hear constantly she's limited to mach 1.6. I understand this was the requirement, but when they say she's fast.... does that mean her cruising speed (assume that's .9 mach) is higher than your average F-16 or legacy bird?

Or, are they referring to her ability to hold something between .9 mach and say, 1.1 or 1.2??