Commander Naval Air Forces wants more F/A-18s

Military aircraft - Post cold war aircraft, including for example B-2, Gripen, F-18E/F Super Hornet, Rafale, and Typhoon.
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spazsinbad

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Unread post03 Jun 2017, 09:50

US Navy Sends Congress $5.3B Wishlist of Planes, Ships and More
01 Jun 2017 Marcus Weisgerber

"The 48-item ‘unfunded priorities list’ arrived a week after the service’s $172 billion budget request for 2018.

The U.S. Navy is asking Congress to consider providing an extra $5.3 billion for planes, ships, missiles, and dozens of smaller projects that did not make it into the 2018 budget request sent to lawmakers last week.

Notable items on this year’s edition of the “unfunded priorities list” include 10 F/A-18 Super Hornets ($739 million), six P-8 Poseidon subhunting planes ($1 billion), four F-35C Joint Strike Fighters ($540 million), five Ship-to-Shore Connector hovercraft ($312 million), and four CMV-22 Ospreys ($392 million), according to a copy of the list obtained by Defense One. Those four items account for about $2.7 billion, half of the total request.

Adm. John Richardson, the chief of naval operations, sent the 48-item list to Congress on Wednesday. “The FY 2018 unfunded priorities list predominantly accelerates the recovery of readiness and wholeness of today’s fleet,” Richardson wrote. “As well, it proposes some critical enablers and advanced capabilities.”...

...The list went to Congress eight days after the Navy sent over its $171.5 billion 2018 budget request.

That larger request asks for 14 Super Hornets, seven P-8s, four F-35 Joint Strike Fighters, three Ship-to-Shore Connectors and six Ospreys. The Super Hornet and Poseidon are both made by Boeing. Boeing and Bell Helicopter jointly make the V-22. Lockheed Martin and others make the F-35 and the Ship-to-Shore Connector is made by Textron."

Source: http://www.defenseone.com/politics/2017 ... re/138326/
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neptune

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Unread post03 Jun 2017, 10:04

spazsinbad wrote:...Aircraft top the U.S. Navy’s 2018 unfunded priorities list sent to Congress this week, as the service seeks $2.7 billion to buy 24 more planes.... The aircraft include (10) F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet strike fighters, (4) F-35C ....]


Now (2017) that the Navy has accepted the Ford/ CVN-78 (F-35C capable), it will have to figure out how to deploy (2020) for operations with both the SBug and F-35C on the same flight deck.

Today, CVW-2 is sailing with Carl Vinson/ CVN-70 with 65 a/c (of which (10) F-18C will be replaced by the F-35C).

I don't see the F-35C flying "tanker" for the SBugs.
:wink:
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Unread post03 Jun 2017, 16:44

U.S. Navy’s $5.3B Wish List: Super Hornets, P-8, F-35
01 Jun 2017 Lara Seligman

"After hinting at a large buy of Boeing F/A-18s earlier this year, President Donald Trump’s first Pentagon budget request disappointed many defense hawks by essentially sticking to the previous administration’s plans for naval aviation. But now, the U.S. Navy is asking Congress directly to fund a boost in Super Hornet and Lockheed Martin F-35 procurement to address the strike fighter shortfall.

In a $5.3 billion wish list of items submitted to Congress June 1, the Navy is asking for 10 additional Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornets, six more Boeing P-8 maritime surveillance aircraft, and four extra Lockheed Martin F-35Cs. This “unfunded priorities list,” obtained by Aviation Week, is par for the course of annual budget negotiations.

This year, the Navy wants $739 million to buy 10 additional Super Hornets in fiscal 2018, bringing the total to 24; [74 Million each?] $1 billion for six more P-8s, bringing the total to 13; and $540 million for four extra F-35C carrier variants, bringing the total to eight. [135 Million each?] The list also includes $392 million for four additional Bell-Boeing CMV-22B Ospreys for the carrier-onboard-delivery mission, bringing the total to 10 for fiscal 2018.

In an accompanying letter sent to the defense congressional committees, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson said the list “predominantly accelerates the recovery of readiness and wholeness of today’s fleet” as well as proposing “some critical enablers and advanced capabilities.” He singled out the Super Hornet boost, saying the additional fighters are needed to replenish combat-worn aircraft and increase ready available strike fighter inventories.

Meanwhile, the additional F-35Cs will level the fiscal 2017 to 2019 procurement ramp and continue to mitigate the Navy’s strike fighter shortfalls, according to a description of items accompanying the list...."

Source: http://aviationweek.com/defense/us-navy ... s-p-8-f-35
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Unread post09 Jun 2017, 20:59

Because we have USN/USMC OBOGS problems in this thread both SHornet & Goshawk (& now F-35A elsewhere LUKE) I'll stick this ongoing USN/USMC OBOGS story here - NOTICE LOX rears its UGLY HEAD! When will HARRIERS be infected?
Navy, Marines Still Struggling with T-45C Trainer Oxygen System Failures
07 Jun 2017 Sam LaGrone

"WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Navy and Marine Corps are still struggling with oxygen system problems that have plagued the Navy’s carrier training aircraft and have clogged both services’ pipeline of new pilots, the commander of Naval Air Systems Command said during a Wednesday congressional hearing.

Testifying before the House Armed Services tactical air and land forces subcommittee, Vice Adm. Paul Grosklags said the service was exploring two courses of action in light of an increase in physiological episodes that has prevented the full operation of the service’s fleet of T-45C Goshawk trainers since a partial stand-down in late March. Reports of illnesses and negative physiological effects from T-45 Goshawk instructors and students spiked to 47 incidents per 100,000 flight hours in 2016 – a four-fold increase over 2012 numbers, according to figures provided in the Navy’s written testimony.

In tandem the Navy is working to identify the failures in the On-Board Oxygen Generation Systems (OBOGS) that have plagued the Goshawks and take corrective actions for the long-term, as well as outfit the T-45s with “alerting and protective measures” to get the planes back to full operation in the short term.

“We’re doing those two things in parallel, one is not waiting for the other,” Grosklags said at the hearing.

Additionally, he said in response to a question, the Navy is considering replacing today’s OBOGS with an older liquid oxygen system (LOX) to provide air to pilots, but he called that a “longer-term solution.” Grosklags said he needs something to get the Goshawks back in the air in a matter of weeks, whereas the LOX solution could take months....

...“This system has worked fine for 20-plus years. Something happened,” Davis said. “It’s the same box in the [AV-8B] Harrier. It’s the same OBOGS box and we don’t have a problem in Harriers. So what’s different? What is different in the T-45s?”

The results of a fleet-wide study into the physiological episode issue — led by U.S Pacific Fleet commander Adm. Scott Swift — is due to do be briefed later this month."

Source: https://news.usni.org/2017/06/07/navy-m ... m-failures

Introduce LOX and one has the fun aspect of the A-4 series of aircraft (amongst other LOX oldies): COUGH COUGH COUGH [once was good enough however YMMV] then the VALSALVA MANEUVER.
“...a high concentration of oxygen at low altitudes can lead to “absorption atelectasis,” in which too much oxygen can wash away necessary nitrogen within the lungs and cause lung tissue to collapse.”...
http://www.aviationweek.com/Article.asp ... 497809.xml
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southernphantom

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Unread post10 Jun 2017, 04:21

Would it be possible to blend the pure O2 with ram air to avoid that?
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Unread post10 Jun 2017, 04:34

Yes - cabin air (wherever it comes from) plus LOX at some percentage of total. For example the RNZAF changed their A-4K Skyhawk LOX system into a similar cabin air/LOX input when the change was made to the KAHU modifications I believe. AFAIK it was similar to the Sea Venom / Macchi MB326H [RAN/RAAF] system (oxygen mask & input). Otherwise the Venom/Macchi did not use LOX AFAIK / IIRC but bottled oxygen under pressure - I guess I should look it up eh.

Recently the RNZAF A-4K KAHU 'NATOPS' PDF was sent to me so the NEW Oxygen System details are in the attached .GIF.
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Unread post13 Jun 2017, 00:45

Looks like no F414-EPE. Not surprising as the Navy has been prioritizing reliability, engine efficiency and reduced maintenance expense over performance.


https://www.yahoo.com/news/u-navy-appro ... 59545.html

U.S. Navy Approves Boeing's F/A-18 Super Hornet Upgrades


The U.S. Navy has decided to fund Boeing's fighter division to upgrade the service's F/A-18E and F/A-18F Super Hornets to the "Block III" configuration... The new configuration will improve the heads-up display and computing capabilities of the Super Hornet, while also modestly upgrading the stealth and radar cross section. The multirole fighter will receive "advanced network architecture" in the form of a new computer called the Distributed Targeting Processor Network (DTPN). A large new display in the cockpit will help pilots monitor the additional information they receive. New Tactical Targeting Network Technology (TTNT) will also improve the Super Hornet's information pipeline so more data can be transmitted to and from the jet.

The improvements to stealth include possible low-observable coating, and new Conformal Fuel Tanks (CFT) are planned to replace the Super Hornet's current external fuel tanks. The CFTs will improve radar cross section slightly, but they are primarily intended to reduce aerodynamic drag. The Navy is also planning a long-range infrared sensor for the Super Hornet for early threat detection.
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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Unread post13 Jun 2017, 01:22

Interesting last four paragraphs from 'popcorn' post above:
"...The primary goal of the upgrade is to make the Super Hornet play nicely with the Navy's incoming F-35C. The carrier variant of the F-35 is the last of the F-35s to enter service, as it has not reached initial operating capability (IOC) like the Marine and Air Force jets have. When the Navy starts flying the fifth-generation fighters, their air coverage will have a lot more incoming data to share and analyze with various aircraft.

The Navy is looking to dominate air space with fleets of Block III Super Hornets, EA-18s, F-35Cs, as well as E-2 Hawkeye airborne early warning planes. The computing upgrades to the Super Hornets in the field will ensure that all the aircraft can communicate over the same network to get the best picture of the battlefield.

"You can have an F-35 in its very stealthy way doing a deep-strike mission with Super Hornet providing air superiority at that same range, or you can have Super Hornet carrying large standoff weapons that F-35 cannot carry, with F-35 providing some air cover," Gillian told Aviation Week.

The arrival of the F-35 has sent air warfare strategists back to the drawing board to develop the most effective packages to capitalize on the new fighter's capacity to soak up information and transmit it to other aircraft in the formation. For the F-35C to work at full capacity, the Navy has decided the trusty F/A-18 Super Hornet needs to be a little smarter."
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Unread post13 Jun 2017, 01:44

Waiting with bated breath the cost of the Blk 3 SH.
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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Unread post13 Jun 2017, 01:53

In other news, which I bet Spaz might be interested in, I flew my first 2 night "magic carpet" (PLM) approaches to das boat a couple nights ago. It was life altering. I know most of you all are interested in tactical upgrades, but this non-tactical system probably just revolutionized modern carrier aviation as much as angled decks and steam catapults did 60 years ago.
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Unread post13 Jun 2017, 01:54

popcorn wrote:Waiting with bated breath the cost of the Blk 3 SH.

It'll depend on the block buy deal. At low rates, It could top easily $100m, but with a good multi-year purchase plan, more like $85-90m each.

Most of the Block III costs are in non-recurring engineering.
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Unread post13 Jun 2017, 02:34

:notworthy: Thanks '35_aoa' - hope all continues to go well - may your carpet have no fluff. Must be MAGIC indeed. Just wait until you are in the F-35C & able to see in the dark! DAS gut. Your Charlie will be delta flight path. :cheers: :crazypilot:
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Unread post13 Jun 2017, 03:21

spazsinbad wrote::notworthy: Thanks '35_aoa' - hope all continues to go well - may your carpet have no fluff. Must be MAGIC indeed. Just wait until you are in the F-35C & able to see in the dark! DAS gut. Your Charlie will be delta flight path. :cheers: :crazypilot:


I probably won't be around long enough for that, but the future is bright, Rhino or whatever we end up calling the F-35 on the ball.
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Unread post14 Jun 2017, 02:05

Navy Wants to Buy 80 More Super Hornets for $7.1B Over the Next Five Years

https://news.usni.org/2017/06/13/navy-i ... -shortfall

The Navy’s written testimony to the Senate Armed Services seapower subcommittee notes the “Fiscal Year 2018 President’s Budget requests $1.25 billion in [the Navy’s aircraft procurement account] for 14 F/A-18E/F Super Hornet aircraft” and that, “with the support of Congress, we will also procure a minimum of 80 additional Super Hornets across the Future Years Defense Program (FYDP) and continue modernization plans to address continuing warfighter demand for advanced tactical aircraft. These additional procurements begin to mitigate the decline in [the Department of the Navy’s] strike fighter inventory and enable older aircraft to be pulled from service for mid-life upgrades and rework to extend their service life.”


“I get the question a lot, tell me about this F-35 versus F-18. And I say, it’s not a versus. The complementary nature of both these aircraft in the future for our Navy, our aircraft carrier Navy, is very exciting.”
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Unread post14 Jun 2017, 02:11

On F/A-18E/F numbers, the 2017 Navy Program Guide states "The FY 2016 program of record is 584 aircraft." If we add 80 to that, we get 664 Super Hornets in addition to the 160 E/A-18G Growlers. This is getting to be an absurd number, in my opinion, particularly when the F-35C will hit IOC in the next year or two. I love how we debate Canadian and European acquisition programs for tiny numbers of aircraft while the US Navy casually plans to buy 80 legacy aircraft (OK, some will be Block III) to resolve maintenance issues with the previous 584 Super Hornet airframes in addition to the 601 or so regular Hornets in "service and test roles" in the Marines and Navy.
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