F-35 program updates

Program progress, politics, orders, and speculation
  • Author
  • Message
Offline
User avatar

doge

Senior member

Senior member

  • Posts: 293
  • Joined: 13 Jul 2015, 16:07

Unread post25 Apr 2018, 13:16

I hope that it will work... :salute:
https://www.bizjournals.com/washington/ ... ution.html
Lockheed expects F-35 repair dispute resolution soon
By Robert J. Terry – Senior Staff Reporter, Washington Business Journal Apr 25, 2018, 3:53am
Lockheed Martin is confident that a spat with the Pentagon over a repair bill in the hundreds of millions of dollars for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter will be resolved soon.

The issue has flared in recent days after it was revealed the Department of Defense was not accepting delivery of five F-35s — the Pentagon’s most expensive weapons program ever — because of a corrosion issue with aluminum fasteners.

The issue has not affected flights or the jet's safety, but reports peg the repairs costing anywhere from $119 million to $180 million. CEO Marillyn Hewson said Tuesday during the company’s first-quarter earnings call that she expects the contractual issue to get worked out.

“We’ll get resolution to this soon,” she said.

Lockheed has said it will deliver 90 of the F-35s this year and Hewson stuck to that projection, noting that production of the jets had not stopped. Investors pay close attention to anything related to the F-35 because of how key it is to the company’s future financial performance, assuming it meets all testing and production milestones. Lockheed is vowing to reduce the cost of each F-35 from $94 million to $80 million by 2020.

http://news.morningstar.com/all/dow-jon ... pdate.aspx
Lockheed Aims to Mend Fences With Pentagon Over F-35 Costs -- Update
4-24-18 2:36 PM EDT | By Doug Cameron
Lockheed Martin Corp. executives pledged to resolve a dispute with Pentagon officials that has halted deliveries of F-35 combat jets.

The Defense Department has toughened criticism of the jet's running costs in recent months. The discovery of a corrosion problem affecting jets that have already been delivered has further complicated negotiations over the multibillion-dollar sale of the next batch of F-35's.

Between five and 10 planes remain undelivered at Lockheed's huge facility near Fort Worth, Texas, because the U.S. Air Force won't accept them until the repair issue is resolved. The U.S. and a number of allies plan to buy as many as 3,000 of the F-35 jets, and the program already accounts for a quarter of Lockheed's sales.

Lockheed Chief Executive Marillyn Hewson said the defense company still expects to deliver 90 of the planes this year. "It's not affecting production," Ms. Hewson said. "We'll get resolution on that."
Offline

SpudmanWP

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 8390
  • Joined: 12 Oct 2006, 19:18
  • Location: California

Unread post25 Apr 2018, 19:55

GAO says the USMC (and all services) needs to standardize the sharing of "lessons learned".
Attachments
691469[1].pdf
Warfighter Support: DOD Needs to Share F-35 Operational Lessons Across the Military
Services
(1.37 MiB) Downloaded 792 times
"The early bird gets the worm but the second mouse gets the cheese."
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 23290
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post25 Apr 2018, 22:46

I believe the GAO report (thanks 'SWP') is 'anodyne' "not likely to cause offence or disagreement and somewhat dull" but hey once the meedja get aholt of it then all hell breaks loose as per this little acknowledged as to source FliteGlobular. We can all remember ALIS has been tested already in ALASKA where the sun don't shine and hell freezes over regularly. But of course the USMC moved ALIS before this test so prudently went via WARM CLIMES - they know these already alright?
F-35 deployment to Japan hit with sustainment problems
25 Apr 2018 Garrett Reim

"Since the US Marine Corps’ deployment of the Lockheed Martin F-35B Lightning II to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan in January 2017 the aircraft has been hit with an assortment of sustainment problems....

...Issues with the F-35B supply chain include lengthy travel times for parts, inaccurate estimated delivery dates, delays at customs and difficulty shipping Autonomic Logistics Information System equipment, known as ALIS.... [duh you'd reckon that any FIRST far from main base would have some issues that need to be sorted - & they will be sorted by golly]

...Other issues with sustaining the F-35 in Japan include long repair times, shortages and poor reliability of certain aircraft parts...."

Graphic: download/file.php?id=27116 (PDF 1.4Mb)


Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... le-448025/
Attachments
F-35BsupplyChainJapanProblemsGAOreportApr2018.gif
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
Offline

marauder2048

Forum Veteran

Forum Veteran

  • Posts: 788
  • Joined: 14 Mar 2012, 06:46

Unread post25 Apr 2018, 23:12

So were the concerns about ALIS actually justified? I'm sure Flight's crack team will get right on that!
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 23290
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post25 Apr 2018, 23:13

More yadayada on the GAO report here: https://www.military.com/dodbuzz/2018/0 ... ments.html

By GEE by GOLLYgosh one wonders about these 'reports'. Nothing is perfect but it gets 'perfected' with effort/experience.

Reading the GAO original report the only thing of note is: DoD is setting up mechanisms for sharing 'lessons learnt'. DUH.

MOAR: https://news.usni.org/2018/04/25/docume ... deployment
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
Offline

SpudmanWP

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 8390
  • Joined: 12 Oct 2006, 19:18
  • Location: California

Unread post08 May 2018, 00:47

Lockheed resumes F-35 jet deliveries to Pentagon

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Defense resumed accepting F-35 jet deliveries from Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N) last week after reaching an agreement on covering the costs to fix a production error, the Pentagon told Reuters on Monday.

Terms of the agreement were not disclosed. The cost of the fix was $119 million, people familiar with the situation had previously told Reuters.

...

The majority of aircraft will be repaired within two years, the statement said.

More at the Jump
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-lock ... SKBN1I827Q

The timeline of two years supports my original theory that the holdup was all about "when" the repairs have to happen rather than "who" will pay for it. It looks like LM will fix them or pay the USAF to fix them when the F-35s are in for pre-scheduled depot maintenance. The two-year number also looks like it will coincide with the Block 3F/concurrency updates that are already scheduled in the budget docs.
"The early bird gets the worm but the second mouse gets the cheese."
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 23290
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post08 May 2018, 16:17

F-35 deliveries resume as DoD, Lockheed clear up financial disagreement
08 May 2018 Valerie Insinna

"WASHINGTON — The Pentagon is now accepting deliveries of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter again, after resolving a disagreement with Lockheed Martin over who should pay to fix a couple hundred jets, the company confirmed Monday. However, it’s still unknown who will ultimately be left with the repair bill.

Spokesmen from Lockheed and the F-35 Joint Program Office declined to comment on whether the company or government will be held financially responsible for the production escape. The decision to resume deliveries was first reported by Reuters….

...The problem, sources said at the time, is that the department and Lockheed had agreed upon a plan to repair about 200 jets that were impacted by a quality lapse — but not who should pay for it.... [The problem was who should pay?]

...Ultimately, Defense Department officials felt the Pentagon shouldn’t be held wholly responsible for paying to retrofit planes due to Lockheed’s mistake, leading it to partially freeze deliveries while negotiating with the company....

...Lockheed spokesman Mike Friedman declined to comment on whether Lockheed would bear responsibility for covering repair costs. “While we don’t discuss specific cost figures and contracting terms, we have a comprehensive plan in place to effectively and efficiently address the F-35 hole primer issue,” he said.

The JPO statement did not address who will fund the repairs except to say that the plan ensures the services will receive “an affordable and quality weapons system from industry.” “The F-35 Joint Program Office, along with the U.S. services, international allies and Lockheed Martin, have implemented a comprehensive corrective action plan to make the necessary repairs to all aircraft while minimizing impact to operations,” the JPO statement reads. “The majority of aircraft will be complete within 24 months with the remaining aircraft completed as their availabilities/modification timing allows.”...

...“The department, in an effort to move forward with the program, has perhaps not been as thoughtful[?] as we want to be from this point forward in terms of what we consider acceptable performance,” she said. [TRIPLE DUTCH DOUBLE] “I think this corrosion issue is one example where we have expectations for workmanship, and at this point we’re not seeing those workmanship levels being achieved.”"

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018/05 ... agreement/
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
Offline
User avatar

blindpilot

Elite 1K

Elite 1K

  • Posts: 1220
  • Joined: 01 Mar 2013, 18:21
  • Location: Colorado

Unread post08 May 2018, 17:16

spazsinbad wrote:
F-35 deliveries resume as DoD, Lockheed clear up financial disagreement
08 May 2018 Valerie Insinna

"WASHINGTON — ... one example where we have expectations for workmanship, and at this point we’re not seeing those workmanship levels being achieved.”"

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018/05 ... agreement/


Well, I'm not sayin ... or perhaps I am ...

Kids these days ....

So a couple days ago my kids weren't sure what to do about a bear threatening their goats. So I took my dawg, and we spent the night on the porch ...
... bear problem is taken care of. Nuthin like a good coon dog.
man and his dog.jpg
Man and his Dawg

Maybe I'm just old and crotchity, but it sure seems like kids these days don't seem to know what to do, and what good workmanship entails. They seem to think quality is in a Japanese manufacturing book or on YuTube. My blue tic knows what good workmanship is, better than most of the workers I see lately ... at least that's the opinion of old man with nuthin to do with his day but sit on the porch.

My grand daddy would'a whipped my a$$ if I left the corrosion treatment of a few holes. And I never would have entered the workforce till my a$$ had already learned that, and my a$$ was only 15 when I got my first real job paycheck.

Just sayin,
BP
Offline
User avatar

Dragon029

Elite 1K

Elite 1K

  • Posts: 1349
  • Joined: 22 Dec 2014, 07:13

Unread post09 May 2018, 05:32

On my F-35 subreddit we just recently had a Fort Worth worker chime in and answer some questions; apparently a lot of the new hires have never worked on aircraft before and there's been incidents such as an F-35C aileron being cracked when a person tried to raise it by hand at its edge, another drilled a hole into a flaperon (without consulting anyone) using a cutting disc when a nut plate came loose inside, a bunch of cotter pins and nuts have been found loose, etc. The workers with experience are basically having to be extra vigilant at QC.
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 23290
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post10 Jun 2018, 21:58

Last fast facts of may had 135,000 hours flown NOW there are 140,000 hours in several recent accounts - this is onesuch.
Lockheed Martin-Built F-35 Comes Home to RAF Marham
06 Jun 2018 LM PR

"...Around the world, there are now nearly 300 F-35 aircraft operating from 15 bases globally and the programme has achieved more than 140,000 flight hours."

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/lockhee ... raf-marham
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
Offline
User avatar

Dragon029

Elite 1K

Elite 1K

  • Posts: 1349
  • Joined: 22 Dec 2014, 07:13

Unread post11 Jun 2018, 21:39

Offline

wrightwing

Elite 3K

Elite 3K

  • Posts: 3266
  • Joined: 23 Oct 2008, 15:22

Unread post12 Jun 2018, 04:42

Dragon029 wrote:https://twitter.com/thef35/status/1006264316612567040?s=19

300th F-35 (AF-150) delivered.

And more than 140,000 hours.
Offline
User avatar

spazsinbad

Elite 5K

Elite 5K

  • Posts: 23290
  • Joined: 05 May 2009, 21:31
  • Location: ɐıןɐɹʇsn∀¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Warnings: -2

Unread post12 Jun 2018, 10:02

Pentagon And Lockheed Martin Deliver 300th F-35 Aircraft
11 Jun 2018 LM PR

"...The first 300 F-35s include 197 F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variants, 75 F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) variants, and 28F-35C carrier variants (CV) and have been delivered to U.S. and international customers. More than 620 pilots and 5,600 maintainers have been trained, and the F-35 fleet has surpassed more than 140,000 cumulative flight hours...."

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/pentago ... 5-aircraft

A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
Offline

madrat

Elite 2K

Elite 2K

  • Posts: 2295
  • Joined: 03 Mar 2010, 03:12

Unread post12 Jun 2018, 12:23

Last I remember hearing was Su-57 was at 8-ish and J-20 at 13-ish.
Offline

gideonic

Senior member

Senior member

  • Posts: 283
  • Joined: 06 Sep 2015, 13:54

Unread post12 Jun 2018, 12:46

madrat wrote:Last I remember hearing was Su-57 was at 8-ish and J-20 at 13-ish.

The J-20 number seems a bit low. But yeah, it doesn't change the fact that both of these will be lucky if they ever reach 200 aircraft, let alone more.
PreviousNext

Return to Program and politics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests