Australian lawmakers confident in F-35's future

Program progress, politics, orders, and speculation
  • Author
  • Message
Offline
User avatar

Dragon029

Elite 1K

Elite 1K

  • Posts: 1201
  • Joined: 22 Dec 2014, 07:13

Unread post11 Jun 2018, 09:41

Those are just holes to make that part of the mechanism lighter:

Image
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 3K

Elite 3K

  • Posts: 20705
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post11 Jun 2018, 10:07

OK thanks. I thought they were glass lenses or something. Cool. https://i.imgur.com/nrx6MlD.jpg
Attachments
3holeF-35B.jpg
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 3K

Elite 3K

  • Posts: 20705
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post21 Jun 2018, 21:48

Lots of details not excerpted below in 6 page PDF with anti-radiation missiles & other gear NGJ Digital Attack & SPOOKAY!
Putting the GRRR in Growler - RAAF to equip Growler for the future with AARGM & NGJ
July 2018 Max Blenkin

"...The Growler currently carries the ALQ-99 jammer pods which come in mid-band and low-band configurations.

Despite being continually upgraded, the ALQ-99 was developed in the late 1960s and was first deployed on US EA-6B Prowler aircraft at the tail end of the Vietnam War.

To have remained in service so long, ALQ-99 must do a lot right. But the ALQ-99’s technology is analogue-based in a digital age, and reported problems include poor reliability, regular failure of the built-in test facility, high drag resulting in reduced aircraft performance, and interference with the Growler’s APG-79 AESA radar.

In Australian and US service, the ALQ-249 Next Generation Jammer (NGJ) will replace the ALQ-99, a limited number of which the RAAF acquired through the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) deal in which Australia acquired its 12 Growlers.

The ALQ-99 is not a single unit which does everything. Depending on the mission, a Growler could carry up to five of the 450kg 4.5m pods on wing and centreline hardpoints, but a typical Growler loadout is two configured for the mid-band of the frequency spectrum, and one for the low-band....

...From the outset of the Growler acquisition, it was envisaged that Australia would acquire a better jammer as the US Navy replaced its ALQ-99 pods. As the only Growler operator outside the US and at this stage the only other customer for NGJ, it not only seemed fair to contribute to development costs, but also gave Australia input to ensure it is capable of dealing with the kind of threats likely to be encountered in this region.

But development of the new jammer to succeed the ALQ-99 has proven to be challenging, with the US not expecting to see IOC of the NGJ mid-band (NGJ-MB) capability until early next decade, and the follow-on low band (-LB) capability later still.

Australia is definitely interested and is willing to share in the development costs, which are substantial. For a fifth-generation air force, Growler is a very important capability with nothing remotely comparable in service anywhere in the region.

In November 2017, Chief of Air Force Air Marshal Leo Davies announced the signing of an MoU between Australia and the US for the development of the NGJ, specifically, Australia and the US Navy will jointly develop the ALQ-249(V)1 NGJ-MB capability.

“This is a very important milestone for both nations, one that took four years of communication and collaboration to successfully achieve,” AIRMSHL Davies said.

The MoU provides a framework for communication, coordination and cooperation between the US Navy and the RAAF during the engineering and manufacturing development phase. This followed an earlier announcement by Defence Minister Marise Payne at the Avalon Airshow in February 2017 that the government would invest A$250 million in this development.

“As this is a rapidly evolving area, we will work in partnership with the US Navy to develop the next generation jamming capability, which will ensure that our aircraft remain at the technological forefront throughout their service life,” she said.

NGJ is a key element of the ADF’s AIR 5439 Phase 6 enhancing Growler Airborne Electronic Attack Capability (AEAC) project. The wide-ranging program has a nominal budget of $5-6 billion over a two-decade timeframe (2016-2035), and will ensure upgrades to the Australian Growler fleet mirror those of the US Navy.

NGJ has been a long time coming and much of its intended capability remains closely held. In the basic jamming role, it can produce sufficient power in appropriate frequencies to swamp hostile radars.

But more than that, it has been reported that NGJ will also have a cyber-attack capability, using the Growler’s and perhaps the F-35’s AESA radar to insert data into remote systems. That could have the effect of spoofing a hostile air defence system to conceal inbound aircraft, or show them as friendly, or at a different location.

On F-35, while it’s still early days, it has been envisaged that NGJ could integrate directly with that aircraft’s onboard systems and not require a specialised aircraft configured for EW...."

Source: Australian Aviation Magazine July 2018 No.361
Attachments
Grrrr GROWLER A_A_2018_07 pp6.pdf
(522.27 KiB) Downloaded 28 times
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
Offline

magitsu

Senior member

Senior member

  • Posts: 250
  • Joined: 12 Jun 2015, 22:12

Unread post22 Jun 2018, 08:19

Here's some footage from last weekend to complement that brief Growler look. First from inside the tent, then from around 1 min flight checks and take off prep with air traffic controller radio comms included. 4.40 actual take off. 6 mins landing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANR8_w4oEIc
Previous

Return to Program and politics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests