F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 30 Apr 2009, 16:41
by jacarlsen
Does anybody know how many people have flown the F-35 now? Who has the most hours?

And what is Jon Beesley doing? I saw him in a program about the F-22 and he said that testing was so hard work that he didn't know if he had it in him to do it again.

F-35 vs F-22

Unread postPosted: 28 Jun 2009, 18:57
by steve8341
Unfortunately if Mr Gates gets his way the far superior and proven F-22 will be out of production before the facts come out on the F-35. The F-35 unit cost will be equal or greater than the F-22 while being extremely less capable than the F-22. This will be shocking news to hard working Americans who were sold on the low cost F-35 propaganda.

The USN and Lockheed Martin are drinking their own bath water on the proposed cost and capabilities of the F-35.

There is an end-game for F-22 production. The F-22 production should continue until the Air Force has approximately 300 and Japan has 60. If you are an American wouldn't you rather China realize that someone close to them has a very capable adversarial weapon rather than leaving it to our country to fly across the world when the trouble starts. More than likely the US will have to also engage but at least we wouldn't be alone. The F-35 does not even have a role in this scenario. The F-35 joins the fight later by design, if there is a "later".

I'm estimating that by the time 800 F-35's are built the production will cease due to a much less costly (true this time) and greatly capable UAV availability to replace the bloated F-35.

Re: F-35 vs F-22

Unread postPosted: 30 Jun 2009, 03:59
by Corsair1963
I'm estimating that by the time 800 F-35's are built the production will cease due to a much less costly (true this time) and greatly capable UAV availability to replace the bloated F-35.[/quote]


I doubt UCAV's would be mature enough to replace Tactical Fighters in such a short time. Regardless, such a argument doesn't belong here.......

Unread postPosted: 05 Aug 2009, 09:24
by Tinito_16
Why first for the B and then for the other variants? Is it because we're going to export the B first (to the British)?

Unread postPosted: 05 Aug 2009, 09:35
by SpudmanWP
The B model is the first scheduled for IOC in 2012, then the A in 2013 and C in 2015.

When the B goes IOC, it will be with Block 2 software as it's primary role is CAS. They will get the other block upgrades as they are developed.

Unread postPosted: 08 Aug 2009, 00:59
by Shaken
Tinito_16 wrote:Why first for the B and then for the other variants? Is it because we're going to export the B first (to the British)?


The first F-35 user will be the USMC, not the Royal Navy.
But yes, the testing takes place first on F-35B as it is the first variant to enter service.

-- Shaken - out --

Unread postPosted: 08 Aug 2009, 02:40
by dwightlooi
Any news on when AF-1 will fly? It has been over 7 months since it rolled out.

Unread postPosted: 08 Aug 2009, 04:26
by Tinito_16
Yikes

Unread postPosted: 01 Sep 2009, 16:09
by neptune
The secretary should have had a good view of the '35 parking lot with all of the A,B,C '35s sitting around getting ramp time. BF-01 is getting late in the month, delayed by ???????? Hope PW had a good fix on the turbine disc/ blade issue, and the new S/W rev. is ready for VSTOL. Waiting for public news of the trip to Pax River. Best Wishes. :pint:

Unread postPosted: 05 Sep 2009, 21:50
by xb1maintainer
How in the world do you guys know so much on the F35. Hell I work on them on the flightline and you guys are way ahead of me!
BTW, great photo ZTEX!!

Unread postPosted: 05 Sep 2009, 22:50
by sextusempiricus
We are not Russian spy...

Unread postPosted: 06 Sep 2009, 09:18
by cywolf32
xb1maintainer wrote:How in the world do you guys know so much on the F35. Hell I work on them on the flightline and you guys are way ahead of me!
BTW, great photo ZTEX!!


People do their homework :wink:.

Unread postPosted: 09 Sep 2009, 03:17
by Ztex
XB1 sometimes I get lucky that's all...and thanks for the comment on the photo...although I'm disappointed in the quality of it..I was fighting my camera for control...hehe



Speaking of homework...

Did BF-1 roll today?

Unread postPosted: 09 Sep 2009, 16:10
by sewerrat
spazsinbad wrote:F-35B Back in the Air for STOVL Tests Posted by Graham Warwick at 9/8/2009

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... 7c18aba2c0
OR
http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/ ... 090909.xml

"The first STOVL F-35B, aircraft BF-1, returned to the air with a hour-long flight on Friday, restarting the countdown to the first vertical landing - in October would be my guess. BF-1 was down for an extended period of modifications resulting from previous flight and hover-pit tests, and proved reluctant to return to flight.".......


What an ugly duckling of an airplane. Fat, bulbous, stubby... All the qualities the combined US Air Force's need in an air superiority fighter. Probably optimized for transonic rather than anything else. Isn't going to be a good replacement for the A-10's as it lacks the fortitude of that airplane. Probably relies on EOTS to kills vehicles at distance... Which of course means lots more friendly fire incidents. A box kite would be an improvement over the Marines Harrier, so its going to be a good thing for them. With its weight and aerodynamics its going to be outclassed in low alt fights compared to the -16 and a few other birds across the pond. But gun fights are long gone so no need to worry about that. At mid&high alt and 50% fuel it may turn into a Ferrari however. But again, gun fights are long gone.

Unread postPosted: 10 Sep 2009, 00:21
by Code3
spazsinbad wrote:F-35B Back in the Air for STOVL Tests Posted by Graham Warwick at 9/8/2009

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... 7c18aba2c0
OR
http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/ ... 090909.xml

"The first STOVL F-35B, aircraft BF-1, returned to the air with a hour-long flight on Friday, restarting the countdown to the first vertical landing - in October would be my guess. BF-1 was down for an extended period of modifications resulting from previous flight and hover-pit tests, and proved reluctant to return to flight.".......


Did anyone else notice that in the first video when the female calls out "Mach 1" it doesn't appear that the F-35 is in AB (based on nozzle position and lack of flame). If that's really the case, it would be interesting, but not all that suprising.

Unread postPosted: 10 Sep 2009, 01:23
by VprWzl
Damn . . . you could be right. You can see it in AB in several other parts and, while I can't tell for sure, it sure looks that way from the video . . . unless they just mis-synch'd the audio and video for a prettier picture.

Unread postPosted: 11 Sep 2009, 03:36
by StolichnayaStrafer
sewerrat wrote:
spazsinbad wrote:F-35B Back in the Air for STOVL Tests Posted by Graham Warwick at 9/8/2009

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... 7c18aba2c0
OR
http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/ ... 090909.xml

"The first STOVL F-35B, aircraft BF-1, returned to the air with a hour-long flight on Friday, restarting the countdown to the first vertical landing - in October would be my guess. BF-1 was down for an extended period of modifications resulting from previous flight and hover-pit tests, and proved reluctant to return to flight.".......


What an ugly duckling of an airplane. Fat, bulbous, stubby... All the qualities the combined US Air Force's need in an air superiority fighter. Probably optimized for transonic rather than anything else. Isn't going to be a good replacement for the A-10's as it lacks the fortitude of that airplane. Probably relies on EOTS to kills vehicles at distance... Which of course means lots more friendly fire incidents. A box kite would be an improvement over the Marines Harrier, so its going to be a good thing for them. With its weight and aerodynamics its going to be outclassed in low alt fights compared to the -16 and a few other birds across the pond. But gun fights are long gone so no need to worry about that. At mid&high alt and 50% fuel it may turn into a Ferrari however. But again, gun fights are long gone.


Uhm, the B model is NOT destined for the Air Force- USMC, Royal Navy, and the RAF perhaps, plus any other eligible countries that might want some.

Harriers have been a combat proven battle bird worthy of praise, not scorn. You seriously should look at their combat records from the last 30 or so years.

Lastly- people keep saying that dogfighting is a thing of the past, ditch the cannons. The strange thing is that every time they do this, they wind up needing them- BADLY. I am not a gambling man, but I would care to wager that the majority of fighter pilots would gladly sacrifice the room and weight to keep a gun at hand in their birds.

Unread postPosted: 02 Oct 2009, 00:48
by neptune
Any flights since AA left for Edwards??


Are only the BF's flying for now??

Unread postPosted: 05 Nov 2009, 06:51
by seruriermarshal
I take a news First Flight of Marine JSF in STOVL Mode Now Expected in December , anybody have more information ?

http://defense.iwpnewsstand.com/websear ... 2009_nov4a)>

Unread postPosted: 05 Nov 2009, 14:25
by Pecker
elp wrote:The BF-1 flight to Pax should be soon I would think.


Shortly after they conduct one or two STOVL conversions (at altitude) and wrap up a practice ferry mission.

Unread postPosted: 06 Nov 2009, 00:16
by energo
Pecker wrote:
elp wrote:The BF-1 flight to Pax should be soon I would think.


Shortly after they conduct one or two STOVL conversions (at altitude) and wrap up a practice ferry mission.


Should be off soon. Some pretty wet and cloudy weather has held it up lately. The Flight Sciences aircraft are strictly VFR, so no flying if the weather gods don't cooperate. BF-1 might make a quick stop at Marietta before heading off to Pax.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 06 Nov 2009, 16:10
by f22enthusiast
An F-35B went downtown awhile back...

Unread postPosted: 07 Nov 2009, 03:10
by seruriermarshal
energo wrote:
Pecker wrote:
elp wrote:The BF-1 flight to Pax should be soon I would think.


Shortly after they conduct one or two STOVL conversions (at altitude) and wrap up a practice ferry mission.


Should be off soon. Some pretty wet and cloudy weather has held it up lately. The Flight Sciences aircraft are strictly VFR, so no flying if the weather gods don't cooperate. BF-1 might make a quick stop at Marietta before heading off to Pax.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo


So they'll take F-35B BF-1 STOVL test in this month ?

Unread postPosted: 14 Nov 2009, 03:52
by Ztex
So...Did BF-1 leave Ft. Worth, permanently, yesterday?

Unread postPosted: 14 Nov 2009, 08:41
by spazsinbad
Ztex: ELP is sayin' that BooF-1 :-) is headin' out:

http://twitter.com/E_L_P/statuses/5694887980

"F-35 on its way to Patuxent River? BF-1 may have left today with a stop in Marietta."

Unread postPosted: 14 Nov 2009, 20:09
by f35phixer
It is there in Ga. Next stop PAX.... Praise Jesus, what a long strange trip it's been :bang:

Unread postPosted: 14 Nov 2009, 21:50
by Ztex
Well Rats...I missed it. I never got to see BF-1 except for First Flight Day and I was way down on the other end of the field when they were landing.

Oh well...it's not the first airplane I've missed...wont be the last.

Thanks for the update.

Unread postPosted: 14 Nov 2009, 23:12
by elp
Source was Graham Warwick of Aviation Week Twiiter posts.

Also AF-1 has done its first flight !!!!

Unread postPosted: 15 Nov 2009, 04:37
by banken
The mach number gets higher the higher you are. So Mach 1 at MSL is not the same speed as Mach 1 at FL300...

But it's impressive if it can super-cruise like the 22.

Unread postPosted: 15 Nov 2009, 16:15
by energo
elp wrote:Source was Graham Warwick of Aviation Week Twiiter posts.

Also AF-1 has done its first flight !!!!


Yahoo!

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-d ... thund.html


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 16 Nov 2009, 00:58
by elp
BF-1 is at Pax

source: Graham Warwick -Twitter

Unread postPosted: 16 Nov 2009, 08:07
by elp
Very large photos of BF-1 arriving at Pax. I won't preview them. You will just have to look at the links.

:lol:

Some very good photography by LM.

http://sitelife.aviationweek.com/ver1.0 ... 3.Full.jpg

http://sitelife.aviationweek.com/ver1.0 ... 6.Full.jpg

Unread postPosted: 16 Nov 2009, 15:42
by seruriermarshal
Thanks guys , great information .

Unread postPosted: 16 Nov 2009, 18:24
by gemini01
Left here at Dobbins for Pax around 11:30am EST.

Great getting to see it for the first time!

Unread postPosted: 17 Nov 2009, 05:33
by seruriermarshal
gemini01 wrote:Left here at Dobbins for Pax around 11:30am EST.

Great getting to see it for the first time!


gemini01 , hope you can send some BF-1 STOVL photos in here .

:D

Unread postPosted: 17 Nov 2009, 16:57
by StolichnayaStrafer
Great pics, elp- and even better, great news for the F-35 program! :D

Unread postPosted: 17 Nov 2009, 21:03
by gemini01
seruriermarshal wrote:
gemini01 wrote:Left here at Dobbins for Pax around 11:30am EST.

Great getting to see it for the first time!


gemini01 , hope you can send some BF-1 STOVL photos in here .

:D


Your wish is my command!

Unread postPosted: 18 Nov 2009, 13:46
by seruriermarshal
Thanks gemini01 , that's great pic !

:)

Unread postPosted: 20 Nov 2009, 23:35
by Vipernice
StolichnayaStrafer wrote:Great pics, elp- and even better, great news for the F-35 program! :D


If certain unmentionable rumors is true then we'll get a less than great update soon.

Unread postPosted: 21 Nov 2009, 10:57
by seruriermarshal
Vipernice wrote:
StolichnayaStrafer wrote:Great pics, elp- and even better, great news for the F-35 program! :D


If certain unmentionable rumors is true then we'll get a less than great update soon.


thanks , any information about those unmentionable rumors ?

Unread postPosted: 21 Nov 2009, 15:05
by Vipernice
Nothing other than that BF-1 has missed all its scheduled flights so far.

Unread postPosted: 21 Nov 2009, 16:02
by seruriermarshal
So they'll take it into STOVL this month ?

Unread postPosted: 24 Nov 2009, 04:46
by Vipernice
seruriermarshal wrote:So they'll take it into STOVL this month ?


"Return to flight is planned for the week of Dec. 7. "

From http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-13236.html

RE: SDD Flight Status as of 1 Dec 09?

Unread postPosted: 11 Dec 2009, 14:40
by PhillyGuy
When is the F-35 going to be shooting and bombing stuff?

First F-22A flew in September of 1997. First F-22A AMRAAM launch was in October of 2000. First F-22A combat squadron was declared IOC in 2005.
First F-35 flew in December of 2006. First F-35 to launch anything? First F-35 IOC squadron... 2014?

Seems to me either the F-35 is going to be doing such soon or it is in for a delayed and rushed test period. Especially if the projected IOC dates are to be maintained.

Unread postPosted: 15 Dec 2009, 22:42
by Corsair1963
As in it will be used for target practice? Possibly, with both gun fire and missiles???

Unread postPosted: 16 Dec 2009, 02:44
by neptune
Corsair1963 wrote:As in it will be used for target practice? Possibly, with both gun fire and missiles???
It's beginning to look like AF-1 or BF-1 might be better candidates for target practice than AA-1, the only one that could fly 90 times. :bang: :wtf:

Unread postPosted: 17 Dec 2009, 04:25
by LMAggie
Because AA-1 had such a rosy start? Oh wait, it didn't. New birds take time to iron out the kinks.

Unread postPosted: 19 Dec 2009, 21:30
by sextusempiricus
About two years ago I began calling the "Lightning II" the F-35 Mockup. Two years later, the thing can barely get off the ground. I hate it when I'm proven right...

Re: AA-1 is Done

Unread postPosted: 20 Dec 2009, 02:52
by seruriermarshal
muddflap wrote:AA-1 completed it's last flight into China Lake. Ready for LFT&E.


So AA-1 in China lake , and It will launch AIM-120 ?

RE: Re: AA-1 is Done

Unread postPosted: 20 Dec 2009, 03:43
by geogen
We need a Poll taken, IMHO... 'will F-35 become IOC before SDD Flight Testing is completed'? The whole development Program is truly perplexing, if there's not a better word for it?

RE: Re: AA-1 is Done

Unread postPosted: 20 Dec 2009, 18:01
by underhill
There are many better words for what is going on. All of them, sadly, are obscene, potentially defamatory or both.

Re: AA-1 is Done

Unread postPosted: 21 Dec 2009, 09:19
by energo
seruriermarshal wrote:
muddflap wrote:AA-1 completed it's last flight into China Lake. Ready for LFT&E.


So AA-1 in China lake , and It will launch AIM-120 ?


AA-1 won't fire weapons; it will be subjected to fire in a full-up, full-scale ground test. It will surely be a sad sight indeed...


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

BF-2 PAX arrival

Unread postPosted: 30 Dec 2009, 01:09
by energo
Couple of photos from todays BF-2 arrival at PAX.

Full story:
http://www.f-16.net/news_article3954.html
http://www.f-16.net/news_article3953.html


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 30 Dec 2009, 06:42
by Ztex
Glad they made it!

The weather looks much better at the destination than it did for departure...

Image

Unread postPosted: 30 Dec 2009, 14:13
by bjr1028
Good looking bird. I hope she works like (unlike per predecessor). Anyone know when we're going to start getting production spec prototypes?

Unread postPosted: 30 Dec 2009, 18:41
by SpudmanWP
If by production spec you mean with all the computers and such, then BF-4, IIRC.

If you mean body shape and such, then all the current airframes (sans AA-1) are current.

Unread postPosted: 30 Dec 2009, 23:35
by energo
Ztex wrote:Glad they made it!

The weather looks much better at the destination than it did for departure...


Great shot nevertheless, looks more stealthy! :)

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 31 Dec 2009, 05:55
by seruriermarshal
Thanks for pics and Where are BF-3 and AF-2 , borth in Fort Worth ?

Unread postPosted: 03 Jan 2010, 11:52
by sceptic
Spudman,

Once again I have to ask the question after reading yet another one of your LM propoganda posts...what planet do you live on?

I'm still looking for you on the LM flightline BTW. I stopped by the plant to see some bro's...I was enroute back from Vegas to the east coast and stopped for gas and grub at Ft Worth JRB. Took my buddy's car over to the LM side to check up with some former flying mates...no one seems to know anyone by the callsign "Spudman". Again, how do you come by you "expert" opinions? If you are not a driver or design engineer, I got to ask what is your expertise to make such comments on a program as vast and complex as the JSF? Do you work in LM Public Relations and Damage Control?

JSF is the PS 3 version of the A-7. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. LEG is spot on. We boofed it. Should of pressed production of F-22 to C-variant and pushed funds to upgrade F-18's and vipers rather than blowing billions on the PS3 A-7. LEG is correct, and must have been a operational planner at one stage in his life. After day 2-3, stealth won't matter. And yes Spudman, I have been downtown and back so I can comment, expertly, on the matter.

Happy New Year.

Unread postPosted: 03 Jan 2010, 17:56
by SpudmanWP
1st, welcome to the boards sceptic... I see you plan on living up to your name.

2nd, I live on Terra, third planet from Sol.

3rd, How would you classify presentations made by LM AND members of the DoD as propaganda? If you have a problem with a specific post, fell free to post a comment in the appropriate thread

4th, I never claimed to have anything to do with LM or the USAF. I have said before, and will do so again, I am a computer programmer/network admin and am a US Army 19K vet from the late 1980's.

Again, welcome to the board an I look forward to any positive input you provide in the future.

P.S. I always have a happy New Year, it's my son's birthday (missed a tax deduction by 10 hours) ;)

Unread postPosted: 04 Jan 2010, 15:58
by shep1978
Interesting to see we have a new troll for the new year and yes i'd agree he's living up to his name really rather well.

Unread postPosted: 07 Jan 2010, 08:15
by seruriermarshal
Where are new F-35 plan ? they must take STOVL in Jan ?

Unread postPosted: 08 Jan 2010, 15:19
by energo
As noted by our ever vigilant forum participants STOVL flights have begun. :applause:

Full story: F-35B begins in-flight STOVL operations


B. Bolsøy
Oslo


USMC BF-01 Initial Transition flight at NAS Patuxent River, MD. Mr. Graham Tomlinson is the Test Pilot. First time the STOVL lift system (MODE 4) has been engaged in flight. [LM photo by Andy Wolfe]

Unread postPosted: 09 Feb 2010, 08:02
by wingster1
Does anybody know when Lockheed will begin hiring for various other F-35 jobs....I am a Armament Systems Technician and have submitted for about 8 weapons jobs with the F-35 with lockheed. Do they take a long time to reply?? Maybe my resume does not meet there "computer's" requirements. I want the job at Eglin but it is beginning to look grim. Any info or help would be much appreciated!!!

Unread postPosted: 10 Feb 2010, 21:42
by energo
wingster1 wrote:Does anybody know when Lockheed will begin hiring for various other F-35 jobs....I am a Armament Systems Technician and have submitted for about 8 weapons jobs with the F-35 with lockheed. Do they take a long time to reply?? Maybe my resume does not meet there "computer's" requirements. I want the job at Eglin but it is beginning to look grim. Any info or help would be much appreciated!!!


Howdy and welcome!

You might get a faster response if you ask the question in the F-16 job/carrer forum: http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_index-c-9.html

Good luck!

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 11 Feb 2010, 19:49
by energo
How about that, BF-3 four flights and a BF-2 flight in one week -- despite two feet of snow at PAX. :applause:

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 12 Feb 2010, 13:23
by Conan
energo wrote:How about that, BF-3 four flights and a BF-2 flight in one week -- despite two feet of snow at PAX. :applause:

B. Bolsøy
Oslo


Very interesting. Thanks for the (continual) updates.

Provides a very interesting counter-point to those who think that L-M can not even manage 12 flight tests per month, per airframe...

Unread postPosted: 12 Feb 2010, 23:44
by butters
Conan wrote:
energo wrote:How about that, BF-3 four flights and a BF-2 flight in one week -- despite two feet of snow at PAX. :applause:

B. Bolsøy
Oslo


Very interesting. Thanks for the (continual) updates.

Provides a very interesting counter-point to those who think that L-M can not even manage 12 flight tests per month, per airframe...
When did that happen?

Here is the total of FY2010 F-35 test flights as of 11 Feb. The fiscal year ends in Oct, so if LM is gonna get in the 1200 flights scheduled...

AA-1 FY2010-1

BF-1 FY2010=12

BF-2 FY2010=9

BF-3 FY2010=4

AF-1 FY2010=3

Unread postPosted: 26 Feb 2010, 20:36
by energo
Gaining momentum: 31 days - 3 aircraft - 16 flights!


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 28 Feb 2010, 04:25
by lb
Could we please see some realistic numbers regarding the flight test program? According to Stephen Trimble about two weeks ago less than 30 of 1,200 planned flights for FY2010 had been completed more than 5 months into the FY. In order to catch up they'd need around 180 flights a month for the next 6 months or been averaging 100 a month for this FY. We all know the flight test program is far behind schedule. The main questions should be when does it stop falling further behind and when it starts catching up. It would be useful to know if Trimble is accurate.

Unread postPosted: 28 Feb 2010, 14:52
by underhill
"Could we please see some realistic numbers regarding the flight test program?"

That, and a pink flying unicorn!

Unread postPosted: 28 Feb 2010, 15:30
by VarkVet
energo wrote:As noted by our ever vigilant forum participants STOVL flights have begun. :applause:

Full story: F-35B begins in-flight STOVL operations


B. Bolsøy
Oslo


USMC BF-01 Initial Transition flight at NAS Patuxent River, MD. Mr. Graham Tomlinson is the Test Pilot. First time the STOVL lift system (MODE 4) has been engaged in flight. [LM photo by Andy Wolfe]


Is there a patch available for the first Bonehead that over-speeds that lift fan door?

Unread postPosted: 28 Feb 2010, 19:40
by spazsinbad
The sim demo pilot says a 'red button' has to be pressed to go into STOVL mode (as I recall). I would think that computer flight laws will not allow that huge door to be oversped and other computer control flight laws will help protect the aircraft from bone head pilots methinks. 'I could be todally rong but I'm a dancing fool...' (Frank Zappa).

Unread postPosted: 18 Mar 2010, 21:07
by energo
First vertical landing by the F-35 today. Read more.

Watch the amazing video: LINK

:applause:

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 20 Mar 2010, 00:40
by lb
The new estimate is an average cost of $114 to $135 million:

Unread postPosted: 20 Mar 2010, 01:56
by SnakeHandler
So when do we see it short takeoff, supersonic dash and vertical land?

Unread postPosted: 20 Mar 2010, 04:15
by Ztex
spazsinbad wrote:. 'I could be todally rong but I'm a dancing fool...' (Frank Zappa).


Yowza, yowza, yowza!

Unread postPosted: 20 Mar 2010, 06:03
by SpudmanWP
lb wrote:The new estimate is an average cost of $114 to $135 million:


It's the same estimate, just in "Then Year" dollars (ie with inflation included).

I really wish you people would do a little research instead of jumping on every 'doom and gloom' article that comes out.

Unread postPosted: 23 Mar 2010, 22:45
by energo
SpudmanWP wrote:
lb wrote:The new estimate is an average cost of $114 to $135 million:


It's the same estimate, just in "Then Year" dollars (ie with inflation included).


Then Year 2012-2014 according to Defensenews.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 24 Mar 2010, 06:52
by beepa
Thanks for the updates and all your hard work energo!!...It's people like yourself and the rest of the F16.net crew that keep me coming back, although lately it's been a gauntlet of trolls to pass before I can see the forest.

Unread postPosted: 26 Mar 2010, 22:10
by bumtish
energo wrote:
SpudmanWP wrote:
lb wrote:The new estimate is an average cost of $114 to $135 million:


It's the same estimate, just in "Then Year" dollars (ie with inflation included).


Then Year 2012-2014 according to Defensenews.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo


The only then year dollar year being (publically)operated with within the JSF program is TY2034 dollars, being the last planned year of vehicle procurement.

Defensenews also got it wrong as the deliveries in 2010-2014 are not at APUC, but at the specific cost for these years.

Check lb' post at bottom of the previous page.

Then year dollars are not inflation adjusted. :wink:

Unread postPosted: 03 Jun 2010, 23:01
by lb
Actually the new estimate is $155 million TY or $112 million in 2002 dollars PAUC. For average procurement cost the new estimate is $133 million or $92 million in 2002 dollars. Here is Dr Carter's June 1st letter to Congress and a CBO study that was just released and is not getting much attention as of yet.

Unread postPosted: 06 Jun 2010, 20:26
by Asif
F-35C CF-01 makes first taxi tests May 28, 2010


Lockheed Martin test pilot Jeff Knowles takes the first F-35C, called CF-1, on its first taxi test at Lockheed Martins' Fort Worth facility on May 28th, 2010. [Photo by Carl Richards]

Unread postPosted: 25 Mar 2011, 00:47
by energo
F-35 Weekly Updates on the Canadian F-35 program website: http://f-35.ca/2011/f-35-weekly-update

Unread postPosted: 25 Mar 2011, 04:16
by SpudmanWP
Cool find... I've added that site to my daily list. :)

Unread postPosted: 25 Mar 2011, 18:40
by neptune
energo wrote:Source: http://f-35.ca/2011/f-35-weekly-update- ... h-24-2011/

Thursday, March 24th, 2011
F-35 Weekly Update – March 24, 2011
A Message from Larry Lawson

.... AF-3 resumed flight ops for a functional check of the newly installed Mission Systems software and hardware, and returned Code One.
.....


Kudos to the team for Code One. It's a "Big Deal" to get this mod. effort working for LO, a path forward for all F-35s. :D

Unread postPosted: 25 Mar 2011, 18:50
by neptune
energo wrote:Source: http://f-35.ca/2011/f-35-weekly-update- ... h-24-2011/

Thursday, March 24th, 2011
F-35 Weekly Update – March 24, 2011
....This week, the Fort Worth team is hosting a series of high level visitors including the acting Deputy Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition, Mr. Dave van Buren; the USAF Commander of the Air Education and Training Center, Gen. Ed Rice; and Lt. Gen. Terry Robling..


It'd be nice to see if a "Bee" (VL :) or not) could join the Admirals and Generals at The Navy League’s Sea-Air-Space Exposition in Arlington, Va.; 12 April; if the SDD schedule permits. :idea:

Unread postPosted: 28 Mar 2011, 18:55
by SpudmanWP
F-35 ahead of schedule, even after generator failure.

http://www.lexingtoninstitute.org/f-35- ... a=1&c=1171

Author: Loren B. Thompson, Ph.D.
Date: Monday, March 28, 2011

Flight tests of the tri-service F-35 Joint Strike Fighter are running well ahead of the plan for 2011, with 181 flights completed as of March 25 against a plan of 133. In addition, the productivity of each flight test is increasing, with an average of 7.7 unique test points achieved per flight. The combination of additional test flights above plan and greater-than-expected productivity per flight has enabled the overall test program to complete 1,310 test points -- far above the number of 899 planned for this stage in the testing cycle. All three variants of the F-35 are being tested, with the average aircraft performing six flights per month.

The test program might have been dealt a serious setback on March 9 when a conventional takeoff variant was forced to make an emergency landing due to a dual generator failure. Generators provide the electricity that starts the fighter's engine and powers flight controls. However, the cause of the failure was quickly traced to faulty maintenance procedures which have now been corrected, and the test fleet has returned to service. These kinds of anomalies are commonplace in tests of new aircraft.

Lockheed Martin officials are confident they can resolve problems identified in testing with several parts of the short-takeoff/vertical-landing (STOVL) version of the F-35 being developed for the Marine Corps. Among the fixes required are a strengthening of the doors above the mid-fuselage lift-fan, reinforcement of a bulkhead, and resolution of excessive heat deposition at one point near the engine exhaust. Defense secretary Robert Gates recently put the Marine variant on a two-year probationary period to make the necessary fixes, while stating the Air Force and Navy variants were progressing well.

The conventional-takeoff Air Force version will be the most heavily produced F-35, comprising over 70 percent of the domestic production run and almost all of the export sales. The Air Force plans to buy 1,763 conventional-takeoff F-35s, while the Navy and Marine Corps collectively will buy 680 of their two variants. Overseas allies are expected to buy thousands of the planes over the next three decades as they replace aging Cold War fighters and seek a low-cost solution to their requirement for a versatile and survivable tactical aircraft.

Unread postPosted: 16 Jul 2011, 06:35
by Jon
Hi guys

Need an update on squadrons that are for sure getting the F-35.

58th FS....

Unread postPosted: 22 Sep 2011, 17:22
by luke_sandoz
Interesting . . .

http://f-35.ca has a 'special" Canuckistan version of the F-35 with the gun blister on the right side.

Looks like LM hired a PR firm to handle the negative press in Canada and they have goofed the image.

Unread postPosted: 22 Sep 2011, 17:43
by SpudmanWP
hehe... that was one of my fav sites for a few weeks. They were posting the weekly (very detailed) updates that came directly from LM (see energo's March 25th, 2011 post above). Apparently LM frowned upon that and had them not only stop, but scrub their site of all previous weekly posts. Bummer.

I emailed them about it and, surprise surprise, they did not respond. ;)

Unread postPosted: 22 Sep 2011, 22:04
by spazsinbad
luke_sandoz caught the Canuks Cack Handed :D "...'special" Canuckistan version of the F-35 with the gun blister on the right side...."

After 'mirror' error corrected it looks a lot mo' betta...

Unread postPosted: 23 Sep 2011, 01:48
by luke_sandoz
Oh great, a flipped picture, but now look at the Canada & logo aft of the cockpit.

"adanaC"

Unread postPosted: 23 Sep 2011, 01:51
by spazsinbad
"adanaC" -that is the 'Great White UP'!? No? :D O! Canada revisited...

Unread postPosted: 23 Sep 2011, 03:16
by luke_sandoz
Much improved.

Probably adds 200 knots to the top speed and 500km to the range.

Because spelling is important.

Unread postPosted: 23 Sep 2011, 03:30
by rpgrynn
Ah yes the wonders of "foto shop" ;)

Unread postPosted: 26 Oct 2011, 19:52
by spazsinbad
Pentagon, Lockheed At Odds Over F-35 Fixes Oct 26, 2011 By Amy Butler

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/ ... es&next=10

"...Also, as of close of business on Oct. 25, the entire program has conducted 803 flights, exceeding the 749 planned and 6,287 test points against 5,796 planned.

Stevens acknowledges that a design review is ongoing to explore a new approach to the arrested landing hook for the F-35C carrier version, which has not performed well during tests.

Stevens also acknowledged that the program is about two months behind in software development work, an issue that senior program officials acknowledged was one of concern earlier this year. While the 1B software is flying, the Block 2 software was expected to be ready for release for flight testing. Stevens says the company is working to recover the lost time."

Unread postPosted: 27 Oct 2011, 13:57
by spazsinbad
F-35 flight testing on pace for 2011, Lockheed says October 26, 2011 - Bob Cox


http://blogs.star-telegram.com/sky_talk ... -says.html
"Flight testing of the three variants of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter continues to go well, according to Lockheed Martin officials.

The company on Wednesday released new figures on the progress of flight testing so far this year. As of Sept. 30, the flight test program was more than 8 percent ahead of schedule for both test points and test flights.

As of Oct. 25, F-35s had flown 849 times this year and completed 6,254 test points. F-35A models, those destined for the Air Force and most foreign buyers, have completed 388 flights and 2,890 test points.

The F-35B short-takeoff-vertical landing variants completed 287 test flights and 2,043 test points, including 265 vertical landings and 72 vertical landings in 19 days earlier this month aboard the USS Wasp amphibious ship.

F-35C carrier variants have flown 129 times and completed 1,321 test points through Oct. 25. The C-model has been launched by a catapult 59 times in Navy ground testing.

Lockheed Chief Executive Robert Stevens, in remarks to financial analysts, said the test results showed the F-35 program was making good progress. Testing of the F-35C, Stevens said, had showed the need to redesign the arresting hook system used for carrier landings."

Unread postPosted: 01 Nov 2011, 08:55
by spazsinbad
This post is partly repeated (due different content) here: http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-16307.html

Pentagon concludes "should cost" review of F-35 31 Oct 2011

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/11/ ... ompanyNews

"...Lockheed on Monday said the F-35 flight test program was more than 9 percent ahead of schedule, as of Oct. 29.

From the start of flight testing in December 2006 through Oct. 29, it said F-35s flew 1,412 times, including flights by production-model planes and AA-1, a flight test aircraft.

It said the F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) jets being built for the Air Force had flown 398 times in 2011, while the F-35B short takeoff, verticle [sic] landing plane had completed 290 flights and 265 vertical landings. The F-35C or carrier variant had flown 131 times in 2011, it said."

Unread postPosted: 01 Nov 2011, 16:14
by neptune
[quote="spazsinbad... Testing of the F-35C, Stevens said, had showed the need to redesign the arresting hook system used for carrier landings."[/quote]

Redesign usually means the current design is inadequate for the test conditions. :) One big question; in the several trap events were any of them successful or has the "Sea" "snagged any wire"?? :lol: :oops:

Kudo's on the Cat launches and all but we're anxiously awaiting a "good three wire" :wink: ; AOAs/ hook angle/ length, etc.; all the geometry and physics to get it on the deck before the wire, best wishes :2c:

Unread postPosted: 04 Nov 2011, 18:39
by 1st503rdsgt
Says here that the F-35C has performed "three arrestments" as of November 3. What? Where's the video? Has anyone else heard of this?

Edit: It also states the the F-35A has already reached Mach 1.6.

http://defensetech.org/2011/11/04/f-35- ... st-update/

Unread postPosted: 04 Nov 2011, 21:47
by SpudmanWP
FORT WORTH, Texas, November 4th, 2011 -- Lockheed Martin’s [NYSE: LMT] F-35 flight test program continues to make progress. Since the last flight test update issued on Sept. 20, the F-35 Lightning II 5th Generation multirole fighter conducted 185 test flights, bringing the total number of test flights for the year to 837.

A major highlight for October was the completion of F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) ship suitability testing aboard the USS WASP (LHD-1) off the coast of Virginia. The test began when BF-2 executed the first shipboard vertical landing on Oct. 3. The next day, BF-2 executed the first short takeoff from the WASP. During the third week of sea trials, BF-2 and BF-4 operated simultaneously on the ship. Combined, they accomplished 72 short takeoffs and 72 vertical landings during the three-week testing period.

Several flight test and production key milestones were accomplished since the last report:

October was the busiest month for flying in the history of the F-35 flight test program, with F-35 aircraft executing 122 flights. The F-35B aircraft known as BF-2 accomplished 22 flights, the most ever for an F-35 in one month.
F-35Bs completed their 500th flight on Sept. 30. In October, F-35Bs executed the most vertical landings (73) for a single month in the history of the flight test program, including the 200th vertical landing for the program Oct. 4.
AF-12 and AF-13 F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) aircraft were delivered to the 33rd Fighter Wing at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., on Oct. 19 and 26, respectively. This marked the fifth and sixth delivery of CTOL jets to Eglin and the 12th overall delivery of an F-35 to the Department of Defense in 2011.
As of Nov. 3, F-35C carrier variant (CV) jets had executed 59 successful catapult launches and three arrestments.
F-35C aircraft achieved 200 flight hours on Sept. 22.
The F-35A known as AF-1 achieved the F-35’s maximum design limit speed of Mach 1.6 for the first time on Oct. 25.

Cumulative flight test activity totals for 2011 are provided below:

F-35A CTOL jets have flown 407 times.
F-35B STOVL aircraft have completed 296 flights.
F-35C CV jets have flown 134 times.

From the start of flight testing in December 2006 through Nov. 3, F-35s flew 1,432 times, including the production-model flights and AA-1, the original flight test aircraft. For video highlights of the F-35 program, click here.

The F-35 Lightning II is a 5th Generation fighter, combining advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled operations and advanced sustainment. Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 with its principal industrial partners, Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security company that employs about 126,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services.

Media Contacts:
Original PR

Here is the video on Youtube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioF__z5hDAo

Unread postPosted: 18 Feb 2012, 21:42
by spazsinbad
F-35 Test Program Update 12 January 2012

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/f35_news ... tem_id=547

"The F-35 Lightning II test team carried out 972 flights and completed 7,823 test points in 2011, 100 flights and nearly 1,200 test points more than originally planned. The totals include 474 flights and 3,600 test points for F-35A conventional takeoff and landing variant; 333 flights and 2,636 test points for the F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing variant; and 165 flights and 1,587 test points for the F-35C carrier variant. The F-35B test team also executed 268 vertical landings, including seventy-two on the USS Wasp (LHD-1) at sea. The F-35 flight test program plan calls for the verification of 59,585 test points by 31 December 2016. Through 2011, 12,728 test points, or 21.4 percent of the requirement, have been accomplished."

Unread postPosted: 21 Feb 2012, 03:11
by thebigfish
I keep reading on some blogs that "the F35 has failed the initial test of its stealth capability". Is that right or are some trolls spreading rumours on other Blogs.
Any info appreciated.

Unread postPosted: 21 Feb 2012, 03:25
by spazsinbad
Exactly the opposite. How about posting your question on the forum proper please. Thanks. Go here:

'theBIGfish' Question Repeated - Passed Stealth TEST?
http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... 241#217241

Unread postPosted: 23 Feb 2012, 19:50
by neptune
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/p ... g-rep.html

Lockheed Martin F-35 Flight Test And Production Progress Report

Report time again, a bit more detail of CodeOne report. :)

Unread postPosted: 23 Feb 2012, 20:35
by spazsinbad
Woth posting report here as a record for this forum. Websites/URLs have a habit of disappearing/changing....

Lockheed Martin F-35 Flight Test And Production Progress Report 23 Feb 2012

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/p ... g-rep.html

"FORT WORTH, Texas, Feb. 23, 2012 -- Lockheed Martin’s [NYSE: LMT] F-35 program continues to build on its 2011 flight test success. For 2012, the baseline F-35 System Development and Demonstration (SDD) flight test plan calls for the accumulation of 1,001 test flights and 7,873 test points. However, growth in test point requirements throughout the year is anticipated, and the plan will be adjusted as needed.

As of Feb. 20, the F-35 Lightning II 5th Generation multirole fighter had conducted 114 flight tests and achieved 773 test points. A portion of the earned test points came from work added to the flight test baseline plan. Lockheed Martin has delivered three F-35s to the Department of Defense (DOD) year to date.

Since Jan. 1, the F-35 program accomplished several flight test and production milestones:

On Jan. 9, AF-4, an F-35A Conventional Takeoff and Landing (CTOL) test aircraft, reached the highest altitude to date in an F-35; 43,000 feet Mean Sea Level (MSL).

Lockheed Martin ferried the first two production model F-35B Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft to the U.S. Marine Corps on Jan. 11. The aircraft, known as BF-6 and BF-8, are now assigned to the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing's Marine Fighter/Attack Training Squadron 501 residing with the host 33d Fighter Wing at Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Fla.

Demonstrating the ongoing maturation of the F-35 integrated sensor suite, AF-3, an F-35A CTOL test jet, completed the first low Distributed Aperture System (DAS) approach on Jan. 17. [Anyone know what this is / means exactly? Thanks.]

On Jan. 18, the first night flight in the history of the Lockheed Martin F-35 program was completed at Edwards AFB, Calif. Piloted by Lockheed Martin test pilot Mark Ward, AF-6, an F-35A CTOL test jet, took off at 5:05 p.m. PST and landed after sunset at 6:22 p.m.

With the ferry flight of BF-7, an F-35B STOVL, Eglin AFB, Fla., became home of the largest F-35 fleet in the DOD on Jan. 19. BF-7 was the 23rd F-35 Lightning II delivered to the DOD.

On Jan. 20, citing the tremendous progress the F-35B STOVL variant made in 2011, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta rescinded probation for the F-35B, almost a full year ahead of schedule.

The F-35 SDD fleet including AA-1, the original test aircraft, crossed the 2,500 flight hour threshold on Jan. 25.

On Feb. 16 at Edwards AFB, Calif., AF-1, an F-35A CTOL test jet, flew the first external weapons test mission in program history.

Cumulative flight test activity totals for 2012 through Feb. 20 are provided below:

F-35A CTOL jets have flown 46 times.

F-35B STOVL aircraft have completed 45 flights.

F-35C Carrier Variant (CV) jets have flown 23 times.

From the start of flight testing in December 2006, F-35s have flown 1,704 times, including the production-model flights and AA-1, the original flight test aircraft....”

Unread postPosted: 23 Feb 2012, 23:41
by spazsinbad
This article repeats what we see directly above however it adds this bit about more DAS fix stuff: [I guess this bit should be added to the HMDS thread for archive purposes]

Lockheed Martin Releases F-35 Testing Records 23 Feb 2012 by Tamir Eshel

http://defense-update.com/20120223_f35_ ... +Update%29

"...Performance issues associated with DAS have limited the use of the F-35 unique helmet display and sight, developed for the program by VSI. The sight was designed to use DAS live image feeds to display the outside view for the pilot, alleviating the need for night vision goggles for night flight. BAE Systems and VSI were asked to work on temporary solutions using NVG, to provide a near-term solution. However, using NVG on top of the standard helmet will limit the use of the sophisticated display and information fusion capabilities that make the F-35 unique. Therefore, it is anticipated that the objective helmet will be reinstated once DAS will deliver imaging within the required spec. Among the fix being considered are fixed camera mounted in the cockpit, and another, coupled to the helmet, both reducing the latency of night imagery imported from the DAS...."

Unread postPosted: 20 Oct 2012, 11:37
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Martin Provides F-35 Flight-test Update AIN Defense Perspective
October 19, 2012 by Chris Pocock

http://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/ ... est-update

"Flight-testing of the Lockheed Martin F-35 is ahead of the 2012 plan, and software development is making up lost ground, now standing at two months behind schedule. Steve O’Bryan, Lockheed Martin’s v-p for F-35 program integration and business development, told a meeting in London sponsored by The Air League that the F-35B STOVL version that the UK will buy is 40 percent ahead on flights and test points. Of the nine million lines of software code in the aircraft, 87 percent is now in flight test, with another 6 percent in laboratory tests. In response to earlier concerns, Lockheed Martin established a second software laboratory at its Fort Worth facility, at a cost of $150 million and employing 200 more people.

O’Bryan also described the status of efforts to resolve development problems with the F-35’s unique helmet-mounted sight. In the latest simulations, the device demonstrated a latency of only 130 milliseconds, against a 150-millisecond requirement. A new near-infrared camera to improve night-vision acuity is being tested at MIT Lincoln Laboratories and will be flight-tested next year. The “micro-IMUs” (inertial measurement units) that are designed to solve the “jitter” problem are already in flight-test.

The F-35 flight envelope has now been extended to 700 knots, 7g and 20 degrees angle of attack, with higher AOAs to be flown later this year, O’Bryan continued. An F-35A dropped a 2,000-pound GBU-31 BLU-109 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) for the first time this week, from the left internal weapons bay. This follows the first F-35 weapons release, of a 1,000-pound GBU-32, which took place in August. AIM-9X AAMs are flying on outboard wing stations. Forty five F-35s are flying today; another 15 have been rolled out, and the 112th aircraft is now on the final assembly line. Twenty aircraft are now at Eglin AFB, the initial training base; deliveries for the first operational units will be made to Yuma MCAS and Nellis AFB before year-end...."

All good stuff above. The HMDS info will be repeated on that thread.

Unread postPosted: 06 Nov 2012, 03:06
by spazsinbad
Eglin Completes 500TH F-35 Sortie 05 Nov 2012

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/p ... ortie.html

"EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla., Nov. 5, 2012 – The Integrated Training Center (ITC) here completed its 500th combined sortie for both the F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) and F-35B short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft Friday. Flight operations for the F-35 began on the Emerald Coast March 6. There are currently 22 F-35s at Eglin as the fleet continues to grow supporting the team as it trains instructor pilots and maintainers. The team accomplished the 500 sorties in 238 days cutting the time between each milestone sortie:

100th sortie – July 12 - accomplished in 123 days
200th sortie – Aug. 24 - accomplished in 44 days
300th sortie – Sept. 21 - accomplished in 28 days
400th sortie – Oct. 16 - accomplished in 25 days
500th sortie – Nov. 2 - accomplished in 16 days"

Unread postPosted: 12 Jan 2013, 05:54
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Martin Highlights F-35 Program Achievements for 2012 FORT WORTH, Texas, Jan. 11, 2013

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/p ... -2012.html

"The Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Program completed 30 aircraft deliveries and achieved significant advances in flight test highlighting a year of continued progress for 2012.

The 30 F-35 deliveries in 2012 included 11 Conventional Takeoff and Landing (CTOLs), 18 Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing (STOVL) variants, and one Carrier Variant (CV). Two of the STOVLs were the program’s first two international jets, which were delivered to the United Kingdom. All but the carrier variant, known as CF-5, were production aircraft delivered to various bases for operational purposes. CF-5 was built for flight testing and delivered to the System Development and Demonstration (SDD) program. The 30 aircraft delivered in 2012 is more than double the 13 aircraft delivered in 2011.

The 2012 flight test plan called for 988 flights and 8,458 test points by Dec. 31. For the year, the SDD program flew 1,167 flights and tallied 9,319 test points. The F-35A Flight Science test aircraft flew 291 flights and accomplished 2,573 test points. The F-35B Flight Science test aircraft accomplished 396 flights and 2,443 test points. The F-35C flew 239 flights and tallied 2,247 test points. The Mission Systems test aircraft accomplished 241 flights and 2,056 test points. The F-35B also executed 102 vertical landings.

The cumulative 2012 milestones were achieved through a combination of planned test flights and test points, along with test flights and test points added throughout the year. The flight test program is now more than one third complete in aggregate with the Air Force’s F-35A variant leading the way with 43 percent complete.

“We are completing our third year of on-plan system development performance since the F-35 Program Executive Office completed its Technical Baseline Review in 2010,” said Orlando Carvalho, Lockheed Martin F-35 program executive vice president and general manager. “We fully expect this to continue in 2013 as we begin flight test of the Block 2B mission system software which will ultimately provide the initial war-fighting capability the Marines need for their initial operational capability. This successful system development progress, a maturing production line and further operational base stand up are all strong indicators of the F-35 program’s positive trajectory.”

Other 2012 major milestones:

· U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta announced the end of probation for the F-35B STOVL, nearly one year ahead of schedule.

· The first two international F-35s were delivered to the United Kingdom.

· The first three operational F-35B STOVL fighters delivered in November marked the beginning of tactical operational training at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz.

· 33rd Fighter Wing at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., completed its Operational Utility Evaluation (OUE) and Air Education and Training Command (AETC) officials announced that the wing is ready for pilot training in 2013. The wing flew more than 700 sorties in 2012.

· Norway procured its first F-35 commencing the largest public procurement project in its history. The event was marked by Minister of Defence Espen Barth Eide authorizing the order for the first F-35A for the Norwegian Armed Forces.

· Luke AFB was selected for F-35A U.S. and international pilot training. The base will receive 72 aircraft for three fighter squadrons.

· Major flight test accomplishments included the first aerial weapons release for the CTOL and STOVL; the F-35A reached maximum high-angle-of-attack milestone in four flights; the first night flight and night refueling missions were accomplished and both the CTOL and STOVL completed air-start testing.

· F-35 program surpassed 5,000 flight hours."

Nothing else worthwhile.

Re:

Unread postPosted: 12 Jan 2013, 15:37
by weasel1962
The Green Knights to get full sqn of F-35B by end 2013.

http://www.yumasun.com/news/aircraft-84 ... n-new.html

RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 31 Jan 2013, 01:14
by spazsinbad
100th F-35 On Lockheed Martin’s Production Line

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/p ... ction.html

"FORT WORTH, Texas, Jan. 30, 2013 – Assembly of the 100th Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] F-35 Lightning II is well underway at the F-35 production facility here. F-35 technicians are in the final phase of building the wings that will be installed on the 100th aircraft known as AF-41. AF-41, a conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variant, is one of 88 F-35s in various stages of completion on Lockheed Martin production lines Fort Worth and Marietta, Ga., and supplier locations across the world. The jet will be delivered to the U.S. Air Force and is slated for pilot training at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz...."

RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 01 Feb 2013, 21:47
by f-22lm
Lockheed F-35 program head to retire

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013 ... s-versions

Tom Burbage, a former Navy fighter pilot who ran Lockheed Martin Corp's F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program for 13 years, plans to retire at the end of March, Lockheed said on Thursday.

"After 32 years of working with Lockheed Martin and legacy divisions, Tom Burbage has decided to retire. His impact to the F-35 Program and other areas of aeronautics is immeasurable," said Lockheed spokeswoman Laura Siebert.

RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 01 Feb 2013, 22:20
by spazsinbad
Perhaps worthy to have joined this earlier posted article here already? Not that it matters - no one noticed. Must be the 'Butler Effect'. :D

Farewell Tour: Burbage and the F-35s by Amy Butler 31 Jan 2013 http://www.aviationweek.com/Blogs.aspx? ... b8b655b86f

AT: http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-22086.html

Interesting quote from the ChicTrib article:

"...Burbage gave a wide-ranging speech about the history of the F-35 program to the Royal Aeronautical Society at the British embassy in Washington in November, noting that it was 21 percent ahead of schedule with test flights at that point. [Anybody have text/quotes from this speech?]

After the speech, he told Reuters that he felt positive about the F-35 program after the ups and downs of recent years.

"I'm pretty sanguine about most everything on this program," he said at the time. "It's all going to be fine. The progress that we're making right now is pretty dramatic, and that's in all areas."
______________________

Plenty of BurbageBIO stuff here with links to other bits (stroll down): http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... age#242421

Re:

Unread postPosted: 14 Feb 2013, 02:08
by weasel1962
http://www.aviationweek.com/Article.asp ... 548301.xml

"Lockheed also plans to deliver 36 low-rate, initial-production aircraft in fiscal 2013"

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Weasel's comments: This will bring up numbers to (79?) LRIP (30 in 2012, 13 in 2011, some of which are for UK). Most of these will be training a/c (Eglin 59, Luke 72 etc). 79 will also coincide with roughly middle of lot 5 reducing the delivery gap with plan to under a year.

RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 22 Feb 2013, 13:41
by f-22lm
Just wanted to post this awesome picture ;).

Image

Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 15 Mar 2013, 23:22
by energo
f-22lm wrote:Just wanted to post this awesome picture ;).

Image


It doesn't get much better than that, thank's. :notworthy:


/BB

RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 16 Mar 2013, 00:53
by aceshigh
Nice pic. Burbage did a very good job for the program. Got a lot of help from Norway in the early phase, early commitment, probably paid off both ways. I have a feeling that had something to do with his personality. Wish him well in his retirement.

RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 12 May 2013, 03:31
by neptune
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=116

F-35 Flight Test Update 10

By Eric Hehs Posted 11 May 2013

20 October 2012: F-35A AF-4 completed the first F-35 spin recovery chute taxi deployment test. Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson deployed the twenty-eight foot diameter parachute at a speed of sixty-five knots. Nelson flew the system on the aircraft for the first time four days later to evaluate the effects of the mounting fixture of the spin recovery chute on flying qualities.

25 October 2012: Navy Lt. Chris Tabert flew F-35C CF-3 at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, for the 1,000th SDD flight for 2012.

26 October 2012: Air Force Maj. Matt Phillips piloted F-35A AF-3 for the first AIM-120 weapon integration flight. The test involved tracking a moving target and simulating launches.

29 October 2012: US government test pilot Vince Caterina flew F-35A AF-4 on its first high angle of attack mission. The aircraft demonstrated acceptable maneuverability at twenty-six and then at thirty degrees angle of attack during this flight. AF-4 was then flown on high-AOA missions five more times on the next five days. The aircraft achieved a maximum angle of attack of fifty degrees. Flights also included angle of attack conditions of -10, 23, 26, 30, 35, 40, and 45 degrees.

29 October 2012: An AGM-154 Joint Standoff Weapon was fit checked for the first time in the weapon bay of an F-35C. While previous fit checks have been performed on mock-up weapon bays, this test marked the first time a JSOW was installed in an actual F-35. The check was on CF-1 at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

7 November 2012: Lockheed Martin test pilot Mark Ward was at the controls of F-35A AF-3 when the aircraft achieved 300 flight hours in a two-hour test mission from Edwards AFB, California.

8 November 2012: Navy test pilot Lt. Chris Tabert ferried F-35B BF-18 from Marietta, Georgia, to the F-35 ITF at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, after being ferried by Tabert from Fort Worth, Texas, to Marietta on 5 November.

12 November 2012: Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson flew F-35A AF-4 to the 50,000-foot altitude design limit during a setup for a test run at 45,000 feet. This flight was the first time an F-35 was flown to its maximum altitude.

15 November 2012: The first weapon pit drop for an F-35C was completed on CF-2 at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. The weapon was a 2,000-pound GBU-31.

28 November 2012: Pit testing required for Block 2B software was completed for F-35C at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

30 November 2012: Lockheed Martin test pilot Bill Gigliotti made the first flight of F-35C CF-5. The aircraft is the final System Design and Development, or SDD, test aircraft.

30 November 2012: BAE test pilot Peter Wilson was at the controls of F-35B BF-1 as it hovered for ten minutes—the longest hover duration of an F-35B to date. The flight occurred at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

3 December 2012: Marine Corps Maj. C.R. Clift was at the controls of F-35B BF-1 for its 200th vertical landing. The flight occurred at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

3 December 2012: Navy test pilot Lt. Cdr. Michael Burks completed the first airborne release of an inert GBU-12 Paveway II laser-guided bomb from an F-35B. Burks, flying BF-3, released the weapon over the Atlantic Test Ranges while traveling at Mach 0.8 at approximately 5,000-feet altitude. The flight originated from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

4 December 2012: Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson flew F-35A AF-4 for the first intentional departure from controlled flight as part of the high angle of attack testing being performed at the Air Force Test Center at Edwards AFB, California. The highest angle of attack observed during this test was seventy-three degrees.

5 December 2012: Marine Corps test pilot Maj. Richard Rusnok completed a series of night STOVL missions in F-35B BF-4 from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. The missions included the first night hover.

7 December 2012: Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson flew F-35A AF-4 for the first high AOA flight with external stores. The flight was also the 150th mission for AF-4. The stores included pylons on Stations 2, 3, 9, and 10 and AIM-9X missiles on Stations 1 and 11. The aircraft was also carrying a GBU-31 and two AIM-120s in its internal weapon bays.

7 December 2012: Marine Corps Maj. C. R. Clift piloted BF-1 for the 1,000th STOVL flight for the F-35 SDD program. The flight occurred at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

8 December 2012: Lockheed Martin pilot Ed Delehant flew the Cooperative Avionics Test Bed, or CATBird CATB, for the 300th flight of the aircraft. CATBird is used to test mission systems for the F-35.

11 December 2012: Marine Corps Maj. C. R. Clift flew BF-4 for the first time carrying live countermeasures. (First time for an F-35B.) The aircraft surpassed 200 total flight hours on the same flight.

11 December 2012: F-35C CF-5, the last F-35 produced under the SDD contract and the seventeenth aircraft delivered for the SDD fleet, is ferried from Fort Worth, Texas, to NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, by Navy Lt. Cmdr. Michael Burks.

18 December 2012: US government test pilot Vince Catarina flew AF-1 at Mach 1.2 in a flying qualities mission that included 360-degree rolls with open weapon bay doors.

31 December 2012: The F-35 test fleet ended 2012 completing 1,167 flights and more than 9,300 test points—the highest annual total of flights and hours for the program.

18 January 2013: F-35C CF-1 and CF-2 take on fuel from a KC-130 tanker during a test flight on 18 January 2013 from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. The flight marked the first time two F-35Cs aerial refueled at the same time. Navy Lt. Chris Tabert flew CF-1 for the mission. Lockheed Martin test pilot Dan Canin flew CF-2.

22 January 2013: Air Force Lt. Col. Brent Reinhardt flew AF-1 to complete full envelope clean wing flutter testing with weapon bay doors opened and closed for the F-35A variant. The final test runs were at 700 knots at low altitude with weapon bay doors opened and closed.

28 January 2013: BAE test pilot Peter Wilson flew F-35C CF-2 beyond 300 flight hours during a test mission that originated from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

5 March 2013: Lockheed Martin test pilot Bill Gigliotti delivered F-35B BF-17 to the F-35 Integrated Test Force at Edwards AFB, California, on 5 March 2013. The aircraft is to be used at the ITF for mission systems testing.

23 March 2013: BAE test pilot Peter Wilson performed the first slow landing in an F-35B with external stores. The flight—BF-1 loaded with a centerline gun pod and six wing pylons, including two pylons loaded with AIM-9X missiles—occurred at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

26 March 2013: Navy Lt. Cdr. Michael Burks piloted BF-3 for the first AIM-120 AMRAAM separation test from an F-35B. The flight originated from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. Two days later, Burks completed the second weapon separation—this time with a 1,000-pound GBU-32. This test was followed the next day with a GBU-12 separation test.

26 March 2013: Navy Lt. Cdr. Michael Burks piloted BF-3 for the first AIM-120 AMRAAM separation test from an F-35B. The flight originated from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. Two days later, Burks completed the second weapon separation—this time with a 1,000-pound GBU-32. This test was followed the next day with a GBU-12 separation test.

20 October 2012: F-35A AF-4 completed the first F-35 spin recovery chute taxi deployment test. Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson deployed the twenty-eight foot diameter parachute at a speed of sixty-five knots. Nelson flew the system on the aircraft for the first time four days later to evaluate the effects of the mounting fixture of the spin recovery chute on flying qualities.

20 October 2012: Spin Recovery Chute Tests
F-35A AF-4 completed the first F-35 spin recovery chute taxi deployment test. Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson deployed the twenty-eight foot diameter parachute at a speed of sixty-five knots. Nelson flew the system on the aircraft for the first time four days later to evaluate the effects of the mounting fixture of the spin recovery chute on flying qualities.

26 October 2012: AIM-120 Integration
Air Force Maj. Matt Phillips piloted F-35A AF-3 for the first AIM-120 weapon integration flight. The test involved tracking a moving target and simulating launches.

25 October 2012: 1,000th SDD Flight For 2012
Navy Lt. Chris Tabert flew F-35C CF-3 at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, for the 1,000th SDD flight for 2012.

29 October 2012: First High AOA Flight
US government test pilot Vince Caterina flew F-35A AF-4 on its first high angle of attack mission. The aircraft demonstrated acceptable maneuverability at twenty-six and then at thirty degrees angle of attack during this flight. AF-4 was then flown on high-AOA missions five more times on the next five days. The aircraft achieved a maximum angle of attack of fifty degrees. Flights also included angle of attack conditions of -10, 23, 26, 30, 35, 40, and 45 degrees.

29 October 2012: First JSOW Loading
An AGM-154 Joint Standoff Weapon was fit checked for the first time in the weapon bay of an F-35C. While previous fit checks have been performed on mock-up weapon bays, this test marked the first time a JSOW was installed in an actual F-35. The check was on CF-1 at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

7 November 2012: 300 Flight Hours For AF-3
Lockheed Martin test pilot Mark Ward was at the controls of F-35A AF-3 when the aircraft achieved 300 flight hours in a two-hour test mission from Edwards AFB, California.

8 November 2012: BF-18 Joins Test Fleet
Navy test pilot Lt. Chris Tabert ferried F-35B BF-18 from Marietta, Georgia, to the F-35 ITF at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, after being ferried by Tabert from Fort Worth, Texas, to Marietta on 5 November.

14 November 2012: Max Altitude
Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson flew F-35A AF-4 to the 50,000-foot altitude design limit during a setup for a test run at 45,000 feet. This flight was the first time an F-35 was flown to its maximum altitude.

15 November 2012: First F-35C Weapon Drop
The first weapon pit drop for an F-35C was completed on CF-2 at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. The weapon was a 2,000-pound GBU-31.
Photo by Arnel Parker

28 November 2012: F-35C Completes Weapon Pit Testing
Pit testing required for Block 2B software was completed for F-35C at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

30 November 2012: CF-5 First Flight
Lockheed Martin test pilot Bill Gigliotti made the first flight of F-35C CF-5. The aircraft is the final System Design and Development, or SDD, test aircraft.

30 November 2012: Longest Hover
BAE test pilot Peter Wilson was at the controls of F-35B BF-1 as it hovered for ten minutes—the longest hover duration of an F-35B to date. The flight occurred at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

3 December 2012: 200th Vertical Landing
Marine Corps Maj. C.R. Clift was at the controls of F-35B BF-1 for its 200th vertical landing. The flight occurred at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

3 December 2012: First GBU-12 Release
Navy test pilot Lt. Cdr. Michael Burks completed the first airborne release of an inert GBU-12 Paveway II laser-guided bomb from an F-35B. Burks, flying BF-3, released the weapon over the Atlantic Test Ranges while traveling at Mach 0.8 at approximately 5,000-feet altitude. The flight originated from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

4 December 2012: First Intentional Departure
Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson flew F-35A AF-4 for the first intentional departure from controlled flight as part of the high angle of attack testing being performed at the Air Force Test Center at Edwards AFB, California. The highest angle of attack observed during this test was seventy-three degrees.

5 December 2012: First F-35B Night STOVL
Marine Corps test pilot Maj. Richard Rusnok completed a series of night STOVL missions in F-35B BF-4 from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. The missions included the first night hover.

7 December 2012: First High AOA Flight With External Stores
Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson flew F-35A AF-4 for the first high AOA flight with external stores. The flight was also the 150th mission for AF-4. The stores included pylons on Stations 2, 3, 9, and 10 and AIM-9X missiles on Stations 1 and 11. The aircraft was also carrying a GBU-31 and two AIM-120s in its internal weapon bays.

7 December 2012: 1,000th STOVL Flight
Marine Corps Maj. C. R. Clift piloted BF-1 for the 1,000th STOVL flight for the F-35 SDD program. The flight occurred at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

8 December 2012: 300th CATBird Flight
Lockheed Martin pilot Ed Delehant flew the Cooperative Avionics Test Bed, or CATBird CATB, for the 300th flight of the aircraft. CATBird is used to test mission systems for the F-35.

11 December 2012: BF-4 Flies With Live Countermeasures
Marine Corps Maj. C. R. Clift flew BF-4 for the first time carrying live countermeasures. The aircraft surpassed 200 total flight hours on the same flight.

11 December 2012: CF-5 Goes To Pax
F-35C CF-5, the last F-35 produced under the SDD contract and the seventeenth aircraft delivered for the SDD fleet, is ferried from Fort Worth, Texas, to NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, by Navy Lt. Cmdr. Michael Burks.

18 December 2012: Supersonic Rolls With Doors Open
US government test pilot Vince Catarina flew AF-1 at Mach 1.2 in a flying qualities mission that included 360-degree rolls with open weapon bay doors.

31 December 2012: Test Fleet Totals
The F-35 test fleet ended 2012 completing 1,167 flights and more than 9,300 test points—the highest annual total of flights and hours for the program.

18 January 2013: Two-Ship F-35C Tanking
F-35C CF-1 and CF-2 take on fuel from a KC-130 tanker during a test flight on 18 January 2013 from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. The flight marked the first time two F-35Cs aerial refueled at the same time. Navy Lt. Chris Tabert flew CF-1 for the mission. Lockheed Martin test pilot Dan Canin flew CF-2.

22 January 2013: F-35A Flutter Envelope Cleared
Air Force Lt. Col. Brent Reinhardt flew AF-1 to complete full envelope clean wing flutter testing with weapon bay doors opened and closed for the F-35A variant. The final test runs were at 700 knots at low altitude with weapon bay doors opened and closed.

28 January 2013: CF-2 Surpasses 300 Flight Hours
BAE test pilot Peter Wilson flew F-35C CF-2 beyond 300 flight hours during a test mission that originated from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

5 March 2013: BF-17 To Edwards
Lockheed Martin test pilot Bill Gigliotti delivered F-35B BF-17 to the F-35 Integrated Test Force at Edwards AFB, California, on 5 March 2013. The aircraft is to be used at the ITF for mission systems testing.

23 March 2013: F-35B Slow Landing With External Stores
BAE test pilot Peter Wilson performed the first slow landing in an F-35B with external stores. The flight—BF-1 loaded with a centerline gun pod and six wing pylons, including two pylons loaded with AIM-9X missiles—occurred at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

26 March 2013: F-35B Weapon Separations
Navy Lt. Cdr. Michael Burks piloted BF-3 for the first AIM-120 AMRAAM separation test from an F-35B. The flight originated from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. Two days later, Burks completed the second weapon separation—this time with a 1,000-pound GBU-32. This test was followed the next day with a GBU-12 separation test.

:)

RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 17 May 2013, 05:34
by spazsinbad
F-35A Successfully Completes High Angle Of Attack Testing 16 May 2013
"EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif., May 16, 2013 - The latest in a series of Lockheed Martin [LMT] F-35A high angle of attack (AOA) testing was recently completed. The testing accomplished high AOA beyond both the positive and negative maximum command limits, including intentionally putting the aircraft out of control in several configurations. This included initially flying in the stealth clean wing configuration. It was followed by testing with external air-to-air pylons and missiles and then with open weapon bay doors. The F-35A began edge-of-the-envelope high AOA testing in the Fall 2012. For all testing, recovery from out of control flight has been 100 percent successful without the use of the spin recovery chute, which is carried to maximize safety...."

RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 17 May 2013, 05:49
by spazsinbad
Expeditionary Airfields go wireless 16 May 2013
"NAVAL AIR SYSTEM COMMAND, PATUXENT RIVER, Md. -- Mike Jiavaras, front left, Expeditionary Airfield (EAF) engineering team lead; Ken Maynard, front center, Applied Research Lab research and development engineer; and Bob Nantz, front right, F-35 integrated test force team lead; review thermal data collected via a wireless system, upon completion of F-35B Joint Strike Fighter testing May 10 at the AM2 Mat vertical takeoff and landing pad at Patuxent River.

The Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment Program Office (PMA-251) EAF team is using new wireless technology and instrumented matting to evaluate the effects of future aircraft on AM2 Mat airfields to ensure safe, supportable flight operations. For more information, visit Expeditionary Airfields": http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... 033942A78E

http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=5347

RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 17 May 2013, 20:35
by SpudmanWP
Massive update to the Flight Test at Edwards

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=117


F-35 Flight Testing At Edwards
By Eric Hehs Posted 17 May 2013

The first thing members of the F-35 Integrated Test Force see when they walk through the main entrance to the hangar at Edwards AFB, California, is a large flat screen display with a list of flight test priorities. The items on that list can change from one day to the next.

“Stability is crucial to successful test execution, but we can turn on a dime if priorities shift,” noted Lt. Col. George Schwartz, US government director for the F-35 ITF at Edwards. “The helmet mounted display test we are flying tonight is an example. The program asked us two days ago to fly an additional night flight for HMD testing. We are conducting that mission tonight.”

Edwards normally operates a daylight flying schedule, so a short-notice night mission requires a significant adjustment in schedules and resources across Edwards. “The night mission exemplifies the incredible support the F-35 ITF gets from the base,” Schwartz added.

The F-35 ITF at Edwards consists of more than 900 military, contractors, and civilian personnel from a variety of services, countries, and industries. In 2012, the ITF operated six F-35As assigned to Edwards—three for flight sciences testing and three for mission systems testing—as well as one F-35B temporarily deployed to Edwards from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, for air start testing.

By the end of 2013, Edwards F-35 ITF will be operating three additional F-35s—two F-35Bs and one F-35C, for a total of nine F-35s. The test pilot population will expand from nine pilots to twelve pilots as well. The additional aircraft and pilots will be involved primarily with mission system testing.

Expanding The Envelope
Since receiving their first two F-35As (called AF-1 and AF-2) in May 2010, Edwards F-35 ITF personnel have been busy expanding the flight envelope.

“We spent the first two years turning the F-35 into a flying machine, but the focus has quietly shifted to weaponizing the aircraft in both flight sciences and mission systems,” Schwartz said. “Flight sciences work began with a small envelope. Today we’re flying at the edge of the envelope—at 100 percent loads—out to 1.6 Mach. Thanks to all the incredible work on envelope expansion done by this team, we are flying at seven g’s with no loads monitoring on our mission systems aircraft, and we have proven the aircraft can operate anywhere throughout the full envelope.”

The majority of the envelope expansion has been accomplished on AF-1, AF-2, and AF-4—the three F-35As devoted to flight sciences testing. F-35A AF-1 is flown in flutter tests. AF-2 is flown for most of the loads testing. And AF-4, recognizable by its spin recovery chute, is flown in high angle of attack test missions. These three aircraft alone accumulated about 600 hours of flying time in about 300 flights in 2012—approximately one-fourth of the total 1,167 System Design and Development missions for the entire fleet, which includes the test aircraft at Pax River.

Mike Glass, F-35 ITF site director at Edwards for Lockheed Martin, doesn’t see that level of activity diminishing for the flight sciences aircraft. “Envelope expansion testing remains significant in 2013,” Glass said. “We’ve completed the clean wing flutter flight sciences testing. Now we are installing pylons on the aircraft and doing the same type of flutter and loads testing we did with the clean wing. We will be conducting these tests for the next couple of years but with different load configurations on the aircraft.”

High angle of attack testing with the F-35 began in late October 2012. This testing involves taking the aircraft to its production angle of attack limit, which is fifty degrees. It also involves taking the aircraft beyond this limit to evaluate its characteristics in recovering from out-of-control conditions.

“High AOA testing produces some of the most challenging environments for the engine because the intake gets bad air,” explained David Nelson, lead F-35 test pilot for Lockheed Martin at Edwards. “The bad air creates a potential for producing a flameout, which is basically an engine shutdown. For that reason, air start testing preceded high AOA testing.”

Air start testing involves shutting down the engine and restarting it in flight. All four test pilots involved in high-AOA flight tests have flown air start missions. “The graduation exercise involved turning off the engine at 45,000 feet and then restarting it,” Nelson said. “Everything worked as planned.”

Besides producing conditions that can cause the engine to flame out, flying at high angles of attack can also lead to out-of-control flight. The spin recovery chute mounted at the apex of a four-legged structure on the back of AF-4 is designed to deal with that possibility. The test pilot can deploy this twenty-eight foot diameter parachute in case the airplane gets into an out-of-control condition from which the pilot cannot recover with the standard flight control inputs. The chute has not been needed to date.

“The airplane does quite well at high AOA,” Nelson added, “and the tests have been proceeding smoothly. We went from twenty degrees angle of attack to fifty degrees in only four days of testing.” Nelson and other pilots have also evaluated flying qualities at minus ten degrees AOA, which is the maximum design limit for negative AOA for the airplane. High AOA testing for 2013 will involve a variety of loadings mounted externally.

Loads Testing
Loads testing involves putting the aircraft in highly dynamic conditions to measure the stresses on the airframe and on other components. The tests verify the structural integrity of the F-35 in all flight regimes. Most of the loads testing has been flown on AF-2. US Air Force test pilot Lt. Col. Brent Reinhardt, who has been at the ITF since June 2012, has flown many of these missions.

“Loads missions can be physically demanding,” he said. “Some test points are hard to hit. I am diving at the ground at sixty degrees, doing Mach-one-point-whatever, and pulling 5.6 g’s while doing a roll—all this maneuvering just so we can hit a loads point at given speed and altitude conditions. Depending on the point, a lot of the runs start at Mach 1.3 and at altitudes nearing 50,000 feet. During the rolls, I increase the g’s so the flight test engineers on the ground can determine if we are overstressing any part of the airplane.”

Jennifer Schleifer is one of the flight test engineers who monitors and measures the loads on the aircraft during these test missions. Assigned to AF-2, she arrived at Edwards with the aircraft in May 2010. “We are flying on the edges of the structural envelope,” she explained, “and we have to make sure the airplane does not cross an edge. We spend a lot of time in the control room making sure that we won’t exceed structural limits.”

“We’re flying at Mach 1.6 and at more than seven g’s,” added Reinhardt. In a lot of the loads tests, pilots perform rolling maneuvers at a particular g. “Once we clear out a portion of the envelope at that g, we move to a higher g and repeat the testing process. We are shooting for a continuous g roll for 360 degrees through a certain block of altitude.”

In these maneuvers, the F-35 is often pushed to a very high roll rate, which is around 200 degrees per second.

“Operational pilots will never execute some of the maneuvers we’re performing in the airplane,” said Reinhardt. “But the maneuvers are part of building a flight envelope. We are verifying that the airframe will be fine structurally if it stays within the limits we are testing here.”

When not flying or conducting an actual mission, test pilots and flight test engineers practice the missions in a simulator. “We go to the simulator with a pilot to see if the more challenging loads points are achievable,” added Schleifer. “In the simulator, we can determine what Mach and what altitude the pilot needs to set up a particular run. We easily spend four hours in the simulator for every flight. We often return to the simulator to rehearse the points the morning of the flight. More practice in the simulator translates to greater mission efficiency in the air.”

Mission System Testing
“Flight sciences testing is fun,” Nelson said, “but it has its limits. Once an aircraft is good to nine g’s, it’s good to nine g’s. There’s no updating the flight envelope thereafter. Mission systems, on the other hand, will evolve for the life of the F-35, just as capabilities continue to evolve for the F-22 and F-16.”

Mission system testing deals with how the aircraft detects what is going on around it and how well it conveys that information to the pilot. Mission system tests are used to evaluate the functionality of the various electronic systems and sensors on the aircraft, including communications (datalinks and satellite communications), radar, countermeasures, distributed apertures, and electro-optical targeting.

Mission systems, combined with stealth, define the F-35. They separate fifth generation fighters from previous generation fighters.

“The F-35 was designed as a stealthy sensor platform,” added Reinhardt. “The aircraft can carry two 2,000-pound bombs and two AIM-120s internally. A similarly configured F-16 must carry those bombs and missiles externally, in the wind stream. Plus the F-16 has to add external fuel tanks as well as external targeting and countermeasure pods. These external loads reduce performance. And they increase radar cross section. We have to look at the whole picture when comparing fighters.”

Before mission systems are tested in the F-35s at Edwards, they are checked out on the ground in the mission systems integration laboratory in Fort Worth, Texas, and in the air in the Cooperative Avionics Test Bed (referred to as CATB, or CATbird), which is also based in Fort Worth.

The mission systems fleet at Edwards originally consisted of F-35A AF-3, AF-6, and AF-7. Unlike the flight sciences test aircraft, these three F-35s fly with a full complement of electronic systems and sensors found on operational F-35s. This current fleet will be increased with the three additional F-35s scheduled for delivery in 2013, which will also be used for mission system testing. F-35B BF-17 arrived in March. It was joined by BF-18 in April. CF-8 is expected to arrive later in the year.

“The additional aircraft coming in will help with multi-ship missions,” explained Glass. “As you can imagine, launching four aircraft for a mission at one time with only four aircraft available can be a real challenge even for an operational unit. Having six aircraft should improve our success.”

These multi-ship missions represent the increasing complexity and continuing evolution of mission system testing. Most of the mission system testing performed with the F-35 prior to 2013 involved single aircraft and even single sensors with limited sensor fusion, that is, the process for taking inputs from two or more sensors, combining them, distilling them, and then conveying them in an intuitive form to the pilot.

“At the system level, we are moving from testing individual systems or testing small federated groups of systems to testing fusion, where all of the sensors work together,” explained Capt. Nathan Yerrick, a US Air Force flight test engineer at the Edwards F-35 ITF.

“Eventually we will have all systems on,” Yerrick continued. “In terms of mission profiles, we had single F-35 operations early on. That is, one F-35 would go out with a chase aircraft. Now we are adding another F-35 as wingman, and the two F-35s are flying against multiple, maneuvering targets. In the next year or so, we will have our first four-ship F-35 mission with multiple maneuvering targets.”

Software
Because mission systems are common for the most part across all F-35 variants, the mission system testing done on an F-35A applies to the F-35B and F-35C. Similarly, the software that underlies the evolution is shared.

Capabilities associated with mission systems are being developed in a series of software blocks. Block 1 covers basic functions of the navigation system, the communication systems, and the sensors. With Block 1, the aircraft is limited to subsonic airspeeds, 40,000-foot altitude, 4.5 maximum g force, and eighteen degrees maximum angle of attack. Block 2A covers the Multifunction Advanced Data Link, the current Link-16, the maintenance data link, and a mission debriefing system.

Block 2B, which is the initial warfighting version of the software, adds capabilities associated with air-to-air and air-to-ground missions. It also has the complete set of maintenance functions. With Block 2B, the aircraft can be flown at supersonic speeds (up to Mach 1.2 for B- and C-models); at maximum g force of 5.5 and 7.5 for B- and C-models, respectively; and at maximum angle of attack of fifty degrees. The software also covers various loadings of the AIM-120 air-to-air missile, 2,000-pound JDAM GPS-guided bombs, and 500-pound GBU-12 laser-guided bombs.

Block 3, the full warfighting version of the software, is scheduled to be installed on production F-35s beginning with the ninth production lot, called Low-Rate Initial Production 9, or LRIP 9.

“We will wrap up the last of the mission system testing for Block 2A in summer 2013 and have already started testing 2B in the spring,” explained Eric Schutte, US government mission systems lead engineer at Edwards. “We corrected a lot of issues during our tests with 2A. The electro optical targeting system, for example, is working a lot better now. Link 16 is working well, too. We performed some interoperability tests with Link 16 last December. We will be doing a lot more interoperability testing with Block 2B.

“The software has come a long way,” Schutte added. “This is an incredibly complex airplane. Getting all the systems talking to each other can be a real challenge.”

Weapon Testing
Software updates are also delivering more weapon capability to the F-35. The test aircraft at Edwards began flying with weapons in 2012. The first bomb separation test occurred from F-35A AF-1 on 16 October 2012. The first AMRAAM separation test came three days later. The Edwards F-35 ITF is gearing up for about another twenty weapon drops in a series of weapon delivery accuracy tests for the spring and summer of 2013.

“We’ve done separation tests with the AMRAAM and a GBU-31,” said Bobby Rocha, a weapons integration engineer at the F-35 ITF. “These are the first steps toward actual weapon launch.”

Early weapon tests fall into the flight sciences regime. The initial separation tests are used to verify that the weapon separation characteristics conform to predictions. These initial tests are done on flight sciences aircraft—mostly on AF-1.

“We have a defined envelope for weapon releases,” Rocha noted. “We start with benign releases at higher altitudes, at one g, and at Mach 0.8. Then we come down in altitude and release at increased pressures. After that, we do releases at g forces above and below one g. Some of these test profiles are to establish an envelope so they are conducted at the edge of the operational envelope.”

As the envelope is established, the tests transition to the mission systems aircraft. “The weapon delivery accuracy tests are flown on the mission systems aircraft,” Rocha continued. “The delivery tests will be fairly simple at first. They will determine that the aircraft can hit a target with the weapon. That involves making sure the weapon receives the updates it needs from the aircraft, guides properly, and hits its target. The releases from mission systems aircraft will become more operationally representative and more complex as the testing proceeds.”

Maintenance Evaluations
Besides flight testing, the F-35s operating from Edwards are also being tasked to verify technical data used to maintain the aircraft and to evaluate and test the overall system for maintaining the F-35.

“For technical data, we have a list by US Air Force specialty codes for maintenance actions we want to evaluate,” explained Mary Parker, deputy for logistics at the F-35 ITF. “Whenever we have a maintenance task on the airplane that can be used to verify the technical data, representatives from the US government and Lockheed Martin are right behind the maintenance technicians asking if the techs have the information and the right tools they need. We are making sure that the maintenance task instructions can be performed in the field.”

The Edwards ITF has recently completed evaluations for servicing and towing the aircraft in chemical protection gear as well as for maintaining the engine. The chemical protection gear consists of overgarments, boots, and gas masks. “We are also evaluating weapons loading, which covers loading AMRAAMs and JDAMS into the internal weapon bays while wearing chem gear,” Parker continued. “In an upcoming phase, we will evaluate maintenance items related to low observable restoration. The maintenance personnel will be wearing chem. gear in these evaluations as well.”

Maintenance at the ITF is performed by personnel from Lockheed Martin as well as by civilians and military personnel working for the US Government. Four technicians come from international air forces—two from the Netherlands, one from Norway, and one from Canada.

“In many ways, the F-35 is easier to maintain than the F-16,” said Capt. Terje Vik, a maintenance lead from the Royal Norwegian Air Force. Vik has been at the F-35 ITF since the aircraft first arrived May 2010. “The F-35 has fewer LRUs [line replaceable units] and is more software driven. Normal scheduled maintenance is reduced. And the computer interface replaces a lot of test equipment. The aircraft also has more built-in test capability. Overall, fewer people are required to maintain the F-35.”

Delivering Capability
While the priorities on those flat screen panels positioned at the main entrance may change from day to day, the overarching goal for the F-35 ITF at Edwards remains constant: To deliver a highly capable fighter that is safe and meets all of its requirements.

“The testing we are doing now is focused on delivering capability,” concluded Schwartz. “Ultimately, we are delivering that capability to future generations of fighter pilots who will be operating the F-35.”
Eric Hehs is the editor of Code One.


RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 21 Jun 2013, 03:44
by arkadyrenko
Update on F-35 testing here:

https://www.box.com/shared/9f0eion3wtr8r27d9ubc

Highlights:

F-35A: 77% of test points
F-35B: only 41% of all test points
F-35C: 96% of test points (ironically best version)

F-35 may be released with some level of buffet/transonic roll off, as they cannot change the control laws much further, C will be most heavily affected, still waiting for more comprehensive testing.

Weapons separation tests are all behind schedule, software is behind schedule. Predicted that 3F separation tests will pressure the 3F release date.

RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 21 Jun 2013, 03:51
by spazsinbad

RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 26 Jun 2013, 14:57
by orkss
F-35 Lightning II Program Status and Fast Facts
June 12, 2013


https://www.f35.com/assets/uploads/down ... ne2013.pdf

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 26 Jun 2013, 17:04
by haavarla
arkadyrenko wrote:Update on F-35 testing here:

https://www.box.com/shared/9f0eion3wtr8r27d9ubc

Highlights:

F-35A: 77% of test points
F-35B: only 41% of all test points
F-35C: 96% of test points (ironically best version)

F-35 may be released with some level of buffet/transonic roll off, as they cannot change the control laws much further, C will be most heavily affected, still waiting for more comprehensive testing.

Weapons separation tests are all behind schedule, software is behind schedule. Predicted that 3F separation tests will pressure the 3F release date.


This is somewhat unexpected. One very cheap and effective way to deal With buffeting wings, is namly upper wing fences.
Sukhoi fixed the Wing buffeting on their Su-34 this way.
But a Guess LM can't help them self, Installing Wing fences would kill all Stealth advantages on the F-35... or would it?

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 28 Jun 2013, 23:51
by spazsinbad
First F-35C Carrier Version Reports for Training Duty at Eglin 28 Jun 2013 Chris Pocock
"...According to the F-35 master schedule, flight-tests supporting the system design and development (SDD) phase are supposed to end in early 2017. But only 50 percent of the total SDD flights scheduled will have been completed by the end of the year, O’Bryan noted. To set this in context, however, the number of test points in the F-35 flight-test program–a grand total of 56,914–“is more than the AV-8B, F-15, F-16 and F-18 programs combined,” he claimed.

Airborne software remains “a key challenge,” O’Bryan said. There are 8.6 million lines of code, compared with two million on the F-22. The aircraft that have already been delivered are using Block 1A and 2A software (for initial and advanced training, respectively), with the final configuration of the latter scheduled for release to the fleet in the last quarter of this year. The Block 2B software that provides initial war-fighting capability by adding sensors and weapons is now in flight-test at Edwards AFB. The ultimate Block 3F software that provides full war-fighting capability with more weapons, radar modes and an expanded flight envelope is not scheduled for release until the third quarter of 2017. Why? Although 88 percent of the airborne software is now flying (and 96 percent of it has been coded), “the last 12 percent is the hardest to integrate,” according to O’Bryan.

The first-life structural tests for the F-35A and F-35B have been successfully completed, with the F-35C “on track.” Structural changes are fewer than predicted, leading to lower concurrency costs–a big issue between Lockheed Martin and the U.S. customer in recent years....

http://ainonline.com/aviation-news/ain- ... duty-eglin

Another bit about URFC is here: http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-24175.html

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 03 Jul 2013, 07:32
by XanderCrews
haavarla wrote:
arkadyrenko wrote:Update on F-35 testing here:

https://www.box.com/shared/9f0eion3wtr8r27d9ubc

Highlights:

F-35A: 77% of test points
F-35B: only 41% of all test points
F-35C: 96% of test points (ironically best version)

F-35 may be released with some level of buffet/transonic roll off, as they cannot change the control laws much further, C will be most heavily affected, still waiting for more comprehensive testing.

Weapons separation tests are all behind schedule, software is behind schedule. Predicted that 3F separation tests will pressure the 3F release date.


This is somewhat unexpected. One very cheap and effective way to deal With buffeting wings, is namly upper wing fences.
Sukhoi fixed the Wing buffeting on their Su-34 this way.
But a Guess LM can't help them self, Installing Wing fences would kill all Stealth advantages on the F-35... or would it?


I only respond to this, because of this:

But Noooh, this is far too simple for LM, no they have to drag more cash out from Pentagon and milk the cow.. This is just too bad LM, shame on you!


and this:

Seriously. Yes Sukhoi did. They even started the Serial Production of the Su-34 before they descovered the wing buffeting problem. And Guess what, thay just add an easy fix on the go..
Wing fences would ruin stealth.. Yeah right. I can tell you one sure fact: All jet fighter(even the F-22!) has its compromises. LM better get their head out of their @ss and fix this. There are not unlimited chi-ching on this F-35 program! LM, you getting this!?


which you wrote here:
http://www.aviationweek.com/Article.asp ... 592154.xml

Do you want a real answer or did you already make up your mind like above and I can save the time it would take to try and explain it?

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 03 Jul 2013, 09:43
by haavarla
The question still remain, if LM can no longer tweak the FBW system to correct this buffet/transonic roll off problem.

What is the next course of action?

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 03 Jul 2013, 10:00
by spazsinbad
The F-35C has 'wing spoilers' built in already which may or may not be used - and to be deleted if not required. Perhaps that solution will be used in the other versions also? However why do you expect forum members to be aircraft designers 'haavarla'? There must be a few threads on this forum about the F-35C wing spoilers. I guess I should find them eh....

SCROLL DOWN this forum page to see a few 'spoiler' shots + artickle:

http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ler#208750
___________________

Another potential spoiler situation here:

http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopi ... oiler.html
_____________________

More 'spoiler' info here: http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ler#197513
&
Here: http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ler#160756

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 03 Jul 2013, 10:09
by haavarla
Thx for the reply spaz.
No i wasn't aware of such "wing spoilers", but i will look into this.

Its a Perfect legit question here on these forums. But Perhaps in the wrong thread.
Seriously its an open aviation forum, so no i do not expect LM Aircraft designers to comment. But there are People here whom have knowledge on aerodynamics..

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 03 Jul 2013, 10:12
by spazsinbad
More links for 'haavarla' about spoilers above.... BUMP (after his reply before links all included above).

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 02 Aug 2013, 12:55
by spazsinbad
F-35 Lightning II Program Status and Fast Facts July 10, 2013
"Last month, the F-35B performed its 400th vertical landing and first vertical take-off. (May 10 –VTO and May 14 400th)"

https://www.f35.com/assets/uploads/down ... ly2013.pdf (0.2Mb)

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 02 Aug 2013, 14:04
by sprstdlyscottsmn
I'm still confused as to when the engine ratings went from the actual (43 and 28) back down to the requirement (40 and 25). Given the testing and F100 history it will only be a matter of time (decades) before they are rated to higher levels (50 and 30).

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 10 Aug 2013, 21:17
by spazsinbad
Lightning strike: Flight simulator lets people pilot F-35 fighter jet 10 Aug 2013 Christina Higginbotham
"...According to a public statement, the F135 is the only engine powering the F-35 Lightning II flight test program with more than 3,200 flights, 5,300 flight hours and nearly 500 vertical landings while maintaining very high mission readiness levels.

The F135 has accumulated more than 26,000 hours of ground and flight test and all variants achieved Initial Service Release (ISR) certification from the U.S. Department of Defense in 2010...."

http://www.fosters.com/apps/pbcs.dll/ar ... /130819943

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re:

Unread postPosted: 28 Aug 2013, 04:44
by neptune
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=123

F-35 Flight Test Update 11

By Eric Hehs
Posted 27 August 2013


The F-35 Flight Test Update in the Volume 28, Number 1 issue of Code One concluded with the first aerial release of an AIM-120 AMRAAM from an F-35B on 26 March 2013. This eleventh installment in the series of flight test updates on the F-35 program covers the AIM-120 launch as well as other achievements of the F-35 Integrated Test Force located at Edwards AFB, California, and at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.



2 April 2013: Marine Corps Maj. C. R. Clift;
completed the first vertical landing at night in an F-35. The mission, at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, was performed in F-35B BF-4.

3 April 2013: Marine Corps Capt. Mike Kingen;
took an F-35C to Mach 1.6 for the first time during a flight from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. Mach 1.6 is the top design speed for the F-35C.

9 April 2013: Air Force Lt. Col. Jon Ohman;
performed the first GBU-12 separation test in an F-35A. The weapon was released from the left weapon bay of F-35A AF-1 flying over the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Center ranges.

10 April 2013: Air Force Lt. Col. Peter Vitt;
flew F-35A AF-1 on its 300th flight. The mission involved a successful GBU-31 separation test over the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Center ranges.

10 April 2013: Air Force Capt. Eric Schultz;
flew F-35A AF-7 in the first night Instrument Meteorological Conditions flight test. The IMC mission, from Edwards AFB, California, also included the first hot pit refueling for an F-35 at night.

11 April 2013: Air Force Lt. Col. Jon Ohman;
flew BF-17 for the first F-35 link with an AWACS aircraft, successfully exchanging Link 16 messages during a multiship flight that included an E-3 Sentry, multiple F-16s, and multiple F/A-18E/Fs.

18 April 2013: Navy Lt. Cdr. Michael Burks flying CF-5 and Lockheed Martin test pilot Dan Canin flying CF-2;
The F-35C fleet completed the 500th System Design and Development flight;

26 April 2013: Royal Air Force Sqn. Ldr. James Schofield;
delivered F-35B BF-18 to the F-35 Integrated Test Force at Edwards AFB, California. The aircraft is to be used at the ITF for Mission System testing. BF-18 was ferried from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, by way of Fort Worth, Texas.

29 April 2013: Lockheed Martin test pilot Mark Ward;
flew F-35A AF-2 for the first high asymmetric load flight test on an F-35. The load consisted of an AIM-120 on Station 7; a GBU-31 on Station 8; an AIM-9X on Station 11; and weapon pylons on Stations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, and 10. The load equated to 15,000 foot-pounds asymmetry.

2 May 2013: The F-35 test program flew eleven flights in one day;
to set a new record. The flights consisted of five for F-35A, four for F-35B, and two for F-35C.

3 May 2013: Air Force Lt. Col. Peter Vitt;
flew F-35A AF-6 for the first mission that included two AIM-120 missiles. The flight occurred at Edwards AFB, California.

10 May 2013: The F-35 SDD fleet surpassed 5,000 flight hours.

13 May 2013: Marine Corps Maj. C. R. Clift;
flew BF-4 in a test that marked the 400th vertical landing of an F-35B during SDD. The flight occurred from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

16 May 2013: F-35As AF-3, AF-6, and AF-7 demonstrated the first three-ship connectivity for the Multi-Functional Advanced Datalink, or MADL;
during ground operations at Edwards AFB, California.

20 May 2013: Marine Corps Lt. Col. Patrick Moran;
was at the controls for Flight 100 of F-35C CF-3.

28 May 2013: Sqn. Ldr. James Schofield;
flying F-35B BF-1 on Flight 296, performed the first vertical landing for an RAF pilot at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

31 May 2013: Lockheed Martin test pilot Dan Canin;
was at the controls for Flight 200 of F-35C CF-2.

4 June 2013: BAE test pilot Peter Wilson;
was at the controls for Flight 300 of F-35B BF-1.

5 June 2013: Air Force Lt. Col. George Schwartz;
flew F-35A AF-1 for the first powered AIM-120 air-to-air missile launch from an F-35. The missile was released from the internal weapon bay of the F-35. The flight originated from the Air Force Test Center at Edwards AFB, California. The launch occurred over the Point Mugu Sea Test Range off the California coast.

6 June 2013: Navy Lt. Cmdr. Tony Wilson;
was in the cockpit during the test. F-35C CF-3 was used for a heavyweight ground tow test;
at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division test facility at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. The aircraft was fitted with four 2,000-pound GBU-31 guided bombs on its external pylons.

14 June 2013: AF-6, AF-7, BF-17, and BF-18 were used to complete the first F-35 airborne four-ship MADL connection;
at Edwards AFB, California. The airborne four-ship also achieved MADL connectivity with AF-3 during its ground test, marking the first five-ship MADL connection.

20 June 2013: Lockheed Martin test pilot Bill Gigliotti;
flew the first flight of F-35C CF-8 (US Navy Bureau Number 168735). Takeoff and landing occurred at NAS Fort Worth JRB, Texas. CF-8 is scheduled to join the test fleet at Edwards AFB, California, later in 2013.

9 July 2013: Air Force Maj. Mark Massaro;
completed the last GBU-31 separation test required as part of the process for releasing 2B software for the F-35A fleet. The flight occurred with AF-1 at Edwards AFB, California.

11 July 2013: Marine Corps Lt. Col. Patrick Moran;
flew the first night aerial refueling mission in an F-35B. The mission, from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, was Flight 265 for BF-2. The tanker was a US Air Force KC-10.

16 July 2013: Air Force Maj. Matt Phillips;
flew AF-1 to complete an AIM-120 launch at Mach 1.2. This flight was the first supersonic and second overall AIM-120 launch for the F-35 program.

22 July 2013: Navy Lt. Cdr. Michael Wilson;
was at the controls for Flight 200 of F-35B BF-4.

24 July 2013: Marine Corps Maj. Richard Rusnok;
was at the controls of F-35A AF-1 to complete the third and final AIM-120 launch required as part of the process for releasing 2B software to the F-35A fleet.

24 July 2013: Marine Corps Lt. Col. Patrick Moran;
The first strategic tanking test with an F-35B and a KC-135;
with wingtip hose and drogue refueling capability was carried out on the range near NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. The test was strictly a contact test in which no fuel was transferred. Marine Corps Lt. Col. Patrick Moran was at the controls of F-35 BF-2 on Flight 266. The KC-135 came from McConnell AFB, Kansas.

31 July 2013: Air Force Maj. Matt Phillips;
was at the controls for Flight 200 of F-35A AF-3.

3 August 2013: Navy Capt. Michael Kingen;
completed the 500th vertical landing of an F-35B when he landed F-35B BF-1 on Flight 315 at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Nov 2013, 18:06
by neptune
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=129

F-35 Flight Test Update 12

By Eric Hehs

Posted 25 November 2013

The F-35 Flight Test Update in the Volume 28, Number 2 issue of Code One concluded with the 500th vertical landing of an F-35B on 3 August 2013. This twelfth installment in the series of flight test updates on the F-35 program covers the successful second phase of shipboard testing for the F-35B, the beginning of high angle of attack testing for the F-35C, plus other major achievements of the F-35 Integrated Test Force located at the Air Force Test Center at Edwards AFB, California, and at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division test facility at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

12 August 2013: F-35B Shipboard Testing Phase II Begins

F-35B BF-1 and BF-5 land on the USS Wasp (LHD-1) for a second session of shipboard testing called Development Testing II. See related article in Volume 28, Number 3 issue of Code One.

13 August 2013: First Launch And Landing For RAF F-35B Pilot At Sea

Sqdn. Ldr. Jim Schofield, a Royal Air Force test pilot, became the first international pilot to conduct a sea-based launch and landing in the F-35B.

14 August 2013: First Night Vertical Landing At Sea

Marine Corps test pilot Maj. C. R. Clift completed the first shipboard vertical landing at night for an F-35B. The landing occurred during developmental tests aboard the USS Wasp.

14 August 2013: F-35C Flight With Spin Recovery System

F-35C CF-5 was flown for the first time with the spin recovery chute in preparation for high angle of attack testing. The initial test flight with the system was flown by Lockheed Martin test pilot Dan Canin from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

20 August 2013: F-35C Aerial Refueling Qualified

Marine Corps test pilot Lt. Col. Patrick Moran completed the first F-35C air-to-air refueling from a drogue-equipped Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker during a flight off eastern Maryland. The flight, which originated at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, was the 217th flight in the first F-35C carrier variant test aircraft, designated CF-1. All three variants of the F-35 are now qualified to refuel from a KC-135.

28 August 2013: F-35B Shipboard Testing Phase II Ends

The second session of F-35B shipboard testing on the Wasp called Development Testing II was completed. The testing involved F-35B BF-1 and BF-5.

10 September 2013: F-35C Achieves Max AoA

BAE test pilot Peter Kosogorin achieved maximum angle of attack when he took F-35C CF-5 to fifty degrees during a test flight from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

13 September 2013: CF-8 To Edwards ITF

Lockheed Martin chief test pilot Al Norman flew F-35C CF-8 to Edwards AFB, California, from Fort Worth, Texas. The aircraft joined eight other F-35A and F-35B aircraft at the Integrated Test Force at Edwards.

30 September 2013: Fourteen Cat Shots In One Month

F-35C CF-3 completed fourteen catapult launches in one month. The testing occurred on the TC-7 steam catapult system at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

30 September 2013: F-35 Fleet Surpasses 10,000 Flight Hours

The F-35 Lightning II program surpassed 10,000 flight hours. More than half of the total hours were accumulated since October 2012. This milestone was achieved by operational production aircraft operating from Eglin AFB, Florida; MCAS Yuma, Arizona; and F-35 System Development and Demonstration and Operational Test aircraft operating at Edwards AFB, California; NAS Patuxent River, Maryland; and Nellis AFB, Nevada. Almost half of the total hours were accumulated by production aircraft.

7 October 2013: High AoA Departure At Lowest Altitude

Air Force test pilot Lt. Col. Brent Reinhardt was at the controls of F-35A AF-4 for a departure resistance test flight at 20,000 feet—the lowest altitude to date.

21 October 2013: First Weapon Separation Test For F-35C

Navy Capt. Justin Carlson performed the first F-35C weapon separation by releasing a GBU-12 from F-35C CF-2. The flight originated from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

23 October 2013: First Small Diameter Bomb Pit Test

US government test pilot Vince Caterina was at the controls of F-35A AF-1 for the first pit test of the GBU-39 Small Diameter Bomb. The tests, all drops from the internal weapon bay, were conducted at the F-35 Integrated Test Force at Edwards AFB, California.

29 October 2013: First Guided Weapon Drop

Marine Corps Maj. Richard Rusnok was at the controls of F-35B BF-17 for the first guided weapon delivery from an F-35. Rusnok used the Electro-Optical Targeting System, or EOTS, to guide a GBU-12 Paveway II to a specified ground target after releasing the weapon from the internal weapon bay of the F-35. The GBU-12 is a 500-pound Mk-82 general-purpose bomb mated with a nose-mounted laser seeker and flight guidance fins for precision strike. The test mission was conducted from Edwards AFB, California.

30 October 2013: First Live Missile Launch

The F-35 program executed its first live-fire launch of a guided air-to-air missile over the test range off the California coast. The AIM-120 AMRAAM was launched from F-35A operating from the F-35 Integrated Test Facility at Edwards AFB, California. The pilot, Air Force Capt. Logan Lamping, launched the AIM-120 from the F-35’s internal weapon bay against an aerial drone target. The drone was identified and targeted using the aircraft’s mission systems sensors. After launch, the missile successfully acquired the target and followed an intercept flight profile.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Nov 2013, 19:30
by spazsinbad
Rolls-Royce Bags Contract To Produce & Support LiftSystem For F-35 Lightning II 25 Nov 2013
"...Moreover, the F-35B fleet nears multiple major milestones. In more than 450 flights of Mode 4 operation, F-35B aircraft have completed over 1,000 short take-offs, 640 vertical landings, comprising over 150 aboard the USS Wasp, 550 slow landings and 250 hover test points...."

http://www.rttnews.com/2229092/rolls-ro ... ng-ii.aspx

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 02 May 2014, 20:14
by bring_it_on
Joint Strike Fighter: What Do the Pilots Who Are Flying It Today Have to Say?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vxe4Jv1cJxI

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 02 May 2014, 23:48
by spazsinbad
'bring_it_on' there is a 'thread' about this "WEST 2014" conference with bits of video/audio on this forum. I'll go look....

viewtopic.php?f=61&t=24950&p=266351&hilit=Gigliotti#p266351
&
viewtopic.php?f=61&t=24950&p=266403&hilit=Gigliotti#p266403
&
VIDEO + Audio CLIP about dat Hook: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=15767&p=262684&hilit=Gigliotti#p262684
&
Seminar info here: viewtopic.php?f=61&t=24814&p=262678#p262678

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 03 May 2014, 01:24
by bring_it_on
spazsinbad wrote:'bring_it_on' there is a 'thread' about this "WEST 2014" conference with bits of video/audio on this forum. I'll go look....

viewtopic.php?f=61&t=24950&p=266351&hilit=Gigliotti#p266351
&
viewtopic.php?f=61&t=24950&p=266403&hilit=Gigliotti#p266403
&
VIDEO + Audio CLIP about dat Hook: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=15767&p=262684&hilit=Gigliotti#p262684
&
Seminar info here: viewtopic.php?f=61&t=24814&p=262678#p262678


Thanks..Interesting bit of info..

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 May 2014, 18:34
by bring_it_on
F-35 Lightning II Integrated Test Force 2013 Year in Review

[YouTube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=voUNeb_JzLY[/YouTube]

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 May 2014, 18:41
by spazsinbad
Same Video posted earlier here in the 'F-35 Unit' section: viewtopic.php?f=59&t=25483 The reason? Sheer stupidity I guess.

The way to get youtube videos to show here is different now. Try this: Use only the string after the equals sign surround that with the bracketed youtube/youtube bookends to see this:

youtube]voUNeb_JzLY[/youtube] (I left out the first bracket to illustrate - now for the real deal


Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 09 May 2014, 02:52
by spazsinbad
April Marks New F-35 Flying Records

"FORT WORTH, Texas, May 8, 2014 – The Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] F-35 Lightning II aircraft fleet, which surpassed 16,000 cumulative program flight hours to date in April, flew a monthly record high for System Development and Demonstration (SDD) with 282 flight hours and 153 flights in April.

“The SDD fleet achieving more than 150 flights in one month speaks to the quality of this aircraft and the commitment of this team,” said J.D. McFarlan, Lockheed Martin's vice president for F-35 Test & Verification. “We’re nearly complete with Block 2B software flight science testing on the F-35As, and we’ll move forward with Block 3 software testing this summer. The SDD program is scheduled to complete Block 2B testing for the F-35B this year in support of the U.S. Marine Corps’ Initial Operational Capability (IOC) in 2015 with its F-35B fleet.”

In April, operational F-35s fleet-wide flew 812 hours, with SDD F-35 aircraft flying 282 flight hours in one month. In 2014, through April, F-35A test aircraft flew 420 hours; F-35B test aircraft flew 281 hours; and F-35C test aircraft flew 222 hours. Operational F-35s of all three variants flew 2,790 hours for the year.

Operational F-35s at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., flew 515 flight hours in April, and operational F-35 at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., flew 172 hours. Eglin’s 33rd Fighter Wing is home to 48 F-35A/B/Cs and provides training for U.S. military and program partner nation pilots and maintenance personnel. Yuma is home to the Marine Corps’ first operational F-35B Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing aircraft.

Among the record SDD flights, the F-35B version completed its 700th vertical takeoff and landing sortie, and it began crosswind landings and expeditionary operations...."

CAPTION: "Lockheed Martin Test Pilot Paul “Hat” Hattendorf maneuvers F-35A aircraft AF-3 in a composite photo of the first Manual Ground Collision Avoidance System (MGCAS) test flight over the dry lakebed at Edwards AFB, Calif. on April 11, 2014. Lockheed Matin Photo by Chad Bellay."

BIG PIC: http://www.lockheedmartin.com/content/d ... omp_01.jpg

SOURCE: http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/p ... cords.html

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Jun 2014, 14:18
by bring_it_on
Lockheed F-35 bulkhead cracks solution proposed, Pentagon says

ockheed Martin Corp. and the Pentagon say a fix has been found that should prevent more bulkhead cracks on the Marine Corps version of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, the costliest U.S. weapons program.

On-the-ground stress testing may resume as soon as Sept. 30, officials said. It was suspended this past September after inspections found cracks in three of six bulkheads on a plane used for such tests.

[...]

More: http://fwbusinesspress.com/fwbp/article ... -says.aspx

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 11 Jul 2014, 19:14
by spazsinbad
F-35 Issues Complicate Cost-Reduction Rollout
14 Jul 2014 Amy Butler and Tony Osborne | Aviation Week & Space Technology

"...Though on hold, flight testing is 57% complete, Bogdan says. Envelope expansion testing for Block 2B aircraft is 95% finished, says Al Norman, an F-35 test pilot. These are aircraft with the software package to be used by the U.S. Marine Corps to declare initial operational capability (IOC) for the F-35B next July. “We are very, very confident that from a flight sciences perspective we will get our 2B work done” this year, Norman says, referring to the latest software version. The test team also has scored seven of seven attempted weapons firings from the F-35, out of 15 planned...."

Source: http://aviationweek.com/defense/f-35-is ... on-rollout

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Jul 2014, 02:45
by bring_it_on



Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Aug 2014, 23:36
by spazsinbad
Back to program updates...
F-35 Flight Test Program Milestones Maturing Combat Capabilities
25 Aug 2014 LM

"The Lockheed Martin F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) program continued a steady path of flight test milestones in August, including weapons separation, software compatibility and flight hours, all demonstrating program maturity.

"The test milestones are a direct result of the detailed planning, coordination and execution between various government teams and the integrated test force," said J.D. McFarlan, Lockheed Martin's Vice President for F-35 Test & Verification. "Every testing milestone demonstrates the development of the F-35 in successive steps toward enabling the U.S. Marine Corps to attain its F-35B Initial Operational Capacity (IOC) next year."

F-35A aircraft AF-1 accomplished its 400th flight during a successful GBU-31 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) aircraft separation test on Aug. 13 at Edwards Air Force Base, California. This was the first GBU-31 Mark-84 (2,000-pound guided munition) separation demonstration from the F-35. Previous GBU-31 separations were with the BLU-109 (Bomb Live Unit) bomb body.

F-35B aircraft BF-1 and BF-4 completed "Mode 4" formation testing on Aug 9th, as required for Block 2B software capability. "In Mode 4 operations, the STOVL Propulsion System is engaged, the lift fan, roll post nozzle, and three-bearing-swivel nozzle are operating, and all propulsion system doors and inlets are open. Flight testing validated the F-35B Short Take Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) variant's ability to operate well in this configuration during formation flight which supports operations around the ship; a key milestone for the F-35B path to IOC," McFarlan said.

F-35B aircraft BF-3 completed the 2B software fleet release weapon separation requirements for the F-35B with two successful AIM-120 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) Air Vehicle Instrumented (AAVI) separation flights on consecutive days, Aug. 14 and 15. The AIM-120 radar-guided missiles were launched over the Atlantic Test Range. "2B software fleet release is critical to the warfighter because it delivers the first combat capability to our most dominant 5th generation platform. Weapons employment is one the most critical combat capabilities. This culminates years of dedicated work that proves safe separation in 2B configurations and provides this capability and confidence to our customers," McFarlan said.

Along with the testing milestones, to date, the overall System Development and Demonstration (SDD) F-35A test fleet surpassed its 4,000th flight hour on Aug. 14 and in total, the F-35 Fleet has surpassed 19,500 flight hours, with more than 8,000 hours in SDD aircraft. F-35A aircraft AF-1 achieved its 400th flight milestone on Aug. 13; F-35A aircraft AF-4 surpassed 500 flight hours, Aug. 11 and F-35C aircraft CF-2 achieved 300 flights on Aug. 14...."

Source: http://www.asdnews.com/news-56569/F-35_ ... lities.htm

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 30 Sep 2014, 06:41
by weasel1962
The latest GAO report has some juicy details

http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-778

Timeline on pg 6: Low rate production will continue til 2019. However production milestone for full rate decision will only be made in 2019. The issue is that FR1 is intended to start long lead acquisition in year 2017.
Pg 7: full rate production planned for fiscal year 2019 (2018).
Pg 7: Contractor is assembling next lot of 36 which means lot 5 deliveries have been complete sometime between June to Sep 2014. 36 = lot 6 which according to pg 7 has a scheduled delivery by end-2015 (1 year behind schedule).
Pg 7: June 2014 - 78 fielded which means all of lots 1-4 + 1/2 of lot 5.
Pg 12: F-35A, B & C operational cost target per hour cannot exceed $35,200, $38,400, and $36,300.
Pg 17: Mean flight time between failure - significantly above expected time at this current level
Pg 18: A&C variants requiring more time to repair.
Pg 25: Breakdown of O&S cost - fuel only part of unit level consumption. Highest cost = parts & other consumables cost.
Pg 26: Fuel burn rates for estimates = 1,493 gal per hour at lower speed/altitude for B. To increase if vertical landings.
Pg 27: Fuel burn rate of 1,558 gal/hr for A = more accurate.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 30 Sep 2014, 16:41
by SpudmanWP
I don't have time to go through it all, but one mistake in you interpretation is the delivery schedule for Lot6.

It is not a year behind schedule.

Remember that annual fighter production, especially when you start to get into larger buys, have their production start dates spread throughout the year to stabilize the production line. A fighter that is started in Dec of 2012 will be delivered a year after one started in Jan 2012 even though they are both part of the same Fiscal Year buy.

Also Keep in mind that "Production end" is not the same thing as "Delivery". After Production, the F-35 goes through a series of "Delivery" steps that includes shakedown flights, tuneups, etc. Newer LRIP charts now display this "Delivery" window.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 01 Oct 2014, 07:28
by weasel1962
https://www.f35.com/news/detail/lrip-6- ... agreements

The 71 aircraft are currently in various stages of production. Lockheed Martin will begin delivering LRIP 6 aircraft in the second quarter of 2014 and LRIP 7 jets in the second quarter of 2015. LRIP 6 will mark the first delivery of international F-35 jets for Italy and Australia, and LRIP 7 will mark the first delivery to Norway.


Lot 6 should be complete by 2nd quarter 2015 in order for LRIP 7 to start. By end-2015 would be 6 months max, not 1 year (Agreed). It would also signify that Lot 5 was actually quite close to schedule since it was supposed to end by 2nd qtr 2014.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 01 Oct 2014, 16:42
by SpudmanWP
Remember too that this is a moving production line and Lot 7 will be taking up slots as Lot 6 are moving along.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Jan 2015, 09:46
by spazsinbad
F-35 Continues on Path Toward Full Weapons Certification
16 Jan 2015 F-35 News

"...Specific F-35 Flight Test accomplishments during the past four months include:

· First F-35 day and night Mission Effectiveness Close Air Support (CAS) flights completing 2B CAS testing (Oct. 21)

· Completion of live fire testing on an F-35B ground test article. (Sept. 9)

· Successful first (Sept. 9) and night flight (Sept. 18) with the Generation III helmet-mounted display with 3iR4 software

· Completion of final buffet, loads and high-angle-of-attack testing required for F-35A Block 2B software (Nov. 18)

· Successfully launched an AIM-120 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) from an F-35C, marking the last weapon separation test needed for Block 2B software (Sept. 30)

· F-35C set a record for 17 sorties in a day for a single F-35 aircraft (Nov.5) and a record 22 sorties with F-35C aircraft CF-3 and CF-5 combined aboard USS Nimitz for F-35C Sea Trials off the coast of San Diego (Nov. 3-14)

· First separation test of a GBU-39 Small Diameter Bomb, a 250-lb. precision-guided glide weapon (Oct. 21) and multi-separation test (Nov. 20)

· First F-35 external flutter tests flown with the AIM-132 Advanced Short Range Air-to-Air Missile (ASRAAM) (Oct. 29) and Paveway IV missiles (Nov. 13)

· Three Weapon(s) Delivery Accuracy (WDA) live fire events completed in a week. The F-35 employed two AIM-120 AMRAAMs and one Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM). These events included the first supersonic-guided missile launch and the first JDAM release on target coordinates generated from the Electro-Optical Targeting System (EOTS) (Nov. 18-25 )"

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/f-35-co ... tification

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Jan 2015, 13:52
by spazsinbad
A lot of stuff in this update so only a few excerpts below and these are ones which interest me whilst you all may have different ideas.... :mrgreen:
F-35 Lightning II Flight Test Update 14
20 Jan 2015 Eric Hehs

"...22 April 2014: Multiple Crosswind Tests
Lockheed Martin test pilot Dan Levin was at the controls of BF-4 Flight 225 for a day of extensive crosswind testing at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, that included three short takeoffs, two slow landings, and two conventional landings. Crosswinds for these tests ranged from nineteen to twenty-five knots....

...28 April 2014: AM-2 Matting Certification Starts
Flight test missions to certify that F-35B can be used with AM-2 matting began with BF-1 at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. BAE test pilot Peter Wilson performed a series of vertical landings for expeditionary operations for these initial tests. AM-2 matting is a portable metal matting used by the US Marines for rapid deployments of aircraft on rough field conditions. While vertical takeoffs and landings at Patuxent River and other operating locations typically take place on AM-2 matting, these particular tests involve the matting placed on soft soil conditions ....

...01 May 2014: Four-Ship MADL/Fusion
A four-ship Multifunction Advanced Data Link, or MADL, fusion flight (AF-6, AF-7, BF-18, and CF-8) with CATBird, two air targets, a tanker, and multiple ground targets was accomplished; eight total aircraft launched for the mission....

...27 May 2014: F-35C Maximum Sink Rate
Navy test pilot Lt. Cdr. Michael Burks was at the controls of F-35C CF-3 at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, for the first structural survey MK-7 arrestment at the maximum test sink speed of 21.4 feet per second....

...16 June 2014: F-35B Wet Runway Testing Completed
Wet runway testing with F-35B BF-4, deployed to Edwards AFB, California, concluded. The tests also cleared the aircraft’s twenty-knot crosswind envelope for conventional takeoffs and landings, short takeoffs, and short landings. The testing, which was completed in thirty-seven missions over a forty-one day period, covered 114 test points and all directional control and anti-skid wet runway testing....

...30 July 2014: F-35B Slow Landings With Loads Completed
BAE test pilot Peter Wilson completed the last test points for slow landings with loads needed for Block 2B software. The test mission, Flight 422 for BF-1, was flown from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland....

...19 August 2014: Multiship Fusion With F-35A And F-35C
AF-7 and CF-8 completed a multiship data fusion flight at the Pacific Test Range. The mission involved five F-16 targets and KC-10 refueling support. The objective was for the two F-35s to locate, fuse, identify, and target five approaching and maneuvering F-16s at different altitudes and speeds....

...3 September 2014: First CAS Mission
Lockheed Martin test pilot Mark Ward flew CF-8 from Edwards AFB, California, over Fort Irwin to complete the first F-35 day Mission Effectiveness Close Air Support flight. Fort Irwin is a major training area for the US military forces in the Mojave Desert in California.

4 September 2014: First Night CAS Flight
Marine Corps test pilot Lt. Col. Jon Ohman flying CF-8 and Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson flying AF-7 completed the first night F-35 Mission Effectiveness Close Air Support flight over Fort Irwin, operating in support of ground troops against several ground targets....

...9 September 2014: First Flight With Gen III Helmet
Lockheed Martin test pilot Mark Ward flew the first 3iR4 software and Generation III helmet mounted display during an airworthiness flight in AF-3. The mission was flown from Edwards AFB, California....

...24 September 2014: BF-5 To Eglin For Climatic Testing
Lockheed Martin test pilot Billie Flynn ferried BF-5 from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, to Eglin AFB, Florida, in preparation for climatic chamber testing....

...16 October 2014: CF-5 Set Record For Sorties In One Day [17]
US Navy test pilot Lt. Cmdr. Theodore Dyckman, flying CF-5, completed fourteen sorties to finish all of the shake, rattle, and roll testing for catapults and arrestments. US Navy test pilot Cmdr. Christian Sewell completed an additional three field carrier landing practice sorties in CF-5 later in the day. The mission count of seventeen set a record for sorties in a day for a single aircraft for the F-35 program....

...21 October 2014: CAS Test Flights For 2B Software Complete
Marine Corps test pilot Lt. Col. Jon Ohman flying BF-17 and Air Force test pilot Maj. Logan Lamping flying BF-18 completed a two-ship Mission Effectiveness Close Air Support flight at Fort Irwin. The mission marked the completion of close air support test flights needed for 2B software....

...3 November 2014: First Carrier Landing
US Navy test pilot Cmdr. Tony Wilson made the first arrested landing of the F-35C Lightning II on an aircraft carrier. Wilson landed F-35C test aircraft CF-3 at 12:18 p.m. local time aboard the USS Nimitz (CVN-68) underway in the Pacific Ocean. Wilson caught the number three arresting wire. The arrested landing is part of initial at-sea developmental testing for the F-35C.

4 November 2014: First Catapult Launches At Sea
US Navy test pilots Cmdr. Tony Wilson Lt. Cmdr. Theodore Dyckman, flying CF-3 and CF-5 respectively, perform the first catapult launches from the USS Nimitz (CVN-68) on the second day of at-sea testing for the F-35C.

14 November 2014: Initial F-35C Sea Trials Completed
The initial sea trials for the F-35C ended with pilots performing 124 arrested landings; 222 touch-and-goes; two bolters, both intentional for test purposes; and 124 catapult launches on thirty-two flights covering 38.6 flight hours."

Source: http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article. ... f7045660=1

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 23 Jan 2015, 19:35
by maus92
spazsinbad wrote:
F-35 Continues on Path Toward Full Weapons Certification
16 Jan 2015 F-35 News

"...Specific F-35 Flight Test accomplishments during the past four months include:

· First F-35 day and night Mission Effectiveness Close Air Support (CAS) flights completing 2B CAS testing (Oct. 21)

· Completion of live fire testing on an F-35B ground test article. (Sept. 9)

· Successful first (Sept. 9) and night flight (Sept. 18) with the Generation III helmet-mounted display with 3iR4 software

· Completion of final buffet, loads and high-angle-of-attack testing required for F-35A Block 2B software (Nov. 18)

· Successfully launched an AIM-120 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) from an F-35C, marking the last weapon separation test needed for Block 2B software (Sept. 30)

· F-35C set a record for 17 sorties in a day for a single F-35 aircraft (Nov.5) and a record 22 sorties with F-35C aircraft CF-3 and CF-5 combined aboard USS Nimitz for F-35C Sea Trials off the coast of San Diego (Nov. 3-14)

· First separation test of a GBU-39 Small Diameter Bomb, a 250-lb. precision-guided glide weapon (Oct. 21) and multi-separation test (Nov. 20)

· First F-35 external flutter tests flown with the AIM-132 Advanced Short Range Air-to-Air Missile (ASRAAM) (Oct. 29) and Paveway IV missiles (Nov. 13)

· Three Weapon(s) Delivery Accuracy (WDA) live fire events completed in a week. The F-35 employed two AIM-120 AMRAAMs and one Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM). These events included the first supersonic-guided missile launch and the first JDAM release on target coordinates generated from the Electro-Optical Targeting System (EOTS) (Nov. 18-25 )"

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/f-35-co ... tification


Love all those CAS test, except 2B jets won't have suitable weapons for close contact CAS - interdiction, yes; CAS, no.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 23 Jan 2015, 20:16
by spazsinbad
What aircraft does CAS for the USMC today? Will they be there tomorrow?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 23 Jan 2015, 21:12
by codeonemagazine
The photos now match the article for the F-35 Flight Test Update!

--C1 Editor

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 23 Jan 2015, 23:22
by neptune
spazsinbad wrote:What aircraft does CAS for the USMC today?

1- AH-1W SuperCobras (currently in production)
2- AV-8B Harrier II (last produced in 2003)

attack and destroy surface targets in all weather

3- F/A-18A++ (last produced in the late 1980s), F/A-18C (last produced in the late 1990s) Hornet
4- F/A-18D (last produced in 2000) Hornet

Will they be there tomorrow?


...Yes, "Can Do"........until they are re-inforced with the F-35B..... :)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Jan 2015, 11:37
by willhan
codeonemagazine wrote:The photos now match the article for the F-35 Flight Test Update!

--C1 Editor

Only one photo there... No gallery this time ? :(

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Jan 2015, 19:52
by eskodas
I know there's a graph floating around of cost to date by year which does R &D and procurement separately, does anyone know where it is? I can't find it >.<

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 26 Jan 2015, 22:23
by codeonemagazine
after resolving some technical issues, the photos are now REALLY posted for the latest F-35 Flight Test Update (14) article. Click on the image in the gallery to get the highest resolutions.

--C1

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 26 Jan 2015, 23:35
by spazsinbad
Thanks for the relevant and extra photos. Particularly liked this one (gofigure) and THE END: [IS THAT CF-3 AFTER that HEAVY Landing?] :doh: :devil: :mrgreen:
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/images/media/20140527_MK7_Testing_CF3_14P00230_13_1267828237_7022.jpg
"27 May 2014: Navy test pilot Lt. Cdr. Michael Burks was at the controls of F-35C CF-3 at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, for the first structural survey MK-7 arrestment at the maximum test sink speed of 21.4 feet per second. Photo by Michael D. Jackson"

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/images/media/20140909_BG1_livefire_01_1267828237_4303.jpg
"9 September 2014: The F-35 live fire test team completed the final shot on F-35B BG-1, a non-flying full-scale STOVL variant built for static ground tests. The live fire testing began on 1 May 2014 and consisted of a series of fifteen shots directed at various positions on the airframe. The effort was led by Naval Air Systems Command’s Weapons Survivability Laboratory at China Lake, California. Lockheed Martin Photo"

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Feb 2015, 05:50
by spazsinbad
A video update this time:
F-35 By the Numbers
Published on Feb 5, 2015 LockheedMartinVideos

"A video highlight of major 2014 milestones for the F-35 Lightning II program including 23,000 total flight hours, 106 aircraft in assembly, and 9 F-35 bases operating. Discover recent F-35 news: https://www.f35.com/news ."


Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Feb 2015, 05:53
by spazsinbad

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 17 Feb 2015, 10:53
by popcorn
Status of different partner-nations.



http://www.sldinfo.com/an-update-on-f-3 ... uary-2015/

AN UPDATE ON F-35S AND THE PARTNERS: FEBRUARY 2015

2015-02-16 Australia, Italy, the UK, the Netherlands and Norway are all hitting new milestones as the F-35 comes closer to entering their combat forces.

Australia, the Netherlands and the Italians will all train at Luke AFB with the Aussies being the first to arrive, the Dutch next month and the Italians at the end of the year.

The British are training with the Marines at Beaufort Marine Corps Air Station and their first plane has arrived their already with operational testing going on in Edwards.

And the first Norwegian F-35A is being assembled at Fort Worth, and will be delivered in the Fall of this year.


More....

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 May 2015, 06:35
by weasel1962
Long lead for lot 10 engines. 44-A, 9-B, 2-C for USAF, USMC & USN respectively. 30-A and 5-B for international partners making total 90.

http://www.defense.gov/Contracts/Contra ... actID=5530

United Technologies Corp., Pratt & Whitney Military Engines, East Hartford, Connecticut, is being awarded a $156,955,110 fixed-price-incentive-firm target advance acquisition contract to procure long lead-time components, parts, materials and effort in support of 90 low-rate initial production Lot X F-135 propulsions systems for the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter aircraft. These systems include (44) F-135-PW-100 for the Air Force; (9) F-135-PW-600 for the Marine Corps; and (2) F-135-PW-100 for the Navy. In addition, this contract provides for the procurement of (30) F-135-PW-100 and (5) F135-PW-600 systems for international partners and Foreign Military Sales customers. Work will be performed in East Hartford, Connecticut (67 percent); Indianapolis, Indiana (26.5 percent); and Bristol, United Kingdom (6.5 percent); and is expected to be completed in September 2017. Fiscal 2015 aircraft procurement, (Air Force and Navy) funds, as well as international partner and Foreign Military Sales funds in the amount of $156,955,110 are being obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 2304(c)(1). This contract combines purchases for the Air Force ($64,015,312; 41 percent); the Navy ($32,345,557; 20 percent); international partners ($43,229,790; 28 percent); and foreign military sales ($17,364,451; 11 percent). The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity (N00019-15-C-0004).

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 May 2015, 21:23
by bring_it_on
Major General Jeffrey L. Harrigian, USAF, F-35 update 5/21/15 - Mitchell Institute/AFA


Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 May 2015, 22:13
by spazsinbad
Thanks - good to know STEALTH maintainability on flight line is good - from an EX-F-22 Generale no less. AND... the last question about SIM training. Any chance the talk slides will become available please? Thanks again. OK I see 'SWP' got in. :mrgreen:

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 May 2015, 22:16
by SpudmanWP
Would have been nice to have the PPT to follow along with :(

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 May 2015, 22:35
by bring_it_on
SpudmanWP wrote:Would have been nice to have the PPT to follow along with :(


the video should be up soon...

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 May 2015, 22:45
by SpudmanWP
That works too, thanks :)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 May 2015, 10:53
by spazsinbad
Report from Video above. Amazing how 45 minutes or so and about 15 minutes of Q&A is condensed into this. As always probably best to read it all at the JUMP.
U.S. Air Force eyes ways to avert delays in more F-35 capabilities
21 May 2015 Andrea Shalal

"May 21 The U.S. Air Force is concerned that a squadron of F-35 fighter jets scheduled for combat in August 2016 will face delays in getting some capabilities that are expected to be delivered in a 2018 software package, a two-star Air Force general said Thursday.

Major General Jeffrey Harrigian, who oversees the F-35 program for the Air Force, said he would meet with officials from Lockheed Martin Corp and the Pentagon's F-35 program office in several weeks to discuss ways to mitigate against any delays....

...Harrigian told an event hosted by the Mitchell Institute think tank that the Air Force was keen to ensure that everything promised in the Block 3F software due in 2018 was delivered as promised, and that no capabilities were delayed.

He said issues had arisen during development that could affect certain capabilities but declined to comment further since those capabilities are classified.

Lieutenant General Chris Bogdan, who runs the F-35 program for the Pentagon, has insisted that Lockheed must deliver the 3F software with its full, promised capability.

The Senate Armed Services Committee has proposed legislation that would restrict some F-35 funding until the Air Force certified that the 3F software would be delivered as promised.

Defense officials said they saw some risks of delays, but the 3F software appeared to be on track for now...."

Source: http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/05/ ... VS20150521

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 May 2015, 13:01
by bring_it_on
Features Becomes Upgrades


Some capabilities planned for the F-35 Block 3F—the planned all-up configuration for all three services flying variants of the fighter—will migrate to the Block 4 upgrade, Air Force F-35 integration director Maj. Gen. Jeff Harrigian explained Thursday. Most of the planned 3F capabilities that will become part of the first upgrade package live “in the classified world,” Harrigian said, begging off detailing what they are. “Some of it is hardware-driven, some of it’s software driven,” he told reporters after an AFA Mitchell Institute event. However, he said USAF is working to find “mitigation strategies” to make sure some of those capabilities “don’t move” from the 3F configuration. USAF is trying to determine, “What’s the constraint? Is it time? Is it money? ... And, that’s the discussion we need to have” with the Joint Program Office, he said.


http://www.airforcemag.com/DRArchive/Pa ... rades.aspx

F-35 Joint Program Office Preparing For Block 4 JROC In December


The F-35 joint program office is looking closely at Block 4 requirements, priorities and costs over the next few months as it works toward getting an approved capabilities development document from the Joint Requirements Oversight Council in December.
Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Harrigian, director of the F-35 integration office, said during a May 21 Air Force Association event that although the Air Force intends to achieve initial operational capability in August 2016 with Block 3i software, it needs to take a careful look at the capabilities that will be delivered in Block 4.
Further, as it better defines that plan over the next few months, the JPO must also develop a strategy to keep requirements from earlier blocks from slipping into Block 4.
Concerns about capabilities slipping from earlier software blocks have come both from within the program office and from Congress, and Harrigian said it is one of his top concerns as his team works to define and attach a price tag to Block 4 capabilities.
"We're working closely with the JPO and industry to understand, "OK, why can't we fix this now? Is it time? Is it money? What resources are required to fix something that could possibly slip into Block 4?'" he said, adding that he will have a meeting in the next few weeks to discuss that very issue.
Harrigian wouldn't specify which capabilities the JPO is most concerned might slip from Block 3F into Block 4, saying only that they are both software- and hardware-related and that most of them "live in the classified realm."
However, requirements have already been pushed into Block 4, and Harrigian noted that those slips -- of things like advanced weapons -- have made it difficult to attach a cost to and prioritize individual Block 4 capabilities.
All of these variables, he said, make it important that the service conduct the necessary analysis now to assure that its requirements are affordable and delivered at the appropriate time.
"Quite frankly, we're working through some of the challenges of understanding the costs associated with some of the capabilities that we would like to get into the airplane," he said. "And that's something that we're going to continue to work closely with industry and the program office to fully understand."
Harrigian continued: "I think we're seeing programs where our appetite is more than we can afford. And so we're trying to be as clear-eyed as we can on what we think we can afford."
The JPO plans to deliver Block 4 in four increments, with one new increment -- 4.1, 4.2, 4.3 and 4.4 -- fielded every two years. Some Block 4 requirements include additional weapons integration, increased radar interoperability and improved sustainability. Because of this plan and the way that requirements in later increments would build on delivered capabilities from earlier increments, Harrigian said timing is particularly important. -- Courtney Albon


Inside Defense - May, 22

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 May 2015, 08:10
by spazsinbad
19 Feb 2015 Program Brief .PPT: https://info.aiaa.org/Regions/NE/Nation ... _brief.ppt (9.6Mb) I'll make a PDF to attach soon meanwhile here is a SLIDE SDD update.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 26 May 2015, 09:01
by gabriele
The italian ministry of defence has dribbled the last wave of political opposition, and obtained a committment to go ahead with the program. By 2020, italian acquisitions will have been 38, and the final target of 90 for now stands. The way looks clear for the next LRIP lots, beginning with Lot 9 which is likely to include the first F-35B.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 26 May 2015, 22:58
by spazsinbad
Pentagon firming F-35 Block 4 configuration
26 May 2015 James Drew

"As Pentagon decides what new combat capabilities to “bake” into the Block 4 configuration of the Lockheed Martin F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, there is concern about planned upgrades sliding beyond Block 3F, and about the overall price tag as those modifications are rolled out in the early 2020s.

“We’ve seen programmes where our appetite is more than we can afford,” Maj Gen Jeffrey Harrigian, who heads the US Air Force F-35 integration office, said at a recent Mitchell Institute event in Washington, DC.

The air force expects its first squadron of 12 to 14 A-model F-35s in the baseline Block 3i configuration to be ready for combat in a limited capacity by August 2016. But each aircraft will need to be modified to achieve “full warfighting capability” with the full suite of armaments and improvements provided in the subsequent Block 3F and Block 4 upgrades

Harrigian says the F-35 joint programme office is currently defining exactly what will be included in Block 4 ahead of a Pentagon requirements review later this year. Once approved, the configuration will be the baseline for future Block 4 increments as they are rolled out every two years or so.

The general’s two main concerns are “sliding things from 3F into Block 4” and affordability. He says the air force is in discussions with the joint programme office and the F-35 industry team about how best to stage the delivery of new capabilities so they are inserted at the right time and at the right cost.

“We’re trying to be as clear-eyed on what we think we can afford to make sure as we go through [increments] 4.1 and 4.2 we’ve got our priorities straight,” he says...."

Source: http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... on-412762/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 29 May 2015, 12:59
by bring_it_on
USAF Begins Effort To Integrate Nuclear Weapon On Joint Strike Fighter; Inside Defense May 29, 2015


The Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center has commenced early risk-reduction work to arm the Joint Strike Fighter with a strategic weapon, the first steps in integrating the B61-12 Life Extension Program with the F-35A in an effort to give the service's newest combat aircraft a nuclear capability early in the next decade.
According to Air Force spokesman Ed Gulick, the service plans later this year to conduct the initial flight tests that will check the fit of the B61-12 on the F-35A and assess the impact of the aircraft on the weapon and the weapon on the aircraft. In addition, the Air Force plans the same for the PA-200, a platform flown by NATO allies.
In total, the Air Force plans to integrate the B61-12 on the F-15E, the F-16, and the B-2A. Early integration and test efforts began in 2013, according to Gulick, and continue in various stages for the different aircraft.
"B61-12 tests include fit checks, environmental Vibration Fly-Around / Instrumented Measurement Vehicle (VFA/IMV) flight tests, safe separations, Controlled Test Vehicle (CTV), and both unguided and guided developmental flight tests," according to Gulick.
In fiscal year 2013 and FY-14, the Air Force conducted B61-12 "fit checks," he said, and in FY-14 and FY-15, the service conducted the vibration fly-around/instrumented measurement vehicle flight tests on the F-15E, the B-2A and the F-16.
"Early F-35 and PA-200 VFA/IMV flights are scheduled for later this year," said Gulick. "Upon completion of fit checks and VFA/IMV flights to assure compatibility, the balance of the PA-200 and F-16 aircraft integration effort will continue in FY19. Early risk-reduction work is being conducted with the F-35 program, which is scheduled to begin full integration of the B61-12 in the early 2020s."
The Air Force has contracted with Boeing and Northrop Grumman to integrate the B61-12 on the F-15E and the B-2 respectively, arrangements that include ensuring operational flight program software can handle the new B12 variant.
"Early integration work with these aircraft began in FY14, which included delivery of B61-12 simulators to the aircraft Software Integration Laboratories (SIL). The F-15E is the primary test aircraft during B61-12 development, and the OFP development is synchronized with the B61-12 test program.
The B61-12 is the next reincarnation of the B61 gravity bomb -- a nuclear weapon developed in the 1960s that the Defense and Energy departments are modernizing to bolster European alliances and arm aircraft such as the F-35 and a future Long-Range Strike Bomber.
The bulk of the B-61 inventory is among the oldest in the U.S. nuclear stockpile; some weapons in the inventory were built as far back as 1978, according to Air Force officials, and critical non-nuclear components are in need of replacement.
The National Nuclear Security Administration is responsible for most of the B61 LEP program, an effort that aims to consolidate older variants -- the B-61-3, the B61-4, the B61-7 and the B61-10 -- into the B61-12.
In addition, the Air Force, with Boeing, is designing and building a tailkit that aims to incorporate a guidance kit that improves the accuracy of the weapon, giving U.S. Strategic Command a device that promises the same effects as older bombs with lower nuclear yield. -- Jason Sherman

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 30 May 2015, 00:12
by SpudmanWP
bring_it_on wrote:Features Becomes Upgrades

The JPO plans to deliver Block 4 in four increments, with one new increment -- 4.1, 4.2, 4.3 and 4.4 -- fielded every two years. Some Block 4 requirements include additional weapons integration, increased radar interoperability and improved sustainability. Because of this plan and the way that requirements in later increments would build on delivered capabilities from earlier increments, Harrigian said timing is particularly important. -- Courtney Albon

Inside Defense - May, 22


If I am reading that right, they are taking what was originally planned to be a single, 2-year process (Blk4 IOC 2 years after Blk3 IOC) and stretching it out to be a 9 year process (3 years from 3F IOC to 4.1, 2 years to 4.2, 2 years to 4.3, and 2 years to 4.4).

If that is correct and they are not substantially increasing what the entire Block 4 encompasses.. this is extremely disappointing.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 01 Jun 2015, 16:32
by bring_it_on
F-35 Block 4 Taking Shape


The Block 4 version of the F-35 strike fighter—the omnibus upgrade program after the Block 3F configuration is deployed with all three services—will be “sorted out in the next few months,” Pentagon acquisition chief Frank Kendall said Friday. There will be upgrades “in two-year increments,” roughly alternating hardware and software improvements, and the length of each one “drives the length of time” it will take to field it, he added. Block 4 improvements will be deployed between 2019 and 2025, Kendall said; presumably a Block 5 will follow after that. Block 4 will also include integration of foreign weapons desired by partner nations, such as Norway, Turkey, and the UK, he said. Navy acquisition chief Sean Stackley, also on the telecon, said the Pentagon is breaking the upgrade into smaller increments to avoid “one big bang” of new capabilities all at once, hoping to smooth the path of improvements. Air Force acquisition chief William LaPLante said the timing of the increments is roughly based on Moore’s Law, which predicts a doubling of electronic capability every two years or so, and is considered a “best practice” borrowed from industry. Kendall said, “I would expect the F-35 will be upgraded continuously” over its lifespan. The jet is spec’d for 8,000 hours, but the program is testing the structure to three lifetimes, program manager Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan noted.


http://www.airforcemag.com/DRArchive/Pa ... Shape.aspx

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 01 Jun 2015, 16:54
by neptune
bring_it_on wrote:....Air Force acquisition chief William LaPLante said the timing of the increments is roughly based on Moore’s Law, which predicts a doubling of electronic capability every two years or so, and is considered a “best practice” borrowed from industry. ...we are starting to try to define the "END" of Moore's Law.. :shock: ....less another tech. "break through"... :shock: :wink:

Kendall said, “I would expect the F-35 will be upgraded continuously” over its lifespan.

The jet is spec’d for 8,000 hours, but the program is testing the structure to three lifetimes, program manager Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan noted.
....24,000 hrs.....how many relative hours on the oldest H mod. "BUFF"..???...not apples and oranges (fighters and bombers)...just metal to metal...???
:)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 01 Jun 2015, 18:17
by SpudmanWP
8 years to do what previously planned on 2.. discusting

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 01 Jun 2015, 23:16
by KamenRiderBlade
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moore%27s_law

Moore's law states the doubling of transistors every 2 years, not capabilities.

Somebody obviously didn't research what Moore's law is.

All because you double the amount of transistors, doesn't mean you get a straight doubling of capabilities.

Anybody who is in the Computer / Technology world could tell you that.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 02 Jun 2015, 17:00
by spazsinbad
Similar to 'flightglobal' article days earlier over page however 'affordability' for all concerned is a concern I would think.
Pentagon Ready to Ramp Up F-35 Production, Studies Options for Logistics Support
29 May 2015 Sandra I. Erwin

"...Air Force Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Harrigian, director of the F-35 integration office, said the sustainment of the fleet is one of the program’s biggest challenges. “Lots of thought and effort are being put into this,” he said.

On the F-35 program agenda, too, are the next series of software and hardware upgrades for all three variants. The most advanced versions of the F-35 that will be delivered between now and 2019 will have either block 2B or block 3F software. Program engineers are still working to fix glitches in both these software configurations as well as problems in the logistics support software. They also have to make sure the training simulators have the same configuration as the actual aircraft.

The next upgrade, block 4, will focus on integrating new weapons. “We’re going to sort that out during the next few months,” Kendall said. The United States, the United Kingdom, Norway and Turkey all have different weapons they want to bring into the F-35. Block 4 upgrades are scheduled to take place between 2019 and 2025.

Harrigian said he would like to see a firm plan for block 4 sooner, rather than later. “It’s important that we have a strategy to look beyond 3F,” he said last week at an Air Force Association gathering. “We need to determine what we need to do to move forward.” A panel of four-star officers, the Joint Requirements Oversight Council, will be reviewing a proposed block 4 plan, he said. “We have to decide what we can afford. That’s the challenge for us. Sometimes our appetite is more than we can afford.”..."

Source: http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/ ... a2&ID=1855

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Jun 2015, 07:38
by bring_it_on
Pentagon Awards $156M Contract For F135 Engines
June,3,2015; insidedefense


The Pentagon has awarded a $156 million contract to Pratt & Whitney in support of Joint Strike Fighter Low-Rate Initial Production Lot 10.
Pratt is the prime contractor for the F135 engine that is installed in all F-35 variants. The funds will go toward long lead components, parts and materials for the 90 propulsion systems.
The Lot 10 buy includes 44 F-35A conventional-takeoff-and-landing jets for the Air Force, nine F-35B short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing jets for the Marine Corps and two F-35C carrier jets for the Navy, according to the June 3 Pentagon statement.
Additionally, this contract includes funding for 30 F-35As and five F-35Bs for international partners and foreign military sales customers.
-- Lee Hudson

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Jun 2015, 09:06
by gabriele
bring_it_on wrote:Pentagon Awards $156M Contract For F135 Engines
June,3,2015; insidedefense


The Pentagon has awarded a $156 million contract to Pratt & Whitney in support of Joint Strike Fighter Low-Rate Initial Production Lot 10.
Pratt is the prime contractor for the F135 engine that is installed in all F-35 variants. The funds will go toward long lead components, parts and materials for the 90 propulsion systems.
The Lot 10 buy includes 44 F-35A conventional-takeoff-and-landing jets for the Air Force, nine F-35B short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing jets for the Marine Corps and two F-35C carrier jets for the Navy, according to the June 3 Pentagon statement.
Additionally, this contract includes funding for 30 F-35As and five F-35Bs for international partners and foreign military sales customers.
-- Lee Hudson



Was already announced April 30... or is it a new contract for the exact same amount...? http://www.defense.gov/Contracts/Contra ... actID=5530

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 05 Jun 2015, 10:27
by spazsinbad
No: CR-105-15
04 June 2015 CONTRACTS NAVY

"Lockheed Martin Corp., Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, is being awarded a $920,350,132 advance acquisition contract for long lead time, materials, parts, components, and effort for the manufacture and delivery of 94 F-35 Lightning II low rate initial production aircraft. This contract provides for 78 F-35A aircraft for the Air Force (44), the government of Italy (2), the government of Turkey (2) ; the government of Australia (8); the government of Norway (6); and for various foreign military sales customers (16). In addition, this contract provides for the procurement of 14 F-35B aircraft for the Marine Corps (9), the government of Britain (3) and the government of Italy (2), as well as 2 F-35C aircraft for the Navy and Marine Corps.

Work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas (55 percent); El Segundo, California (15 percent); Warton, United Kingdom (10 percent); Orlando, Florida (5 percent); Nashua, New Hampshire (5 percent); Baltimore, Maryland (5 percent); and Cameri, Italy (5 percent), and is expected to be completed in May 2019.

Fiscal 2015 aircraft procurement (Air Force, Marine Corps, and Navy), non-U.S. Department of Defense participant funding, and foreign military sales funds in the amount of $920,350,132 are being obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to FAR 6.302-1. This contract combines purchase for Foreign Military Sales program customers ($352,102,228; 38 percent); the Air Force ($227,666,000; 25 percent); non-U.S. Department of Defense participants ($207,086,904; 22 percent); and the Navy/Marine Corps ($133,495,000; 15 percent). The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity (N00019-15-C-0003).

Source: http://www.defense.gov/Contracts/Contra ... actID=5556

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Jun 2015, 01:02
by bring_it_on
Northrop Grumman Gears Up For F-35 Production Push
Jun 12, 2015 Guy Norris | Aviation Week & Space Technology


Northrop Grumman is opening up new production spaces and introducing advanced manufacturing technology on its F-35 center fuselage integrated assembly line (IAL) here in preparation for a doubling of production in the next five years.

Northrop Grumman, which plans to accelerate its IAL to a three-day production interval in September from the current four-day tempo, works in lockstep with Lockheed Martin which delivered 36 F-35s in 2014 compared to 13 in 2011. Together with new final assembly lines in Italy and Japan, total annual production is set to pass the 100 mark in 2018. However, the ramp-up at Palmdale—and other sites around the complex Joint Strike Fighter supplier base—necessarily occurs earlier; with the wave approaching, Northrop Grumman is looking to deliver around 45 fuselages this year and more than 50 in 2016.

The IAL has 46 fuselages moving down the line now, of which 19 are for international F-35 customers, but this will “be close to 100 in flow on the line when we hit max rate,” says Hank Reed, Northrop Grumman F-35 business development manager. “We are in that ramp now. We are filling in the empty spaces on the line with more tooling and filling up the time with extra shifts.”

Already highly automated, with several robotically controlled processes and manufacturing steps, the IAL is about to implement the use of an Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and industry-developed projector guidance system in manual cells for fastener insertion during F-35 assembly. The Fastener Insertion Live Link System (Fills) can be used at any fastener installation station throughout the F-35 assembly process to standardize data-entry processes and eliminate manual data entry. The AFRL says Fills provides accurate hole location and fastener-size information, which reduces kitting preparation and delivery time and fastener installation span time and assures accuracy.

“It directs which kind of fasteners to use by taking the data and projecting it directly onto the composite skin panels,” says Reed. “It uses an electronic ‘gun’ to measure the holes and tells the mechanic how to do it,” he adds. Fills, which was developed in association with Variation Reduction Solutions and Delta-Sigma Corp., is expected to result in cumulative unit recurring flyaway-cost savings of more than $82 million. The average time savings per shipset is expected to be 111 hr.

Fuselages from Palmdale are delivered to Lockheed Martin’s F-35 final assembly line in Fort Worth where they are mated with other subassemblies including, most recently, the first F-35A wing-set produced by Italy’s Finmeccanica-Alenia Aermacchi. The wing set was produced at the F-35 final assembly and check-out (FACO) facility in Cameri, Italy, and is the first of a planned 835 sets.

Owned by the Italian government and operated by Alenia Aermacchi in association with Lockheed Martin, the FACO rolled out Italy’s first F-35A aircraft, AL-1, in March. Center fuselages for the Italian aircraft are a mix of units provided by Northrop and Turkish Aerospace Industries (TAI). Produced on the original tooling used by Northrop to make the first 20 F-35 shipsets, TAI manufactures and assembles the center fuselages, composite skins and weapon bay doors, and manufactures fiber placement composite air inlet ducts.

“We are helping them to set up under a coproduction deal,” says Reed, who notes the first TAI-built fuselage was shipped to Fort Worth in December 2013. At full-rate production, TAI will support the U.S. and Italian F-35 final assembly lines by shipping one center fuselage every 10 days. The highest rate on the Turkish line will be around 40 per year, he adds.

The production plan is geared toward final assembly of about 17 aircraft per month from Fort Worth, plus at least one from Italy. For an undetermined period, aircraft will also be added from a third FACO line now being established with Mitsubishi in Nagoya, Japan. Under a 2013 agreement, the first four F-35s for Japan will be delivered from the U.S. line in 2016, with another 38 to be assembled in Nagoya.

Planned production numbers are not expected be affected by the recent call from Pentagon procurement chief Frank Kendall for an international block buy of F-35s to help sustain the ramp-up while driving costs down. Kendall’s proposal, delivered at the annual F-35 CEO conference in Oslo, Norway, in late May, is to bundle three years of contract announcements for 2018-20 together. Lockheed Martin says the concept will not affect the production build-up numbers but will make the process “cheaper and more stable.”

“There is already an aggressive cost-reduction curve,” Northrop Grumman’s Reed says. “From LRIP [low-rate initial production] 1 to LRIP 8 we reduced unit cost by probably 45%.” In addition, Northrop Grumman is part of the “Blueprint for Affordability” plan launched by the program last year. It calls for Lockheed Martin, Northrop and BAE Systems to invest an additional $170 million in further production improvements to drive unit costs down to around $80 million a year ahead of a preexisting 2019 target date. “The Blueprint for Affordability is squeezing out additional savings and now Mr. Kendall wants to see another 10% savings. It is a challenge ahead of us and, we are certainly looking at it,” Reed says.




http://aviationweek.com/defense/northro ... ction-push

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 14 Jun 2015, 02:31
by charlielima223
http://www.defense.gov/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=128947

http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... st-413469/

For those who do not have a sign in/log in

On an Arizona runway nearly 4,900nm removed from Le Bourget’s festivities, 10 selected Lockheed Martin F-35Bs will be preparing to make history as the Paris air show gets under way.

The US Marine Corps (USMC) is set to declare later this year the 10 F-35Bs assigned to the VMFA-121 Green Knights squadron at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Arizona, as the first unit to achieve initial operational capability (IOC). Nearly 14 years after the US Department of Defense awarded Lockheed the Joint Strike Fighter development contract, the first of the three F-35 variants will finally be an operational system.

The short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) F-35B has still not attended an international air show, but it will soon be available for combat.

Not much is likely to change for VMFA-121 in the months following the IOC declaration. The unit will be available for operations if called on, but it is not scheduled for its first deployment – to Iwakuni, Japan – until 2017. By that time, the US Air Force should have declared the first squadron of the conventional take-off and landing F-35A to have achieved IOC, with the US Navy following suit in 2018 with a first squadron of carrier-variant F-35Cs.

“We’re on track to do that [Marines IOC], on track for Air Force IOC the following year,” assistant secretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics Frank Kendall told reporters on 29 May adding that, after that, the navy and international partners would start declaring IOC.

“We’re continuing to execute to the plan that was baselined in 2011, so good progress on all of those things. We’re either meeting or exceeding our projections for cost and schedule.”

Getting to this point has been a struggle, especially for the F-35B. As the world’s first operational fighter that combines supersonic speed and STOVL capability, the model is a technological breakthrough. In fiscal year 2015, each propulsion system alone – Pratt & Whitney F135 engine, Rolls-Royce LiftFan and other major components, such as wing-mounted roll-posts and a three-bearing exhaust swivel nozzle – cost $32 million.

Proving the F-35B can operate reliably on an amphibious carrier was the last remaining hurdle before the Marines could declare IOC. In previous tests aboard the amphibious assault ship USSWaspin 2013, the F-35B showed that it could take-off and land as it was designed. But the deployment revealed other issues, particularly in the logistics department.

It was discovered, for example, that the system the USMC currently relies on to automatically monitor and diagnose faults, order repairs and keep track of spare inventories – Lockheed’s autonomic logistics information system (ALIS) – could not physically fit aboard theWasp. So, all maintenance actions were co-ordinated remotely from Lockheed’s global F-35 sustainment hub in Fort Worth, Texas. As a result, the programme funded a deployable version of ALIS, which accompanied the F-35B squadron on the latest round of embarked tests.

One final operational assessment staged aboard theWaspfrom 18 to 27 May was intended to answer the ALIS issue and many other questions about the F-35B’s ability to go to war.

Ninety-one marines, including 10 pilots, joined six F-35Bs – a shipboard squadron – aboard theWaspin the Atlantic Ocean for eight days of flying, which included 108 sorties in 85.5 flight hours. The pilots flew sorties focused on carrier qualification, air interdiction, defensive combat air, air traffic management and supporting a rescue mission for a simulated downed aircrew.

“I would say highly successful,” says Lt Gen Jon Davis, the Marines’ deputy commandant for aviation.

Although the public focus was on the number of sorties, the USMC were most interested in what was happening on and below deck. “We focused this carrier period on logistics and sustainability,” Davis says. “So, what would it be like to go do that and what would it take to include a lot of force maintenance actions, both above deck and below deck. That all kind of worked how we thought it would. There were a couple of small things we discovered – an additional tool here or an additional part there, but the bottom line is we accomplished all of the stuff we wanted to, to include flying an [F135] engine on board the ship on the [Bell Boeing] V-22.”

The size of the F135 engine had raised concerns that one could not be physically loaded and carried by a V-22 from the shore or another ship to an amphibious carrier deck. However, the US Naval Air Systems Command, Bell Boeing and P&W developed a cradle for the F135 to load inside the tiltrotor, ensuring that spare engines could be dispatched to the ship if needed.

“We flew it on on the 21st of May and flew it off on the 27th, and moved that thing around like we were putting it into an aircraft,” says Davis.

A thermal coating on the deck also “performed well”, Davis adds. The F135 engine produces nearly twice the thrust of the R-R Pegasus engine on the Boeing AV-8B Harrier, and the heat exhaust emitted by the F-35 during a vertical landing can melt an untreated carrier deck. So the protective coating makes sure the aircraft can operate safely aboard ship.

Most importantly, the deployable version of ALIS also “worked very well” aboard the ship, Davis says. That “allows us to achieve our turnaround times,” he adds. “We have good interoperability with ALIS on board theWasp, and there’s an organic system now on that ship.”

Maintaining the F-35B’s very low observable signature to radar was another objective of the last deployment. Previous stealth aircraft required extensive post-flight maintenance to re-apply radar-absorbent materials and adhesives that cover gaps on panels.

“We proved we could do that at sea as well,” Davis says. “All in all, a successful deployment. We got what we wanted out of the shipboard period, and now we are tracking the additional items we have to do to accomplish our IOC objectives.”

In general, the IOC term in the military’s acquisition lexicon simply means that a new weapon system meets the user’s minimum operational needs. For the F-35B, this is defined as the ability to carry internally two 454kg (1,000lb) bombs or two 227kg bombs and two Raytheon AIM-120 AMRAAM air-to-air missiles.

It also includes a suite of software-enabled capabilities that are only partially complete. In 2010, the Marines agreed to declare IOC in 2015 with a degraded software build called Block 2B, while the USAF is waiting for Block 3I software in 2016, which includes updated hardware. The navy's IOC declaration is waiting for the availability of Block 3F in 2017.

In March, F-35 programme executive officer Lt Gen Chris Bogdan acknowledged that a portion of the Block 2B software capability would not be ready when the USMC's window for declaring IOC opens in July.

One of the reasons for calling the F-35 a “fifth-generation fighter” is the aircraft’s ability to fuse data from multiple sensors, both on board and from other aircraft. The pilot can use that information to track and positively identify targets that could not be identified using a single sensor. But the Block 2B software’s fusion algorithms are still not working properly.

In formations of more than two aircraft, the F-35’s sensor fusion computer often gets confused: each sensor detects a target with varying degrees of resolution, and so the pilot is told by the computer that there are several targets where there is only one.

It is a problem that the navy encountered when developing a similar sensor fusion engine for the Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, programme manager Capt Frank Morley told Flightglobal in a recent interview. For the Super Hornet, the air-to-ground capability that is causing problems for the F-35B’s Block 2B software was still challenging, but turned out to be the easy part. Making the sensor fusion algorithms work in an air-to-air environment in three-dimensional space was much more difficult, Morley says.

“We spent about nine months beyond what we expected just to work out the kinks on that,” he says.

The F-35 programme is scheduled to start testing a fix for the sensor fusion problem in a few weeks, Bogdan says. But the Marines could declare the first F-35B unit operational before the fix is ready.

“The fixes we are getting ready to flight test for some of the deficiencies we found in our fusion algorithms and some of our pilot vehicle displays are actually being tested on our Block 3I software,” Bogdan says. “Once we complete that, we will go back and retrofit all the 2B airplanes with those fixes. We intend on taking that 3I software with the fixes to flight test around the last week of June. We’ll spend about 30 days flight testing those fixes, and if they appear to be good, then we will just leave those in 3I for the future airplanes and port them back into 2B.”

As the software is being fixed, the F-35 programme is finally preparing to enter a new phase. The long period of development and testing will begin to wind down in two years. Meanwhile, Lockheed’s factory has been stuck in a holding pattern for three years, delivering F-35s at an average pace of about three aircraft per month to US and international customers.

If the Pentagon’s budget proposals are cleared by Congress and international customers buy their expected share, F-35 deliveries could increase by about five-fold over the next five years. The Department of Defense is continuing to negotiate a block-buy deal for the next two years, but is already looking to negotiate a three-year block buy of more than 400 aircraft.

Bogdan first floated the idea of a multi-year, bulk acquisition of the F-35 at the Farnborough air show last July. More details of the proposal were released in March. The programme office issued a pre-solicitation notice for a proposal to buy as many as 477 F135 engines on a single contract covering a three-year period, with no spare engines included.

If Congress authorises the multi-year deal, Lockheed and its supply chain may be able to achieve the economies of scale required to drive the unit recurring flyaway price of the F-35A from $108 million a year ago to about $80 million in FY2019, as programme officials have promised. Although the programme has invested $170 million to fund cost-saving initiatives, Bogdan has said that four-fifths of F-35 cost reductions come from increasing the production rate to achieve economies of scale.

But Kendall’s staff will be watching the negotiations carefully. Multi-year acquisition deals are generally approved only when the contractor agrees to reduce unit costs by more than 10%, which in the case of the F-35 can amount to $8-10 million reductions each year of the deal.

“I’d like to see double-digit savings, not very different from what we try to do with a multi-year,” Kendall says.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 14 Jun 2015, 03:58
by spazsinbad
That fliteglobular article mentioned here earlier - btw easy to register there for FREE - :devil: but WHY in this case? :mrgreen:

viewtopic.php?f=22&t=27345&p=292910&hilit=untreated#p292910

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 14 Jun 2015, 15:59
by bring_it_on
F-35 Maintenance Reporting Evolves as Aircraft Matures


Lockheed Martin has introduced the second of three major software releases it will deliver for the maintenance support system of the F-35 Lightning II fighter. The false reporting codes maintainers experienced using the Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS) on earlier blocks of the F-35 should be resolved as the air vehicle matures, the manufacturer said. But the system will be fielded without a radio frequency downlink that would enable the F-35 to send reports while in flight, a feature that has been deferred for later development.

Lockheed Martin (Chalet 316) describes ALIS as the “operations management backbone” of the F-35, an information technology infrastructure that captures and analyzes health and maintenance data for individual airframes as well as for the larger fleet. The system is designed to support F-35 operations, maintenance, fault-prediction and parts deliveries over the lifecycle of the fighter, providing maintainers with timely information over a distributed network.

As of this spring, ALIS Version 2.0, the second of three planned releases, was installed at nine military bases in the continental U.S. and at the F-35 Final Assembly and Check-Out facility Lockheed Martin operates with Alenia Aermacchi at Cameri Air Base in Italy. A version of the system was installed on the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp, where testers validated the system’s performance for F-35 shipboard operations.

“ALIS is progressing per its development plan,” said Jeff Streznetcky, ALIS program director with Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training in Orlando. “In terms of major releases, I’d say we’re two-thirds of the way there to getting ALIS fully developed and fielded to our customers.” The third release is planned in 2017 with the conclusion of the F-35 system development and demonstration phase.

Lockheed Martin was testing ALIS version 2.0.1 before releasing it into the field. This version supports a deployable version of ALIS contained in ruggedized transport cases that can be moved on and off aircraft carriers or amphibious ships and deployed to remote operating locations. Before it declares initial operational capability (IOC) of the F-35B short takeoff and landing variant as expected this summer, the U.S. Marine Corps will have verified the functionality of ALIS software as well as the “deployability” of system hardware, Streznetcky said.

An ALIS version 2.0.2 system was in development. This will support the Air Force’s planned IOC declaration for the F-35A in mid-2016. The final release–ALIS 3.X–was in an earlier phase of development, and will support IOC of the F-35C by the U.S. Navy as well as international partner operations.

Health Reporting Codes

The Marine Corps F-35B will begin operations with air vehicle Block 2B software. Fighters that Lockheed Martin delivered to Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, which is home to an integrated training center for F-35 pilots and maintainers, came with earlier versions of the aircraft software, designated Blocks 1B and 2A.

An ALIS predictive, or “prognostic,” health monitoring application that resides with the aircraft software has generated a high percentage of false positive health reporting codes (HRCs) in F-35s with earlier versions of that software. In a report accompanying the Fiscal Year 2016 defense authorization act this spring, the U.S. House Armed Services Committee said that it received “numerous complaints and concerns by F-35 maintenance and operational personnel regarding the limitations, poor performance, poor design and overall unsuitability of the ALIS software in its current form.” Department of Defense (DOD) officials who testified before the committee’s Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces in mid-April confirmed those reports.

With the health monitoring application, the F-35 generates HRCs that are recorded on a data storage device. The data is later downloaded into the ALIS system, which generates work orders for maintenance actions and administrative tasks for pilots and maintainers to close. Lockheed Martin acknowledged that maintainers at Eglin AFB experienced a high degree of false positive HRCs on F-35s with Block 1B and 2A software–reports that did not require any corrective action. The false reports served to induce unnecessary workload into the system.

The manufacturer described the problem of false-positive reports as a developmental issue that will be resolved as the F-35 air vehicle software matures. Fighters delivered to Luke AFB and Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, F-35 bases in Arizona that were activated after Eglin AFB, came with Block 2B software. Block 2B software “shows a 50 percent diagnostic improvement of false positives” versus the earlier software versions, Lockheed Martin said.

“As the air vehicle system has matured and the software that runs on the air vehicle has matured, the system has been able to fine tune its diagnostic capabilities,” Streznetcky said. “We’ve seen that from Block 1B to Block 2A and from Block 2A to 2B–a continuing reduction in the number of false health reporting codes that have been generated by the aircraft. I’m certain that what is being observed at Eglin is due in part to the fact that the jets they are operating with are of the 1B and 2A variety, and therefore an earlier product that came out of the development lifecycle. We do have objective data that indicates there’s a continual maturation of the prognostics capability on the aircraft.”

The problem should be resolved with later versions of F-35 air vehicle software, Lockheed Martin claimed. “We expect to reach negligible false HRCs with the delivery of Block 3i/3F and new ALIS software currently in development,” the manufacturer said.

One of the more compelling features system designers envisioned for ALIS–an RF downlink that would enable the F-35 to send health monitoring data to the ground while the fighter is airborne–has been deferred for later development in order to better secure the data stream. In the meantime, such data will be extracted from a storage device when the jet lands. While the deferral was “a joint decision” of Lockheed Martin and the DOD’s F-35 Joint Program Office (JPO), Streznetcky referred questions on that issue to the JPO.

Responding to an inquiry from AIN, the JPO issued the following statement: “The Prognostics and Health Management data downlink provides F-35 maintainers with an advanced look into aircraft diagnostics, consumables and weapons status prior to landing. Testing of the downlink revealed the need to upgrade it with enhanced security measures.

“Those improvements will be completed in follow-on development; specific timelines for all Block 4 capabilities are under program review. The downlink has no bearing on the aircraft’s diagnostics performance. The same information can be obtained once the F-35 lands.”


http://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/ ... ft-matures

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 29 Jul 2015, 14:07
by bring_it_on
F-35 Radar Cross Section
Solicitation Number: N00019-14-G-0020-RCS
Agency: Department of the Navy
Office: Naval Air Systems Command
Location: NAVAIR HQ


The F-35 Joint Program Office intends to issue an order under Basic Ordering Agreement N00019-14-G-0020 on a sole source basis to Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company, Fort Worth, TX to perform Radar Cross Section (RCS) testing on the F-35 platform to assess a weapon system and its effect on aircraft performance. The proposed order is anticipated to be awarded no later than 30 September 2015.

This effort will be awarded on a sole source basis to Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company under authority FAR 6.302-1, and in accordance with Class Justification and Approval, dated 14 October 2014.



Any firms believing that they can perform the effort described above related to the F-35 Lightning II Air System may submit a written capability statement to be received at the Contracting Office no later than response date indicated on this notice. Questions regarding this notice should be addressed to John Camac via email at john.camac@jsf.mil


What weapons system could this be?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 29 Jul 2015, 15:42
by SpudmanWP
As Block 2B testing is complete, this could be any of he Block 3F external stores.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 31 Jul 2015, 15:26
by bring_it_on
Software Development Schedules Remain A Risk To F-35 IOC Dates

Pentagon acquisition chief Frank Kendall is confident in the progress the F-35 joint program office is making toward achieving the Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy's initial operational capability requirements, but a report released to Congress last month notes some risk in those plans, largely related to software delivery.

The three services have staggered IOC targets, based on their unique needs. The Marine Corps is moving through the final approvals to declare the F-35B variant operational, and the Air Force expects to declare IOC for the A variant next summer. The Navy is aiming for IOC for its F-35C in 2018.

Kendall's report, which Inside the Air Force obtained this week, only highlights software related risks. It notes that both the Marine Corps and the Navy will likely declare IOC with a lesser slate of capability than what they had expected.

As previously reported, the Marine Corps will have an incomplete version of Block 2B software with limited sensor fusion capability. The service has said the capability is not required for its initial IOC mission set.

According to the report, the Navy has deferred its requirement for a wide-area sea surface and track capability, which will no longer be delivered in time for IOC. The JPO did not respond to a request for comment about the deferral by press time (July 30).

The biggest software-related risk to the Air Force's IOC date is linked to the development of mission data files. The report notes that there is risk to that development schedule "which can be attributed to competing demands for mission data files by other services and partners within the F-35 program."

The program also is monitoring closely schedule risk associated with software development for the Autonomic Logistics Information System. The report notes that the JPO has increased its oversight of prime contractor Lockheed Martin's ALIS development activities and is seeing improvements in its ability to track and measure the system's performance. Still, ALIS challenges remain a risk for the program, and the department is closely monitoring its impact on the Air Force and Navy IOC dates as well as for the program as a whole. -- Courtney Albon


http://insidedefense.com/inside-air-for ... -ioc-dates

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Aug 2015, 10:00
by spazsinbad
The Defense Contract Management Agency’s Role in the F-35 Roll Out
03 Aug 2015 SLDinfo

"...As of July 1, the F-35 Lightning II has surpassed 36,000 combined flight hours between F-35 military fleet aircraft and System Development and Demonstration test aircraft.

The F-35 Operational Fleet features 112 aircraft (105 U.S. and seven international partner aircraft) and the F-35 Test Fleet features 18 aircraft (six F-35A, seven F-35B, and five F-35C).

Currently, 172 F-35 pilots and 1,810 maintainers from U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom have been qualified through the aircraft’s training system.

The F-35 has completed multiple weapons tests as well as F-35B and F-35C first-life durability testing.

Additionally, the program has conducted two F-35B developmental test shipboard trials aboard the USS WASP; the Marine Corps conducted its F-35B first operational test aboard USS Wasp in May 2015; and the F-35C will conduct its second developmental test event in late 2015."

Source: http://www.sldinfo.com/the-defense-cont ... -roll-out/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Aug 2015, 13:12
by sferrin
Won't be long before there are more F-35s than F-22s.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Aug 2015, 13:50
by jdrush
@ over 200 in production or flying

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Aug 2015, 15:43
by lamoey
bring_it_on wrote:F-35 Radar Cross Section
Solicitation Number: N00019-14-G-0020-RCS
Agency: Department of the Navy
Office: Naval Air Systems Command
Location: NAVAIR HQ


The F-35 Joint Program Office intends to issue an order under Basic Ordering Agreement N00019-14-G-0020 on a sole source basis to Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company, Fort Worth, TX to perform Radar Cross Section (RCS) testing on the F-35 platform to assess a weapon system and its effect on aircraft performance. The proposed order is anticipated to be awarded no later than 30 September 2015.

This effort will be awarded on a sole source basis to Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company under authority FAR 6.302-1, and in accordance with Class Justification and Approval, dated 14 October 2014.



Any firms believing that they can perform the effort described above related to the F-35 Lightning II Air System may submit a written capability statement to be received at the Contracting Office no later than response date indicated on this notice. Questions regarding this notice should be addressed to John Camac via email at john.camac@jsf.mil


What weapons system could this be?


Could it be the gun pod? Under wing ordonnance is not expected to be that stealthy anyway, but the gun pod is.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Aug 2015, 17:11
by bring_it_on
Pentagon, F-35 Joint Program Office At Odds Over Navy Radar Capabilities

The Pentagon and the F-35 joint program office are at odds over exactly when the Navy's Wide-Area Search Sea Surface and Track initial operational capability is set to be required for the Joint Strike Fighter.

While Frank Kendall, the top Defense Department acquisition official, has said the capability was meant to be included in Block 3F, the program office says the technology was always planned for Block 4.1.

Indeed, in a June report to Congress, Kendall wrote that "software development is proceeding in earnest and flight testing for Block 3F began in March of this year."

"Despite a deferral of Wide Area Search Sea Surface and Track Capability, all of the required capabilities are on track to be completed and verified prior to US Navy IOC," Kendall's report added.

However, F-35 spokesman Joe DellaVedova wrote in an Aug. 19 email to InsideDefense.com that a request was made to investigate expanding Block 3F radar techniques to include Wide-Area Search, thought it was not an original requirement for the 3F batch.

"Implementing this capability in Block 3F would have incurred a significant schedule impact, and would have also required an integration of a new weapon capability to fully deploy the anti-surface warfare mission improvements," DellaVedova wrote. "Based on this, the warfighter decided to include it in Block 4.1, which will be delivered in 2019."

Block 3F is being delivered with two radar techniques, Wide-Area Search and Sea Target Track, which were selected in tandem with the Block 3F weapon set to support Navy anti-surface warfare mission requirements at IOC.

Wide Area Search and Sea Target Track allow the F-35 to rapidly establish tracks on surface units to build and maintain the maritime picture around the carrier strike group, Jim Gigliotti, F-35C program director for Lockheed Martin, wrote in an Aug. 5 statement to InsideDefense.com.

"Maintaining the maritime picture is critical to Navy units in that it allows the application of the right number/type of assets to execute the anti-surface warfare kill chain," he wrote.

"The decision to delay Wide Area Search was a programmatic decision and does not prevent F-35 from executing the anti-surface warfare mission," he added.

DellaVedova reiterated to InsideDefense.com the decision to not include the Wide-Area Search capability in Block 3 was a programmatic decision and does not prevent the F-35 from supporting the Block 3F anti-surface warfare mission once the F-35C is declared wartime ready. -- Lee Hudson

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Aug 2015, 17:43
by spazsinbad
More on the above software article here:
Navy need deferred, but F-35 software ‘on the right track’
20 Aug 2015 James Drew

"...The radar capability’s “deferral” was disclosed in a software development report sent by the Pentagon to US lawmakers in June.

The DOD says in the report that F-35 software development and integration remains a key concern, but the programme “is on the right track and will continue to deliver on the commitments made to the F-35 enterprise” – which includes partner nations and foreign military sale customers . That goes for both the aircraft itself and the troubled Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS) that supports it, according to the report.

The report says Block 2B – which the Marine Corps declared IOC with in July – has eight unresolved issues that centre on “sensor fusion, electronic warfare and Link 16 communications,” although those problems “do not interfere with the USMC IOC mission sets” and will be resolved in Block 3F – which Lockheed has already begun flight testing.

The US Air Force, meanwhile, has identified six Block 2B software deficiencies that it needs resolved prior to its IOC declaration with the A-model in August 2016. Those aircraft will be fielded with Block 3i software and a faster computer processor.

“The air force requested improvements in the software to provide clear and timely information concerning the health and status of various sensors on the aircraft,” the JPO says. “The improved software will inform pilots of immediate degradation of the mission system core computers, the radar processing computers, and the tactical situation display.

“The improvements will also provide clearer indication of the field of regard for the radar, and the prioritization of targets. Computer enhancements will also be made to speed up the download times of post-flight data.”..."

Source: http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... ht-415913/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Aug 2015, 18:03
by SpudmanWP
I'd love to see the original report.

btw, The Navy must really have a pair of brass ones if on one hand they are asking to bring forward a radar mode from Block 4 into Block3F (which would cause schedule issues for everyone else) and on the other hand planning to reduce the annual F-35C buy.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Aug 2015, 18:30
by neptune
SpudmanWP wrote:..asking to bring forward a radar mode from Block 4 into Block3F (which would cause schedule issues for everyone else)...


...no they crawfished and left it in 4+..but if they really want "Big SAR," they can add it to their new mission computers for the AESA SBugs. Maybe they can iron out the bugs before bringing forward Block 4.

Wow! the "canoe club" contributing something to the 'Sea" other than "foot dragging".

Who would have "thunk it"!

:)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Aug 2015, 18:56
by SpudmanWP
It would take them a hell of a lot longer than 2019 to get BigSAR into the Superbug. According to the OT&E folks, they have not even got all the issues ironed out of the -79 for it's baseline features.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Aug 2015, 22:47
by cantaz
To be fair, WASSTT probably benefits an ESG more than a CSG. ESGs don't have organic E-2s to fall back on.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Aug 2015, 22:58
by sferrin
...........

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Aug 2015, 23:03
by spazsinbad
I would have posted the video in 'Armament, Stores & Tactics' specifically in this thread where text will reside related to the video above: [although the thread wobbles a bit]

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=27499&p=296719#p296719

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Aug 2015, 23:09
by sferrin
spazsinbad wrote:I would have posted the video in 'Armament, Stores & Tactics' specifically in this thread where text will reside related to the video above: [although the thread wobbles a bit]

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=27499&p=296719#p296719



Moved.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2015, 00:26
by popcorn
lamoey wrote:Could it be the gun pod? Under wing ordonnance is not expected to be that stealthy anyway, but the gun pod is.

I'd have thought they would've confirmed the gun pod RCS by this time.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2015, 09:03
by hornetfinn
lamoey wrote:Could it be the gun pod? Under wing ordonnance is not expected to be that stealthy anyway, but the gun pod is.


Well, it depends on ordnance. Some are designed specifically with stealth in mind like JASSM, JSOW or Storm Shadow. Some others have rather small RCS due to small size and some design features (like A-A missiles, SDB, Brimstone). While installing any of those externally will certainly increase RCS, their external carriage might not make the aircraft totally unstealthy. Besides, it's very good to know exactly what the RCS of aircraft is with all kinds of loadout options. F-35 can tell the pilot how far away the enemy radar can see it and this can be very important information even in unstealthy or reduced stealth configurations. I think such measurements should be taken before any new weapon in certified for external carriage.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2015, 09:15
by popcorn
So many possible combinatIons of external ordnance, each with it's unique impact on overall RCS. So lots of tests.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2015, 09:32
by hornetfinn
popcorn wrote:So many possible combinatIons of external ordnance, each with it's unique impact on overall RCS. So lots of tests.


Very true. Maybe there is a way to reduce the problem in some ways to fewer tests. Maybe it's possible to do tests only to most common/important loadouts and use simulations with others. If simulations and real world tests give similar results with those, then this could be done.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2015, 15:09
by johnwill
hornetfinn wrote:
popcorn wrote:So many possible combinatIons of external ordnance, each with it's unique impact on overall RCS. So lots of tests.


Very true. Maybe there is a way to reduce the problem in some ways to fewer tests. Maybe it's possible to do tests only to most common/important loadouts and use simulations with others. If simulations and real world tests give similar results with those, then this could be done.


We (General Dynamics) did that on the F-111 almost fifty years ago and F-16 almost forty years ago. I'm sure others did the same thing. USAF does that to clear new stores for carriage and separation.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2015, 16:07
by bring_it_on
hornetfinn wrote:
popcorn wrote:So many possible combinatIons of external ordnance, each with it's unique impact on overall RCS. So lots of tests.


Very true. Maybe there is a way to reduce the problem in some ways to fewer tests. Maybe it's possible to do tests only to most common/important loadouts and use simulations with others. If simulations and real world tests give similar results with those, then this could be done.



Some of this stuff with over-testing vs 'intelligent testing' is covered in this talk -


Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2015, 16:08
by bring_it_on
AFOTEC: Collaboration Key Among JSF Testing Community


As the F-35 moves through developmental testing, the Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center is working closely with teams to both provide resources and to glean any information that might better inform and improve operational testing.

AFOTEC Commander Maj. Gen. Matthew Malloy told Inside the Air Force this week that although the F-35's first initial operational test and evaluation event will be weapons validation in mid-2016 -- and the majority of operational testing will not be completed until 2018 -- the operational test (OT) community is closely involved in ongoing developmental testing, providing pilots and sometimes working with test squadrons to lend OT resources to the effort.

Malloy told ITAF Aug. 20 that the relationship between the developmental and operational test communities goes a long way toward helping his team prepare for future testing. His evaluators are closely watching the data that comes from developmental test (DT) and sometimes his pilots have the opportunity to fly DT sorties and familiarize themselves with new flight software prior to their test events.

"What we really want to do is leverage commonality in test," Malloy said.

Because the Joint Strike Fighter program has such a large international buy-in -- nine countries, including the United States, have committed to investing in the platform -- Malloy noted that another focus for AFOTEC is to balance international testing priorities in its OT plan. Different countries require different testing variables, including the environment the aircraft needs to be tested in and the types of weapons it will carry.

AFOTEC then takes those demands and prioritizes them to make sure testers are giving weight to more than just the U.S. testing plan.

"It's hard work," Malloy said. "It's new work. It's new ground."

Because these partners have all invested in the program at some level and have been involved in decision-making, Malloy said there is a mutual understanding of the resource constraints and the capabilities that are being prioritized on the aircraft. That buy-in also means partners expect a certain level of access to information, and Malloy said part of his job is to keep track of what information can be released without exposing vulnerabilities or sharing protected data.

"We are dealing with limited assets right now, so the hard part is expectation management," he said. "They're wanting access to data . . . and they've partnered into this, so there's an understanding that information will be exchanged. But now we have to do it and all of a sudden it's hard."

The key, Malloy said, is communication.

"You don't do anything in silos," he said. "Everybody has to be at the table." -- Courtney Albon

Related News | Aircraft |

Inside the Air Force - 08/21/2015 , Vol. 26, No. 33

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Aug 2015, 13:00
by bring_it_on

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Aug 2015, 14:10
by bring_it_on
The F-35 Joint Program Office intends to issue an order under Basic Ordering Agreement N00019-14-G-0020 on a sole source basis to Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company, Fort Worth, TX to deliver a report which determines the design impacts of a proposed change on the overall F-35 weapon system, to include Mission Planning, Training and Reprograming capabilities. The proposed order is anticipated to be awarded no later than 30 September 2015.
This effort will be awarded on a sole source basis to Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company under authority FAR 6.302-1, and in accordance with Class Justification and Approval, dated 14 October 2014.


https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity ... e&_cview=0

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Aug 2015, 20:52
by SpudmanWP
There was only one issues with the vid.

At the end they mention the same unit doing "2B to 3B" upgrades this fall.

There is no "3B" block and they are likely talking about 3i.

This is actually more impressive as it includes Tech Refresh 2 where the "1B to 2B" upgrade was primarily software.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2015, 05:54
by spazsinbad
F-35 Block 3F Funds Awarded
03 Sep 2015 Marc V. Schanz

"Lockheed Martin received a $311.4 million contract for the F-35 program’s Block 3F upgrade—the planned all-up configuration—which will be performed on Air Force, Marine Corps, Navy, and British variants of the Joint Strike Fighter, according to a Sept. 1 contract announcement. The “undefinitized delivery order,” made against another ordering agreement for the four customers, is to purchase “retrofit modification hardware” needed for Block 3F upgrades, and engineering support for kit installations at Lockheed Martin’s Fort Worth, Texas, facility and at a facility in Baltimore, Md. Naval Air Systems Command at NAS Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting authority. Work on the modifications is expected to last until September 2021. The contract is a combination purchase for the four customers, with the largest portions going to USAF (approximately $142.7 million of the contract) and the Marine Corps (approximately $86.2 million). Earlier this year, a senior USAF official noted some capabilities planned for the Block 3F full configuration of the fighter will move to the Block 4 update, which will be fielded between 2019 and 2025. The Marine Corps declared initial operational capability for its F-35B variant in early August with the 2B software configuration, which provides initial combat capability. The Air Force will declare IOC with the 3i software in 2016, which provides the same capabilities as the Marine Corps' Block 2B, but includes an upgraded processor and the "gen 3" helmet, F-35 Executive Vice President Lorraine Martin said in June."

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/DRArchive/Pa ... arded.aspx
&
Original: http://www.defense.gov/News/Contracts/C ... cle/615582

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Sep 2015, 15:19
by bring_it_on
USAF Set For Operational Tests Of F-35 Service Software

Operational testing of the first F-35A software load for initial U.S. Air Force service is expected to begin in October as development testing for follow-on full warfighting software picks up speed.

The imminent transition of Block 3I software from development to operational test aircraft marks a key milestone in the F-35 System Design and Demonstration (SDD) phase, now 70% complete after its beginning in 2010. “The main focus is to make sure we get Block 3I right, and we have it to Operational Test on time. That’s the big hitter right now, as well as making sure we are staying on time line for the Air Force IOC [initial operational capability],” says Maj. Hans “Money” Buckwalter, Acting Director of Operations for the 461st Flight Test Sqdn., which conducts developmental testing here for the F-35.

First to fly with the 3I software will be the Nellis AFB, Nevada-based 422nd Test and Evaluation Sqdn., which is developing the F-35A tactics manual for air-to-air and air-to-surface combat. The aircraft first arrived at Nellis, home of the Air Force’s Warfare Center, in January and this summer performed close air support missions during the Green Flag West exercise. The Edwards-based 31st Test and Evaluation Sqdn. is meanwhile continuing operational tests with Block 2B, the interim software standard used to enable the U.S. Marine Corps to declare initial operations at the end of July.

The 3I test effort is tracking to plan, says Buckwalter, partly because software issues have been tackled and resolved during development testing, and because of the approach taken to evaluate software in parallel with operational tests (OT). That approach has helped counter the impact on the schedule of the numerous software issues which have dogged the fighter program. “Right now we have version 3IR6 testing and we are close to wrapping that up for IOC in 2016. And we are concurrently testing Block 3F for IOC with the Navy in 2018,” he says.

Software development is 98% complete for the 3F package, which adds key combat capabilities including data- link imagery and the full complement of weapons carried both internally and externally. It is slated for inclusion on the low-rate initial-production (LRIP) 9 aircraft, and is expected to be ready for delivery at the end of the development program in October 2017.

“It is almost unprecedented how quickly OT is getting software after we are done with it,” says Lockheed Martin F-35 site lead test pilot David “Doc” Nelson. “The advantage of that is the OT guys assess and say, ‘Yes, it is effective in combat,’ or they say, ‘We want you to change this.’ So the earlier that happens, the less impact it has down the road.” Transition of operational standard software to OT also represents an inflection point for the entire program, he says. “There’s been a feeling that maybe SDD would last forever, but the feeling I get is we are coming around the last corner and about to get on the home stretch. There is an end in sight and we [can] wrap up SDD in October 2017.”

Development testers are confident of handing over a working software load on time, after conducting mission effectiveness flights involving four aircraft earlier this summer, with two each from the demonstration and operational test units. “We work hand-in-hand with those pilots,” says Buckwalter, who adds that a Marine Corps F-35B pilot also participated. “We flew operationally representative scenarios to make sure 3I is ready to go to OT.” Tests simulated offensive counter-air missions as well as suppression and destruction of enemy air defenses.

“Some of the operational test flights are just going to build time on the software. With Block 3I, if we were to verify all the fixes and fly the number of hours statistically required to verify, with a certain level of confidence, that we had fixed everything, we would delay the software and keep it in DT. But with handoff and coordination between the two versions at test we can make sure it is safe and ready to fly, and they can develop the actual hours on the software and statistically verify that,” says Buckwalter. Testing of the software identified “numerous deficiencies, but these have been identified and fixed,” he adds.

The unit also says recently completed “jitter” and infrared (IR) tests of the Gen-3 helmet-mounted display system have shown a “tremendous improvement” over the earlier Gen-2, which had problems ranging from latency and alignment to symbology jitter, night-vision acuity and insufficient display contrast, or “green glow.” “We conducted extensive testing in day and night conditions, identified some fixes and moved on with those,” says Buckwalter.

The testing focused primarily on nighttime evaluations of the Gen-3’s improved ISIE-11 night vision camera system, and associated improvements to acuity, as well as interaction with the Distributed Aperture System, which streams real-time imagery to the helmet from six aircraft-mounted IR cameras. “We did not do a lot of high-g or high-alpha work; the bulk of what we flew in the most recent round was at night,” he says.

The helmet adds a light-emitting diode (LED) and camera to the front of the helmet (and back of the forward cockpit camera), to augment head-tracking and automate the calibration of display alignment. It also includes an inertial measurement unit to dampen symbology and mitigate jitter caused by aircraft buffet. “It is not perfect, but it is readable throughout the flight envelope,” says Nelson, who adds that jitter was not specifically tested on Gen-3, “because it was overcome already. What Gen-3 brings to the table is a much bigger night camera, and that makes a huge difference. The other is [overcoming] green glow.”

Upcoming weapons evaluations include the first deployment of a GBU-39 (250 lb.) small-diameter bomb, scheduled to begin testing in October. “We are also in the buildup phase for testing the AIM-9X,” says Nelson.

The live weapons testing, which since early June has also included the aircraft’s GAU-22/A 25mm gun, means that some of the DT fleet will temporarily retain the baseline Block 3I package. “Then we will switch them over. We are on the third version of 3I now and soon we will get the fourth. So as that matures we’ll have a pretty full-up airplane with a gunsight, AIM-9 reference and helmet and geo-location enhancements.”

A Royal Australian Air Force KC-30A multirole tanker transport meanwhile will shortly arrive at Edwards AFB to conduct aerial refueling tests with a U.S. Air Force F-35A, following the completion of identical tests involving an Italian air force Boeing KC-767A. The Italian aircraft, similar in overall configuration to the 767-200/2C-based KC-46A tanker currently in development for the U.S. Air Force, is the first international tanker to be certified to refuel a U.S. military aircraft.

Italian and U.S. flight crews say clearance of the full air refueling envelope was completed without incident, auguring well for the eventual introduction of the KC-46A. “We are really satisfied with the behavior of the tanker,” says Italian air force test pilot Maj. Fabio de Michele, who leads the KC-767/F-35 test and certification campaign. “The receiver pilots were surprised by how well they could keep station behind the tanker, and particularly liked the lighting system. There was no wake turbulence or any difficulties, even when tanking at night.”

The first of more than 45 test flights was conducted on July 29 when the KC-767, one of four Italian air force tankers from the 8th Sqdn. of the 14th Wing based at Pratica di Mare AB, near Rome, offloaded more than 16,000 lb. of fuel. Each subsequent test flight included 5-77 contacts and involved the transfer of an average of 25,000 lb. of fuel.

The forthcoming Australian tests will begin later this month and extend into October.

Image





Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Sep 2015, 17:30
by bring_it_on
F-35 Joint Program Office To Start Testing New 3i Software Next Week Insidedefense.com September, 10/15

The F-35 joint program office expects to begin flight tests with the latest -- and nearly final -- version of Block 3i software next week and is on track to deliver the completed software load in January in support of Air Force initial operational capability.

F-35 director of engineering Gregg Costabile told Inside the Air Force in a Sept. 10 interview that the program is wrapping up lab and airworthiness testing of the software load and he expects flight tests to begin Sept. 18. He said testing should wrap up pretty quickly and will be followed by one more software modification that incorporates fixes to the fuel system.

"I don't expect that testing to take very long," Costabile said. "Once we get 30, 40, 50 hours on it, we'll have a very good idea about the stability of that system."

The software should be ready to deliver to the Air Force by the end of January. The JPO confirmed after the interview that developmental flight test is expected to be completed this month, while noting that there may still be additional tests based on initial findings.

The JPO has already been testing 3i in flight, but this next load incorporates mission effectiveness fixes that should improve stability. Costabile said that while the capability differences between the most recent software deliver, Block 2B, and 3i are not significant, the transition was a little more challenging than expected because the two software blocks run on different processors with different hardware architectures. As a result, pilots noticed problems with stability in some subsystems.

Costabile said the root cause of the problem did not take long to identify, which made it easier to develop a fix.

"We knew what we needed to do to fix it," Brown said. "We expect the first flight test next Friday to prove out the mission effectiveness things we've done and then show also that the stability of the system has been improved."

Meanwhile, the program is also designing a fix to mitigate risk to the aircraft's fuel tank. During earlier testing, the program found that in certain conditions -- namely when a pilot is flying in a scenario in which there is high gravitational force and increasing pressure -- the aircraft's fuel tanks were at risk of a rupture.

The service is working now to design a modification to address that risk, Costabile said, and is currently building the associated hardware and has already purchased long-lead parts. The service will test the software fix before the end of the year, he said, and it should be delivered with the full 3i load in January.

Costabile said the fuel-fix testing is the biggest remaining risk to 3i delivery, but he is fairly confident in the program's ability to deliver the software on time. "We're in good shape for Air Force IOC for 3i," he said.

After 3i is delivered, the program will shift its focus to the next software block, Block 3F, which it has already begun to test. He said the transition from 3i to 3F will be more challenging than the 2B to 3i transition, largely because the difference in capability is so much greater.

"That's a whole different animal," Costabile said. -- Courtney Albon

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Sep 2015, 08:27
by bring_it_on

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 03 Oct 2015, 01:37
by bring_it_on
AARGM Block IV - Hughes, Robin. Jane's Missiles & Rockets Vol. 19, 11



F-35 JPO expected to issue a sole source contract to Lockheed Martin to assist Block 4 integration efforts of an extended range AARGM variant into Lightning II....





In the interim, the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program Office (JPO) is expected to award Lockheed Martin a sole source contract in October 2015 to complete a study to assist the NAVAIR Program Executive Office for Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons (PMA-242) in Block 4 integration efforts for an extended range (ER) variant of AARGM for internal carriage on the F-35A/C aircraft.

PMA-242 in February 2015 issued a request for information (RfI) to industry for proposals "to support future acquisition planning to increase [the] range of the AGM-88E AARGM. PMA-242 said that while the RfI was primarily aimed at information regarding a range increase for the AGM-88E AARGM, the solution could be applied to other members of the AGM-88 family of missiles.

Based on earlier NAVAIR and other government analyses, PMA-242 is focused on a solid rocket motor (SRM) solution - the AGM-88E currently uses the Thiokol dual-thrust SRM - with increased delivered impulse to be incorporated into the AARGM missile, although non-SRM-based solutions that improve range performance will also be considered. Industry solutions are expected to deliver designs and concepts that leverage existing AARGM hardware and software but minimise changes to the aerodynamic profiles and mass properties to within 10% growth. However, PMA-242 accepts that range improvement may also require changes to the AGM-88E missile subsystems, including the guidance and control hardware, software, fuzing, radome, and the missile battery. The solution should also be compatible with existing LAU-118, BRU-68A, and LAU-147 launchers, or should deliver recommendations for a compliant, form-fit replacement if a launcher with greater performance and/or capacity is needed for the proposed solution.

No capability improvements to the AARGM seeker and WAU-7/B warhead performance are currently required, with PMA-242 noting that "any modifications to the seeker or warhead to support range improvement that adversely affect those two subsystems are to be avoided".

Funding for the AGM-88E AARGM ER programme is included in the FY 2016 President's Budget. Funding for the winning extended-range solution is expected to start in FY 2016 to meet a fielding requirement objective for 2021, but no later than 2022.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 03 Oct 2015, 01:46
by oldiaf

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Oct 2015, 07:43
by spazsinbad
A Message from Lorraine Martin
11 Sep 2015 LM PR

"...Switching over to the flight test world, we are more than 75 percent complete with SDD baseline testing....

...Much like the maturation of the flight test program, our entire F-35A fleet is maturing, and it recently surpassed 20,000 flight hours. Collectively, the three variants have exceeded 39,000 hours....

Source: https://www.f35.com/assets/uploads/docu ... _15_v2.pdf (0.3Mb)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 09 Oct 2015, 22:24
by bring_it_on
Pentagon Cleared To Shift $3.9B Between Accounts, Boost Modernization By $350M - Inside Defense Posted: October 09, 2015



Congress has granted the Defense Department a modicum of budget relief, granting permission to shift $3.9 billion between accounts as part of a reallocation of previously appropriated funds, injecting more than $350 million in additional spending into weapons modernization accounts and giving the Pentagon a green light to launch three new-start projects.
On Oct. 9, the office of the Pentagon's comptroller published the final version of the pair of fiscal year 2015 omnibus reprogramming requests sent to lawmakers in late June. The budget actions, which grant permission to shift funds appropriated in fiscal years 2015, 2014 and 2013 to higher-priority programs in FY-15, were recently approved.
Originally, the Pentagon sought to shift a total of $4.8 billion in two omnibus reprogramming actions; one 77-page document sought to move $4.5 billion between accounts; another shorter document dealing with military intelligence programs sought to move $294 million.
Lawmakers rejected or partially denied more than a dozen proposed reprogramming moves that, when combined, effectively blocked more than $900 million the Pentagon sought to shift between accounts, denying the Defense Department nearly 20 percent of its total request. In total, lawmakers approved a $3.65 billion omnibus request along with $254 million shifted between military intelligence programs.
The House Appropriations Committee denied the Air Force's request to shift $100 million to add a launch to the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle program manifest to support a 2017 mission to carry the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program payload into orbit. 
The approved finalized omnibus allows the Army to shift $250 billion to buy 13 additional, Boeing-built Apache helicopters and grants the Air Force an additional $127 million -- of $149 million requested -- to buy additional long-lead items to support a planned buy of 44 Joint Strike Fighters in FY-16, an increase of 14 more than requested in FY-15.
Lawmakers partially denied a Navy request to shift $76 million to cover new costs associated with developing the DDG-1000 destroyer, allowing a transfer of only $30 million for the destroyer program.
The Pentagon is now authorized to launch three new-start programs: a $9.8 million Army project to beef up its Stryker combat vehicle with a cannon and a $3.6 million Army project to modify the Longbow Hellfire missile with a software enhancement to increase seeker capability to acquire and attack a wider variety of targets.
In addition, the reprogramming authorizes a $1.2 million down payment on an estimated $5 million Navy effort to support the rapid development and fielding of a prototype distributed and netted undersea sensor system, a project that leverages investments by the service and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.
Conversely, lawmakers denied reprogramming requests designed to authorize four other new-start programs: a $17 million Air Force gambit to add automatic takeoff and land capability to the MQ-9 Reaper unmanned aerial system; and a $5 million Army project to begin work on an "advanced networked munition initiative to replace" an aging land mine with an "air-delivered, anti-personnel and anti-vehicular man-in-the-loop system," according to the budget action.
Congress also denied the Office of the Secretary of Defense's request for $1.2 million to support formation of the new Electronic Warfare executive committee.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2015, 15:53
by spazsinbad
Navy Winds Up F-35Cs Development Tests On USS Eisenhower
12 Oct 2015 Colin Clark

"...Also, DellaVedova said in an email that the program stressed the airframe of the F-35A, the Air Force version, for the equivalent of two lifetimes. The test, known as the F-35A Full Airframe Durability Test Article (AJ-1) finished the day before we flew to the Ike, completing 16,000 hours of maneuver and buffet loads cycling."

Source: http://breakingdefense.com/2015/10/navy ... isenhower/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Oct 2015, 16:51
by bring_it_on
The HASC hearing is at 3:30PM EST. Here's a link to their YouTube channel -


Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Oct 2015, 05:19
by Dragon029

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 30 Oct 2015, 19:51
by tritonprime
"Top F-35 leader to help Lockheed absorb Sikorsky"
by Max B. Baker
Oct 29, 2015

Source:
http://www.star-telegram.com/news/busin ... 873685.htm

FORT WORTH--Lorraine Martin, who oversaw steady improvement in Lockheed Martin’s F-35 program as executive vice president and general manager, is being promoted to help the aerospace giant with its acquisition of the Sikorsky helicopter business.

Martin, who has worked on the F-35 program for four years, will serve in a newly-created job as deputy executive vice president for Mission Systems and Training, the division that is set to absorb Sikorsky, which Lockheed agreed to buy in July for $9 billion.

Martin will be replaced in Fort Worth by Jeff Babione, who has been serving as Deputy General Manager on the F-35 program. He will lead the development, production and sustainment efforts across the fighter jet’s three variants.

Babione will oversee the anticipated ramping up of production at the Lockheed plant west of Fort Worth as well as achieving initial operational capability, or “combat ready” status, for the jet by the United States Air Force in 2016 and the Navy in 2018.

"For the past three years Jeff Babione has served as Lorraine’s deputy. He has the skills and leadership necessary to continue the advancements we’re making in the F-35 program". Lt. Gen. Chris Bogdan, F-35 program executive officer

“He brings a deep understanding of the F-35 program, strong customer relationships and a collaborative leadership style that will ensure we continue the positive momentum of the program,” said Orlando Carvalho, executive vice president at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics.

Martin stepped into a leadership role with the F-35, the nation’s most expensive weapons system, after it had been rocked by cost overruns and technical failures. At one time, the F-35 ran so far over budget and fell so far behind schedule that the Pentagon put the program on probation in 2010.

Eventually, two years were added to the program, along with $4.5 billion more for development. Since the probation was lifted in 2012, performance has improved and the F-35 program has won praise from its customers.

Earlier this month, Martin said the program has been able to “meet all of our milestones,” including the fighter being declared combat ready by the Marines, while also bringing down the costs.

Martin’s new job will include a significant increase in responsibility, the company said. Currently the Systems and Training division is a $7.2 billion business with more than 18,000 employees. But it will double in revenue and workforce once the Sikorsky acquisition is completed, Lockheed officials said.

“I congratulate Lorraine on her new position. Since 2013 we worked together on the F-35 program to deliver a world-class weapons system to the warfighter and improve government and contractor relations,” said Lt. Gen. Chris Bogdan, the F-35 program executive officer.


Read more at the source.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Nov 2015, 04:52
by Dragon029
http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/11/ ... OJ20151103

Lockheed wins preliminary deal worth up to $5.37 billion for more F-35s

Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N) has won a preliminary contract valued at up to $5.37 billion to build a ninth batch of 55 F-35 jets for the U.S. military and its allies, the U.S. Defense Department said on Tuesday.
...


That's $97.6 million per airframe (average of all 3 variants; roughly 3/4 are A models). By comparison, LRIP 8 was $4.7 billion for 43 airframe; $109.3 million per airframe, with 2/3 being A models.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Nov 2015, 05:53
by spazsinbad
Another look... Was there a wait for the BUDGET for US Mil to Pass - or irrelevant?
Lockheed Gets $5.37B for 55 F-35 Fighters
03 Nov 2015 Christopher P. Cavas

"WASHINGTON — Contracts worth $5.37 billion have been awarded to Lockheed Martin to produce 55 Lot IX F-35 Joint Strike Fighters, the Pentagon announced Tuesday evening.

A total of 41 F-35A conventional ground-based aircraft were ordered, including 26 for the US Air Force, six for Norway, seven for Israel and two for Japan.

Twelve F-35B Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing aircraft were ordered, six for the US Marine Corps and six for the United Kingdom.

Another two F-35C carrier-based variants were ordered for the US Navy.

The aircraft are to be delivered by December 2017, according to a Pentagon contract announcement.

While most of the work will be done in the US, some will be done in foreign countries — 20 percent in Warton, UK, and five percent in Nagoya, Japan.

The contract includes funding from the US military services and from foreign military sales accounts."

Source: http://www.defensenews.com/story/defens ... /75128086/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Nov 2015, 05:56
by weasel1962
Looks like the 1A1B Italy order did not happen.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Nov 2015, 13:40
by joost
weasel1962 wrote:Looks like the 1A1B Italy order did not happen.


Indeed no Italians. Which is strange because I remember an article about parts being built of the first STOVL. Maybe the order will be added later for the Italians, or they do not count the production of the FACO facility at Cameri in this total order.

See here the article about the aft fuselage:

https://www.f35.com/news/detail/bae-sys ... -air-force

Also there were negotiations mention in June for lot 9 and 10 for buth 2 aircraft per lot for IT.

So my guess is that the 55 aircraft are the aircraft build by LM at FW, and exclude any foreign production.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Nov 2015, 16:39
by gabriele
I think the italian aircraft will be added later as contract modification. It has already happened at least once, if i recall right.

1 F-35A and 1 F-35B were in the 2014 Long Lead contract.

Didn't the final 2015 DoD budget provide for 28 F-35A and 4 F-35C...? Will they also appear later as contract modification, i wonder?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Nov 2015, 17:34
by spazsinbad
Lockheed receives funding for 55 F-35s as negotiations continue
04 Nov 2015 James Drew

"...The F-35 joint programme office and Lockheed expect to conclude negotiations for low-rate initial production lots nine and 10 by the end of the calendar year. The $625 million obligated on 3 November essentially bridges the financial gap between the start of the US government fiscal year on 1 October and the final agreement, Lockheed officials confirm.

"Both LRIP Lots 9 and 10 airframe and engine contract negotiations are nearing completion and contract award is anticipated later this year for LRIP Lot 9, and once the DOD budget is authorised and appropriated, we will be ready to award the LRIP Lot 10 contract sometime at the beginning of the new year," F-35 chief Lt Gen Christopher Bogdan said in written testimony to Congress last month."

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... io-418607/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Nov 2015, 22:05
by neptune
Lockheed receives funding for 55 LRIP 9 F-35s, negotiations continue

04 NOVEMBER, 2015 BY: JAMES DREW WASHINGTON DC

The Pentagon has awarded $625 million to Lockheed Martin to continue producing the ninth low-rate production batch of F-35s while negotiations on a final contract price continue.
As part of a not-to-exceed $5.37 billion “undefinitised contractual action” announced by the DOD yesterday, the award supports production of 55 jets, including 34 for the US services and 21 for international buyers.

It procures 41 F-35As combine for the US Air Force (26), Israel (seven), Norway (six) and Japan (two). Twelve F-35Bs are being manufactured for the US Marine Corps (six) and British Royal Navy (six), and the US Navy will receive two carrier-variant F-35Cs.


The F-35 joint programme office and Lockheed expect to conclude negotiations for low-rate initial production lots nine and 10 by the end of the calendar year. The $625 million obligated on 3 November essentially bridges the financial gap between the start of the US government fiscal year on 1 October and the final agreement, Lockheed officials confirm.

"Both LRIP Lots 9 and 10 airframe and engine contract negotiations are nearing completion and contract award is anticipated later this year for LRIP Lot 9, and once the DOD budget is authorised and appropriated, we will be ready to award the LRIP Lot 10 contract sometime at the beginning of the new year," F-35 chief Lt Gen Christopher Bogdan said in written testimony to Congress last month.

:)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 05 Nov 2015, 01:02
by spazsinbad
Clarity perhaps.
Lockheed Gets Nod for $5B JSF Deal
04 Nov 2015 Christopher P. Cavas

"...Under an "undefinitized contractual action" (UCA) agreed on Tuesday, $625 million in fiscal year 2015 money is being moved to Lockheed to cover company expenses spent thus far on the Lot IX aircraft. The full contract is being negotiated under a not-to-exceed limit of $5.37 billion.

"The government's negotiating position is that the final number will be below that figure," DellaVedova said. "We're confident that the final terms of the contract will represent the best interests of the government and its partners."

Earlier, $698 million in advance procurement funding was awarded for Lot IX using fiscal 2014 money.

A previous story announcing a contract award was due to confusion over the wording of a Pentagon announcement, [what is wrong with them - I have given up on unnerstanning US Budget matters - long ago?] DellaVedova acknowledged....

...The contract with Lockheed does not include engines for the aircraft, which are being negotiated separately with Pratt and Whitney.

"We also expect a hand-shake agreement with P&W by the end of this year, and we'll definitize that contract in early 2016," DellaVedova said.

All Lot IX aircraft are expected to be delivered by the end of 2017."

Source: http://www.defensenews.com/story/defens ... /75128086/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 05 Nov 2015, 10:36
by gabriele
Not really clear yet. The couple of italian aircraft still not mentioned, and nothing said of the additional 2 USAF F-35A and 2 additional F-35C.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 06 Nov 2015, 02:27
by neptune
gabriele wrote:Not really clear yet...



Perhaps a little clarity...a contract modification...

http://www.defense.gov/News/Contracts/C ... cle/627545

Contracts

Release No: CR-211-15
November 3, 2015

NAVY

Lockheed Martin Corp., Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, is being awarded an undefinitized contractual action not-to-exceed $5,370,955,495.00 to the previously awarded low-rate initial production Lot IX F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter advance acquisition contract (N00019-14-C-0002).

This modification provides for the procurement of:

41 F-35A aircraft; including 26 for the Air Force; 6 for Norway; 7 for Israel; 2 for Japan;

12 F-35B aircraft; including 6 for the Marine Corps and 6 for the British Royal Navy;

2 F-35C aircraft; including 2 for the Navy.

55 JSF aircraft

Work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas (30 percent); El Segundo, California (25 percent); Warton, United Kingdom (20 percent); Orlando, Florida (10 percent); Nashua, New Hampshire (5 percent); Nagoya, Japan (5 percent); and Baltimore, Maryland (5 percent), and is expected to be completed in December 2017.

Fiscal 2016 aircraft procurement (Air Force, Marine Corps, and Navy); and non-U.S. Department of Defense participants and foreign military sales funds in the amount of $625,099,999, are being obligated on this award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

I know there are arguments fed when I do the following;

$5,370,955,495.00 / 55 = $97,653,736.27 ea. "not to exceed"

No, the final prices have not been settled but the "go ahead" to build the 55 airplanes "IS".

:)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 06 Nov 2015, 05:47
by weasel1962
Just wanted to highlight that lot 8 included cameri numbers so the exclusion in lot 9 is not likely because they don't count Italy. Agree that does not mean there cannot be a further contract mod to include Italy down the road.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Dec 2015, 21:29
by bring_it_on
Jamie Hunter's write up on the F-35 from next months combat aircraft...

https://www.scribd.com/doc/292541627/F3 ... wyBoILi2L0

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Dec 2015, 22:00
by spazsinbad
Same PDF from Jan 2016 edition of CAM is attached here: viewtopic.php?f=59&t=28364&p=308915&hilit=Hunter#p308915

8 page PDF: download/file.php?id=22249 (1.9Mb)
&
another similar reference: viewtopic.php?f=59&t=28364&p=310673&hilit=Hunter#p310673

Re: F-35 vs F-22

Unread postPosted: 12 Dec 2015, 18:21
by cooldude2819
steve8341 wrote:Unfortunately if Mr Gates gets his way the far superior and proven F-22 will be out of production before the facts come out on the F-35. The F-35 unit cost will be equal or greater than the F-22 while being extremely less capable than the F-22. This will be shocking news to hard working Americans who were sold on the low cost F-35 propaganda.

The USN and Lockheed Martin are drinking their own bath water on the proposed cost and capabilities of the F-35.

There is an end-game for F-22 production. The F-22 production should continue until the Air Force has approximately 300 and Japan has 60. If you are an American wouldn't you rather China realize that someone close to them has a very capable adversarial weapon rather than leaving it to our country to fly across the world when the trouble starts. More than likely the US will have to also engage but at least we wouldn't be alone. The F-35 does not even have a role in this scenario. The F-35 joins the fight later by design, if there is a "later".

I'm estimating that by the time 800 F-35's are built the production will cease due to a much less costly (true this time) and greatly capable UAV availability to replace the bloated F-35.

XD woah there were some jackasses back then.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 14 Dec 2015, 00:52
by armedupdate
Dragon029 wrote:http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/11/03/us-lockheed-fighter-idUSKCN0SS2OJ20151103

Lockheed wins preliminary deal worth up to $5.37 billion for more F-35s

Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N) has won a preliminary contract valued at up to $5.37 billion to build a ninth batch of 55 F-35 jets for the U.S. military and its allies, the U.S. Defense Department said on Tuesday.
...


That's $97.6 million per airframe (average of all 3 variants; roughly 3/4 are A models). By comparison, LRIP 8 was $4.7 billion for 43 airframe; $109.3 million per airframe, with 2/3 being A models.

Is the 97.6 million flyaway cost(including development of that unit) or including spare parts, maintenance equipment, etc? And what is an accurate estimate of the weapons system cost.?(development included)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 14 Dec 2015, 01:32
by Dragon029
It does include extras, but what exactly is unknown.

For one thing however, it will include 87 full mission simulators, which is about 1/3 of all simulators intended to be built for the program (within the US). Each of those simulators costs around $1.5 million.

If I were to guess though, I would make the assumption that the $5.37B figure does include initial spares and some maintenance equipment.

To give a bit of context; LRIP-8 cost $4.7 billion, yet according to the JPO, the cost of an F-35 (airframe; not including the engine) was $94.8m for the A, $102.0m for the B and $115.7m for the C. LRIP-8 consisted of 43 aircraft; 29 A models, 10 B models and 4 C models.

Add those airframe costs up and you get $4.232 billion, leaving $468 million as a remainder for "other" equipment (roughly $10.9m extra per jet)

Furthermore, if you look back at the last few LRIPs, you'll find that in LRIP-6, there was $14m of "extras" per jet, and $11m of "extras" per jet in LRIP-7.

Now, to diverge a bit...

If we make some assumptions, like that the cost of these "extras" trend downwards due to bulk ordering, and if we assume that LRIP-9 includes $10m of "extras" per jet, then that gives us an estimate of $4.82 billion being spent on the 55 airframes themselves.

If you then also look at the ratios of what percentage an A model cost, compared to a B or a C model, we can then even make estimates of what each airframe costs. From LRIP-8, a B model cost roughly 7.6% extra and a C model cost $22% extra. With those ratios and the known number of each variant in LRIP-9, my very rough estimate is:

$85.5 million per F-35A
$92.0 million per F-35B
$104.3 million per F-35C

Now, for flyaway cost; the engines for LRIP-8 cost: $13.2m, $32.0m, $13.3m for the A/B/C. If we assume they've only decreased in cost slightly (rounded down to the nearest million), then we get:

F-35A: $98.5m
F-35B: $124.0m
F-35C: $117.3m

For the flyaway costs for LRIP-9 aircraft, with engines. I'm not putting too much faith into my assumptions and those numbers, but I will point out that my assumptions have edged on the side of pessimism, assuming that the airframes make up a larger percentage of the total production lot cost than they did in LRIP 6/7/8, and assuming that the engines have only decreased in cost by 0% to 2.3%. I'm also assuming that the $5.37 billion (which is a "not to exceed" cost), is the actual cost of LRIP-9; though in all realism it'll be very close to that figure.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 01 Feb 2016, 21:32
by citanon
Breaking Defense is reporting that Navy will go all-in on f35c, increase buy numbers, abandon UCLA'S in favor of unmanned tanker, citing urgent need for on deck stealth in 2020s

http://breakingdefense.com/2016/02/good ... 17-budget/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 01 Feb 2016, 21:58
by popcorn
Hahaha... crows may have to be put on the endangered species list.


From aforementiined article,

... In fact, the budget is so tight and the priority on the F-35 is so high that the Navy won’t be able to buy any F/A-18E/F Super Hornets this year, despite its desire for more manned strike fighters...

http://www.navytimes.com/story/military ... /22949703/

The top officer of one of three services projected to spend tens of billions of dollars on stealthy new F-35 Joint Strike Fighters, now says "stealth may be overrated."..
"It's not just Greenert, it's across the naval aviation community: They're just not that into the F-35," said Richard Aboulafia, vice president for analysis at the Teal Group.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Feb 2016, 00:49
by Dragon029
As was heavily hinted, the USAF is delaying the acquisition of some F-35s while KC-46 and LRS-B begin to require increased funding. This somewhat is offset / offsets the 11 extra FY16 F-35s that were added by Congress.

http://www.defensenews.com/story/breaki ... /79769342/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Feb 2016, 07:39
by Corsair1963
Dragon029 wrote:As was heavily hinted, the USAF is delaying the acquisition of some F-35s while KC-46 and LRS-B begin to require increased funding. This somewhat is offset / offsets the 11 extra FY16 F-35s that were added by Congress.

http://www.defensenews.com/story/breaki ... /79769342/



It will never happen.....Expect the Congress to increase the number of F-35's! :wink:

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Feb 2016, 11:52
by spazsinbad
The UK at Pax River: Integrated, Innovative and Creating 21st Century Airpower
04 Feb 2016 Robbin Laird and Ed Timperlake

"...What was striking about the day was the significant gap between the working reality of the dedicated professionals in the F-35 program, including test pilots putting their life on the line every flight, and the world only a few miles away inside the Beltway. At Pax, the F-35 is moving rapidly to becoming a 21st century combat reality.

Many cubical commandoes have made a career using second order interlocking google searches that are essentially hypothetical opinion pieces with no actual research to comment on the F-35. The vast amount of ‘literature” discussing the plane has little or nothing to do with the reality at Pax and all the actual tactical flying going on at many military airfields where the F-35 fleet can be found.

It should be noted that the F-35 program is reaching the 50,000 flight hours threshold worldwide.

And in 2015, the Pax River ITF flew 628 flights, 994.4 flight hours, and performed 4,744 test points...."

Source: http://www.sldinfo.com/the-uk-at-pax-ri ... -airpower/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Feb 2016, 10:48
by spazsinbad
F-35 Lightning II worldwide fleet exceeds 50,000 flying hours
11 Feb 2016 PEO(JSF) Public Affairs

"ARLINGTON, Va. — F-35 Lightning II aircraft operating at 12 different locations worldwide surpassed the 50,000 flight hour mark this month.

The first flight hour was achieved by an F-35B aircraft, BF-01, June 1, 2008. The 25,000 flight hour milestone occurred in December 2014, six years and six months later. As a sign of program growth and maturity, the second 25,000 flight hours were reached only one year and two months later.

“The F-35 program continues to grow and accelerate as we complete additional flight testing and increase deliveries to our U.S. and partner warfighters,” said Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan, F-35 Joint Program Executive Officer. “The next 50,000 hours will be achieved much quicker as we double the size of the F-35 fleet worldwide in the next three years alone.”

Flight hours are divided into two main categories: Operational flying hours, flown by 155 jets delivered to six different nations, and System Development and Demonstration (SDD) flight test hours, flown by 18 aircraft assigned to the Integrated Test Forces at Edwards AFB, and NAS Pax River. Of the 50,000 hours, operational jets flew approximately 37,950 hours while SDD aircraft flew 12,050 hours. More than one third of the program’s flight hours were flown in 2015 alone. Among the three variants, approximately 26,000 hours were flown by the F-35A, 18,000 hours by the F-35B and 6,000 by the F-35C.

F-35s are flying at eight operating locations: Edwards Air Force Base, California, Eglin AFB, Florida, Hill AFB, Utah, Luke AFB, Arizona, Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, South Carolina, MCAS Yuma, Arizona, Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland, and Nellis AFB, Nevada. Jets are also flown at two F-35 depot locations at MCAS Cherry Point, North Carolina, and the Ogden Air Logistics Complex at Hill AFB, Utah. Flight hours were also recorded at the two F-35 production facilities at Cameri, Italy, and Fort Worth, Texas.

To date, more than 250 F-35 pilots and 2,400 aircraft maintainers from six nations are trained and more than 110 jets are jointly under construction at both production facilities...."

photo: "Lt. Col. Tom Fields, an F-35 Lightning II test pilot assigned to the F-35 Pax River Integrated Test Force (ITF) at Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23, conducts external weapons testing Feb. 1 during flight 434 of aircraft BF-02. (U.S. Navy photo)" http://www.navair.navy.mil/img/uploads/16P00029_08.jpg


Source: http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=6184

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Apr 2016, 10:19
by charlielima223
I don't know if this video was put up somewhere else on here but here it is.


Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 03 May 2016, 07:44
by spazsinbad
1000th VL
25 Apr 2016 Jeff Babione

"While the assemblers are working on brand new F-35s, one of the first, BF-1, surpassed a milestone, completing the 1,000th SDD vertical landing (VL). BAE Systems test pilot, Peter “Wizzer” Wilson completed the landing along with four other VLs that day. It’s interesting to note the first VL was also performed by a BAE Systems test pilot, Graham “GT” Tomlinson. GT performed the 1st VL on BF-1, 6 years ago. Aircraft BF-1 has performed more than 630 VLs and Wizzer has almost 400 total VLs. The operational fleet has performed hundreds more.

“Accomplishing vertical landings now has become so routine,” remarked Wizzer. “Everyone at Pax is very used to it from the traffic controllers, to the ground crews and test teams. I feel very fortunate to be on this team and even after nearly 400 vertical landings, I am still amazed at the capabilities of the F-35B and how easy it is to complete a landing that in legacy jets is a much higher workload for the pilot.”

Outstanding work to the Pax team as you continue to improve the maturity of the STOVL systems on the F-35B. Even though Wizzer thinks it’s routine, I am still amazed every time I see the F-35B hover and land effortlessly. It’s truly a feat of engineering and we should all be proud."

Source: https://www.f35.com/assets/uploads/docu ... _28_16.pdf (500Kb)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 11 Jun 2016, 04:29
by Dragon029
https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... 6_9_16.pdf

GM Weekly Update
09 Jun 2016 Jeff Babione

"Hill AFB recently accepted their 12th F-35A, giving them the full complement of jets needed to enable them to
declare IOC."

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Jun 2016, 13:24
by bring_it_on
Deleted

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2016, 17:13
by bring_it_on
Farnborough 2016: F-35 testing enters final phase ahead of peak production
Jane's Defence Weekly 08-07-2016


Lockheed Martin and the Joint Program Office are entering into the final stages of the System Development and Demonstration (SDD) phase of the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) programme ahead of the ramp-up to peak production, a senior official told IHS Jane's on 7 July.Jeff Babione, Lockheed Martin's executive vice president and general manager for the multinational programme said that the final few SDD test items should be completed largely by the end of this year, with SDD certification to be wrapped-up in 2017. After SDD is fully finalised, the way will then be clear to begin ramping up production to its planned peak of between 170 and 180 aircraft per year by 2023.

"We're just now beginning to finish-up SDD, and have about 18 months to go until that has been completed," Babione said.

According to Babione, the remainder of 2016 SDD testing will see a surge in weapons integration, with the necessary range time having already been secured ahead of time. Software is also being developed, with the final touches to the Block 3F package (full combat capability) now being undertaken at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB) in California and Naval Air Station Patuxent River in Maryland. Block 3F needs to be delivered to the US Air Force (USAF) before the service will declare initial operating capability (IOC) for its F-35As between August and December of this year, and to the US Navy for it to declare IOC on its F-35C jets in 2018.

Further to the flight trials, this final phase of SDD will see structural testing come to a conclusion. All three aircraft variants are being tested to 16,000 flight hours (the equivalent of two full service lives). Testing of the A model is already complete, while that for the B and C models will be completed by the end of this year.

Finally, the finishing touches to the Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS) will be made during this closing SDD period. The USAF requires the ALIS 2.02 standard for its IOC declaration, with the final ALIS 3.0 version to follow after. "We are focused like a laser to get [ALIS 2.02] to them," Babione said.

Following the final weapons, software, and structural tests this year, 2017 will see a winding-down of the SDD flight trials, Babione noted, with the emphasis instead switching to reports and certification.

Once SDD is completed, the programme will then begin the process of ramping up to peak production in the coming years. Although the F-35 is currently in low-rate initial production (LRIP), Babione noted that with 200 aircraft on course to have been built by the end of this year the programme is already turning out the sorts of numbers that would be considered full-rate production for other platforms. "To all intents and purposes we are now at the numbers that others would consider to be full-rate production," he said.

With SDD drawing to a conclusion, Babione said that he was extremely buoyant about the current state of the programme. To date, 60,000 hours have been flown across the test and training fleets, which compares with a total of 27,000 hours just two years ago. "And this rate will now rise exponentially," he said.

Lockheed Martin currently has a performance-based logistics (PBL) contract target to deliver a 50% availability and 75% mission effectiveness rate. In terms of availability, Babione said that the F-35 is now at about 60% (compared with 35 to 40% two years ago), and its mission effectiveness rate (as measured by the pilots) is between 85 and 90%. All of these metrics compare highly favourably to current aircraft types in service, he noted.

The maintenance rates on the F-35 are proving to be less than those of other types, such as the F-16 Fighting Falcon. "The meantime between failure [MTBF] rate for the [Block 2B - initial combat capability] LRIP 6 and 7 F-35s is about six to seven flight hours, while that for [Block 3i - initial full capability] LRIP 8 is about eight hours. Those earlier jets that are being retrofitted to the latest current standards are showing similar improved figures," Babione said, adding, "The F-16 is significantly worse than this."

With all three variants having met their SDD key requirements, and with the programme now progressing to plan, Babione enthused that "there are good things on the horizon" for the F-35.

Comments

Babione's upbeat assessment of the current state of the F-35 programme backs-up earlier statements that issues raised in a recent critical report by the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) 2015 Director of Operational Test and Evaluation (DOT&E) had already been identified and had either already been rectified or would soon be.

Issues mentioned include problems with the aircraft's ejection seat; lengthy maintenance durations due to heat management concerns, particularly with regard to the weapons bays; vibrational and acoustic stresses affecting the weapons bays; mechanical rubbing of the gun; manoeuvrability issues discovered during air combat trials; manoeuvrability issues on early Block aircraft when fully fuelled; in-flight refuelling restrictions for the hose-and-drogue F-35B and F-35C; speed restrictions on the use of the internal weapons bays and countermeasures for the F-35A; and structural cracking among others. Also, the report noted that the current timetable to have SDD completed by August 2017 in time for the commencement of initial operational test and evaluation (IOT&E) "is unrealistic".

The issuance of a critical report followed by a robust defence has now become a familiar theme for the F-35 programme. For those outside looking in, it can almost seem as if there are two separate realities when it comes to the programme; one where everything is behind schedule and over budget, and in which the F-35 is single-handedly bleeding the defence-industrial complex dry, and another where all the former issues have been resolved and the effort is forging ahead to budget and schedule, and in which the F-35 will be the answer to the West's combat aviation prayers for approximately the next 30 years.

For its part, Lockheed Martin and the JPO are both publically confident on the F-35's ability to now deliver its promised capabilities on time and to budget. The truth (or otherwise) of this confidence will be made known in the next couple of years.


Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2016, 17:36
by bring_it_on
Farnborough 2016: USAF to declare F-35 IOC sooner rather than later



The US Air Force (USAF) expects to be able to declare initial operating capability (IOC) for the Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) sooner rather than later, the chief of Air Combat Command (ACC) said on 7 July.Speaking ahead of the Farnborough International Airshow, General Herbert Carlisle said that there are now no issues that would affect the declaration of IOC, and that he expects this to happen towards the beginning of the service's timetable for doing so.

"There is nothing '[amber]' or 'red' that could stand in the way of IOC, and aircraft and aircrew-wise we are on track. We need to do some pilot verification in July, but I believe that we will hit the front-end of the August to December IOC window," Gen Carlisle said.

With the US Marine Corps (USMC) having declared IOC for its short take-off and vertical landing F-35Bs in 2015, the USAF has targeted a goal for IOC of its conventional take-off and landing (CTOL) F-35A before the end of this year (the US Navy will do the same for its carrier variant [CV] F-35C in 2018).

In order to achieve this date, it must have between 12 and 24 fully mission-capable aircraft (with Block 3F software) with trained air and ground crews, and available parts for deployment and sustainment. "IOC for us is capability rather than calendar driven, [and] we will make the IOC decision when these are all in place," the general said. Once IOC is declared, the USAF plans initially to field it in the basic close air support (CAS), air defence, and basic suppression of enemy air defences (SEAD) roles, before rolling out more advanced functions and capabilities.

Although the USAF plans to build-up the F-35's capabilities incrementally, Gen Carlisle said that he would have no qualms with sending the aircraft directly into combat, if it were shown to be needed.

"That is the whole purpose of IOC," he said. "We have a capability plan that we are working on that would first see the F-35 deployed on a TSP [Theater Security Package] to either Europe or the Pacific. Will it be in the Middle East? Yes, absolutely. That isn't in our near-term plan, [but] I would send the F-35 into combat in a heartbeat if a commander asked for it."

Gen Carlisle has been extremely pleased with how the USAF's preparations for IOC have gone, and with the potential that the F-35 has to offer the service in the future.

"The F-35 is doing spectacular, and although it is still in its SDD [System Development and Demonstration] phase it is actually ahead of where the [Lockheed Martin] F-22 [Raptor] was at this stage in its development," he said, adding, "I am a huge fan of this airplane, and it will change the way that we fight."

As noted by Gen Carlisle, the F-35 will afford its pilots more situational awareness via its sensor fusion technologies, as well as the advantages of stealth and an electronic warfare capability that is "orders of magnitude better than anything that has come before".

Air combat trials flown against Lockheed Martin F-16 and Boeing F-15 Aggressor aircraft have seen the F-35 come out on top on every occasion. "The F-35 did not lose a single engagement," he said.

The F-35 has also shown itself to be a capable close air support (CAS) platform, the general added. "The jets now have Block 3i software (initial full combat capability), so they are not quite there yet, but the Block 3F (full combat capability) and 4 (increased combat capabilities) aircraft will have a full-up CAS capability. The important thing for the F-35 is that it will be able to do CAS where other aircraft cannot - where you would lose F-16s and A-10s."

Not only is the F-35 hugely capable in its own right, Gen Carlisle said, but its advanced capabilities help to improve the abilities of those older fighters that are flying alongside it. "It makes every other [friendly] aircraft in the fight better. The F-22 did that, but the F-35 takes it to the next level."

COMMENT
Although the bedrock around which the USAF's future force will be built, the F-35 is but one of a number of platforms that the service will be fielding over the coming decades.

Aside from the F-35, Gen Carlisle took time during his briefing at the Royal International Air Tattoo (RIAT) to spell out some of the ACC's other near-term priorities, and to address some of its challenges.

In terms of reports that the F-22 production line might be restarted to boost numbers, Gen Carlisle noted, "I would love to have 700 F-22s [compared with the 195 that were built], but the challenge to that is the cost and time that would have to go into restarting the line. To do that while we are trying to [build the] F-35 at a high rate, and while we are looking at what comes next after fifth-generation - I think that the money could be better spent."

On the subject of the Fairchild-Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II, Gen Carlisle confirmed the earlier announced plans to begin the divestiture process in the 2021 to 2022 timeframe, although this is "slipping to the right", he said.

"I'm the last person in the world who wants to retire aircraft - I don't have enough already. The A-10 is doing really well in the fight [against Islamic State]," the general added.

In the short-term the USAF has plans to replace some A-10s with F-16s, and there is a long-term plan for the A-10's eventual replacement dubbed A-X. Gen Carlisle said that options for a platform that can operate either in a permissive environment or one that can operate in a permissive and contested environment are being considered, and that an upgraded A-10 is also an option. "Part of the A-X discussion is enhancing the A-10 - the engines, wings, and avionics - but it is a balance between the age of the aircraft and the money you'd have to spend. We have not ruled it out, but a [brand new] A-X looks to be more attractive," Gen Carlisle said.

With regard to the Northrop U-2 surveillance aircraft, Gen Carlisle reaffirmed that the USAF still plans to replace this platform with the Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle, but that the timing of this would first need to be agreed with Congress.

For the Boeing F-15C Eagle air-defence fighter, Gen Carlisle noted that this aircraft "will be around for decades". As such the general confirmed that funds have been allocated to equip the platform with an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar and the Eagle Passive Active Warning Survivability System (EPAWSS), as well as for a wing refurbishment programme. Other areas that will need to be upgraded, the general noted, are the avionics and weapons (while the engines do not need improvement).

In terms of the long-range threats, Gen Carlisle said that the USAF really needs to be looking beyond fifth-generation and to what comes after. "If you look at the potential threats out there, our tac-air [combat aircraft] will not be able to get to the fight by about 2030. At the moment it is really all about the F-22 and F-35, but what comes after that? We are looking at what it is going to take," he said.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2016, 18:26
by smsgtmac
bring_it_on wrote:Farnborough 2016: USAF to declare F-35 IOC sooner rather than later



...With the US Marine Corps (USMC) having declared IOC for its short take-off and vertical landing F-35Bs in 2015, the USAF has targeted a goal for IOC of its conventional take-off and landing (CTOL) F-35A before the end of this year (the US Navy will do the same for its carrier variant [CV] F-35C in 2018).

In order to achieve this date, it must have between 12 and 24 fully mission-capable aircraft (with Block 3F software) with trained air and ground crews, and available parts for deployment and sustainment. "..."

...COMMENT...

....With regard to the Northrop U-2 surveillance aircraft, Gen Carlisle reaffirmed that the USAF still plans to replace this platform with the Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle, but that the timing of this would first need to be agreed with Congress...


So the AF Needs block 3F for IOC and "Northrop" built the U-2. Gawd that was awful

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2016, 20:16
by blindpilot
smsgtmac wrote:....
So the AF Needs block 3F for IOC and "Northrop" built the U-2. Gawd that was awful


I was thinking the same thing. Some fluff pieces are worse than the hit pieces. LOL :D :D

BP

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 09 Jul 2016, 02:39
by Dragon029
http://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/ ... maker-says

F-35 Unit Cost To Go Below $100 Million, Maker Says

Negotiations to finalize the contract for the next 160 F-35 Lightning II airframes are still not concluded, although a deal concluding the supply of their F135 engines was announced by the F-35 Joint Program Office (JPO) today. However, Lockheed Martin (LM) F-35 program general manager Jeff Babione told reporters attending a briefing at the Royal International Air Tattoo (RIAT) in the UK that the unit recurring flyaway cost (URFC) of the F-35A version is now heading below $100 million...


I'm still holding out a tiny bit of hope that negotiations will conclude by Farnborough... :|

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 09 Jul 2016, 11:28
by bring_it_on
blindpilot wrote:
smsgtmac wrote:....
So the AF Needs block 3F for IOC and "Northrop" built the U-2. Gawd that was awful


I was thinking the same thing. Some fluff pieces are worse than the hit pieces. LOL :D :D

BP



We'll someone is clearly having a bit too much fun at RIAT :)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 09 Jul 2016, 15:21
by bring_it_on
Dragon029 wrote:
I'm still holding out a tiny bit of hope that negotiations will conclude by Farnborough... :|



Bogdan Hints F-35 Contract Could Be Announced at Farnborough

RAF FAIRFORD, England — The Defense Department’s long awaited contract for F-35 low rate initial production lots 9 and 10 is in its final stages, and may be settled in time for Farnborough International Airshow next week.

"My guys are back at home right now finishing up this deal,” F-35 Joint Program Executive Officer Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan said Saturday at the Royal International Air Tattoo. “We think we're close enough such that my contracting officers can close this deal out."

The timing of the agreement, which will cover more than 140 aircraft valued at approximately $14 billion for US and international customers, will be up to aircraft manufacturer Lockheed Martin, Bogdan said.

"We are in the end game. We all understand what the costs are in building that many airplanes, and now it's just a matter of us working a business deal that's fair to everybody. And that's not always easy either,” he said. “But we've gotten past the big rocks, so to speak. We're in the end game, and the important thing here is to now to come up with a business arrangement that's fair to everybody."

A Farnborough contract announcement would be another publicity coup for the F-35, which is making its first UK appearance at RIAT and Farnborough. The aircraft was planned to make its international debut at Farnborough two years ago, but an engine fire led to the grounding of the fleet and the cancellation of its appearance.

This year, the Marine Corps sent three F-35Bs and the Air Force sent F-35As to RIAT for demonstrations. Both performed Friday, and the Marine Corps’ planes will also fly at Farnborough.

“It’s a big deal. For many years people thought it was a paper airplane and all they would hear about are the negative things about it,” Bogdan said. “Now they have the opportunity to see the airplane fly and to watch its incredible capabilities.”

The JPO originally expected a LRIP 9 and 10 contract early this year, but Bogdan said the government needed more time to understand the full cost of the airplane.

“It's just taken us longer to explore all of the costs all the way through the supply chain to make sure that the taxpayers are getting a good deal,” he said. “And so I don't blame anybody for the delay, other than the government had to do its due diligence on $14 billion worth of work."

The Defense Department and F-35 engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney announced a $1.5 billion agreement for F135 engines on Thursday. The company will manufacture 99 engines as part of the low rate initial production batch.

The program office is also eyeing a block buy contract in fiscal year 2017 for international partners and foreign military sales customers buying lot 12 jets, with US participation beginning in FY18 for lots 13 and 14 if approved by Congress.

“I think it is for sure on track for the services and the Congress to do that in ’18,” Bogdan said.

A full block buy, including US jets, could save anywhere from $2 billion to $2.8 billion, according to industry estimates. Without the US planes, savings would drop by “hundreds of billions,” Bogdan said.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 09 Jul 2016, 18:13
by spazsinbad
There is a thread about 'potential LRIP 9/10 negotiations finish one day' here: (and there will be others for sure)
LM LRIP 9/10: Tech Investments Cut Costs of F-35 Jets viewtopic.php?f=58&t=26994

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Jul 2016, 16:18
by Dragon029
https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... oc-427568/

USAF completes F-35A modifications required for IOC

The US Air Force now has the minimum number of 12 Lockheed Martin F-35A fighters with completed modifications required before the first squadron can be declared initially capable for operations, service officials announced on 13 July.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Jul 2016, 17:15
by spazsinbad
Dragon029 wrote:https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/usaf-completes-f-35a-modifications-required-for-ioc-427568/

USAF completes F-35A modifications required for IOC

The US Air Force now has the minimum number of 12 Lockheed Martin F-35A fighters with completed modifications required before the first squadron can be declared initially capable for operations, service officials announced on 13 July.

More text from URL mistakenly posted later here by moi: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=50336&p=347930&hilit=OOoops#p347930

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 27 Jul 2016, 14:32
by Dragon029
http://www.iiss.org/en/militarybalanceb ... -date-c62d

The total number of F-35 aircraft is now greater than its fifth-generation peer, the F-22.

By Ian Keddie, Research Analyst, Defence and Military Analysis Programme

The latest figures released by Lockheed Martin confirm that the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) is now the most numerous fifth-generation aircraft in existence, overtaking the F-22 Raptor as it moves closer to becoming the ubiquitous twenty-first century airframe. At the end of 2015, 154 Low Rate Initial Production aircraft had been produced in addition to 20 System Development and Demonstration (SDD) models. A total of 53 F-35s are due to be built in 2016 and second quarter earnings information, released by Lockheed Martin on 19 July, revealed that 20 of those 53 aircraft had been delivered by the mid-point of the year.

When the last F-22 was delivered to the United States Air Force (USAF) in May 2012 it marked the 197th (189 plus eight SDD) fifth-generation aircraft to be built. Three Raptors have been lost in crashes since it was introduced, leaving 194 in existence. At 2016 production rates, a new F-35 is completed in Fort Worth, Texas, or at Cameri, Italy, in less than seven days. The figures revealed to Lockheed Martin investors brings the total number of F-35s to 194 (174 plus 20 SDD airframes) as of 26 June and marks a major landmark for the much-maligned programme.

Though its primary role is air-to-surface, the F-35 was always envisioned to be a multi-role platform, designed to be integrated into a variety of armed forces and nations. In contrast, the F-22 was developed as a specialist air-superiority fighter for the USAF. As such, a direct comparison of the two aircraft is not possible as both fulfil very different roles and will ultimately work together on US operations. Nevertheless, this remains the most significant milestone to date as F-35 numbers will continue to increase in comparison to its fifth-generation peers over the coming decade.

With F-35 production accelerating, falling unit costs and aircraft achieving initial operating capability (IOC) it appears that the JSF is entering a new phase. This is some distance from 2011, when the entire programme was perceived to be on the edge of a 'death spiral’. Rising costs and delays brought deserved criticism and eventually led to the appointment of Lieutenant-General Christopher C. Bogdan, drafted in to reform the programme in December 2012.

The US Congress has called for a new assessment over the possible procurement of more F-22s, in order to meet a perceived gap in air-superiority, and some critics continue to compare F-35 unit costs to current platforms such as the F/A-18 or F-16. What must also be taken into account, however, are the costs of restarting a production line from scratch or the rising maintenance costs and increasingly limited capabilities of legacy platforms.

If there was ever an opportunity to rethink F-35 and F-22 numbers, it was in the troubled years of 2010 and 2011: a time when the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform suggested cancelling the F-35B and halving orders for F-35A/Cs; and when the F-22 production line was still active. That time has passed: the USAF will declare IOC for the F-35A later this year, while the US Marine Corps will deploy F-35Bs to Japan in 2017. The JSF programme has suffered problems and has been justifiably scrutinised as the most expensive military weapons system in history.

There remain some serious challenges to be addressed as the aircraft is brought in to service but these should be seen as problems to be ironed out in due course, not as the catastrophic failures as some would have. The F-35 has now become the most common fifth-generation aircraft and will likely be twice as numerous as the combined total of all current competitor platforms. Over 3,000 airframes will be built over the course of its lifetime, and it will become the workhorse for many military forces’ air combat capability for decades.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 27 Jul 2016, 16:19
by ngroot0
Dragon029 wrote:http://www.iiss.org/en/militarybalanceblog/blogsections/2016-629e/july-e429/f-35-achieves-most-significant-milestone-to-date-c62d

The total number of F-35 aircraft is now greater than its fifth-generation peer, the F-22.

... The figures revealed to Lockheed Martin investors brings the total number of F-35s to 194 (174 plus 20 SDD airframes) as of 26 June ...


I think they counted 13 SDD aircraft and 181 production aircraft:
A model: AA-1 (1), AF-1—AF-4, AF-6—AF-101 (100), AN-1—AN-2 (2),AM-1—AM-2, AM-4 (3), AU-1—AU-2 (2), AL-1—AL-3 (3), AS-1 (1) = 112
B model: BF-1—BF-51 (51), BK-1—BK-5 (5) = 56
C model: CF-1—CF-3, CF-5—CF-29 (28) = 28
total: 112+56+28 = 196 F-35's

AF-27 (10-5015) was written off on June 23, 2014 and AA-1 won't ever fly again, so this gives us 194 F-35's that are active.
The 6 other SDD aircraft are AG-1, BG-1, CG-1 (ground test airframes) and AJ-1, BH-1, CJ-1 (for durability testing).

This count was as of June 26, 2016, currently AL-4 and AL-5 are also flying, bringing the total to 196 F-35's.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 02 Aug 2016, 18:36
by Dragon029
Probably worth putting the USAF F-35A IOC declaration in here for archival purposes as well:
http://www.acc.af.mil/News/ArticleDispl ... ready.aspx

Breaking News: Air Force declares the F-35A ‘combat ready’

HQ ACC Public Affairs / Published August 02, 2016

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, Va. --

The F-35A Lightning II fifth generation fighter aircraft was declared ‘combat ready’ today by Gen. Hawk Carlisle, the commander of Air Combat Command.

Carlisle lauded the aircraft’s performance, noting that the aircraft had met all key criteria for reaching initial operational capability.

Airmen trained, manned and equipped to conduct basic close air support, interdiction, and limited suppression/destruction of enemy air defenses in a contested environment with an operational squadron of 12-24 aircraft, the ability to deploy and conduct operational missions using program of record weapons and missions systems and having all necessary logistics and operational elements in place.

“I am proud to announce this powerful new weapons system has achieved initial combat capability,” Carlisle said. “The F-35A will be the most dominant aircraft in our inventory, because it can go where our legacy aircraft cannot and provide the capabilities our commanders need on the modern battlefield.”

The F-35A is the latest addition to ACC’s fleet of deployable and fifth generation aircraft. It provides air superiority, interdiction, suppression of enemy air defenses and close air support as well as great command and control functions through fused sensors, and will provide pilots with unprecedented situational awareness of the battlespace that will be more extensive than any single-seat platform in existence.

“Bringing the F-35A to initial combat readiness is a testament to our phenomenal Airmen and the outstanding support of the Joint Program Office and our enterprise partners. This important milestone for our fighter force ensures the United States, along with our allies and international partners, remains prepared to deter, deny, and defeat the full spectrum of growing threats around the globe," added Deborah Lee James, Secretary of the Air Force.

Gen. David Goldfein, Chief of Staff of the Air Force, said that dynamic new capability will benefit the joint warfighter.

"The combat ready F-35A is the latest fifth generation fighter aircraft in the Air Force's inventory and provides our nation air dominance in any environment. The F-35A brings an unprecedented combination of lethality, survivability, and adaptability to joint and combined operations, and is ready to deploy and strike well-defended targets anywhere on Earth," Goldfein said. "Today's declaration of IOC is an important milestone on the road to achieving full warfighting capability for the F-35A.”

The 34th Fighter Squadron of the 388th Fighter Wing, based at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, is the service’s first operational F-35A squadron, having met all the established criteria for Initial Operational Capability including a successful June deployment to Mountain Home AFB, Idaho and a series of eight-aircraft sorties held in mid-July. 34th FS Airmen will fly and maintain the F-35A alongside Air Force Reservists from Hill’s 419th Fighter Wing.

"Our Airmen have worked tirelessly to make sure our aircraft are combat ready: meeting challenges head-on and completing all the required milestones," said Col. David Lyons, 388th Fighter Wing commander. "We're very proud that the Air Force has declared us combat ready and we're prepared to take this aircraft wherever it's needed in support of our national defense."

Those sentiments were echoed by Col. David Smith, 419 FW commander. “It's an honor to fly and maintain the F-35 with our active duty counterparts here at Hill,” Smith said. “Our units were the first to fly combat-ready F-16s nearly 40 years ago and we're very proud to have made history once again in bringing the Air Force's newest fighter jet to IOC.”

For more information click this link: http://www.acc.af.mil/AirCombatCommands ... ogram.aspx

For questions, contact Air Combat Command Public Affairs at (757) 764-5007 or via e-mail accpa.operations@us.af.mil

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 Aug 2016, 03:14
by weasel1962
UTC gets lot 11 contract for 48 A, 14 B, 4 C engines for USAF, USMC, USN and 51 A +3 B for FMS. Looks like 120 F-35s for lot 11.

http://www.defense.gov/News/Contracts/C ... cle/918895

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Oct 2016, 19:43
by spazsinbad
NEW LM F-35 FAST FACTS pages will be updated: "...The new interactive F-35 Fast Facts guides the reader through some of the most important aspects of the F-35 and includes updates on flight hours, number of pilots and maintainers trained, and IOC dates...." https://www.f35.com/about/fast-facts

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 11 Jan 2017, 21:18
by spazsinbad
F-35 Program Delivers 200th Operational Jet
11 Jan 2017 LM PR

"Tuesday marked a historical milestone for the F-35 Lightning II program.

The 200th operational jet, the second delivery for the Japan Air Self-Defense Force, departed Lockheed Martin’s Fort Worth production facility here and arrived approximately two hours later at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. Known as AX-2, the jet joins Luke’s F-35 fleet of 46 jets to train pilots from several F-35 partner countries. The F-35 program continues to grow and accelerate as it now operates in 12 locations worldwide including Israel and Italy. The program has also logged 75,000 flight hours while training more than 380 pilots and 3,700 maintainers."

PHOTO: https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... __main.jpg

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/f-35-pr ... tional-jet

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 17 Jan 2017, 13:13
by spazsinbad
LM F-35 GM Update
13 Jan 2017 Jeff Babione

"F-35 Flight Test
The results are in, and 2016 was a record year for the F-35 flight test team. For the year the team recorded 1,447 flights – a record for the most flights in a one-year span. With those flight tests and some ground testing, the team checked off 8,450 test points. This led to the F-35A flight science SDD baseline completion, with the F-35B and F-35C testing right behind it, accomplishing more than 90 percent of all development testing....
&
1000th Flight Hour
Nearly eight years ago, David “Doc” Nelson took to the skies for his first flight of an F-35. He became the sixth person to pilot the F-35 when he flew AA-1 flight 77 in Fort Worth. Doc recently completed his 1,000th flight hour in an F-35, becoming the first test pilot to cross this significant milestone. Docs been a key member of the F-35 flight test community & helped develop the F-35 into what it is today. Thank you, Doc, for your 1,000 flight hours & your dedication to the F-35 program. Congratulations on an exciting milestone for you and the program...."

Source: https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... _13_17.pdf (0.8Mb)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 Mar 2017, 18:49
by magitsu
I guess this counts as a program update. Chris Bogdan will apparently retire during the summer. To be replaced by his 2nd, Mathias Winter.

http://www.defensenews.com/articles/dep ... his-summer

http://www.navy.mil/navydata/bios/navybio.asp?bioID=578

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 29 Mar 2017, 10:07
by spazsinbad
Admiral Takes Helm Of F-35; Good For C Model?
28 Mar 2017 Colin Clark

"...“Adm. Winter is a safe choice to serve as PEO because he knows the program inside out and has all the necessary technical credentials,” says defense consultant Loren Thompson. “General Bogdan was the right leader for a time when the political system had not yet fully embraced the fighter, but now the main issue is securing enough funding each year to sustain production at economical rates.”

The most difficult issues Winter is likely to face in the short term (besides letting President Trump claim all the credit for lowering program costs) are the battle to keep up the numbers for the Navy purchase of the F-35C and the overall buy of the F-35 across all three services. The Air Force plans to buy 1,763 F-35As. The Marines plan to buy 353 F-35Bs and 67 F-35Cs. The Navy, which has been most cautious about committing to the F-35 even as it faces grave readiness problems with its F-18 fleet, plans to buy only 260 of the carrier variant.

Winter may help convince the Navy to buy the full tranche of F-35Cs, though I’m skeptical given how Adm. Venlet fared with the Navy during his tenure....

...Winter, one of the Navy’s most experienced acquisition professionals, is steeped in the F-35 program and helped Bogdan prepare the data for the review of the costs and capabilities of the F-18 and the F-35 ordered by Defense Secretary Jim Mattis. We’ll watch him and the program as carefully as we can. And we wish him well in managing the biggest conventional defense program in the world."

Source: http://breakingdefense.com/2017/03/admi ... r-c-model/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2017, 21:08
by spazsinbad
LM F-35 GM Weekly Update
30 Mar 2017 Jeff Babione

"...ALIS Update
Congratulations to the entire F-35 ALIS team on reaching two program milestones. Last week, the ALIS team completed development of the ALIS 3.0 release. While there is still more work to do, this indicates we’re on track to complete testing for ALIS 3.0 – in line with a major milestone to finish the SDD phase of the F-35 program.

In more ALIS news, ALIS version 2.0.2 is making great strides with the completion of the validation milestone at Nellis AFB this past weekend. We’re working hard to ensure all F-35 units will have the ALIS 2.0.2 upgrade by the end of 2017...."

Source: https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... _30_17.pdf (0.86Mb)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2017, 23:09
by spazsinbad
F-35 Integration Office Gets New Chief
07 Apr 2017 AFM

"​Air Force Col. Todd Canterbury has been nominated to take over the F-35 Integration Office at the Pentagon. Canterbury, currently the chief of the operations division at the F-35 Integration Office, would receive the rank of brigadier general if confirmed. He would replace Brig. Gen. Scott Pleus, who now heads to a position in Air Combat Command, Air Force spokesman Col. Patrick Ryder said Thursday."

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/DRArchive/Pa ... Chief.aspx

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Jun 2017, 01:41
by spazsinbad
Japan produces its first F-35A
06 Jun 2017 Paige Williams

"...“More than 220 operational F-35s have been built and delivered worldwide and they have collectively flown more than 95,000 flight hours,” the announcement said."

Source: http://www.defensenews.com/articles/jap ... irst-f-35a

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Jun 2017, 09:12
by weasel1962
https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity ... a0bc902d5f
https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity ... e&_cview=0

Couple of links from FBO that reflects numbers from lot 12-14.

Per budget, there is a shift of 2 from F-35C to F-35A for lot 12. Also shows the planned ramp up for the USN F-35s with 12 Cs in lot 13 and 18 Cs in lot 14.

The sustainment link suggests 343 As, 119 Bs, 56 Cs by FY 2019 with partners getting 24 B (RN), 18 A, 11 B (IT- Italy), 48 A (RAAF-Australia), 26 A (RNLAF-Netherlands), 22 A (TAF- Turkey), 34 (NAF- Norway), 16 A (ROKAF-Korea), 16 A (JASDF-Japan), 21 (IAF – Israel), 6 (RNDAF- Denmark).

Note Australia will be the biggest F-35 operator outside the US.

This means a grand total of 760 F-35s delivered and in operation by FY 2019 (550 A, 154 B, 56 C). Only slightly more than the Typhoon. That’s not counting the order from the 4th redacted entity which has not been revealed. Not bad for an aircraft in a death spiral.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Jun 2017, 03:22
by neptune
weasel1962 wrote:https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&tab=core&id=f1194749331353023e45d2a0bc902d5f
https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity ... e&_cview=0

Couple of links from FBO that reflects numbers from lot 12-14.

Per budget, there is a shift of 2 from F-35C to F-35A for lot 12. Also shows the planned ramp up for the USN F-35s with 12 Cs in lot 13 and 18 Cs in lot 14.

The sustainment link suggests 343 As, 119 Bs, 56 Cs by FY 2019 with partners getting 24 B (RN), 18 A, 11 B (IT- Italy), 48 A (RAAF-Australia), 26 A (RNLAF-Netherlands), 22 A (TAF- Turkey), 34 (NAF- Norway), 16 A (ROKAF-Korea), 16 A (JASDF-Japan), 21 (IAF – Israel), 6 (RNDAF- Denmark).

Note Australia will be the biggest F-35 operator outside the US.

This means a grand total of 760 F-35s delivered and in operation by FY 2019 (550 A, 154 B, 56 C). Only slightly more than the Typhoon. That’s not counting the order from the 4th redacted entity which has not been revealed. Not bad for an aircraft in a death spiral.


...Lots 12/ 13/ 14; Israel, Japan and Korea were not included in those orders or redacted.
:)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Jun 2017, 08:06
by weasel1962
Actually I think it is. Have to download the CJA pdf file to see the redacts. Repost link below.
https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity ... a0bc902d5f

I finally took some time to experiment with the insertion of suggested words using Arial size 10, letter size on an MS word doc and the redacted portions align,

Example (inserting Singapore and 2020 in the 2 redacted portions):
Supplies and services acquired under the anticipated Lot 12 contract actions will commence on or about October 2017 and end on or about December 2020. United States, British, Italian, Australian, Turkish, Norwegian, Singapore Danish, Netherlands, Japanese, Korean and Israel aircraft deliveries are estimated to commence in January 2020 and complete in December 2020.

or with a standard bullet (inserting the 4 countries). Cut and paste into a word doc seems to replicate the original document.

• Long lead-time materials, including long lead-time materials for a subsequent lot of Italian and Netherlands aircraft to be assembled in Italy at the Final Assembly and Checkout Facility, and for a subsequent lot of Singapore aircraft to be assembled in 2020 at the Final Assembly and Checkout Facility;

With Spain, Spanish or Belgium being too short for the 2nd line (which ironically also fits "Canadian"), I originally thought completely redacted line referred to Canada whose F-35 procurement plans are not so clear and could have been redacted due to a cancellation. However, Canadian F-35s would have been manufactured at Fort Worth rather than Cameri so the 2nd subsequent line regarding Cameri would not have made sense. Other European air forces would allow production at FACO, but none if any would have made a lot 12 decision by now. The only other buyer who intended to buy F-35s via Cameri production is Singapore. Add the highly secretive procurement practices of Singapore, it is highly suggestive that Singapore may have already decided to enter procurement from lot 12.

Similarly, the redacts could also signal a cancellation or postponement by Singapore....

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Jun 2017, 13:55
by neptune
weasel1962 wrote:..Example (inserting Singapore and 2020 in the 2 redacted portions):
Supplies and services acquired under the anticipated Lot 12 contract actions will commence on or about October 2017 and end on or about December 2020. United States, British, Italian, Australian, Turkish, Norwegian, Singapore Danish, Netherlands, Japanese, Korean and Israel aircraft deliveries are estimated to commence in January 2020 and complete in December 2020.

or with a standard bullet (inserting the 4 countries). Cut and paste into a word doc seems to replicate the original document.

• Long lead-time materials, including long lead-time materials for a subsequent lot of Italian and Netherlands aircraft to be assembled in Italy at the Final Assembly and Checkout Facility, and for a subsequent lot of Singapore aircraft to be assembled in 2020 at the Final Assembly and Checkout Facility;

With Spain, Spanish or Belgium being too short for the 2nd line (which ironically also fits "Canadian"), I originally thought completely redacted line referred to Canada whose F-35 procurement plans are not so clear and could have been redacted due to a cancellation. However, Canadian F-35s would have been manufactured at Fort Worth rather than Cameri so the 2nd subsequent line regarding Cameri would not have made sense. Other European air forces would allow production at FACO, but none if any would have made a lot 12 decision by now. The only other buyer who intended to buy F-35s via Cameri production is Singapore. Add the highly secretive procurement practices of Singapore, it is highly suggestive that Singapore may have already decided to enter procurement from lot 12.

Similarly, the redacts could also signal a cancellation or postponement by Singapore....


...would Singapore consider: "The first F-35A Lightning II aircraft began its assembly today at the Nagoya, Japan, F-35 Final Assembly and Check-Out (FACO) facility."....????

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Jun 2017, 15:51
by weasel1962
Revised.

"Long lead-time materials, including long lead-time materials for a subsequent lot of Italian and Netherlands aircraft to be assembled in Italy at the Final Assembly and Checkout Facility, and for a subsequent lot of Japanese aircraft to be assembled in Japan at the Final Assembly and Checkout Facility;"

fits the redacted version. Agreed.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Jun 2017, 20:01
by Dragon029
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-airsh ... 990S8?il=0

Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N) is in the final stages of negotiating a deal worth more than $37 billion to sell a record 440 F-35 fighter jets to a group of 11 nations including the United States, two people familiar with the talks said...

The pricing of the jets was still not final, though the average price of the 440 jets was expected to be $85 million, the people said on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the negotiations publicly. The multi-year deal for the fighters will consist of three tranches over fiscal years 2018-2020...

The memorandum of understanding being negotiated between Lockheed and the customers aims to procure 135 or more jets in fiscal year 2018 for delivery in 2020 for about $88 million per jet, the people said. In the subsequent fiscal years, 2019 and 2020, procurement would ramp up to 150 or more jets per year. The average price in 2019 could be $85 million for the F-35 "A" variant and could drop below $80 million in 2020, the people said. That would mark the lowest price ever paid for an F-35, making this deal an important step in reducing the overall cost of each jet.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 19 Jun 2017, 07:43
by geforcerfx
440 aircraft sold at once, that's just insane. I thought the US couldn't join the block buy until OT&E was done? At any rate that will prob make some peoples heads exploded, just imagine if Canada joins as well, the tears will flow.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 19 Jun 2017, 07:51
by Dragon029
The US can't really join the block buy / multi-year procurement, but they are able to / will procure long-lead items for LRIP 12+13+14 at the same time, which essentially guarantees Lockheed, etc of their orders (plus or minus a handful of jets as per the next few budgets). The partner nations also obviously aren't subject to waiting for IOT&E and they make up >50% of the total order.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 19 Jun 2017, 08:47
by hornetfinn
More than 150 F-35s per year is just insane. That's getting near F-16 production numbers during 1980s. I don't think this kind of mass production has happened since. My head sure is spinning in this death spiral... :wink:

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 19 Jun 2017, 08:56
by spazsinbad
Somebody oughtta tell 'dethspiralsolomon'.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 19 Jun 2017, 12:42
by popcorn
geforcerfx wrote:440 aircraft sold at once, that's just insane. I thought the US couldn't join the block buy until OT&E was done? At any rate that will prob make some peoples heads exploded, just imagine if Canada joins as well, the tears will flow.

AFAIK completing OT&E is a requirement for a MYP but a Block Buy bypasses that step.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Jun 2017, 06:21
by spazsinbad
I would have thought the ' potential block buy' soon would have gone elsewhere but anyway here it is now....
Lockheed grows closer to F-35 block buy deal with US, international customers
19 Jun 2017 Valerie Insinna

"LE BOURGET, France — Lockheed Martin is hammering out the details on a F-35 block buy proposal that could shave $2 billion off the total cost of the purchase, the company’s F-35 program manager said.

The deal, which could be worth anywhere from $35 billion to $40 billion, would include about 440 aircraft for procured in low-rate production lots 12, 13 and 14, Jeff Babione, executive vice president and general manager, said Monday at the Paris Air Show. The F-35 joint program office has said the United States would pursue an economic order quantity, or EOQ, agreement — which would allow the U.S. military to buy spare parts over multiple years, but not entire aircraft — instead of a block buy.

Eleven countries, including the United States, are interested in participating and are nearing a decision, Reuters reported Monday morning. The average price of an A-model would drop to an estimated $85 million as a result....

...“It’s more than just airplanes. You get the spares; you get training. There will be a lot of things that go with that contract, but it will be in that scale,” he said. “This supports the ramp of staff that we have been talking about for some time, growing from about 150,000 worldwide to closer to 200,000.”...

...[Babione] “Again, if you’re going to buy the airplanes, why wouldn’t you put in a construct or an angle to produce and offer those airplanes at the lowest possible price? So we’re encouraged by the support, and I think it’s something that will go forward.”"

Source: http://www.defensenews.com/articles/loc ... -customers

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Jun 2017, 21:51
by USMilFan
If this deal materializes, it could be the best news the F-35 program has seen in a long time, could it not? A block buy of this magnitude validates assertions made by many here on f-16.net that if a block buy is arranged, unit prices will fall significantly.

For many years Lockheed-Martin has been claiming that F-35 prices will fall significantly if only the various government buyers would commit to larger-scale lot buys. It certainly is great news to see partner governments finally agreeing to buy in greater quantities. Kudos to the many here at f-16.net who have long advocated for raising purchase quantities as the best means for saving program dollars.

If my count is correct, it seems that the only partner country or foreign customer not participating is Canada. Regret, it seems, is only for Canadians. :)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Jun 2017, 18:31
by spazsinbad
Marine Aviation Says He'd Like Want 13 More F-35Bs; Lockheed PM Speaks On Timing, Block Buy
22 Jul 2017 COLIN CLARK

"[Jeff Babione in VIDEO]...lays out what’s needed and details just how much money may be needed to add to the budget to make the big 450-plane Block Buy for Low Rate of Initial Production lots 12-14 a reality. The block buy, of course, is designed to provide economies of scale for the U.S., F-35 partner nations and friends and allies like Japan and Israel. For perspective, the first 11 LRIP lots put together account for 448 planes. This should help bring down the unit cost — always a politically sensitive issue, especially for partner countries — close to $80 million a plane.

To make the Block Buy a reality and smooth out production as much as possible, the Joint Program Office estimates how much it thinks is needed for advanced procurement of parts and tooling. Babione says the estimate is about $660 million should be inserted into the fiscal 2018 budget.

My prediction: Rep. Kay Granger, chair of the House Appropriations defense subcommittee and lawmaker from Fort Worth, Texas (home of Lockheed’s F-35 plant), will find a way to add that money to the budget. It’s good for her constituents, the F-35 partners are likely to support it and the longer-term goal of substantially reducing the unit cost is in just about everyone’s interest."



Source: http://breakingdefense.com/2017/06/mari ... block-buy/


Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 26 Jun 2017, 11:01
by citanon
Reuters us reporting that F35A prices are actually set to drop BELOW $80 million in 2020.

The multiyear block buy has an average price of $85 but starts out more expensive ~$90 and ends up cheaper.

http://mobile.reuters.com/article/idUSKBN1990S8

:shock:

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 26 Jun 2017, 11:54
by spazsinbad
The article 'citanon' cites is dated 19 Jun 2017 & it was cited by the 'Dragon029' on that day on previous page this thread:

viewtopic.php?f=58&t=13143&p=369803&hilit=negotiating#p369803

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2017, 14:51
by quicksilver

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2017, 18:48
by spazsinbad
Lockheed gets $5.6B for work on next batch of F-35s
08 Jul 2017 Valerie Insinna

"WASHINGTON — The Defense Department has awarded Lockheed Martin a $5.6 billion undefinitized contract that will allow the company to continue work on the eleventh lot of F-35s. The F-35 joint program office still intends wrap up negotiations on a final contract by the end of the year, but making an interim award was necessary because of “complex production lines and supply chain dynamics,” JPO spokesman Joe DellaVedova said in an emailed statement to reporters.
The award immediately obligates a combined $4.49 billion from the U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps for work on 91 aircraft. A $2.28 billion payment to Lockheed from international customers is expected later this month for an additional 50 aircraft.

The JPO is also engaged in ongoing negotiations with Pratt & Whitney, which supplies the joint strike fighter’s F135 engine, and plans to finalize a deal by the end of the year. The program office regularly issues separate contracts for the F-35 airframes and engines.

“Final aircraft prices for each customer's variant will be determined upon final negotiations targeted for the end of this year. We are confident that the final negotiated Lot 11 aircraft unit prices will be less than Lot 10,” DellaVedova stated.

Lot 11 deliveries are anticipated to run from 2019 to 2020."

Text from 'QS' post above: "...For the U.S., the funding would provide 48 F-35A aircraft for the Air Force, 18 F-35B aircraft for the Marine Corps, and eight F-35C aircraft for the Navy and Marine Corps. DellaVedova said the remaining 17 U.S. aircraft come from previously awarded fiscal 2015 and 2016 aircraft contracts...."


Source: http://www.defensenews.com/articles/loc ... h-of-f-35s

LM F-35s Surpass 100,000 Flight Hours, SDD Completion on Tra

Unread postPosted: 24 Jul 2017, 17:37
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Martin F-35s Surpass 100,000 Flight Hours, SDD Completion on Track
24 Jul 2017 LM PR

"The Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) F-35 Lightning II fighter aircraft fleet recently exceeded 100,000 flight hours while the F-35 Integrated Test Force teams are completing the remaining requirements in the program’s System Development and Demonstration (SDD) phase.

“This 100K milestone marks a significant level of maturity for the program and the F-35 weapons system,” said Lockheed Martin Executive Vice President and F-35 Program General Manager Jeff Babione. “We are well positioned to complete air vehicle full 3F and mission systems software development by the end of 2017.”

The remaining development flight testing includes validating the final release of 3F software, F-35B ski jump testing, F-35B austere site operations, high-Mach Loads testing for both the F-35B and F-35C and completion of the remaining weapons delivery accuracy tests.

Major SDD fleet test milestones in recent months include:
------ Completed testing for the F-35A’s final envelope involving high risk ‘edge of the envelope’ maneuvers,
--------- stressing the aircraft to its limits in structural strength, vehicle systems performance, and aerodynamics while
--------- proving excellent handling qualities.

------ Completed all U.K. Weapon Delivery Accuracy tests for the AIM-132 ASRAAM and Paveway IV weapons, and
--------- completed 45 of 50 SDD Weapon Delivery Accuracy tests including multiple tar get [this site makes an URL from this word (& others that have to
------------------- be misspelt)
& multiple shot engagements as well as internal gun & centerline external pod 25mm gun accuracy tests.

------ Performed multi-ship mission effectiveness tests, such as Offensive Counter-Air and Maritime Interdiction,
--------- demonstrating the performance of the F-35 System."

Graphic: https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... __main.png

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/lockhee ... ent-and-de

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 27 Jul 2017, 04:26
by spazsinbad
Rather than in the weapon thread this 'program update' goes here & is really a rebadged LM PR release above - as always.
F-35 tracking to SDD flight trials completion by end of year
25 Jul 2017 Gareth Jennings

"Lockheed Martin and the F-35 Joint Program Office (JPO) are on track to compete System Design and Development (SDD) flight testing of the Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) programme before the end of the year, it was announced on 25 July.

The remaining development flight testing includes validating the final release of Block 3F software, F-35B ‘ski jump’ testing, F-35B austere site operations, high-Mach loads testing for both the F-35B and F-35C, and completion of the remaining weapons delivery accuracy tests.

“We are well positioned to complete air vehicle full [Block] 3F and mission systems software development by the end of 2017,” Jeff Babione, Lockheed Martin's executive vice-president and general manager for the F-35, said. SDD has been running since 2001, and with flight trials expected to be completed by the end of the year the final certifications and sign-offs should take place in early 2018.

The affirmation that SDD is on track was part of a wider announcement by Lockheed Martin and the JPO that the F-35 programme had hit its 100,000 flight hours milestone. As noted in the announcement, major SDD fleet test milestones conducted in recent months have included the completion of testing for the F-35A’s final envelope involving ‘high-risk edge-of-the-envelope’ manoeuvres, stressing the aircraft to its limits in structural strength, vehicle systems performance, and aerodynamics while proving excellent handling qualities; completing all UK Weapon Delivery Accuracy tests for the AIM-132 Advanced Short Range Air-to-Air Missile (ASRAAM) and Paveway IV weapons, and completing 45 of 50 SDD Weapon Delivery Accuracy tests, including multiple target and multiple shot engagements as well as internal gun and centerline external pod 25 mm gun accuracy tests; as well as performing multiship mission effectiveness tests, such as offensive counter-air and maritime interdiction...."

Source: http://www.janes.com/article/72582/f-35 ... nd-of-year

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Aug 2017, 10:26
by nathan77
Hey all, I'm trying to respond to some basement dwellers, but there's one part of the program I don't know enough to give an adequate response on. And that is, who undertakes Testing for the JSF? The criticism given by the basement dweller is that it's Lockheed Martin who tests the F-35, but that doesn't seem accurate to me. Is it ultimately the DoD? I know that the pilots / maintainers from the various services undertake the testing. And do the services themselves have their own milestones, or is it just part of SDD?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Aug 2017, 15:20
by krorvik
I can't answer for the US entities here.

However, a more generic answer is - the F-35 is tested by LM - as well as the air forces. And this is not a task that "finishes" in delivery. It keeps going until the airframes are taken out of service. This goes for software as well as hardware.

This, btw, has also been true for the previous generation of fighters - the F-16s have been continuously upgraded and testet, although on a smaller scale. The F-35 is very much software-defined, and as such more testing will happen during the lifecycle.

So, in effect, "who tests the F-35" has multiple answers, depending on what component is in question. From small components (unit tests, often from manfacturer) to integration within the airframe (integration tests (LM, but also others)) to larger integrations and acceptance or weapons testing (Air forces).

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Aug 2017, 16:02
by SpudmanWP
That depends on "what" you're testing.

If you are developing new software then it's a combination of LM and JPO (Multi-service and Multi-national) pilots.

If it's OT&E testing then there are no LM pilots involved, only service members.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Aug 2017, 16:06
by Dragon029
To add on what's said above, the USAF for example has the 422nd TES testing the F-35. For things like cyber testing there are personnel involved from various 3 letter organisations as well. There's also USAF and USMC squadrons that perform testing separate / outside of the JSF program entirely (VMFA-121 and 34FS for example did service-level operational readiness evaluations before their respective IOCs).

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Aug 2017, 17:16
by spazsinbad
An odd question in an odd place so here is an odd reply:

Naval Air Station Patuxent River F-35B and F-35C Testing
"Both the F-35B Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) variant and F-35C carrier variant are tested at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland...."
https://www.f35.com/about/who-is-flying/pax
OR
F-35 Lightning II Flight Testing At NAS Patuxent River
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=110

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Aug 2017, 19:14
by blindpilot
nathan77 wrote:Hey all, I'm trying to respond to some basement dwellers, but there's one part of the program I don't know enough to give an adequate response on. And that is, who undertakes Testing for the JSF? The criticism given by the basement dweller is that it's Lockheed Martin who tests the F-35, but that doesn't seem accurate to me. Is it ultimately the DoD? I know that the pilots / maintainers from the various services undertake the testing. And do the services themselves have their own milestones, or is it just part of SDD?


The short answer is it is a team effort throughout the life of the program, including operational crews and personnel. Answers above are spot on.
- - - -
The long answer is

.... a bit more complicated, and Sprey/POGO type confusion on OT&E doesn't help. Having been on contractor, Service OT&E, and Program Office Test Teams, I might provide some insight in the state of affairs.

After the difficulties with the C-5 and F-111, Packard (of Packard Bell) consulted and 1969-70ish recommended a formal Service Level Operational Test and Evaluation by the customer prior to "acceptance." By the Mid 70's an OT&E structure was in place and evolved to today's DOT&E (of Gilmore fame). But the truth is the DOT&E tends these days to be a cosmetic rubber stamp. That doesn't mean it isn't of value in a backhanded way. But it is not what Sprey/Gilmore present as the "Final go/no go" exam.

Let me explain with a fable on military time.
An army platoon was scheduled for a critical deployment at 0600(6AM) the next morning. The 4 Star Chief of staff casually commented to his aid, that if his schedule worked out, he might want to see them off since their mission was key. The Aid mentioned this to the 2 star commanding general, who told the 1 star base commander to make sure everyone was in place by 0500 since the Chief would be there. The 1 star told the Brigade Colonel that the troops needed to be in place by 0400. The colonel told the major to make sure everyone was set to go by 0300. The Major told the company commander to get everyone in formation by 0200. The captain told the platoon lieutenant to have the platoon set to go by 0100. The lieutenant told the Squad leaders to get everyone packed and on their way by midnite. The Squad sergeants told the fire team corporals to have their butts ready by 2300 (11PM) that night. As they were just turning in for one last night's sleep, it was already 2200, so the troops just packed up and headed out to the assembly so they would be ready. The Chief of Staff never did free up his schedule, and didn't show up, so neither did the 2 star, nor the 1 star, nor the colonel, nor ... nor .. and at 0600 the platoon leader showed up and told the troops who had been standing in the rain for 8 hours, to load up.... with no rest ... at risk to the mission.

The point. There is some value to OT&E. But it is not testing. It tends to push back "go/no go" evaluations into earlier test blocks. But it's a two edged sword. It cuts off requirements creep which is good, but it also rules out capabilities that otherwise could have been ready on time.

In the end, the contractor, service development teams, local test teams, and folks that actually know what they are doing, all test the systems. The "Mythical Operational Tests" rarely does anything but push out delivery dates, and unnecessarily limit initial capabilities. The DOT&E personnel at the HQ director's level, have no clue what they are doing, and couldn't test a first grade reading group. Fortunately actual users, pilots, maintainers, those who will use the systems are involved early and throughout the development cycle. They are engaged in testing.
And those "evil contractors" ... Just six months earlier were active duty subject matter experts for the system when serving. (ie. 3,000 hour combat tested fighter pilots etc.)
... That's why they were hired.

MHO,
BP

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Aug 2017, 23:59
by quicksilver
Not sure why spaz limited the links to B and C testing but link this also for a description of what happens at Edwards.

https://www.f35.com/about/who-is-flying ... dwards-afb

If by implication the basement dwellers are arguing that LM is doing its own testing under SDD without USG control/oversight/scrutiny, they are just flat wrong. While not mirrors of each other, the testing activities at Pax and EDW are similarly "...joint military, government and contractor team[s]."

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Aug 2017, 05:16
by blindpilot
What they (the basement dwellers) are probably trying to say is a regurgitation of the DOT&E lies. That is basically the lie that "Until they do the DOT&E test all tests are just LM testing" That is an absolute lie, and furthermore, as I mentioned, the OT&E phase has become a joke, that "at best" will only confirm what the Program Office already knows and has told them. This stuff is the Sprey et al garbage mantra long ago discredited.

MHO,
BP

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Aug 2017, 05:50
by nathan77
blindpilot wrote:What they (the basement dwellers) are probably trying to say is a regurgitation of the DOT&E lies. That is basically the lie that "Until they do the DOT&E test all tests are just LM testing" That is an absolute lie, and furthermore, as I mentioned, the OT&E phase has become a joke, that "at best" will only confirm what the Program Office already knows and has told them. This stuff is the Sprey et al garbage mantra long ago discredited.

MHO,
BP


Yep, hit the nail on the head. I just didn't want to respond from a position of ignorance, so thanks for your detailed responses!

While responding to basement dwellers can sometimes be an exercise in futility, I often ask them to put their money where their mouth is: are they willing to wager that Block 3F won't be signed-off by the USAF before July 2018 (which in when DoT&E states it will slip to). So far I haven't had one person take me up on this. :devil:

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 17 Aug 2017, 22:15
by Dragon029
http://www.edwards.af.mil/News/Article/ ... oward-ioc/

As of days ago, all Block 3F F-35A and F-35C WDAs have been completed, with only a single WDA for the F-35B remaining.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 19 Sep 2017, 23:08
by spazsinbad
Screenie from video is of the 'mixed ordnance' BEAST mode backdrop. Quote about carrying capacity from Jeff Babione.

Lockheed Martin's Babione Shares F-35 Lightning II Fighter Update at ASC17 Defense & Aerospace Report 19 Sep 2017

'BEAST mode' Babione quote is near the end ie. 10 minute 40 second mark of the video: "22k total with 18k external"


Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Sep 2017, 01:48
by spazsinbad
LM F-35 GM Weekly Update
15 Sep 2017 Jeff Babione

Delivering Capability: International Partners Receive Full Mission Simulators
"Our team is focused on delivering a fully integrated air system that provides our customers with game-changing warfighting capabilities. This week, for the first time, we delivered Full Mission Simulators (FMS) to international partners. The FMS, which was delivered to the Israeli and Royal Norwegian Air Forces, is a critical component of the F-35 air system.

As the two Air Forces establish their in-country training capabilities and achieve Configured-for-Use (CFU) status, the F-35 team will continue to support and sustain the technology’s operations. We’re thrilled about this achievement and are focused on delivering the FMS capability to Italy and Japan later this month...."
&
Relevancy & Readiness: Norway Prepares for the Arrival of its first F-35A
"Last week in Fort Worth, we hosted Major General Klever, director of the Norwegian F-35 Program. During his time with the team, Maj. Gen. Klever received a facility and flight line tour, program brief and update on the Norwegian F-35As.

Aircraft relevancy and sustainment were major themes of the discussion. We ensured our Norwegian partner that the F-35As arriving in Ørland, Norway this November will be ready for operation and Maj. Gen. Klever departed Beach Street with an in-depth understanding of the sustainment support the F-35 team will provide for Norway’s jets...."

Source: https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... _15_17.pdf (0.25)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2017, 03:52
by spazsinbad
Modernization Turbulence
Nov 2017 John A. Tirpak

"...F-35 Strike Fighter
The F-35 fighter should be through with development in the next few months, Vice Adm. Mathias Winter, program executive officer, reported in a panel discussion on acquisition program affordability. He thinks operational test and evaluation will begin nearly on time—early in 2018—and he expects prices will go lower. However, Winter said the biggest challenge for the program will be sustainment costs, and right now they’re “too high.”

Jeff Babione, Lockheed Martin’s F-35 program manager, said he expects F-35 prices to eventually reach a level “comparable to those of the F-16.”

Air Combat Command chief Gen. James “Mike” Holmes told Air Force Magazine the service simply can’t afford to buy F-35s at the desired rate of 100 a year. In fact, even 80 a year—USAF’s target for 2022—is a goal that’s been given up. With all the budget pressures, 60 F-35s per year is probably going to be the buy rate “for the foreseeable future,” Holmes said...."

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/MagazineArch ... KC-46.aspx

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2017, 03:59
by spazsinbad
Oops wrong trousers.... :doh:

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2017, 18:50
by markithere
As reported by pogo http://www.pogo.org/straus/issues/weapo ... phans.html

There is a solution to this issue. Set a price cap on how much will be spent upgrading whatever the mix of A's, B's and C,'s you wish to make 3F. Zero is a failed answer as that would leave the Marines in a crippled state with 23% of their fleet crippled compared to the 3F variant. Also the whole premise for the F-35 is to be upgradable. So if they fail here, they will have started the program failing at currency. Why build into a jet the ability to upgrade if you are not going to upgrade? Is the premise that this is an issue being considered ( not upgrading all 108 ) by those over seeing the program or is it Russian propaganda to keep us spending more than we need to on new planes and waist all money on these 108 jets? If a jet is in the 3i configuration will it not still be used for the missions it can complete?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2017, 19:11
by krorvik
You can ask the question the other way - why upgrade a jet if it does not need to? If the jet is allocated for training or testing, and none of those tasks require it, could the money be spent on getting the ones that do need it upgraded, faster than you would otherwise be able to?

Funds are never unlilmited.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2017, 20:07
by white_lightning35
Perhaps it would be better to say "at least where I am from" on the end of that statement, for there are many different countries with many different systems that suit them. Many have healthcare systems that wouldn't work for others, but do work for themselves. Too many fall into the trap of thinking, "X works here, so it must be right for those other people!" and fail to understand the reasons why X might or might not be right. You cannot govern Luxembourg as you would Japan, so to speak. That's all I'm trying to say.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2017, 20:22
by SpudmanWP
white_lightning35 wrote:for there are many different countries with many different systems that suit them.


How many have a "Bernie"? :mrgreen:

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2017, 21:13
by krorvik
Hehe. I live in a single payer health care system. It works mate.

That's all from me as far as that is concerned ;)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2017, 21:24
by SpudmanWP
The main problem with single payer in the US would be that people would expect to get the historically high US level of care for free. To give you an idea of what that would cost, the State of California estimated that it would cost 4 times the current Calif Budget to implement Sp for the state. Now expand that to the entire nation. Where is the money supposed to come from?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2017, 21:47
by krorvik
I wouldn't *dare* to try to have opinions on what may or may not work in the US....

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2017, 22:38
by white_lightning35
krorvik wrote:I wouldn't *dare* to try to have opinions on what may or may not work in the US....


I bet you do... :mrgreen: and I think your system works very well for your country.( As far as I know. Norway seems to have lots of money to spend regardless of if it is inefficient or not.) As I alluded to in my previous post, many people from many different countries of similar development, similar enough to inevitably elicit comparison, love to say that their own ways are the best and need to be implemented everywhere. There are others like you who, very admirably, do not feel the need to tout their superiority, even if they believe they are superior.

I just think that we should all realize that things are different in other places, and that starting arguments about the merits of everyone's respective healthcare systems will not reflect well upon this aviation forum.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2017, 22:49
by white_lightning35
Oh, and opinions are like &$$#oles: everyone's got one.

Unless.....

You're saying you're THE SUPREME LEADER!

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Oct 2017, 03:24
by spazsinbad
Lockheed F-35 deliveries lag in third quarter
24 Oct 2017 Leigh Giangreco

"After nine months of production, Lockheed Martin’s F-35 line is still lagging, according to the latest company earnings report. Lockheed delivered 15 F-35 Joint Strike Fighters at the end of September, according to its third quarter 2017 earnings released this week. That batch brings Lockheed’s total F-35 deliveries to 44 this year, far away from the Lockheed's original goal of 66 jet deliveries by the end of 2017.

Lockheed delivered 14 jets in the second quarter of this year and 15 in the previous quarter, setting a nine-month average of almost three deliveries a month. To meet the 2017 delivery goal, Lockheed needs to average 5.5 deliveries a month for the full year.

While the company often boosts its deliveries in the fourth quarter, the year-end goal would set an ambitious production pace for the next two months. In April, a Pentagon contract management agency forecast Lockheed’s year-end delivery at 57 jets, based on the lower than expected delivery rates in prior years.

Lockheed's delivery target in 2016 was set at 53 F-35s, but the company's globally distributed production system managed to hand over only 46....

...Despite the lagging deliveries so far this year, Lockheed executives struck an optimistic tone during a 24 October earnings call, quoting the low-rate initial production lot 11 contract award from this summer. Lot 11 will deliver another 141 jets, including US and foreign orders."

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... er-442466/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Oct 2017, 08:23
by sunstersun
c'mon lockheed, we need dat good PR

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Oct 2017, 11:06
by hornetfinn
I love the fact that individual LOW Rate initial Production lots of F-35 are larger than the total production numbers for many fighter aircraft... Even these laggard delivery numbers per month are several times larger than many other fighter aircraft are being delivered. Of course these production issues need to be sorted out and I think they will.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Nov 2017, 00:06
by Dragon029
https://insidedefense.com/inside-navy/d ... next-month

Inside the Navy - November 20, 2017
DAB to consider new F-35 Block 4 plan next month
November 17, 2017 |
Courtney Albon Lee Hudson

The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program expects to meet with Pentagon leadership in early December for approval of a new plan that will allow it to continuously develop software capabilities following completion of the post-system development and demonstration phase.

F-35 Program Executive Officer Vice Adm. Mat Winter told reporters in September he expected that approval to come in October.

Air Force Brig. Gen. Eric Fick, F-35 program deputy, told Inside Defense Nov. 15 that while the program expects approval for its new post-SDD strategy, the upcoming Defense Acquisition Board meeting is not solely focused on Block 4 follow-on modernization. It is part of the program's annual update with Pentagon acquisition executive Ellen Lord.

"It's giving her that look across the entire program, laying out the process that we intend to follow as we march forward in modernizing," he said.

The JPO will present a cost estimate for Block 4 during the DAB meeting, but an updated figure is being finalized as part of the fiscal year 2019 budget process, Fick said.

Inside Defense first reported in September the joint program office was adapting its strategy for post-SDD and follow-on modernization, a move that could change the way it develops and delivers new software capabilities. The new strategy would establish a bridge period between delivery of the final version of Block 3F software the program plans to release during development and the start of Block 4 follow-on modernization.

The program expects to deliver all Block 3F capabilities in "early 2018," Fick said. However, the software will have a number of known deficiencies that will not be addressed by the close of SDD next year. The bridge phase would allow the program time to address those deficiencies and incorporate fixes discovered during initial operational test and evaluation, which is slated to start early next year.

Congress has been waiting for months on the JPO to provide a detailed plan for Block 4. Under the Fiscal Year 2017 National Defense Authorization Act, the report was due in March.

In the FY-18 defense policy bill, which passed the House and Senate this week, lawmakers fence off 75 percent of Block 4 funding until the program provides the report, which likely won't be delivered until after the Pentagon approves the plan. -- Courtney Albon and Lee Hudson

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 30 Nov 2017, 15:05
by spazsinbad
F-35 Weapons Capability Passes Key Test Milestone
10 Nov 2017 Jeff Babione

"As we near completion of the System Development and Demonstration (SDD) phase of the program, our team checked
off another key milestone recently with completion of Weapon Delivery Accuracy (WDA) testing at China Lake, California.
In a rigorous testing environment encompassing 42 WDAs, we certified the F-35 for the AIM-120, AIM-9X, ASRAAM, Paveway IV, SDB, GBU-12, GBU-31, JDAM, and JSOW...."

Source: https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... _10_17.pdf (264Kb)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Dec 2017, 10:08
by Dragon029
Lockheed hits 2017 F-35 delivery target despite production hiccups

Dec 18 (Reuters) - Lockheed Martin Corp said that it hit its 2017 target to deliver 66 F-35 fighter jets to the U.S. and its allies last week, despite production problems as the defense contractor built 40 percent more jets this year...


https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa- ... SKBN1EC0VA

fixed*

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Dec 2017, 10:30
by gideonic
Dragon029 wrote:
Lockheed hits 2017 F-35 delivery target despite production hiccups

Dec 18 (Reuters) - Lockheed Martin Corp said that it hit its 2017 target to deliver 66 F-35 fighter jets to the U.S. and its allies last week, despite production problems as the defense contractor built 40 percent more jets this year...


https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa- ... SKBN1EC0SD


Wrong link?
https://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2017/12 ... d-f35.html

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Dec 2017, 10:54
by Dragon029

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Dec 2017, 15:35
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Martin Meets 2017 F-35 Delivery Target
18 Dec 2017 LM PR

"FORT WORTH, Texas, December 18, 2017 – On Friday, December 15, Lockheed Martin delivered the 66th F-35 aircraft for the year, meeting the joint government and industry delivery target for 2017.

To date, more than 265 F-35 aircraft have been delivered to U.S. and international customers. More than 530 pilots and nearly 5,000 maintainers have been trained, and the F-35 fleet has surpassed more than 115,000 cumulative flight hours....

...66 F-35 deliveries in 2017 represents more than a 40 percent increase from 2016, and the F-35 enterprise is prepared to increase production volume year-over-year to hit full rate of approximately 160 aircraft in 2023.

Production Improvements
As production ramps and additional improvements are implemented, Lockheed Martin’s goal is to reduce the cost of an F-35A to $80 million by 2020. With the incorporation of lessons learned, process efficiencies, production automation, facility and tooling upgrades, supply chain initiatives and more – the F-35 enterprise has already significantly reduced costs and improved efficiency. For example:

• The price of an F-35A has come down more than 60 percent from the first contract.
• Touch labor has been reduced by about 75 percent over the last five years.
• Production span time has decreased by about 20 percent since 2015.

To prepare for an increase in production, Lockheed Martin has hired more than 1,300 employees at its Fort Worth, Texas facility since January 2017, and expects to hire a total of 1,800 as previously announced...."

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/lockhee ... ery-target

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Dec 2017, 17:37
by KamenRiderBlade


Video Version

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Dec 2017, 21:46
by sunstersun
Nice I remember people doubting if lockheed could meet their deadline after a production delay due to corrosion.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Dec 2017, 21:47
by marauder2048
So Flight was completely wrong. Useless.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 19 Dec 2017, 05:28
by spazsinbad
Not only but also.... nothing F-35 related can be celebrated at FLIGHT turning into AvWeak (didna realise Av Leak). :doh:

THE ALTERNATIVE F-35 PROGRAM UPDATE - GLASS HALF? :devil: ANAL... for sure.... :doh:
ANALYSIS: The year in review, 2017's top stories in aerospace
18 Dec 2017 FlightGlobal.com

"...F-35: LIGHTNING STRIKES?
The Pentagon’s most expensive procurement programme to date experienced yet another year of taking two steps forward and one step back. Lockheed Martin's F-35 Joint Strike Fighter made a series of momentous transatlantic flights, with delivery to the Royal Norwegian Air Force in November and the F-35A's Paris air show debut in June. But the embattled-though-barely-battle-ready fighter is still plagued by protracted repairs, corrosion issues and development delays.

During the annual Air, Space and Cyber conference in September, the F-35's new programme executive, US Navy Vice Adm Mat Winter, announced the Joint Program Office was considering keeping scores of F-35s equipped with a non-combat rated software operating system.

Lockheed has already delivered more than 108 with Block 2B software and each fighter would require more than 150 modifications to reach the combat-ready Block 3 standard. The modifications could threaten coffers reserved for the coming production ramp up, which will see more than 900 aircraft delivered over the next five years.

The F-35A made its Paris debut this summer, flying a square loop over the fields of Le Bourget and standing out on the static display. Even its grounded [? wot a dick - can one do a square loop on the ground? - better word choices for this aviation HACK please] presence marked a notable event for US stealth aircraft at the show, after controversy over possible French industrial espionage broke out after the last static display in 1991, when the F-117 Nighthawk visited.

But behind the Joint Strike Fighter's pomp and circumstance, reporters at the show pressed US Air Force officials to address ongoing oxygen issues with F-35As stationed at Luke AFB in Arizona. Luke AFB grounded its F-35A fleet on 9 June, after five pilots experienced "hypoxia-like symptoms" over the previous month. The base did not lift altitude restrictions on the aircraft until early August, though the USAF had not identified the root cause of physiological events that prompted the base's decision to restrict its F-35 squadrons' flying operations.

Despite its development difficulties, Lockheed and the F-35 weathered its first year in the Trump administration. After decrying the programme a year ago on his Twitter account, the president appeared to have a change of heart with the stealth aircraft. Procurement for the F-35 remained steady in the White House's fiscal year 2018 defence budget request and Congress outlined additional F-35 orders in its defence spending bills.

Lockheed may be heading into a more optimistic 2018 with its tempestuous customer to the north, though. Canada is reopening its next-generation fighter contract for bids and expects to award by 2021. Initially rebuffed by prime minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberal party, Lockheed's F-35 could fare better in a future fighter competition after Boeing's commercial arm sparked a international trade dispute over allegedly unfair subsidies to Canadian aerospace champion Bombardier's CSeries jetliner project...."

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... in-443653/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Dec 2017, 20:48
by marauder2048
Spaz: I sincerely hope you (and everyone else for that matter) didn't have to pay for this so-called analysis.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Dec 2017, 01:17
by spazsinbad
So many agencies - what do they accomplish? LM says it would deliver 66 F-35s this year (without further detail) & it did.
Lockheed Late Delivering Its F-35s for Fourth Consecutive Year
20 Dec 2017 Anthony Capaccio

"Defense contract agency uses different metrics from contractor
-Nine of the planes were supposed to be delivered previous year


Lockheed Martin Corp. failed to meet delivery timelines set out in contracts for its F-35 jet for the fourth consecutive year, according to the Pentagon’s contract management agency. It’s a less upbeat assessment of Lockheed’s performance than was offered earlier this week by the No. 1 U.S. defense contractor, which said it met its “2017 delivery commitment” of 66 planes.

While the company -- and the Defense Department’s own F-35 program office -- count how many of the fighter jets were turned over in a calendar year based on an agreed-on commitment, the Defense Contract Management Agency zeroes in on the monthly delivery dates set out in production contracts.

The 66 planes delivered in 2017 included nine from the planes’ eighth production contract that were supposed to be ready in 2016, according to the contract agency. Of the remaining 57, 23 were late based on the monthly “contractual requirements,” Mark Woodbury, a spokesman for the agency, said in an email. The agency said in February that Lockheed “did not meet contract requirements in 2014, 2015 or 2016” but has begun to improve its performance.

‘Hard Work’
At the time, Joe DellaVedova, spokesman for the Pentagon’s F-35 Joint Program Office, said the company and the Pentagon “established a joint committee to deliver 66 aircraft.” DellaVedova said in an email Tuesday that both the contract management agency and Lockheed recognize the importance of setting goals and resolving issues.

Lockheed said in an emailed statement that the company “and the F-35 Joint Program Office established a joint commitment to deliver 66 F-35 aircraft in 2017, and on Dec. 15. 2017, we delivered on that commitment.” The contractor noted that the Defense Contract Management Agency “focuses on aircraft-specific contract dates, while our annual target focuses on our total goal for the year.”..."

Source: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... utive-year

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Dec 2017, 02:08
by quicksilver
This is the same DCMA that forecasted last April that LM would deliver only 57 aircraft in 2017.

http://www.courant.com/business/hc-pent ... story.html

Seems the DCMA "failed" to forecast accurately. :poke:

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Dec 2017, 02:37
by spazsinbad
'QS' story above the last para says: "...Lockheed's Babione said the company works closely with the contract management agency because "it's a team sport here – we can't deliver the airplane without them. I think they will always look at it perhaps in a more pessimistic manner than we will."" The DCMA ain't playin' brudda. They have to justify their existence.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Dec 2017, 06:12
by KamenRiderBlade
They have to justify wasting Tax Payer $ on a redundant branch of the government that isn't well informed and serve petty political interests.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Dec 2017, 06:20
by rheonomic
Ironically the program officer for the original Lightning was a 1LT...

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Dec 2017, 09:44
by sunstersun
I miss Bogdan's video updates.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Dec 2017, 18:01
by rheonomic

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 23 Feb 2018, 00:05
by SpudmanWP
F-25 By the Numbers (Feb 2018)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Feb 2018, 07:07
by sunstersun
These are always so epic.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 01 Mar 2018, 23:12
by spazsinbad
:devil: You think that is EPIC - how 'bout this for StinkyWorks changes - can't wait for the EPIC VIDEO. :doh:
Lockheed names new program leaders for F-35, Skunk Works
01 Mar 2018 Daniel Cebul

"WASHINGTON ― Lockheed Martin is reshuffling its program leadership, announcing Thursday that the executive vice president and general manager of the F-35 program, Jeff Babione, will be elevated to vice president and general manager of advanced development programs ― also known as Skunk Works. Babione will replace the retiring Rob Weiss on March 19. Weiss has been at the company for almost 34 years after spending nearly a decade in the U.S. Navy.

Greg Ulmer, currently the vice president of the F-35 aircraft production business unit, will take up Babione’s position at the Joint Strike Fighter program...."

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/industry/20 ... unk-works/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 06 Mar 2018, 13:46
by Dragon029
As was posted by Spaz here: viewtopic.php?f=54&t=53942

Full Block 3F flight envelope and weapons capability delivered for the F-35A:

http://www.aviationweek.com/defense/f-3 ... ons-combat

F-35 Finally Can Use All Its Weapons In Combat

Mar 5, 2018 Lara Seligman | Aerospace Daily & Defense Report

The newest U.S. Air Force F-35s, both stateside at Hill AFB, Utah, and overseas in the Pacific, finally can employ the stealth fighter’s full suite of air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons in combat.

The F-35 Joint Program Office (JPO) has delivered the flight clearances, simulators, threat information, and logistics system required for the Air Force’s F-35As equipped with the latest software load to employ all of its weapons throughout the full flight envelope, according to the JPO, Lockheed Martin and Air Force officials.

This milestone gives the Block 3F-configured F-35As assigned to the 34th Fighter Squadron stationed at Hill and those forward-deployed to Kadena Air Base, Japan—on North Korea’s doorstep—some lethal capabilities. The aircraft now can fire Raytheon’s short-range AIM-9X Sidewinder missile, the GAU-22 25mm gun, and Boeing’s precision-guided Small Diameter Bomb, all while flying up to 9Gs at 1.6 Mach.

The F-35A touched down in Kadena for its first operational deployment to the Pacific in November, a highly anticipated milestone that underlines the U.S. military’s commitment to allies in the region amid tensions over North Korea’s nuclear weapons program.

The “Rude Rams” F-35As join the “Green Knights” F-35Bs of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 121, which is permanently stationed at Iwakuni, Japan, significantly increasing the number of stealth F-35s in the region.

The 12 F-35As from Hill will be deployed to Kadena until May, a six-month rotation, as part of U.S. Pacific Command’s theater security package.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Marine Corps short takeoff, vertical-landing F-35B and U.S. Navy F-35C carrier variant configured with the 3F software will be able to deploy with their full operational capability in May and June, respectively, F-35 Program Executive Officer (PEO) Vice Adm. Mat Winter said during a Feb. 28 media roundtable. For the F-35Cs, this means the aircraft will be able to deploy Raytheon’s AGM-154 Joint Standoff Weapon (JSOW) in combat and fly to 1.3 Mach.

There is one caveat—the final 3F simulator capability has been broken into two releases, Lockheed’s Executive Vice President for Aeronautics Orlando Carvalho said in a March 5 interview. The first release has been delivered for the 3F F-35As, he said.

Even though the F-35’s long development phase finally is drawing to a close, the JPO and Lockheed will continue working to modernize the aircraft with an updated threat library, logistics system and simulators, Winter said.

“We have warfighting capability today that is effective against the current threats and the ability to fight the fight for our U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Air Force,” Winter said. “Is that good enough? It is absolutely effective and good enough for today, but as we look from our intelligence reports and the threat growth in 2025 [we must] ensure that we stay ahead of that growing threat so that the F-35 air system will remain technologically advanced on the battlefield well into the [century].”

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 06 Mar 2018, 21:28
by gabriele
Any clue why the C is limited to 1.3?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 06 Mar 2018, 23:24
by SpudmanWP
Typo?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2018, 02:46
by spazsinbad
Perhaps our 'Admirable of the Perpetual Winter' misspoke? This quote from the latest F-35 SAR 2018 (0.65Mb)

FOUR Page PDF of the Jan 2018 SAR Summary & most interesting KPPs attached from same source. Hmmmmm.... Perhaps the B in this quote should be a C? This SAR seems to be VERY SLOPPY - e.g. some pages dates are 2016?
"...Development
Delivering Full Block 3F capabilities: Steady progress is being made toward delivery of full Block 3F warfighter capability andcompletion of the SDD program. Two important milestones are associated with the closeout of this phase of the program: completion of SDD flight test and the delivery of the full Block 3F capability. The Joint Program Office (JPO)/Industry team will continue SDD until the full Block 3F capability is delivered to the warfighter. Delivery of full 3F capability is projected to meet APB threshold dates for all 3 variants with the exception of F-35B which will be cleared to 1.3 Mach by the threshold date with expansion to 1.6 Mach by May 2018. Critical path for F-35B to 1.6 Mach is a structural integrity update and the air worthiness certification...." https://fas.org/man/eprint/F-35-SAR-2018.pdf

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2018, 23:58
by Dragon029

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Mar 2018, 00:22
by SpudmanWP
U.S. House Armed Services Committee
Scheduled for Mar 7, 2018
F-35 Joint Program Office

Vice Admiral Mathias W. Winter
Program Executive Officer, F-35 Joint Program Office
http://docs.house.gov/meetings/AS/AS25/20180307/106951/HHRG-115-AS25-Wstate-WinterM-20180307.pdf

Lieutenant General Steven R. Rudder
Deputy Commandant for Aviation, Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps
http://docs.house.gov/meetings/AS/AS25/20180307/106951/HHRG-115-AS25-Wstate-RudderS-20180307.pdf

Rear Admiral Upper Half Scott D. Conn
Director, Air Warfare (OPNAV N98), Headquarters, U.S. Navy
(They fked up the link, I emailed them to fix it.. Don't hold your breath)

Lieutenant General Jerry D. Harris
Deputy Chief of Staff for Plans, Programs, and Requirements, Headquarters, U. S. Air Force
http://docs.house.gov/meetings/AS/AS25/20180307/106951/HHRG-115-AS25-Wstate-HarrisJ-20180307.pdf

Source of all PDFs.

http://docs.house.gov/Committee/Calendar/ByEvent.aspx?EventID=106951

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Mar 2018, 03:29
by spazsinbad
Thanks for the comprehensive links 'SWP'. I guess more speakers later on for more PDFs? Anyway I'll keep an eye on links.

Meanwhile this makes sense regarding the F-35C Mach 1.3 limit at moment (mentioned elsewhere and I'll post the quote there also) IF there is a limit at moment (I cannot remember):
Admirable Winter: "...The Program continues to deliver Block 3F capability for the F-35A and is on track to deliver Block 3F capabilities to the F-35B and F-35C later this year in May (BF-63) and July (CF-34), respectively...."
HASC statement 07 Mar 2018 http://docs.house.gov/meetings/AS/AS25/ ... 180307.pdf (0.5Mb)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Mar 2018, 03:36
by spazsinbad
gabriele wrote:Any clue why the C is limited to 1.3?

Perhaps the reason here but I have not found the information that currently restricts the F-35C Mach. I can imagine some old defects such as Sidewinder carriage p'raps or delaminating the tail or whatever one can imagine - just can't remember.
Admirable Winter: "...The Program continues to deliver Block 3F capability for the F-35A and is on track to deliver Block 3F capabilities to the F-35B and F-35C later this year in May (BF-63) and July (CF-34), respectively...."
HASC statement 07 Mar 2018: http://docs.house.gov/meetings/AS/AS25/ ... 180307.pdf (0.5Mb)

Some good graphics in the WINTER pdf:

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Mar 2018, 04:20
by spazsinbad
LtGen Rudder USMC confirms that 3F not available for the F-35B until MAY 2018 (not everything is equal it seems):
"...The F-35 program continues to meet Marine Corps requirements in SDD. We are still on track to receive the full F-35B weapons inventory (external & internal) and envelope around April – May 2018 with the release of 3F software."...
&
...Operational test communities are actively identifying and correcting deficiencies discovered in the 3F test software. There are no anticipated deficiencies that will delay the release of 3F to fleet aircraft....
ALSO
...Currently, there are no known overt risks to SDD exit or 3F; however, concern remains in the rate of production of 3F Mission Data Files (MDFs). The U.S. Reprograming Laboratory (USRL) produces the MDFs, but the process is very data intensive and complex and the lab has a limited a production capacity. These issues have the full attention of the Joint Program Office and Lockheed Martin, and the Marine Corps feels comfortable with the recent positive trajectory. As the program matures, the Reprogramming Labs will gain the capacity to produce multiple MDFs, as well as respond to urgent requests for MDF updates.... HASC 07 Mar 2018 http://docs.house.gov/meetings/AS/AS25/ ... 180307.pdf (135Kb)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Mar 2018, 15:19
by spazsinbad
Geez it is tiresome for OFFICIAL websites to NOT CHECK their postings. The 'witness statement' at HASC for USN by Admirable CONN has us all CONNED.... it is actually the Biography for USMC LtGen RUDDER. WTF? :mrgreen: I guess we have to wait until this link is corrected eh. I BLAME the USN - they are JUST SLOPPY MAN! :drool:

http://docs.house.gov/meetings/AS/AS25/ ... 180307.pdf [RONG INFO]

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 Mar 2018, 23:23
by spazsinbad
:mrgreen: The REAR Admiral CONN PDF now present & suspect: F-35C procurement delay - requirement for BLOCK 4 stuff (similar to USAF - USMC just HAPPY TO BE THERE)!
RADM CONN Testimony to HASC
07 Mar 2018 USN to House Armed Services Committee; TACTICAL AIR AND LAND FORCES SUBCOMMITTEE

"...The Carrier Air Wing of the future must rely on the capacity and capabilities of both fourth and fifth-generation aircraft. The F-35C provides unique capabilities that cannot be matched by modernizing fourth-generation aircraft. Stealth technology and advanced integrated systems enable the F-35C to counter rapidly evolving air-to-air and surface-to-air threats. Whether the mission requires the execution of strike, Close Air Support (CAS), counter air, escort, or electronic warfare (EW), the F-35C is vital to our future as they become a lethal cornerstone of our naval air forces. Delivering this transformational capability to front-line forces as soon as possible remains a top priority....
&
...transition the first Navy squadron on a timeline that supports the first operational deployment on USS CARL VINSON (CVN 70) in 2021....

...Continuous Capability Development and Delivery (C2D2) of Block 4 capability and weapons integration for the F-35C are critical to the success of the Future Carrier Air Wing....

...the Navy has chartered an ongoing independent Senior Review Team to assess, make recommendations to improve, and inform the C2D2 acquisition strategy....

...VFA-147, began their transition in February 2018. VFA-147 is on schedule to complete their transition [to F-35C] by October 2018 and will support the first F-35C deployment in 2021....

...After eleven years and over 16,000 flight hours, the full Block 3F SDD developmental test phase is quickly approaching an end. We estimate completion to be March/April 2018. The program can now proceed into IOT&E. IOT&E is critical to the Navy because we have linked the successful demonstration of 3F capabilities in IOT&E to our IOC declaration for the F-35C....

...We are currently modifying our fleet to correct the outboard weapons station overloading condition discovered with the external carriage of AIM-9X. The F-35 Joint Program Office (JPO) in coordination with Lockheed Martin has resolved the Nz oscillation issue during catapult ride. Plus, we have identified an engineering solution for the Helmet Mounted Display system problems that had posed issues for night shipboard operations that had adversely affected pilot safety in the carrier environment. The Navy is actively engaged with the JPO and other Services to close out SDD and proceed into IOT&E....

...Procurement
The PB-19 procurement ramp optimizes the transition timeline for Navy F-35C squadrons based on current force structure and future deployment schedules. The Navy is committed to procuring F-35Cs to achieve essential fifth-generation capability for “what it takes to win” across all deployed Carrier Air Wings....

...For the Carrier Air Wing of the future to pace a rapidly evolving threat, C2D2 must deliver Block 4 capabilities and weapons on schedule. It is not enough to just evolve the significant capabilities of the F-35C, but [b]equally important to ensure those capabilities are integrated and interoperable with existing ships and Carrier Air Wing aircraft within the Carrier Strike Group. The Navy has aggressively pulled F-35C Link 16 (CMN-4) capability to the left to ensure that information is disseminated across ships and aircraft throughout the strike group. Several critical enablers to Naval Integrated Fire Control advanced kill chains exist in Block 4 technologies, and the Navy’s ability to conduct integrated fires in the future is instrumental to how the future Carrier Strike Group will fight. Weapons integration, radar improvements, electronic warfare capabilities, interoperability, and real-time information dissemination must also continue to progress in order to guarantee mission success in the future high-end threat environment.

Closing
The future of the Carrier Air Wing relies on the F-35C...."

Source: http://docs.house.gov/meetings/AS/AS25/ ... 180307.pdf (238Kb)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 09 Mar 2018, 03:53
by element1loop
Ahh! ... so they're finally proposing to fund C2D2 (Block 4) properly ... :D

" ... total cost for C2D2 could reach USD16.4 billion through FY 2024 – USD11 billion for development and USD5.4 billion in procurement ... "

-----
Pentagon faces major cost increase on F-35 Block 4 modernisation

Pat Host, Washington, DC - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

08 March 2018

The Pentagon is facing a major cost increase for its F-35 C2D2 modernisation, formerly known as Block 4. Source: Lockheed Martin

Key Points

The Pentagon is facing a major potential F-35 Block 4/C2D2 cost increase

This could add between USD6.9 billion and USD12.5 billion more to the Pentagon’s most expensive platform

The Pentagon is facing a cost increase for what was known as Block 4 modernisation of the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) ranging between USD6.9 billion and USD12.5 billion, according to a key lawmaker and a Defense Department official.

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) in August tabbed at over USD 3.9 billion the research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E) funding needed for F-35 Block 4 modernisation, now known as Continuous Capability Development and Delivery (C2D2), through fiscal year 2022 (FY 2022). During a 7 March 2018 House Armed Services (HASC) tactical air and land forces subcommittee hearing, F-35 program executive officer Admiral Mat Winter said C2D2 would cost USD10.8 billion through FY 2024.

Subcommittee Ranking Member Niki Tsongas of Massachusetts said the total cost for C2D2 could reach USD16.4 billion through FY 2024 – USD11 billion for development and USD5.4 billion in procurement. Tsongas believed this figure greatly exceeded any cost figures previously provided to Congress.

GAO said in August that Block 4 would be carried out in four increments – 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, and 4.4. Block 4.1 is primarily software, as well as some new capabilities and correct deficiencies of nine capabilities carried over from the current development programme, such as the prognostics health management system down-link and communication capabilities. GAO said programme officials expected increments 4.1 and 4.3 to be primarily software updates while increments 4.2 and 4.4 would consist of more significant hardware changes.

http://www.janes.com/article/78443/pent ... ernisation
----

The rest behind paywall.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 09 Mar 2018, 04:49
by weasel1962
Great spots and posts. Not sure why the 2018 SAR has the December 2016 headers...

I liked the nugget below:

The current estimate for F-35 total procurement quantity increased from 2443 to 2456. This is the result of an increase of 13 F-35B aircraft to be procured by the United States Marine Corps (USMC). The increase is reflected in both the aircraft and engine subprogram and results in a change from 680 to 693 in the Department of Navy Aircraft Procurement accounts. The USMC validated this requirement through the Marine Corps Requirements Oversight Council (MROC). The additional aircraft are fully funded and the funding is reflected in the FY 2018 President's Budget submission.


So technically its now 366Bs for the USMC.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 09 Mar 2018, 07:20
by spazsinbad
Yes a LEAP YEAR of Bs for USMC - but wait.... Having FUN with NUMBERS here: STROLL DOWN as ye wish - say Hi! to 'BP'

viewtopic.php?f=58&t=53249&p=371434&hilit=procure+Marine#p371434

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Mar 2018, 21:53
by spazsinbad
BF-1 Completes its Final SDD Flight Test
09 Mar 2018 Jeff Babione

"After nearly a decade of flight test, BF-1 completed its final SDD test flight earlier this week. BF-1 flew 725 flights accomplishing many firsts for F-35B STOVL operations throughout its service life. I am extremely impressed with the
body of work this aircraft achieved but even more impressive is the team behind each and every flight. The Integrated Test Force and many other members supported BF-1 through 782 vertical landings, 1,412 short takeoffs, 945 slow
landings, 71 ski jump takeoffs and many more test flights....

...With about 20 test flights remaining, we’re on a path to complete SDD flight testing this spring."

Source: https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... 3_9_18.pdf (225Kb)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Mar 2018, 15:02
by spazsinbad
Photo of the Day
13 Mar 2018 Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR)

"Peter Wilson completes crosswind creeping short take off and vertical landing (STOVL) testing with BF-1, an F-35B, March 5 at Naval Air Station Patuxent River. This is BF-1’s final system design and development (SDD) phase flight test with only a few ground test points remaining to close out SDD for BF-1."

Source: https://www.facebook.com/NAVAIR/photos/ ... 10/?type=3

Lockheed F-35 Cost Stabilizes at $406 Billion, Pentagon Says

Unread postPosted: 13 Mar 2018, 20:43
by SpudmanWP
Lockheed F-35 Cost Stabilizes at $406 Billion, Pentagon Says

The Pentagon’s estimated cost to develop and purchase Lockheed Martin Corp.’s F-35 jet, the costliest U.S. weapons program, has stabilized for now, according to a new report to Congress.

The total acquisition cost for the advanced fighter is projected at $406.1 billion, virtually unchanged from the $406.5 billion estimated last year, according to the Defense Department’s latest Selected Acquisition Report, which will be sent to Congress this week. The projections were obtained in advance by Bloomberg News.

Within the total -- which includes research, development and initial support such as spare parts and military construction -- the estimated cost to procure 2,456 U.S. aircraft has ticked down to $345.4 billion from $346.1 billion, or a 0.2 percent decline.

That’s good news for the F-35, which has wide support in Congress but a past marred by cost overruns. Last year, the annual acquisition report on major weapons estimated that costs would rise about 7 percent to $406.5 billion after several years of declining projections.

More at the link
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-03-13/lockheed-f-35-cost-stabilizes-at-406-billion-pentagon-says

I'll give more details as they are released.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Mar 2018, 08:36
by Dragon029
South Korea's first F-35 (AW-1) has flown:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/105988702 ... 200650964/

Image

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Mar 2018, 20:55
by spazsinbad
The attached six page PDF (1.2Mb) about the F-35 is more like a program update than anything else with most of the information already scattered in many places in this forum. A few nuggets such as $50K flight hour cost (Lt.Gen Harris USAF) stood out for me along with this quotable quote & Block:
It ROCKS! F-35s Game Changing Capabilities and Costly Challenges
Apr 2018 David C Isby

"...on March 7, Lt General Jerry Harris, Air Force Deputy Chief of Staff for Plans, Programs & Requirements, said for Hill’s pilots & technicians: “Block 3F version is the aircraft they were promised. To them, it rocks!..." [title of article]
&
"...What comes after Block 3F is Block 4, mission system software that will enable a wide range of upgrades to the F-35’s
performance. Block 4 software is currently being flight-tested at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The F-35 will evolve from using Block 3F to Block 4 software through a new process. Continuous capability development and delivery, dubbed C2D2, will succeed the System Development and Demonstration (SDD) phase, scheduled to end for the F-35B
in March and the F-35C in May.

The C2D2 process, Winter said, “reflects industry best practices” and aims to provide upgrades and improvements on an
accelerated and responsive schedule.

The C2D2 and Block 4 are answers to the broad – and expensive – requirements for upgrading the F-35. The Block 4 programme will consist of four increments:

4.1 to cure deficiencies in the Block 3 software
4.2 to address deficiencies in hardware
4.3 and 4.4 to provide respectively the additional software and hardware capabilities set out in the Block 4 requirements document approved by the Joint Requirements Oversight Council of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in 2017...."

Source: AIR International Magazine April 2018 Vol.94 No.4

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Mar 2018, 21:15
by SpudmanWP
WTF is this bs about "deficiencies"?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Mar 2018, 22:53
by chucky2
Is the hardware not already available to do 4.2 during 4.1, is is this just a question of $? sh*t is just dragging out...

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Mar 2018, 23:03
by sprstdlyscottsmn
SpudmanWP wrote:WTF is this bs about "deficiencies"?

Software always has bugs and deficiencies. Show stoppers delay the release, other important ones are fixed in later builds, less important ones are sometimes never fixed.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 22 Mar 2018, 23:22
by SpudmanWP
4.1 to cure deficiencies in the Block 3 software
4.2 to address deficiencies in hardware

That is absolute B fing S.

While I am sure that there is a ton of "fixes" that will be deployed in any block, 4.1 and 4.2 are NOT dedicated to fixing deficiencies.

Off the top of my head I can think of several new items that are part of 4.1 & 4.2 that were not planned to be part of 3F and therefore cannot be considered "deficiencies":

UAI & a ton of new weapons (Spear3, SDB2, AIM-120D, Meteor, full Paveway support, etc)
Nuclear capabilities
New EOTS & EODAS
SATCOM
4x the CPU power upgrade
New ICP backplane tech
New panoramic cockpit display (the big one)
A new Aircraft Memory System (faster upload & download of flight data IIRC)

A big one is newer APIs "provide new opportunities for International Partners to assess, integrate, and field unique capabilities based on global sovereign requirements."

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 Mar 2018, 16:26
by element1loop
Air Force Risks Losing Third of F-35s If Upkeep Costs Aren't Cut

By Anthony Capaccio

March 28, 2018, 4:00 AM EDT
Updated on March 28, 2018, 9:54 AM EDT

* Operating costs may force cutting 590 fighters, analysis finds

* Half of support expenditures are spent on contractor support

The U.S. Air Force may have to cut its purchases of Lockheed Martin Corp.’s F-35 by a third if it can’t find ways to reduce operations and support costs by as much as 38 percent over a decade, according to an internal analysis.

The shortfall would force the service to subtract 590 of the fighter jets from the 1,763 it plans to order, the Air Force office charged with evaluating the F-35’s impact on operations and budgets, in an assessment obtained by Bloomberg News.

While the Defense Department has said it has gained control over costs for developing and producing a fleet of 2,456 F-35s for the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps -- now projected at $406 billion -- the internal analysis underscores the current and looming challenges of maintaining and operating the warplanes.

It may cost as much as $1.1 trillion to keep the F-35s flying and maintained through 2070, according to the current estimate from the Pentagon’s independent cost unit.
... /

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... aren-t-cut

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 Mar 2018, 16:41
by SpudmanWP
Much ado about nothing

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 Mar 2018, 17:00
by quicksilver
"Deficiency" is a formally defined reference used in developmental flight test to identify issues worthy of a fix or change. Generally speaking, 'deficiencies' are catgorized by degree or severity and consequence; they are not all the same. Some might be as simple as changing the color or the apparent thickness of a line on a display; some affect safety of flight and become "fix before fly again" kind of things.

In a world where the average joe or judy tend to reference technical matters in relation to their cars or smart phones, the idea that anything is flying around or accepted with 'deficiencies' is an affront to their fundamental sensibilities. It makes some people crazy -- "...why would anyone pay this much money for anything with 'deficiencies' or 'defects'?" The reality is that some deficiencies are never corrected and jets fly around with those deficiencies for the life of the program; all of em...take your pick -- F-15,16,18, SH, et al.

I'll see if I can find a reference.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 Mar 2018, 17:10
by quicksilver
http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a403457.pdf

'DR' is 'deficiency report.' Of particular note --

"A DR should also be submitted when failure is not suspected, but an investigation is needed. DRs should be submitted on all test programs, even if no corrective action is anticipated. Such documentation provides valuable program history and research data to support present and future program development and acquisition management decisions."

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 Mar 2018, 17:28
by element1loop
Comes across as a shocker claim designed to spark contention for agenda traction.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 Mar 2018, 17:29
by quicksilver
"A few nuggets such as $50K flight hour cost (Lt.Gen Harris USAF) stood out for me"

Search CPFH around here (I think spud posted them in recent months) and you'll find that, like 'unit cost', CPFH can vary greatly depending on which stuff you choose to include in the number -- e.g. a large number of fixed costs early in a program when flight hour generation is less. The USG changes what they include or not include in their projections all the time -- without saying too much about doing so. Just look in the changes outlined in the back of any Selected Acquisition Report. How many people read the SAR?

If one wants to beat up the contractor in the public domain about affordability, just suggest numbers like 50K/hr. It is not unlike the concurrency monster from 2011ish; no one seems to remember that the first analysis used by the USG to rationalize certain program decisions was ~35% off on its per-unit cost.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 Mar 2018, 17:48
by element1loop
The whole tone seems af odds with this, same day.

----
Mattis to Military: You Have Your Money. Spend It Wisely

By Marcus Weisgerber Global Business Editor

March 27, 2018

“We’ll see more money going into research and engineering about future protections for the country,” Mattis said.

He mentioned investments made decades ago, such as GPS satellites and stealth, two technologies that officials say have given the U.S. military a leg up on its adversaries.

“Those kinds of approaches will be funded for our time,” Mattis said


http://www.defenseone.com/business/2018 ... e_today_nl

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 Mar 2018, 19:32
by loke
SpudmanWP wrote:Much ado about nothing


Cutting the number of F-35 by a third does not sound like "nothing" to me?

Or is this potential cut just something that originates from the journalist's imagination?

I thought Bloomberg was a quite reliable source?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 Mar 2018, 20:23
by SpudmanWP
The "source" is likely the CBO and they are famous for producing "the sky is falling" reports based on worst case scenarios.

As I have said before, the latest SAR puts the CPFH of the F-35 at 14% above the F-16. So, why do they think that there might have to be 500+ less F-35s if they are only 14% more expensive to operate?

This is before any consideration about the lower cost to prosecute a mission thanks to being self-escorting, less ISR needed, Less IFR needed, etc.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 Mar 2018, 20:41
by wrightwing
Without knowing the assumptions being made, it makes it difficult to make such forecasts. They very likely just plugged in F-35 costs into 4th generation strike packages, assuming all else remains the same. If we compare cost per mission, F-35s are a bargain compared to 4th generation aircraft. This is why when you compare lifetime ownership costs to 2070, legacy aircraft are up around $4 trillion vs $1.1 trillion.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 29 Mar 2018, 19:21
by loke
SpudmanWP wrote:The "source" is likely the CBO and they are famous for producing "the sky is falling" reports based on worst case scenarios.

As I have said before, the latest SAR puts the CPFH of the F-35 at 14% above the F-16. So, why do they think that there might have to be 500+ less F-35s if they are only 14% more expensive to operate?

Many, many years ago I recall LM telling Norwegian media that F-35 would have substantially lower operating costs than the F-16. I don't recall exactly how much; perhaps 15% below?

Let's take one step back and think about this:

1. For many years, the USAF have been clear about how many F-35 they would buy; the number has not changed.
However, behind numbers, there has to be a budget. And behind a budget, there have to be assumptions. Now, where would those assumptions come from? Initially, presumably LM.Would a big company like LM communicate one thing to Norway (an F-35 partner) and something else to USAF? Highly unlikely. From that, I deduct that since LM communicated 15% (?)lower operating costs of F-35 than F-16 to Norway, they would communicate the same to the USAF.

2. The Operating costs numbers from LM would be used to support the F-35 budget estimates for the USAF. When the USAF look at how many a/c they can operate, they need to look at both the operational needs, as well as the budget it takes to support those.

3. On the basis of assumptions of operational needs as well as budgetary constraints, the USAF has until now stuck to the same number of F-35. However, imagine what would happen if the LM estimates of F-35 operating costs being 15% below F-16 operating costs being wrong; imagine those costs instead being 15% above operating costs of F-16. What would this mean? It would mean that either the budget estimates for operating the F-35 must be increased by 30%, or the number of F-35 must be reduced.

This is before any consideration about the lower cost to prosecute a mission thanks to being self-escorting, less ISR needed, Less IFR needed, etc.

Irrelevant for this discussion: The basic assumptions were: a) the number of F-35A; and b) operating cost of those F-35A.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 29 Mar 2018, 19:25
by loke
wrightwing wrote:Without knowing the assumptions being made, it makes it difficult to make such forecasts. They very likely just plugged in F-35 costs into 4th generation strike packages, assuming all else remains the same. If we compare cost per mission, F-35s are a bargain compared to 4th generation aircraft. This is why when you compare lifetime ownership costs to 2070, legacy aircraft are up around $4 trillion vs $1.1 trillion.

Well, they have to come up with reasonable cost estimates pretty quickly since this will determine how many F-35 they can purchase.

No they did not just plug F-35 costs into 4th gen strike package. It does not help this discussion that the F-35 is a "bargain"; the number of F-35A for the USAF has been discussed and agreed upon a long time ago. The question is: are the assumptions regarding operational costs for supporting all those F-35 correct, or not? If not, then either the budget must be increased or the number of F-35 must be dropped. A third alternative would be to somehow lower the operational costs.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 30 Mar 2018, 02:04
by spazsinbad

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 30 Mar 2018, 03:45
by element1loop
loke wrote:A third alternative would be to somehow lower the operational costs.


Which is why this does matter and is relevant:

"This is before any consideration about the lower cost to prosecute a mission thanks to being self-escorting, less ISR needed, Less IFR needed, etc."


Not to mention larger tanks and better range means less reliance on tanker numbers, plus older and costlier twin aircraft, and their logistics and manning and facilities going away, and/or consolidated.

Then there's the MUCH higher weapon payload and deliverable precision weapons numbers over time. Why does that matter to operating cost, you ask?

Because it requires fewer missions to accrue same effects. And fewer missions means fewer expensive support aircraft are needed to cover and operate, for less time, so fewer of those can be procured and operated, as well.

Plus much cheaper to operate drones are replacing expensive to operate older manned support aircraft, for far better coverage, so operating costs are falling as recap occurs.

Plus F-35 ENABLES and FORCE MULTIPLIES the entire joint network like F-16 etal can not. FAR more bang for the buck over F-16, and all other teens, combined.

The effect of operating F-35, and its spectrum of cost, can not be assessed in a meaningful (or even honest) way, in isolation to the cost-synergy of operating it, instead of any legacy option.

Is it any different for your country if you think that through for the other operating cost reductions?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 03 Apr 2018, 16:12
by Dragon029
https://www.defense.gov/News/Contracts/ ... e/1482549/
http://www.janes.com/article/78975/jpo- ... k-4-effort

The US Joint Program Office (JPO) has begun the process for rolling out Block 4 (full combat) capabilities onto the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF).

A USD211.3 million contract for “pre-modernization efforts” related to a Block 4.1 software drop was awarded to the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) on 2 April, with work to be completed by the end of July 2019.

Now known as Continuous Capability Development and Delivery (C2D2), Block 4 will enable the F-35 to employ its full panoply of sensors and munitions. With the wider Block 4 capability to be rolled out in four increments (Block 4.1, 4.2, 4.3 and 4.4), Block 4.1 is primarily software based, although it does also introduce some new capabilities as well as correcting deficiencies to older ones carried over from the system design and development (SDD) phase of the programme, which is shortly due to conclude.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 03 Apr 2018, 22:11
by spazsinbad
Pentagon formulating plan to move F-35 management from central office to services
03 Apr 2018 Valerie Insinna and Aaron Mehta

"WASHINGTON — The Defense Department plans to dissolve the F-35 joint program office and revert to a more traditional management structure where the U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps all run their own program offices – eventually. In a March 27 letter to Congress, the Pentagon’s top acquisition official acknowledged that splitting up the F-35 management into smaller offices is likely the way to go for the future of the Pentagon’s largest acquisition program.

But exactly when such a transformation will occur was not defined in the letter written by Ellen Lord, undersecretary of defense for acquisition and sustainment, and the expectation in the Pentagon is that it could happen within the next several years....

... Pentagon spokesman Cmdr. Patrick Evans told Defense News.... that the transition will occur in three phases:
• “A measured restructure of the existing F-35 management structure, which begins immediately.”
• A hybrid structure, where separate service-run F-35 program offices report to a Joint Program Executive Officer, a position currently held by JPO head Vice Adm. Mat Winter.
• The full transition, where the services will have separate program offices and program executives that will report to the military department’s acquisition head. “The full transition dates will be determined through a conditions-based detailed implementation plan with risk-informed criteria,” he said....

...While the changes could make it easier for the services to have oversight over their respective F-35 variants, the eventual dissolution of the JPO could make it more difficult for international customers to interface with the program.

The JPO currently functions as a one-stop shop for foreign buyers — some of which, like Japan, are considering buying more than one variant of the aircraft. The office also oversees the work done by final assembly lines in Japan and Italy, as well as at sustainment hubs around the world.

Evans said that the department will continue to work closely with F-35 international partners, but acknowledged that “in the longer-term, current international agreements will need to be updated and transition to service-based agreements. The phased implementation approach allows time to work through these changes in close coordination with our international partners in a way that maintains our strong commitment to them & our partnership.”..." [thrown under bus]

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018/04 ... -services/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Apr 2018, 20:02
by archeman
What I found interesting the JPO breakup is the Pentagon plans to cut billets (jobs).
I can only suppose that these are positions that the services feel are duplication of their own positions OR are unneeded tasks begin conducted???

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Apr 2018, 20:08
by SpudmanWP
archeman wrote:What I found interesting the JPO breakup is the Pentagon plans to cut billets (jobs).
I can only suppose that these are positions that the services feel are duplication of their own positions OR are unneeded tasks begin conducted???


They are going from a development to a sustainment footprint so the manpower needed will change, especially if it becomes more service-centric.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2018, 04:26
by spazsinbad
Another view and thank goodness a form of JPO will be around probably to help the poor old FURRINERS! Bloody 'Ell! :doh:
F-35 Restructure Not Imminent
05 Apr 2018 John A. Tirpak

"The Defense Department, in accordance with a mandatory report sent to Congress this week, will eventually devolve management of the joint-service F-35 to the individual branches flying the jet, but not soon, according to Pentagon and Capitol Hill officials.

Ellen Lord, undersecretary of defense for acquisition and sustainment, sent to Congress a report required under the Fiscal 2017 defense authorization bill to explain how the F-35’s management would be improved and possibly restructured. The report said that steps will be taken to put each service in charge of its own F-35 variant, rather than have a single Joint Program Office, as has been the case for the last 18 years.

Even though she said moves will be made “immediately” to improve F-35 management and the services will be given “more direct ownership” of the program as it pertains to them, “the Department will evaluate the right time to begin this transition,” according to the letter. No time certain for such a transition has been set....

...Those shifts will happen when the services are ready for them to happen, and won’t be calendar-based, Pentagon officials said. The Air Force and Navy already have their own F-35 integration offices.

The reason why the services have not led their own F-35 efforts thus far was to ensure that maximum commonality among the services and foreign partners was maintained through the end of the System Design and Development phase. Now that SDD is wrapping up, the services can more reasonably manage their own improvement programs and do the internal horse trading to fund various parts of their own fighter/attack portfolios.

One official involved with the F-35 said the JPO is “still essential as we transition to a deployed system and a normalized support apparatus,” and that some form of the JPO will still be necessary even after the services take on “the day-to-day management of their own variants” so the US can deal effectively with partner nations and FMS customers....

...The services are to start developing plans for the transition and creation of their own SPOs in the near-term. These will be evaluated by Lord’s office in an effort to make sure the change doesn’t cause the number of manpower positions devoted to F-35 management to soar due to duplication.

Asked for comment, the F-35 JPO said it “supports this initiative to ensure the Defense Department, US services, and our international partners have the most effective management structure to deliver warfighting capability. We are implementing improvements to increase transparency, and we'll continue to assess and evaluate the most efficient ways to support and manage this vital national defense program."​"

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pag ... inent.aspx

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 11 Apr 2018, 06:22
by spazsinbad
JPO to hand F-35 management to services
10 Apr 2018 Garrett Reim

"...The Joint Programme Office confirmed the restructuring in an email. “We are implementing improvements to increase transparency, and we'll continue to assess and evaluate the most efficient ways to support and manage this vital national defence program,” the Joint Program Office said. “It is important to highlight that there is no immediate timeline for this.”

International sales of the aircraft will be managed by the respective service offices: The US Air Force office will handle F-35A variant, and the US Navy and Marine Corps office will manage the F-35B and F-35C variants.

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... es-447540/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 11 Apr 2018, 23:24
by spazsinbad
VADM Winter repeats what we know:
F-35 program head supportive of future transition to service-led offices 11 Apr 2018 Valerie Insinna
https://www.defensenews.com/digital-sho ... d-offices/

Photo: https://www.armytimes.com/resizer/RD_ci ... uality(100)/arc-anglerfish-arc2-prod-mco.s3.amazonaws.com/public/45DAPGDAANC25CNFAT5MOSUFQY.jpg

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 11 Apr 2018, 23:37
by spazsinbad
F-35 Aims to Finish System Development and Demonstration Flights This Week
12 Apr 2018 Brian Everstine

"The F-35 program expects to hit a major milestone in its development this week, conducting the final flight in its system development demonstration test—wrapping up flights in a test program that included 70,000 test points and 9,000 flight hours.

Joint Program Office Executive Vice Adm. Mat Winter, speaking at the Navy League’s Sea Air Space expo in National Harbor, Md., said the milestone comes at a time when the program is moving forward on negotiations for the next production lot contracts and as the contractors on the program are working to dramatically reduce production and sustainment costs. ​“This is real, folks,” Winter said. “There are 280 aircraft out there operational, and ready to go to war. We own the fight.”

The program office is “getting close” to closing out the deal for low-rate initial production Lot 11. It has also fielded proposals from Lockheed Martin and Pratt & Whitney on Lots 12, 13, and 14. The JPO is going into these negotiations with a focus on driving the “cost out of production,” Winter said. Under the previous contract award, the Air Force’s F-35A variant fell below $100 million per airplane. By Lots 14 and 15, all three variants will be under the $100 million mark...."

[Other already known details at the jump]

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pag ... -Week.aspx

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 11 Apr 2018, 23:59
by spazsinbad
Winter: F-35 Test Flight This Week Will Wrap Up SDD Flight Tests
11 Apr 2018 RICHARD R. BURGESS

"...Speaking April 11 to an audience at the Sea-Air-Space Exposition, Vice Adm. Mat Winter said, “the last SDD test flight event will occur this week, maybe even today.”

Winter said the SDD program has accrued 9,000 flight hours and 67,000 test points. So far, 82 percent of the specification verification has been completed, with 100 percent completion scheduled by the end of the year.

Winter also said the program has “started some of the pre-IOT&E [initial operational test and evaluation],” with formal operational test scheduled for the fall.

Full-rate production, scheduled for the fourth quarter of 2019, will formally mark the end of SDD.

So far, the program has delivered 280 F-35s of all types out of a planned total of 3,220 aircraft for all nations involved in the program. All aircraft rolling off the line now are equipped with the Block 3F software, which brings all combat capability developed in the SDD program. The first post-3F software will be delivered in June, Winter said.

The Navy eventually will procure 353 F-35Cs and the Marine Corps will procure 273 F-35Bs and 67 F-35Cs.

The Marine Corps F-35B deployed with a detachment of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 121 on board the USS Wasp last month, and the USS Essex will take on board a detachment from VMFA-211 this summer for deployment. VMFA-211’s F-35Bs will mark the first deployment of the 3F software. The USS America and the USS Makin Island will be the next amphibious assault ships to operate the F-35B.

The Navy’s first operational fleet squadron, Strike Fighter Squadron 147 (VFA-147) is in F-35C training and is scheduled to become safe for flight in October, the same month it will conduct its carrier qualifications. The squadron is scheduled to deploy on board USS Carl Vinson.

The USS Abraham Lincoln will be the second carrier to deploy with the F-35C. This ship also will host the F-35C’s at-sea IOT&E in August with Carrier Air Wing Seven.

By the end of 2024, the F-35 is scheduled to be operational on eight amphibious assault ships and four aircraft carriers...."

Source: http://seapowermagazine.org/stories/20180411-F35.html

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 00:45
by marauder2048

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 00:50
by quicksilver
Iirc, flight test flight hours are north of 16k; the reporters mistook the ‘flights’ for ‘flight hours.’

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 02:19
by weasel1962


Not really, this is quite a smart move imho from a finance perspective. Contractors often get paid only when they deliver. The non-acceptance actually is a significant cash-flow cost to LM if they are sitting on inventory without getting paid and that can only grow if nothing is done. The jets probably is worth more to LM than the repair cost so it brings this issue to a higher level of scrutiny within LM.

The program managers on both sides are savvy enough not to let this escalate but LM will have to put in the resources and attention to get this resolved which is what the USAF is counting on. The USAF must have felt LM wasn't putting enough attention on this issue.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 03:26
by marauder2048
weasel1962 wrote:


Not really, this is quite a smart move imho from a finance perspective. Contractors often get paid only when they deliver. The non-acceptance actually is a significant cash-flow cost to LM if they are sitting on inventory without getting paid and that can only grow if nothing is done. The jets probably is worth more to LM than the repair cost so it brings this issue to a higher level of scrutiny within LM.

The program managers on both sides are savvy enough not to let this escalate but LM will have to put in the resources and attention to get this resolved which is what the USAF is counting on. The USAF must have felt LM wasn't putting enough attention on this issue.


Performance-based payments don't really work in this manner. Most of the major payment-events have occurred prior
to delivery. Often, it's just the final incentives/fees/award determinations that are left.

It was already a resolved issue. Do you have any evidence this was done at the Air Force's instigation?
Especially with their strike fighter shortfall (which the corrosion issue does not impact), delaying
delivery of new jets that are not the least-bit impacted is silly.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 04:29
by spazsinbad
Slightly different info here below compared to REUTERS (taking the DARK SIDE) "...so far at least two foreign governments have stopped accepting F-35s as a result of this issue..."
Defense Department halts F-35 deliveries amid repair bill disagreement with Lockheed
11 Apr 2018 Valerie Insinna

"WASHINGTON — The Pentagon has suspended acceptance of most F-35 deliveries as manufacturer Lockheed Martin and the F-35 program office debate who should be responsible for fixing jets after a production issue last year....

...a dispute over who should pay for the fix resurfaced and the Defense Department opted to take another production pause, a source said, declining to comment on how long deliveries have been suspended. Production of the aircraft is ongoing at Lockheed’s line in Fort Worth, Texas, and at final assembly and check out facilities in Nagoya, Japan, and Cameri, Italy. A source noted that some customers have accepted planes due to warfighter demands.

According to Reuters, two aircraft have been delivered to the Defense Department since it imposed the suspension. Meanwhile, a repair bill for more than 200 jets is on the line. The corrosion issue is just one of several production problems that has plagued the F-35 over the last couple years. [ahh the emotional dreaded PLAQUE is back] :mrgreen:

A spokesman for the F-35 Joint Program Office didn’t immediately respond for comment...."

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/breaking-ne ... -lockheed/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 04:54
by weasel1962
marauder2048 wrote:Performance-based payments don't really work in this manner. Most of the major payment-events have occurred prior
to delivery. Often, it's just the final incentives/fees/award determinations that are left.


If you're suggesting F-35 progress payments are made upfront and minimal at delivery, then the F-35 program office has screwed up much bigger than published since the basic principle of procurement is always never pay in full until delivery and even then retain some, which is evidently unlikely imho.

marauder2048 wrote:It was already a resolved issue. Do you have any evidence this was done at the Air Force's instigation? Especially with their strike fighter shortfall (which the corrosion issue does not impact), delaying
delivery of new jets that are not the least-bit impacted is silly.


When reuters mentions: Pentagon stops accepting Lockheed F-35 jets ... I wonder who that Pentagon actually refers to....

Like I said, it may seem silly to you but it certainly won't be taken lightly by LM. I'm sure if this drags, it won't be just the USAF halting deliveries.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 07:14
by marauder2048
Progress payments can be up to 75% of the total contract value; performance-based payments can
be up to 90% of the total contract value.

The basic principle of the procurement is that the acquisition workforce and the program managers have
to *think* about the best way to meet the warfighter's' validated needs. This action is silly in that regard.

Lockheed said it was JPO. My stated view is that I find negotiating through the press or actions of this
kind distasteful and counter-productive.

The Navy does a lot wrong but my hope was that Winter would bring some of the Navy's
cordial and cooperative (if sometimes too cozy) approach to dealing with contractors with him...

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 07:43
by spazsinbad
On previous page this thread there is a photo of a bombed up F35C without DETAILS about the loadout 'over sand' whilst this one for a similar but different article has the details when 'over sea'. Over Sea & Sand is the motto of A4G VF-805. :shock:

https://news.usni.org/2018/04/11/32808
Photo: "Billie Flynn, F-35 Pax River ITF, conducts an external GBU-31 and AIM-9x buffet and flutter test flight from Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland, on April 4, 2018, in an F-35C test aircraft. Lockheed Martin Photo"
https://news.usni.org/wp-content/upload ... 282835.jpg

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 08:16
by Dragon029
Reportedly the very last SDD flight occurred today (out of Pax River).

We also have these slides from a presentation by Winter at the Sea-Air-Space Symposium (images courtesy of Stephen Trimble):
Image
Image
Image
Image

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 10:34
by element1loop
BLOS datalink for Oz version .. nice.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 11:22
by weasel1962
marauder2048 wrote:Progress payments can be up to 75% of the total contract value; performance-based payments can
be up to 90% of the total contract value.

The basic principle of the procurement is that the acquisition workforce and the program managers have
to *think* about the best way to meet the warfighter's' validated needs. This action is silly in that regard.

Lockheed said it was JPO. My stated view is that I find negotiating through the press or actions of this
kind distasteful and counter-productive.

The Navy does a lot wrong but my hope was that Winter would bring some of the Navy's
cordial and cooperative (if sometimes too cozy) approach to dealing with contractors with him...


We don't really know the full details of what happened on the ground that triggered this move. One thing is for sure, the cordial approach hasn't been really successful in managing taxpayer cost since day 1. LM is a profit making entity that's tasked to maximise profits for its shareholders. its not going to give in to costs just because the other party is cordial either. Having seen the words "cost overruns" repeatedly since the start, I'd give the Pentagon the benefit of the doubt before I start criticising. No one knows who leaked this to the press. Could be someone in LM, could be someone in service.

I think the JPO is transitioning to the services.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 14:27
by Dragon029
https://twitter.com/laraseligman/status ... 7061356545

Here is the JPO's statement on #F35 delivery pause (1/2): "F-35 deliveries have been temporarily paused while the government and @LockheedMartin reach an agreement on a contractual issue regarding repair work to remediate the known aircraft fastener hole primer quality escape.

(2/2): This is not a safety of flight issue but rather a contractual resourcing issue that needs to be resolved. The government has implemented this pause to ensure the warfighter receives a quality product from industry. We look forward to a swift resolution of this issue.”

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 15:04
by quicksilver
Chris Bogdan = cordial.

I guess the internet service on Mars has been intermittent for a few years, eh?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 19:45
by spazsinbad
F-35 Completes Most Comprehensive Flight Test Program In Aviation History
12 Apr 2018 LM PR

"NAVAL AIR STATION PATUXENT RIVER, Md., April 12, 2018 - The F-35 program has accomplished the final developmental test flight of the System Development and Demonstration (SDD) phase of the program. “Completing F-35 SDD flight test is the culmination of years of hard work and dedication from the joint government and industry team,” said Vice Adm. Mat Winter, F-35 Program Executive Officer. “Since the first flight of AA-1 in 2006, the developmental flight test program has operated for more than 11 years mishap-free, conducting more than 9,200 sorties, accumulating over 17,000 flight hours, and executing more than 65,000 test points...

...The final SDD flight occurred April 11, 2018 at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., when Navy test aircraft CF-2 completed a mission to collect loads data while carrying external 2,000-pound GBU-31 Joint Direct Attack Munitions (JDAM) and AIM-9X Sidewinder heat-seeking missiles.

From flight sciences to mission systems testing, the critical work completed by F-35 test teams cleared the way for the Block 3F capability to be delivered to the operational warfighter. More than a thousand SDD flight test engineers, maintainers, pilots and support personnel took the three variants of the F-35 to their full flight envelope to test aircraft performance and flying qualities. The test team conducted 6 at-sea detachments and performed more than 1,500 vertical landing tests on the F-35B variant. The developmental flight test team completed 183 Weapon Separation Tests; 46 Weapons Delivery Accuracy tests; 33 Mission Effectiveness tests, which included numerous multi-ship missions of up to eight F-35s against advanced threats....

...Developmental flight test is a key component of the F-35 program’s SDD phase, which will formally be completed following an Operational Test and Evaluation and a Department of Defense decision to go into full-rate aircraft production.

While SDD required flight test is now complete, F-35 flight testing continues in support of phased capability improvements and modernization of the F-35 air system. This effort is part of the Joint Program Office’s Continuous Capability Development and Delivery (C2D2) framework..."

Photo: "The final SDD Test flight was piloted by F-35 Test pilot Peter Wilson, April 11, 2018. The F-35C completed a mission to collect loads data while carrying external 2,000-pound GBU-31 Joint Direct Attack Munitions (JDAM) and AIM-9X Sidewinder heat-seeking missiles. (Photo by Lockheed Martin)" https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... __main.jpg & https://www.f35.com/assets/uploads/imag ... graph2.jpg
ALSO: "The final SDD Test flight CF-2 Flt 596 was piloted by BAE Test pilot Peter Wilson, April 11, 2018, from the F-35 Pax River Integrated Test Force...." http://www.navair.navy.mil/img/uploads/ ... 7-0005.jpg (3.3Mb)


Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/f-35-co ... on-history

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWR1KqeZBoY [YouTube Videos no longer show here in IE 11 it seems, EDGE OK]


Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2018, 19:48
by marauder2048
weasel1962 wrote:
LM is a profit making entity that's tasked to maximise profits for its shareholders. its not going to give in to costs just because the other party is cordial either. Having seen the words "cost overruns" repeatedly since the start


The majority of LRIP contracts have been mixed cost-plus incentive fee (CPIF) and fixed-price incentive fee (FPIF).

How do cost-overruns in CPIF (where the minimum fee can be zero or even negative) and FPIF maximize profits?

I've yet much if any evidence of Lockheed (or the other suppliers) engaging in selective leaking to
enhance a negotiating position. Leaks of this type almost always come from civil servants/congressional
staffers who (typically) aren't under the jurisdiction of the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 01:06
by weasel1962
quicksilver wrote:Chris Bogdan = cordial.

I guess the internet service on Mars has been intermittent for a few years, eh?


Bogdan only took over in 2012. But really what is the point being made?

The contention being made by some other people is that the head of the JPO would benefit from being nicer to the contractor. Rather than picking on irrelevant twisted details, it would be more productive to identify whether the issues were better tackled when people aren't so "cordial" are in charge or prior to that.

As to costs, its easy to obfuscate with high sounding program names or contract terms that most people won't understand. But the fear for those people is that when one drills down to the simple issue highlighted as the justification for the pause, they can't really justify it.

There is a repair to be made. The cost of the repair has to be borne by either the taxpayer or the LM shareholder. Arguing that the JPO should be nice and get the taxpayer to foot the bill, really doesn't cut it. LM's profits of course won't be hit if they don't foot the bill.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 02:56
by marauder2048
weasel1962 wrote:Bogdan only took over in 2012. But really what is the point being made?

The contention being made by some other people is that the head of the JPO would benefit from being nicer to the contractor. Rather than picking on irrelevant twisted details, it would be more productive to identify whether the issues were better tackled when people aren't so "cordial" are in charge or prior to that.

As to costs, its easy to obfuscate with high sounding program names or contract terms that most people won't understand. But the fear for those people is that when one drills down to the simple issue highlighted as the justification for the pause, they can't really justify it.

There is a repair to be made. The cost of the repair has to be borne by either the taxpayer or the LM shareholder. Arguing that the JPO should be nice and get the taxpayer to foot the bill, really doesn't cut it. LM's profits of course won't be hit if they don't foot the bill.



Some people have been shown (repeatedly) not to understand defense contracting.
Yet some people claim it's a simple matter.

Can some people simply tell us when and under what terms the "quality escape" clause was added to the LRIP contracts?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 03:30
by weasel1962
If a quality escape clause exists, and LM is on the hook for the repair costs, then why is there a disagreement?

https://www.defensenews.com/breaking-ne ... -lockheed/

That's simply because in prior year contracts, such a contract term never existed which is why it was recommended as a contract modification in 2013 for all future contracts. So the JPO should roll over and just bite the bullet?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 03:42
by marauder2048
weasel1962 wrote:If a quality escape clause exists, and LM is on the hook for the repair costs, then why is there a disagreement?

https://www.defensenews.com/breaking-ne ... -lockheed/

That's simply because in prior year contracts, such a contract term never existed which is why it was recommended as a contract modification in 2013 for all future contracts. So the JPO should roll over and just bite the bullet?


When was it actually adopted and what are the terms?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 03:45
by weasel1962
lol. Some people don't know the terms and yet have the balls to blame the DoD.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 03:58
by marauder2048
weasel1962 wrote:lol. Some people don't know the terms and yet have the balls to blame the DoD.


But it's a simple matter so surely some people can easily leap to DoD's defense with some actual details.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 04:06
by weasel1962
marauder2048 wrote:
weasel1962 wrote:lol. Some people don't know the terms and yet have the balls to blame the DoD.


But it's a simple matter so surely some people can easily leap to DoD's defense with some actual details.


Not sure why I need to re-type. That's simply because in prior year contracts, such a contract term never existed which is why it was recommended as a contract modification in 2013 for all future contracts.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 04:17
by marauder2048
Unfortunately I need to re-type: when was it adopted and what were the terms?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 04:23
by weasel1962
marauder2048 wrote:Unfortunately I need to re-type: when was it adopted and what were the terms?


That you didn't need to re-type because I don't intend nor need to answer irrelevant questions that try to detract from the issue.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 04:40
by marauder2048
weasel1962 wrote:
marauder2048 wrote:Unfortunately I need to re-type: when was it adopted and what were the terms?


That you didn't need to re-type because I don't intend nor need to answer irrelevant questions that try to detract from the issue.


That must be the simple view that contractual details are irrelevant to a contractual issue.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 04:43
by weasel1962
marauder2048 wrote:
weasel1962 wrote:
marauder2048 wrote:Unfortunately I need to re-type: when was it adopted and what were the terms?


That you didn't need to re-type because I don't intend nor need to answer irrelevant questions that try to detract from the issue.


That must be the simple view that contractual details are irrelevant to a contractual issue.


Slight correction: The simple view is that post contractual details are irrelevant to a contractual issue.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 05:08
by marauder2048
Except the claimed post-contractual details here would become a highly relevant
intra-contractual issue for the sustainment and support contracts. But keep simplifying.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 05:46
by weasel1962
Last I recall F-35s were procured under contracts from 2007 onwards. Since the repair bills refer to the jets delivered since then, I would assume past year contracts are applicable, rather than current. Having said that, its amazing what we can learn from the "experts" nowadays...

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 06:39
by marauder2048
weasel1962 wrote:Last I recall F-35s were procured under contracts from 2007 onwards. Since the repair bills refer to the jets delivered since then, I would assume past year contracts are applicable, rather than current. Having said that, its amazing what we can learn from the "experts" nowadays...


And what were the applicable, detailed terms (if any) in past year contracts to cover quality escapes?

I'm glad you got learned but It doesn't take an "expert" to know to weigh contractual details over
simple recall, assumption and inference.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 06:58
by weasel1962
marauder2048 wrote:
weasel1962 wrote:Last I recall F-35s were procured under contracts from 2007 onwards. Since the repair bills refer to the jets delivered since then, I would assume past year contracts are applicable, rather than current. Having said that, its amazing what we can learn from the "experts" nowadays...


And what were the applicable, detailed terms (if any) in past year contracts to cover quality escapes?

I'm glad you got learned but It doesn't take an "expert" to know to weigh contractual details over
simple recall, assumption and inference.


For the 3rd time, that's simply because in prior year contracts, such a contract term never existed which is why it was recommended as a contract modification in 2013 for all future contracts.

Do you need me to translate into any other language because that's the 3rd time you're asking the same thing.

Also, not sure what your position is right now since its been changing since the 1st post. Are you claiming now that the sustainment contract actually covers the repairs?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 07:37
by marauder2048
I've repeatedly asked if, when and in what form that recommendation was adopted.
You've repeatedly failed to provide any details whatsoever.

You've claimed that such contractual details are irrelevant to contractual issues.
Pre/intra/post production this is a contractual issue therefore the details matter.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 07:53
by weasel1962
marauder2048 wrote:I've repeatedly asked if, when and in what form that recommendation was adopted.
You've repeatedly failed to provide any details whatsoever.

You've claimed that such contractual details are irrelevant to contractual issues.
Pre/intra/post production this is a contractual issue therefore the details matter.


The 2013 recommendation, which I doubt you have actually read it, was for future contracts which adopted is totally irrelevant to this issue because it applies to jets delivered thereafter. Not sure how you can apply irrelevant contracts to this issue but I certainly can't explain it. Still waiting for the response on the sustainment contract and how that applies to this issue....

What is relevant is that the production contracts from 2007 did not include a quality escape clause which is why there is the issue today.

P.s. what I learned has nothing to do with contract details but more of the measure of the person particularly how many times I need to repeat it before that person finally understands the issue, or worse, if he/she ever gets it...

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 08:09
by marauder2048
The quality escape clause is to insulate the *government* from costs.

The DODIG 2013 report contained the recommendation. The DODIG 2015 report said that recommendation
had not been put under contract. That means that all LRIPs up to LRIP 9 are almost certainly on the government.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 08:39
by weasel1962
marauder2048 wrote:The quality escape clause is to insulate the *government* from costs.

The DODIG 2013 report contained the recommendation. The DODIG 2015 report said that recommendation
had not been put under contract. That means that all LRIPs up to LRIP 9 are almost certainly on the government.


And notwithstanding that under the production contracts mean the Government is on the hook, would one fault the JPO for trying every weapon in its book to get LM to bear some of the cost? Of course on the other end, LM is going to fight tooth and nail and stand by the production contracts to say that they shouldn't bear it. Hence the impasse. Since the JPO can't sue LM to bear the cost, the only other weapon they have is to delay delivery.

One might fault the JPO for not including the escape clauses (which they got hit repeatedly) but I don't think the JPO deserves blame for trying in this case. Its a dumb situation when the contract can subtly "encourage" the supplier to produce less than satisfactory machines when they know the customers bears the costs.

and in that context, I can understand when Adm Winter makes comments like "Lockheed Not Cooperating Enough On F-35 Contract"
https://breakingdefense.com/2018/02/loc ... dm-winter/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 11:38
by spazsinbad
F-35 Completes Flight Trials, Now On To Final Test [some praiseworthy quotes not excerpted below]


"...The F-35 has indeed come a long way since the first flight of the F-35A, AA-1, on Dec. 15, 2006. More than 11 years later, the JSF finally completed flight testing on April 11, 2018, at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland....

...The developmental flight tests cleared the way for the JPO to deliver Block 3F capability to the warfighter this year, allowing U.S. Air Force F-35 pilots, both stateside at Hill AFB, Utah, and overseas in the Pacific, to finally employ the stealth fighter’s full suite of lethal air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons in combat. The U.S. Marine Corps’ F-35Bs and the U.S. Navy’s F-35Cs will be able to deploy with their full 3F capability in May and June, respectively....

...But while completing flight tests is a significant milestone, the F-35’s $55 billion development phase, called System Development and Demonstration (SDD), won’t be over until the aircraft successfully completes its final exam, initial operational test and evaluation (IOT&E), and the Pentagon approves Lockheed to begin full-rate production.
IOT&E is scheduled to begin in September 2018...."

Source: http://aviationweek.com/defense/f-35-co ... final-test

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 22:28
by spazsinbad
F-35 delivery pause indicative of more stringent Pentagon standards, Lord says [read it all at JUMP]
13 Apr 2018 Valerie Insinna

"WASHINGTON — Both the Defense Department and Lockheed Martin had become too relaxed in ensuring deliveries of new F-35s met requirements, but recent pause on F-35 deliveries exemplifies how the department will now hold Lockheed to stricter standards, the Pentagon’s top acquisition official said Friday.

On Wednesday, Lockheed Martin confirmed that the Pentagon had stopped accepting deliveries of some F-35s due to a disagreement over whether the government or the company should pay for repairs for more than 200 F-35As with fastener holes that were not treated with the appropriate corrosion-preventing primer.

“The issue itself is well on its way to being resolved,” Ellen Lord, the undersecretary of defense for acquisition and sustainment, told reporters during a roundtable. However, the debacle establishes the “department’s point of view” that Lockheed had gotten sloppy in meeting the specified manufacturing requirements — and that the Pentagon got not been rigorous enough in enforcing them, she said. “The department, in an effort to move forward with the program, has perhaps not been as thoughtful as we want to be from this point forward in terms of what we consider acceptable performance,” she said. “I think this corrosion issue is one example where we have expectations for workmanship, and at this point we’re not seeing those workmanship levels being achieved.”

Lockheed Martin officials understand that, Lord said, including its CEO Marillyn Hewson, who has been meeting with Lord every month to talk about the Pentagon’s new expectations for the development, production and sustainment of the program. “What we are in the process of doing is talking with a greater level of fidelity about our expectation for performance on each of the upcoming lots,” she said. “I know that there is a much higher level of fidelity around expectations and the details that we are discussing at all levels of management.”...

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018/04 ... lord-says/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 22:36
by spazsinbad
Pentagon creates new position to help guide software acquisition, F-35 development
13 Apr 2018 Valerie Insinna

"WASHINGTON — The Defense Department is creating a new position to help formulate its software strategy and ensure that the Pentagon keeps pace with commercial advancements — and his most important job will be overseeing the F-35 joint strike fighter’s agile software strategy. During a Friday roundtable with reporters, Ellen Lord, the undersecretary of defense for acquisition and sustainment, announced that she has tapped Jeff Boleng to the newly created position of special assistant for software acquisition.

Boleng, currently the acting chief technology officer at Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute, will start April 16 as a member of Lord’s team. “Jeff Boleng will spend over 90 percent of his time on F-35. He is going to be the individual who is working amongst all of the groups to enable us to bring the right talent onboard,” Lord said. “We have a challenge, I think both within the JPO [F-35 joint program office] as well as Lockheed Martin, in terms of getting a critical mass of contemporary software skill sets to begin to move in the direction we want to.”

As the F-35 joint program office embarks on a new strategy called Continuous Capability Development and Delivery, or C2D2, which involves introducing agile software development, Lord wants to ensure that both the JPO and Lockheed have employees with the right training to execute the effort and that they can attract new professionals with additional software expertise.

“This is something that [Lockheed CEO] Marillyn Hewson and I have talked about,” she said. “Lockheed Martin has some excellent software capability throughout the corporation. My expectation is that they’re going to leverage that on the F-35. And as we within the Department of Defense really increase our capability for software development focused on C2D2, our expectation is that Lockheed Martin will do the exact same thing. “So they have the capability. I’m very energized about the leadership focus that I have seen in the last four to eight weeks, so I have great expectations that that will continue and that Lockheed Martin will keep pace or outpace DoD in terms of modernization for F-35 software development.”

Boleng, a former cyberspace operations officer and software engineer who served more than 20 years with the Air Force, last held the position of teaching computer science at the Air Force Academy before moving to the private sector. At Carnegie Mellon, he is responsible for spearheading the institutes research and development portfolio, which includes software development, data analytics and cyber security activities in support of the Defense Department. As the special assistant for software acquisition, he will help develop department-wide software development standards and policies and “advise department leadership on latest best practices in commercial software development.”

Boleng will also interface with Pentagon organizations charged with ramping up the department’s software prowess such as Defense Digital Services, a small group of former private-sector tech professionals who led the department’s “Hack the Pentagon” events and have conducted a few assessments of F-35 software. That starts with a meeting today between Lord, Boleng and a Defense Innovation Board group centered on software acquisition, which has been embedded both with the joint program office and Lockheed Martin, Lord said."

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/pentagon/20 ... velopment/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 22:57
by spazsinbad
Lord Says No Referee on F-35 Program Split, No New JPOs for Emerging Technologies
13 Apr 2018 JOHN A. TIRPAK

"Pentagon acquisition chief Ellen Lord doesn’t see a big danger that the F-35 program will spiral away from commonality when the services take over most of the work of managing their own variants. She also said the Defense Department will look to “loosely associating” multi-service efforts in new technologies such as hypersonics and artificial intelligence, but isn’t launching joint program offices in those “technology domains."...

...will happen “based on conditions” not yet met, she told reporters in her Pentagon office Friday, and lead to “more individual service focus.” This is because the program has reached a point where the need to preserve commonality must be “rebalanced” with the needs of the services “to do the things they individually need to do,” because each of the service variants have “slightly different missions.”

Lord said, “We want them to be interoperable, we want them to leverage the economies of scale, and the efficiencies” of common operating procedures. However, she feels that giving the services more control will allow the Pentagon to more “quickly modernize the aircraft” to their own requirements. “At this point, I think we are all very, very focused on affordability and efficiency, and sometimes that might be better done with a little more service involvement” on their own type of the fighter, she said.

Asked if there needs to be an overseer to prevent service-added uniqueness from defeating the commonality already built into the program, Lord said she thinks that issue will take care of itself. “The JPO makes recommendations about this,” she noted, and there’s an Executive Steering Group comprised of the services and foreign users of the F-35 “that looks at the direction of where we’re going … what our budgets are, what our requirements are.” Based on those structures, “I don’t think … we need one referee, so to speak.”

The existing JPO structure is useful for creating “synergy” among the users in developing requirements and operating methods, said Lord. Foreign partners and customers “are particularly appreciative of the JPO because it’s very efficient for them” having a single entity to deal with, and in which their own representatives are embedded. “I think that’s a good construct,” she said. “But we constantly have to work the value equation as to how much centralization delivers efficiency versus how much individual structure delivers capability as well. So, there’s a balance, there.”

Lord said she feels Lockheed Martin has “stepped up” to improving F-35 sustainment costs, a “responsiveness” she said she’d like to see spill over into “production as well as development.” She has seen Lockheed’s leadership “roll up their sleeves and work with us on sustainability” and “we’re on a good trajectory,” Lord said, but “we need to see the magnitude” and speed of cost reductions increase...."

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pag ... ogies.aspx

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 23:00
by F16VIPER
There is a link to the whole F-35 Australian Industry Participation document.

http://www.defence.gov.au/casg/Multimed ... 9-9066.pdf

https://images.defence.gov.au/assets/ar ... tes&sa=yyy
http://www.defence.gov.au/casg/AboutCAS ... fault.aspx

To date, 18 Australian companies have shared in more than AU$1 billion in Tier One production contracts, with over 50 companies benefiting through further supply chain work.

Australian industry is proving its global competitiveness by performing better than initial Defence forecasts. Australian industry involvement in F-35 production is expected to exceed AU$2 billion by 2023.

Australian industry is manufacturing parts that will be fitted to every F-35 in production globally.

Further opportunities are expected for Australian companies to increase production contract values over the next four years as F-35 production rates double.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2018, 23:01
by SpudmanWP
This is what we were told last November:

“The F-35 Joint Program Office is leading the effort with the U.S. services, international allies and Lockheed Martin on a comprehensive engineering assessment and corrective action maintenance plan to implement the necessary repairs” to all deployed aircraft “while minimizing impact to operations,” DellaVedova said.

In the interim, “primer will be applied to fastener holes of fielded aircraft as panels are removed during routine F-35 maintenance operations.,” he said. “Lockheed Martin has taken action to correct the production line work order error to ensure primer is applied to all fastener holes on future aircraft.”
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... -f-35-jets


Having it come down to cost now seems fishy. This should be easy enough for maintainers to do themselves. Is the DoD requiring an LM contractor to fly out whenever a jet's panel is opened? DoD should just do it themselves and charge LM for time with LM providing the material.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 14 Apr 2018, 01:17
by marauder2048
weasel1962 wrote:
marauder2048 wrote:The quality escape clause is to insulate the *government* from costs.

The DODIG 2013 report contained the recommendation. The DODIG 2015 report said that recommendation
had not been put under contract. That means that all LRIPs up to LRIP 9 are almost certainly on the government.


And notwithstanding that under the production contracts mean the Government is on the hook, would one fault the JPO for trying every weapon in its book to get LM to bear some of the cost? Of course on the other end, LM is going to fight tooth and nail and stand by the production contracts to say that they shouldn't bear it. Hence the impasse. Since the JPO can't sue LM to bear the cost, the only other weapon they have is to delay delivery.

One might fault the JPO for not including the escape clauses (which they got hit repeatedly) but I don't think the JPO deserves blame for trying in this case. Its a dumb situation when the contract can subtly "encourage" the supplier to produce less than satisfactory machines when they know the customers bears the costs.

and in that context, I can understand when Adm Winter makes comments like "Lockheed Not Cooperating Enough On F-35 Contract"
https://breakingdefense.com/2018/02/loc ... dm-winter/


From the DODIG reports, JPO had hand-shake and other non-contractual understandings with Lockheed where
the government would tolerate certain non-flight safety, non-performance-related non-conformances in exchange
for quicker deliveries. That's clearly been the spirit and probably the letter of most contracts as Ellen Lord
acknowledges above.

If that spirit breaks down you go back to the contract. If you still can't agree on things you
take it to the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals and they will make a determination about the spirit,
letter and whatever. It's a fairly routine matter.

If JPO wants more leverage it can convert the contract to (Cost/FixedPrice) plus Award where the
government is allowed to use its subjective judgement about things like contractor responsiveness.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Apr 2018, 11:25
by spazsinbad
AvWEAK weighs in on JPO re-org....
Pentagon Could Kill F-35 JPO, But Not Until 2035
13 Apr 2018 Lara Seligman

"...the transition to separate, service-run program offices won’t be complete until 2030-2035, according to a comprehensive Department of Defense study obtained by Aerospace DAILY: http://awin.aviationweek.com/portals/aw ... b_2018.pdf [sucks to be non-subs rather than unsubs]

At the direction of Congress, the Department of Defense examined several alternatives to the existing F-35 management structure, the gargantuan operation called the JPO that currently spans three U.S. services and 12 nations. The full report, recently delivered to the undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics, lays out the strengths and weaknesses of each alternative, and makes the case for a phased approach to transitioning management of the F-35 program to a service-run structure.

Based on the study’s recommendations, the Pentagon will gradually dissolve the JPO over a period of nearly two decades, while moving to establish two separate U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy-run program offices that report to their respective program executive officers (PEO)/service acquisition executives (SAE). The department hopes the deliberate, phased approach laid out in the report enables the services to take on a greater role in program oversight while minimizing cost and risk...." [then an tonne of blather....]

Source: http://aviationweek.com/defense/pentago ... until-2035

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Apr 2018, 12:24
by quicksilver
Ms Seligman assumes that DoD has accepted the recommendations of ‘the study’ whole cloth. Where do we have anyone in OSD on the record as accepting that idea. The fact that they went about ‘studying’ the idea is an indictment of the JPO on its face, and the idea that anyone in OSD or the services are going to engage in high-speed foot-dragging on an implementation that takes 12-17 years is a fantasy that only the USG acquisition bureaucracy can believe.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 19 Apr 2018, 14:24
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Resists $119 Million in Fixes for Its $406 Billion F-35
19 Apr 2018 Anthony Capaccio

"Lockheed Martin Corp. is contesting a repair bill of $119 million to $180 million on the $406.1 billion program to develop and build F-35 jets, according to Pentagon contract data. The dispute over poor workmanship that resulted in corrosion damage last year on some of the fighter jets illustrates the disputes that arise from time to time between the Pentagon and its biggest contractor over its costliest weapons program.

The problem was linked to a primer that’s supposed to be applied as a protective layer on aluminum fasteners to prevent corrosion. The Defense Department temporarily stopped deliveries of F-35s for the month ending Oct. 20 to assess the issue. Delivery of five planes is currently on pause until the dispute over who pays is resolved....

....“We’re not going to comment or negotiate this issue in the press,” Pentagon F-35 program spokesman Joe DellaVedova said in an email “regarding repair work to remediate” the flaw in “primer quality,” and “we look forward to a swift resolution.” Carolyn Nelson, a spokeswoman for Bethesda, Maryland-based Lockheed, said in an email that “we won’t discuss specific cost figures and contracting terms” but “we are working closely with” the Pentagon “to reach a resolution.”

Vice Admiral Paul Grosklags, commander of the Naval Air Systems Command, which oversees the Navy’s model of the F-35, told a House panel last week that the initial corrosion problem was a “mistake made by the contractor during production, and they should pay for that out of their bottom line, not our top line.”"

Source: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... llion-f-35

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 21 Apr 2018, 21:47
by spazsinbad
USAF Takes to Capitol Hill to Air Frustrations With Lockheed, Boeing
20 Apr 2018 Brian Everstine​

"...The F-35 Joint Program Office is currently not accepting deliveries of F-35s as it argues with Lockheed Martin over who is responsible for paying for a production error on more than 200 jets. Air Force acquisition chief Lt. Gen. Arnold Bunch, during a Senate Armed Services Airland Subcommittee hearing on Wednesday, said it is the Air Force's position that Lockheed is responsible for the fixes. Bunch said he is relying on the JPO to "stand up and take this step to make sure we're getting a quality product."..."

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pag ... oeing.aspx

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Apr 2018, 13:16
by doge
I hope that it will work... :salute:
https://www.bizjournals.com/washington/ ... ution.html
Lockheed expects F-35 repair dispute resolution soon
By Robert J. Terry – Senior Staff Reporter, Washington Business Journal Apr 25, 2018, 3:53am
Lockheed Martin is confident that a spat with the Pentagon over a repair bill in the hundreds of millions of dollars for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter will be resolved soon.

The issue has flared in recent days after it was revealed the Department of Defense was not accepting delivery of five F-35s — the Pentagon’s most expensive weapons program ever — because of a corrosion issue with aluminum fasteners.

The issue has not affected flights or the jet's safety, but reports peg the repairs costing anywhere from $119 million to $180 million. CEO Marillyn Hewson said Tuesday during the company’s first-quarter earnings call that she expects the contractual issue to get worked out.

“We’ll get resolution to this soon,” she said.

Lockheed has said it will deliver 90 of the F-35s this year and Hewson stuck to that projection, noting that production of the jets had not stopped. Investors pay close attention to anything related to the F-35 because of how key it is to the company’s future financial performance, assuming it meets all testing and production milestones. Lockheed is vowing to reduce the cost of each F-35 from $94 million to $80 million by 2020.

http://news.morningstar.com/all/dow-jon ... pdate.aspx
Lockheed Aims to Mend Fences With Pentagon Over F-35 Costs -- Update
4-24-18 2:36 PM EDT | By Doug Cameron
Lockheed Martin Corp. executives pledged to resolve a dispute with Pentagon officials that has halted deliveries of F-35 combat jets.

The Defense Department has toughened criticism of the jet's running costs in recent months. The discovery of a corrosion problem affecting jets that have already been delivered has further complicated negotiations over the multibillion-dollar sale of the next batch of F-35's.

Between five and 10 planes remain undelivered at Lockheed's huge facility near Fort Worth, Texas, because the U.S. Air Force won't accept them until the repair issue is resolved. The U.S. and a number of allies plan to buy as many as 3,000 of the F-35 jets, and the program already accounts for a quarter of Lockheed's sales.

Lockheed Chief Executive Marillyn Hewson said the defense company still expects to deliver 90 of the planes this year. "It's not affecting production," Ms. Hewson said. "We'll get resolution on that."

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Apr 2018, 19:55
by SpudmanWP
GAO says the USMC (and all services) needs to standardize the sharing of "lessons learned".

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Apr 2018, 22:46
by spazsinbad
I believe the GAO report (thanks 'SWP') is 'anodyne' "not likely to cause offence or disagreement and somewhat dull" but hey once the meedja get aholt of it then all hell breaks loose as per this little acknowledged as to source FliteGlobular. We can all remember ALIS has been tested already in ALASKA where the sun don't shine and hell freezes over regularly. But of course the USMC moved ALIS before this test so prudently went via WARM CLIMES - they know these already alright?
F-35 deployment to Japan hit with sustainment problems
25 Apr 2018 Garrett Reim

"Since the US Marine Corps’ deployment of the Lockheed Martin F-35B Lightning II to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan in January 2017 the aircraft has been hit with an assortment of sustainment problems....

...Issues with the F-35B supply chain include lengthy travel times for parts, inaccurate estimated delivery dates, delays at customs and difficulty shipping Autonomic Logistics Information System equipment, known as ALIS.... [duh you'd reckon that any FIRST far from main base would have some issues that need to be sorted - & they will be sorted by golly]

...Other issues with sustaining the F-35 in Japan include long repair times, shortages and poor reliability of certain aircraft parts...."

Graphic: download/file.php?id=27116 (PDF 1.4Mb)


Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... le-448025/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Apr 2018, 23:12
by marauder2048
So were the concerns about ALIS actually justified? I'm sure Flight's crack team will get right on that!

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Apr 2018, 23:13
by spazsinbad
More yadayada on the GAO report here: https://www.military.com/dodbuzz/2018/0 ... ments.html

By GEE by GOLLYgosh one wonders about these 'reports'. Nothing is perfect but it gets 'perfected' with effort/experience.

Reading the GAO original report the only thing of note is: DoD is setting up mechanisms for sharing 'lessons learnt'. DUH.

MOAR: https://news.usni.org/2018/04/25/docume ... deployment

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 May 2018, 00:47
by SpudmanWP
Lockheed resumes F-35 jet deliveries to Pentagon

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Defense resumed accepting F-35 jet deliveries from Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N) last week after reaching an agreement on covering the costs to fix a production error, the Pentagon told Reuters on Monday.

Terms of the agreement were not disclosed. The cost of the fix was $119 million, people familiar with the situation had previously told Reuters.

...

The majority of aircraft will be repaired within two years, the statement said.

More at the Jump
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-lock ... SKBN1I827Q

The timeline of two years supports my original theory that the holdup was all about "when" the repairs have to happen rather than "who" will pay for it. It looks like LM will fix them or pay the USAF to fix them when the F-35s are in for pre-scheduled depot maintenance. The two-year number also looks like it will coincide with the Block 3F/concurrency updates that are already scheduled in the budget docs.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 May 2018, 16:17
by spazsinbad
F-35 deliveries resume as DoD, Lockheed clear up financial disagreement
08 May 2018 Valerie Insinna

"WASHINGTON — The Pentagon is now accepting deliveries of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter again, after resolving a disagreement with Lockheed Martin over who should pay to fix a couple hundred jets, the company confirmed Monday. However, it’s still unknown who will ultimately be left with the repair bill.

Spokesmen from Lockheed and the F-35 Joint Program Office declined to comment on whether the company or government will be held financially responsible for the production escape. The decision to resume deliveries was first reported by Reuters….

...The problem, sources said at the time, is that the department and Lockheed had agreed upon a plan to repair about 200 jets that were impacted by a quality lapse — but not who should pay for it.... [The problem was who should pay?]

...Ultimately, Defense Department officials felt the Pentagon shouldn’t be held wholly responsible for paying to retrofit planes due to Lockheed’s mistake, leading it to partially freeze deliveries while negotiating with the company....

...Lockheed spokesman Mike Friedman declined to comment on whether Lockheed would bear responsibility for covering repair costs. “While we don’t discuss specific cost figures and contracting terms, we have a comprehensive plan in place to effectively and efficiently address the F-35 hole primer issue,” he said.

The JPO statement did not address who will fund the repairs except to say that the plan ensures the services will receive “an affordable and quality weapons system from industry.” “The F-35 Joint Program Office, along with the U.S. services, international allies and Lockheed Martin, have implemented a comprehensive corrective action plan to make the necessary repairs to all aircraft while minimizing impact to operations,” the JPO statement reads. “The majority of aircraft will be complete within 24 months with the remaining aircraft completed as their availabilities/modification timing allows.”...

...“The department, in an effort to move forward with the program, has perhaps not been as thoughtful[?] as we want to be from this point forward in terms of what we consider acceptable performance,” she said. [TRIPLE DUTCH DOUBLE] “I think this corrosion issue is one example where we have expectations for workmanship, and at this point we’re not seeing those workmanship levels being achieved.”"

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018/05 ... agreement/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 May 2018, 17:16
by blindpilot
spazsinbad wrote:
F-35 deliveries resume as DoD, Lockheed clear up financial disagreement
08 May 2018 Valerie Insinna

"WASHINGTON — ... one example where we have expectations for workmanship, and at this point we’re not seeing those workmanship levels being achieved.”"

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018/05 ... agreement/


Well, I'm not sayin ... or perhaps I am ...

Kids these days ....

So a couple days ago my kids weren't sure what to do about a bear threatening their goats. So I took my dawg, and we spent the night on the porch ...
... bear problem is taken care of. Nuthin like a good coon dog.
man and his dog.jpg
Man and his Dawg

Maybe I'm just old and crotchity, but it sure seems like kids these days don't seem to know what to do, and what good workmanship entails. They seem to think quality is in a Japanese manufacturing book or on YuTube. My blue tic knows what good workmanship is, better than most of the workers I see lately ... at least that's the opinion of old man with nuthin to do with his day but sit on the porch.

My grand daddy would'a whipped my a$$ if I left the corrosion treatment of a few holes. And I never would have entered the workforce till my a$$ had already learned that, and my a$$ was only 15 when I got my first real job paycheck.

Just sayin,
BP

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 09 May 2018, 05:32
by Dragon029
On my F-35 subreddit we just recently had a Fort Worth worker chime in and answer some questions; apparently a lot of the new hires have never worked on aircraft before and there's been incidents such as an F-35C aileron being cracked when a person tried to raise it by hand at its edge, another drilled a hole into a flaperon (without consulting anyone) using a cutting disc when a nut plate came loose inside, a bunch of cotter pins and nuts have been found loose, etc. The workers with experience are basically having to be extra vigilant at QC.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 10 Jun 2018, 21:58
by spazsinbad
Last fast facts of may had 135,000 hours flown NOW there are 140,000 hours in several recent accounts - this is onesuch.
Lockheed Martin-Built F-35 Comes Home to RAF Marham
06 Jun 2018 LM PR

"...Around the world, there are now nearly 300 F-35 aircraft operating from 15 bases globally and the programme has achieved more than 140,000 flight hours."

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/lockhee ... raf-marham

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 11 Jun 2018, 21:39
by Dragon029

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Jun 2018, 04:42
by wrightwing
Dragon029 wrote:https://twitter.com/thef35/status/1006264316612567040?s=19

300th F-35 (AF-150) delivered.

And more than 140,000 hours.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Jun 2018, 10:02
by spazsinbad
Pentagon And Lockheed Martin Deliver 300th F-35 Aircraft
11 Jun 2018 LM PR

"...The first 300 F-35s include 197 F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variants, 75 F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) variants, and 28F-35C carrier variants (CV) and have been delivered to U.S. and international customers. More than 620 pilots and 5,600 maintainers have been trained, and the F-35 fleet has surpassed more than 140,000 cumulative flight hours...."

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/pentago ... 5-aircraft


Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Jun 2018, 12:23
by madrat
Last I remember hearing was Su-57 was at 8-ish and J-20 at 13-ish.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Jun 2018, 12:46
by gideonic
madrat wrote:Last I remember hearing was Su-57 was at 8-ish and J-20 at 13-ish.

The J-20 number seems a bit low. But yeah, it doesn't change the fact that both of these will be lucky if they ever reach 200 aircraft, let alone more.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Jun 2018, 04:48
by Dragon029
It's my understanding that all of the 11/12 T-50s have been built (IIRC one was merged with the one that had that fire). China meanwhile has >20 J-20s, including the 10 or howevermany test airframes; China's stated that they aim to have at least 100 of them by the end of 2020 with a production rate of 3 per month.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Jun 2018, 07:50
by alloycowboy
Dragon029 wrote:On my F-35 subreddit we just recently had a Fort Worth worker chime in and answer some questions; apparently a lot of the new hires have never worked on aircraft before and there's been incidents such as an F-35C aileron being cracked when a person tried to raise it by hand at its edge, another drilled a hole into a flaperon (without consulting anyone) using a cutting disc when a nut plate came loose inside, a bunch of cotter pins and nuts have been found loose, etc. The workers with experience are basically having to be extra vigilant at QC.


Loose lips sink ships, I expext Lockheed will plug this leak quickly.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Jun 2018, 12:45
by weasel1962
Dragon029 wrote:It's my understanding that all of the 11/12 T-50s have been built (IIRC one was merged with the one that had that fire). China meanwhile has >20 J-20s, including the 10 or howevermany test airframes; China's stated that they aim to have at least 100 of them by the end of 2020 with a production rate of 3 per month.


LRIP production was started Dec 2015 and the first 4 appeared by mid-2016.

https://www.popsci.com/four-in-row-chin ... rows-again

The above link suggests a production run of at least 8 capacity a year but more likely imho 1 per month as a max rate (similar to J-10 LRIP which went up to 2-3 a month after production stablised). 78271-78276 serials appeared at Dingxin by end of 2016 which suggested an actual build rate of at least 6 a year. 78232 suggested a 2nd training brigade at Cangzhou.

If extrapolate from 2017 to date, it suggests a low of 15 (serial 15 was noted on yellow primer on one of the LRIP jets) to as high as 30 production units to date not including the 10 prototypes. Increasing use of covered hangers at CAC, Cangzhou and even Wuhu complicates matters but clearly enough hangers to support more than 30. This is what the PLA has been doing for the later batch J-10s (consolidate production units under wraps and suddenly big bang release).

First J-20s in combat units was announced earlier this year. Apart from the training brigade appears to suggest somewhere between 15 to 30 as a likely outcome.

The J-20 will never reach F-35 production levels (6 now, 12 max a month). However, I would expect it to overtake F-22 numbers in about 10-15 years.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Jun 2018, 07:55
by weasel1962
Repeating what others have said!!!! Neat! 300th F-35 delivered.

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... 30-449420/

The milestone figure comprises 197 F-35As, 75 F-35Bs and 28 F-35Cs.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Jun 2018, 10:03
by spazsinbad
That info is encapsulated in several posts in the lower half of the previous page of this thread.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Jun 2018, 15:43
by weasel1962
After all the death spiral news being repeated over and over...

These are really the kind of news that are worth repeating.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Jun 2018, 16:10
by spazsinbad
IF you feel that way then at least acknowledge previous posters - thanks.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Jun 2018, 02:33
by weasel1962
spazsinbad wrote:IF you feel that way then at least acknowledge previous posters - thanks.


Not really since I posted from a different source but since you feel so strongly about it, your previous post is acknowledged.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Jun 2018, 02:37
by spazsinbad
And there are others also. I think you need to respect the members here who post and otherwise LOOK/READ FIRST.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Jun 2018, 03:21
by weasel1962
spazsinbad wrote:And there are others also. I think you need to respect the members here who post and otherwise LOOK/READ FIRST.


Yup, like how a lot of people seem to acknowledge my sources...but wait...do they?...respect is given when received. But acknowledged, sometimes its a reflection of one's personal values that we act based on what we think is right regardless of what others do. So apologies if there was any offense because it was not a deliberate attempt to disrespect anyone. Just a real shout out at good news as highlighted.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Jun 2018, 03:52
by spazsinbad
Well said.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Jul 2018, 11:17
by krieger22
Reuters is flogging this as an exclusive: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-brit ... ium=Social

The deal for 141 F-35s lowers the price of the F-35A, the most common version of the stealthy fighter jet, to about $89 million, down around 6 percent from $94.3 million in the last deal struck in February 2017, the sources familiar with the talks said.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 19 Sep 2018, 00:53
by jetblast16
Great source of information on F-35 activity; quick and easy :doh:

https://twitter.com/thef35

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 03 Oct 2018, 01:46
by citanon
According to breaking defense, CPFH plunged $12k in 2017:

https://breakingdefense.com/2018/10/f-3 ... 100-f-35s/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 03 Oct 2018, 03:04
by element1loop
citanon wrote:According to breaking defense, CPFH plunged $12k in 2017:

https://breakingdefense.com/2018/10/f-3 ... 100-f-35s/


They still haven't figured this one out?

"Underside of the F-35B as it does a vertical landing back on the USS Essex. Note what appears to be a pod mounted underneath." - October 02, 2018

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 03 Oct 2018, 15:43
by SpudmanWP
The FY2019 numbers will be released within a couple of weeks for RCPFH and I'll update the historical chart. Here is the chart through FY2018.

Image

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2018, 22:49
by playloud
https://breakingdefense.com/2018/10/lor ... valuation/
PENTAGON: It’s official — the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter will begin operational test and evaluation next month, marking one of the most significant transitions for the closely watched program. Next summer, presuming no show stoppers appear during OTE, the program will move to full production.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Oct 2018, 21:17
by SpudmanWP
The RCPFH numbers for FY2019 just came in. For the most part they are stable (went up a little due to fuel costs) across the board except for the F-18C which shot up substantially. Also, the F-35B and C are on the list for the 1st time. I have added them to the graph. The plateauing of the F-35 numbers are related to the ongoing Parts/Depot issues.

Image

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Oct 2018, 21:38
by sprstdlyscottsmn
What is the R in RCPFH and what all does this value entail?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Oct 2018, 22:07
by SpudmanWP
Reimbursable. I posted it because it is the only annually released CPFH calculation that I know of.

A related usage of CPFH is for flying-hour reimbursable billing rates, i.e., how much other DoD, other federal, other customers, and foreign military should be charged on a per-flying-hour basis. These rates build upon the FHP CPFH, adding in cost categories less directly impacted by flying hours such as depot-level maintenance costs.

https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/p ... RR1178.pdf

Image

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 12 Oct 2018, 22:38
by sprstdlyscottsmn
Basic fuel and Mx. Excellent. Thanks.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Nov 2018, 00:52
by weasel1962
https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018/11 ... block-buy/

LRIP 12: 64 A, 26 B, 16 C for USAF, USMC, USN bringing cumulative US totals of lot 1-12 to 290 A, 115 B, 60 C respectively.

Clearly the block buy numbers do not include all partner projected buys for lots 12-14.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Nov 2018, 09:18
by weasel1962
Flight breaks down the 89 partner F-35s to include 18 B. Since UK accounts for 17 B, it suggests Italy may be only going for 1 B instead of 9 B.

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... 23-453656/

Went to the source:
Lockheed Martin Corp., Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, is being awarded a $22,712,874,822 not-to-exceed undefinitized contract modification.
The U.S. aircraft quantities are for the Lot 12 program of record plus fiscal 2018/fiscal 2019 aircraft quantity congressional adds.
https://dod.defense.gov/News/Contracts/ ... e/1690639/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Nov 2018, 10:58
by spazsinbad
Another look at the BLOCK BUY here:
Pentagon Awards $6 Billion Contract Modification To Keep F-35 Production Rolling 14 Nov 2018 Ben Werner
https://news.usni.org/2018/11/14/pentag ... on-rolling

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Nov 2018, 19:56
by spazsinbad

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Nov 2018, 20:24
by steve2267
weasel1962 wrote:https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018/11/14/lockheed-gets-6b-downpayment-to-start-f-35-block-buy/

LRIP 12: 64 A, 26 B, 16 C for USAF, USMC, USN bringing cumulative US totals of lot 1-12 to 290 A, 115 B, 60 C respectively.

Clearly the block buy numbers do not include all partner projected buys for lots 12-14.


It's amazing that the USMC will be 1/3 of the way to it's goal of 353 Killer Bees. They're not fooling around and aren't kidding when they say we can't buy them fast enough.

It's also sobering to consider that the USAF will have more Stubbies in service than most air forces have planes.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Nov 2018, 23:17
by blindpilot
steve2267 wrote:...
It's amazing that the USMC will be 1/3 of the way to it's goal of 353 Killer Bees. ..
It's also sobering to consider that the USAF will have more Stubbies in service than most air forces have planes.


It's that whole Death Spiral thing :D I've sort of lost track of milestones, since I noted that the F-35 passed the total F-22s a while back. Meanwhile, they're passing total Rafales and total Gripens of all types, and as I watch the numbers creep up ...
... I think the USMC Bees may have passed the total Harriers in service now .. ? have to check that ...

Yeah death spiral indeed, if they don't stop it soon, they won't be able to find enough coffins ....

MHO,
BP

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Nov 2018, 01:34
by weasel1962
No rush. 115 B comprises orders until lot 12 which will only be delivered in ~2020. 2018 USMC aviation plan indicated 126 AV-8B/TAV-8Bs in service, so the F-35B "in service" > AV-8B mark may be crossed in 2021/2022. Currently there are 6 AV-8B sqns (incl 1 FRS) vs 3 F-35Bs but that should change by end of 2022. Sundown of the AV-8B is planned to be FY 2026.

P.s. US F-35 orders to lot 12 will pass the sum of both Rafale + Gripen built. The only plane that will stop F-35 production is an F-35 replacement.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Nov 2018, 06:24
by donkeykongsfist
On the topic of cost:
https://twitter.com/JoedeBrig/status/10 ... 15393?s=09
Whats going on in this dude's head

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Nov 2018, 16:53
by SpudmanWP
He's pandering to the LIV crowd (Low Information Viewers).

He did the same back with the Lot9 numbers and was thoroughly debunked as he did things like:
-- Added the long lead contracts to the final cost
-- Added contracts from other Lots
-- Added maintenance contracts
-- Added R&D contracts
--etc.

He did the same thing here where he is adding the LL contract and the main contract together. He seems to forget that contracts are "price estimates" and the final price is what is agreed on at the end.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 17 Nov 2018, 00:28
by marauder2048
https://www.edwards.af.mil/News/Article/1692048/f-35s-begin-auto-gcas-test-flights/

10 months form JPO approval to first test flight :)

The addition of Auto GCAS to the F-35 makes it a more capable aircraft, said Lt. Col. Raven LeClair, 461st FLTS test pilot.

“This technology is the stepping stone to increased combat capability via a fully capable combat autopilot that will be able to execute tactical maneuvers to defeat inbound kinetic and non-kinetic threats and maximize lethality through precise weapon employment,” expressed LeClair. “The future F-35 pilot is going to be a lethal battlefield manager with automated tools at his fingertips to ensure survivability and lethality.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 17 Nov 2018, 00:58
by spazsinbad
From above URL a pic of F-35A with unusual? Looney Lens or just paint markings/stealth infill where the LOONIE Lens Bars were installed? Otherwise there are conventional LOONIES onboard. Dunno: "An F-35 Lightning II from the 461st Flight Test Squadron at Edwards Air Force Base, California, soars over the Mojave Desert on a test sortie. (Courtesy photo by Chad Bellay/Lockheed Martin)" https://media.defense.gov/2018/Nov/15/2 ... 99-412.JPG (0.6Mb)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Nov 2018, 09:37
by spazsinbad
F-35 Tests Out Tech that Keeps Pilots from Crashing Into the Ground
16 Nov 2018 Oriana Pawlyk

"...In January, Vice Adm. Mat Winter, head of the F-35 Joint Program Office, said the Auto-GCAS system was coming roughly five years earlier than originally planned. "Expediting this lifesaving technology into the F-35 fleet by 2019 is estimated to prevent the loss of three aircraft, and more importantly, save the lives of three pilots," Winter said in a news release. "Over the service life of the F-35 fleet, having Auto-GCAS is estimated to prevent more than 26 ground collisions from happening."

Pilots themselves have helped speed that process along, according to Lockheed officials. "The implementation of it is going faster than we thought [it would]," said Greg Ulmer, vice president for the Lockheed Martin F-35 aircraft production business. Ulmer said the expedited timeline is due to the fact that Lockheed began an "agile construct" where an operator -- such as a pilot -- is "embedded as part of the development team." "So we've seen some strong performance in that regard in Auto-GCAS in particular," Ulmer told Military.com in September.

But it's not a foolproof solution for an in-flight emergency, Hamilton said. "The pilot cannot use Auto-GCAS as a crutch," he said. "It's very important they do everything in their power to execute the mission without relying on any safety net to protect them. They've got to execute not thinking it's there, they should execute with that mindset. And then if it saves them, it saves them."

Hamilton stressed that it's better to be over-prepared in any case. "It is our responsibility to use the technology to be able to bring [pilots] home every day, that's something they deserve and it's something we have the capability to provide," Hamilton said."

Source: https://www.military.com/dodbuzz/2018/1 ... round.html

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Nov 2018, 08:41
by spazsinbad
F-35 Begins Collision Avoidance Tests As UK Joins Auto-ICAS Study
19 Nov 2018 Guy Norris [text from: https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/warship ... ml#p691242 ]

Spurred on by the success of the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto-GCAS) in saving lives and aircraft on its F-16 fleet, the U.S. Air Force has begun flight tests of the safety system on the F-35A as part of efforts to fast-track its introduction into the Joint Strike Fighter fleet as early as mid-2019.

The initial flight-test phase, which got underway at Edwards AFB, California, on Oct. 31, will verify noninterference of Auto-GCAS with other aircraft systems and evaluate overall performance of the algorithms in the safety system. Seven flights had been conducted as of Nov. 14.

Collision Avoidance
----- Flight tests of Auto-GCAS started on the F-35A at Edwards AFB
----- Ground-collision protection to be introduced on U.S. Air Force F-35s beginning in 2019
----- U.S.-UK joint study will pave the way for Auto-ICAS on the F-35 in the 2020s

The first flight-test phase is due to be completed by the end of November and, depending on results, will be followed by a second round starting in January and running through April. “The F-35A should field with Auto-GCAS in June, so it’s really on the fast track,” says Mark Wilkins, subject-matter expert at the Office of the Secretary of Defense for the Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT) program under which Auto-GCAS was developed.

Moves to introduce Auto-GCAS on the F-35 follow the success of the system on the Air Force F-16 fleet. Since it was first introduced on the Block 40/50 version of the F-16 in late 2014, the system has been credited with saving eight lives and seven aircraft. Developed by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), NASA and Lockheed Martin, the Auto-GCAS system is designed to prevent fighter/attack aircraft from crashes due to controlled-flight-into-terrain incidents.

Algorithms in the system continuously compare the aircraft’s trajectory against a terrain profile generated from an onboard digital terrain elevation data unit. If the predicted trajectory touches the terrain and the system calculates the aircraft is in imminent danger of collision, it executes a last-minute automatic recovery maneuver. The system is designed to protect against accidents caused primarily by pilot disorientation or temporary incapacity due to high G forces.

Initial flight tests have gone well, says Wilkins, and Auto-GCAS activations, in which the system was deliberately initiated to command a pull-up maneuver, were performed on the first sortie. Once the trajectory-prediction algorithm at the heart of the Auto-GCAS has been tuned to the F-35’s flight control and navigation systems, and the safety device cleared for integration, the first F-35As will be equipped starting next summer, with follow-on installations rolling into the F-35B and F-35C versions, respectively.

Testing of Auto-GCAS for the F-35 comes as the AFRL, Air Force, Lockheed Martin and the UK’s Defense Science & Technology Labs have joined forces to study development of the follow-on Automatic Integrated Collision Avoidance System (Auto-ICAS) for the Joint Strike Fighter. The effort, which will be led by Lockheed Martin, is focused initially on surveying the F-35’s standard sensor suite to “see what’s available to us for air-to-air capability,” says Wilkins.

Auto-ICAS, which was successfully tested in an F-16 in 2017, combines the ground collision avoidance system with an Automatic Air Collision Avoidance System (Auto-ACAS), which was developed to prevent midair collisions. Auto-ACAS is focused on providing extra safety in the highly dynamic Air Combat Maneuvering training environment in which it calculates future aircraft trajectories to determine if an automatic maneuver is required to avoid an imminent midair collision.

The combined Auto-ICAS prioritizes ground collision functions while making the Auto-ACAS “terrain aware.” This prevents air collision avoidance maneuvers that would then force the aircraft toward the ground which, in turn, would require Auto-GCAS to trigger a maneuver.

In the F-16, the Auto-ACAS element of the ICAS function is hosted in the ASQ-T50(V)1 P5 wingtip-mounted air combat maneuvering instrument training pod. Although at one stage Lockheed Martin studied installing a P5 pod in the weapons bay, the F-35 is expected to utilize other aspects of the aircraft’s integrated sensor and datalink suite to achieve the same overall result.

In response to impetus from the Air Force as well as the F-35 Joint Program Office, the AFRL is working to validate the requirement for an automatic integrated collision avoidance system on the aircraft. The UK’s interest is initially driven by the near-term requirement for a collision warning system for operating in the crowded airspace in and around the British Isles. However, a second phase would focus on development of a fully integrated Auto-ICAS with air-to-air and ground collision prevention capability.

Although the sensor study is expected to be completed by mid-2019, the relative complexity of integrating Auto-ICAS into the F-35 means the system is unlikely to be fielded until late into the Block 4 standard deliveries around 2023-24."

Source: http://aviationweek.com/combat-aircraft ... icas-study

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Dec 2018, 06:16
by spazsinbad
[BLOCK BUY] CLASS JUSTIFICATION AND APPROVAL FOR USE OF OTHER THAN FULL AND OPEN COMPETITION
UNK the man from UNK

"...2. Description of the Actions Being Approved.
This Class Justification and Approval (CJ&A) authorizes and approves the issuance of contract actions on a sole-source basis to Lockheed Martin Corporation, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company (LM Aero), Fort Worth, TX, for Lots 12-14 F-35 aircraft and associated supplies and services. Authority to act under this CJ&A expires on 31 December 2022...."

Source: http://milex.org/wp-content/uploads/201 ... acted4.pdf

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Dec 2018, 10:12
by weasel1962
Has anyone posted about the Italian IOC for its 1st sqn of F-35As?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Dec 2018, 11:57
by spazsinbad
weasel1962 wrote:Has anyone posted about the Italian IOC for its 1st sqn of F-35As?

viewtopic.php?f=57&t=53945&p=406717&hilit=Kington#p406717

F-35 JPO Head : JSF enters the new year in a growing phase

Unread postPosted: 10 Dec 2018, 09:50
by spazsinbad
Head of F-35 Joint Program Office: Stealth fighter enters the new year in midst of a growing phase
10 Dec 2018 Vice Adm. Mat Winter [Probably best read ALL of it at source]

"As the “quarterback for the joint force,” the F-35 provides new transformational capabilities that will fundamentally change the way our nation’s military operates around the globe. More than a fighter jet, the F-35’s ability to collect, analyze and share data is a powerful force multiplier that enhances all airborne, sea and ground-based assets in the battlespace, while ensuring our war fighters can execute their mission and return home safe. With stealth technology, advanced sensors, weapons capacity and range, the F-35 is the most lethal, survivable, connected and interoperable fighter aircraft ever built....

...The F-35’s projected service life extends out for more than 50 years (2070), and to ensure the aircraft remains combat-ready and ahead of adversaries, the enterprise will continually deliver enhanced capability to the war fighter with a focus on affordability and speed....

...In 2018, the F-35 program completed the most comprehensive, rigorous and safest developmental flight test program in aviation history. More than 9,200 sorties, 17,000 flight hours and 65,000 test points were achieved to verify the design, durability, software, sensors, weapons capability and performance for all three F-35 variants. In 2019, F-35 flight testing continues in support of phased capability improvements and modernization of the F-35 air system. This agile framework, known as “continuous capability development and delivery,” provides timely, affordable, incremental war-fighting capability improvements to maintain air dominance against evolving threats to the United States and our allies....

...To support the F-35 global fleet and the secretary of defense’s directive to attain an 80 percent mission-capability rate by the end of 2019, government, international allies and industry representatives are increasing spare part supplies, accelerating depot activations, and implementing reliability and maintainability improvement plans to ensure maintainers get the parts they need, when they need them, to sustain F-35s more efficiently. To speed up repairs and lower costs, we are leveraging government capabilities at fleet readiness and air logistics centers, and we are empowering flight line workers with greater authority to streamline standard maintenance actions. These combined sustainment and logistic actions and initiatives will improve overall F-35 readiness for the war fighter....

...The F-35 forms the backbone of U.S. air combat superiority for decades to come. It enhances our international alliances and is a linchpin for future coalition operations. It is a big, complex, rapidly growing and accelerating program that is moving in the right direction. Our steadfast focus is on the continued advancement, development, delivery and sustainment of an affordable, global F-35 weapons system that supports the peace and, if called upon to do so, swiftly and decisively wins the fight every time."

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/outlook/201 ... ing-phase/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 10 Dec 2018, 13:45
by element1loop
“ … Production ramp-up will continue as operational testing concludes in the summer of 2019 and the program enters a full-rate production decision in the fall. …” - Vice Adm. Mat Winter

https://www.defensenews.com/outlook/201 ... ing-phase/


That's as little as 6 to 8 months away.

Isn't that around 6 months earlier than any other source has said the operational testing will be completed? Until now I thought operational testing was supposed to (possibly) be complete by about Jan-Feb 2020.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 10 Dec 2018, 14:42
by spazsinbad
JPO Press Release says on an IOT&E thread says: "...Starting this week and continuing through late summer 2019....
http://www.jsf.mil/news/Releases/201812 ... TnE_v1.pdf (307Kb) "

viewtopic.php?f=22&t=53807&p=406990&hilit=Operational#p406990

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 10 Dec 2018, 14:48
by element1loop
spazsinbad wrote:JPO Press Release says on an IOT&E thread says: "...Starting this week and continuing through late summer 2019....
http://www.jsf.mil/news/Releases/201812 ... TnE_v1.pdf (307Kb) "

viewtopic.php?f=22&t=53807&p=406990&hilit=Operational#p406990


Ah, thanks Spaz, I haven't been around for a couple of weeks, that's the first I heard of it.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 10 Dec 2018, 15:16
by spazsinbad
In the same 'other thread': "...a September 2018 presentation by F-35 test director Air Force Col. Varun Puri states that the test period could run into September 2019...."

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 10 Dec 2018, 18:01
by wrightwing
IOT&E concludes next summer, after which the decision will be made to ramp up production, and declare FOC.

Bunch: USAF F-35, F-16, F-22 Fleets to 80% Mission Capable R

Unread postPosted: 04 Feb 2019, 21:18
by spazsinbad
Bunch: Air Force Can Get F-35, F-16, and F-22 Fleets to 80 Percent Mission Capable Rate
01 Feb 2019 John A. Tirpak​

"Despite a Director of Operational Test and Evaluation report that said the F-35’s readiness hasn’t much improved in the last year, the Air Force thinks it can get its fleet up to an 80 percent mission capability rate by the end of the fiscal year, as directed by former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis. That assessment came from Lt. Gen. Arnold Bunch, USAF’s top uniformed acquisition official, who spoke to an AFA industry audience Friday.

“We’re pushing” for the 80 percent mark, “and … we believe we can make that,” Bunch said. “We’re not going to be 80 percent with everything,” he conceded, but we will achieve that goal “with our combat-coded aircraft” in the F-35 fleet, as well as in the F-16 and F-22 fleets. The DOT&E report gigged the F-35 program’s sluggish improvement in availability, but the Pentagon has acknowledged that newer jets off the line are performing far better than early production models.

Bunch said he’s been in marathon meetings with Lockheed Martin, the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and F-35 Joint Program office officials, and “we’re setting timelines and calendars … dates when we are going to get things done.” Bunch said a list has been created of “the systems that are not performing as we want, the big drivers,” and there is an improvement program for each one....

...USAF is looking at the Autonomic Logistics Information System—ALIS—for ways to make it “more user-friendly and make it to where it’s not taking as much time,” so jets can be turned more quickly. The Air Force is the service acquisition executive authority for the F-35 as long as its program executive officer is a Navy officer, in keeping with the joint nature of the program.... [best read it all at source]

Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pag ... -Rate.aspx

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 14 Feb 2019, 09:02
by doge
SASC chairman Sen. James Inhofe wants F-35s production acceleration... 8)
https://www.investors.com/news/lockheed ... es-inhofe/
Lockheed's Top Moneymaker Gets Backing From This Key Senator
2/12/2019
WASHINGTON — The chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee wants faster Lockheed Martin (LMT) F-35 production, even before a key operational test is completed. Lockheed Martin stock rallied.

Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., has been vocal about boosting production of the stealth jet to triple the fleet by 2024.

He wants more F-35s made sooner to fill the gap in fifth-generation fighters that was created when the F-22, another stealth jet, had its production run cut short in 2009 due to spiraling costs.

But initial operational test and evaluation, a key milestone before the F-35 can start full-rate production, began in December and isn't expected to wrap up until this summer.

Inhofe told reporters at the Defense Writers' Group breakfast Tuesday that he doesn't expect major problems to be found during the current round of tests.

"I believe there are going to be the normal type of deficiencies as it's being developed," he said. "We don't have the luxury of time to wait, in my opinion."

Meanwhile, the F-35 is still struggling to overcome technical hurdles. A report from the Pentagon's chief weapons tester noted problems with the F-35's reliability and readiness due to flaws in its logistics software.

But Inhofe brushed away concerns about lingering problems with the jet saying it was needed and production should be increased.

"We might not be quite through the perfection stage to do that," he said. "But I don't know of anything else that is going to take the place of the F-35 that's in our inventory."

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 14 Feb 2019, 12:23
by marsavian
Let the F-35A vs F-15X Congressional battles begin ! ;)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Feb 2019, 08:47
by doge
marsavian wrote:Let the F-35A vs F-15X Congressional battles begin ! ;)

Senators touching F-15X...! 8) (and support F-35.)
https://insidedefense.com/insider/senat ... -fund-f-35
Senators call on Trump to fully fund F-35
By John Liang February 14, 2019 at 3:31 PM
Sens. John Cornyn (R-TX), Ted Cruz (R-TX), Susan Collins (R-ME), Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) have sent a letter to President Trump urging him to support the current funding schedule for the F-35 as opposed to investing in what they call the "outdated, fourth-generation F-15X."

"We are extremely concerned that, over the last few years, the [Defense Department] has underfunded the F-35 Program and relied on Congress to fund increases in production, sustainment, and modernization," the letter states. "In order to meet the overmatch and lethality goals laid out in the National Security Strategy, the DOD needs to make these investments in the F-35 to affordably deliver and operate this fifth-generation fighter fleet. The F-35 is the most affordable, lethal, and survivable air dominance fighter, and now is the time to double down on the program."

"In order to ensure the United States servicemembers are equipped with the most lethal aircraft capable of operating in the modern battlefield, we request your support and the support of the DOD in investing our defense funds in proven fifth-generation technology -- like the F-35 -- rather than technology that will be outdated before it even rolls off the production line," the senators write.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Feb 2019, 08:59
by popcorn
Doesn't hurt to have friends in high places.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Feb 2019, 09:23
by weasel1962
LM's line is at fort worth, no surprise to see the list of supporting republican senators.

The key would be the "boeing" senators. Less issue in the house since that's Democrat held. Its in the senate where the real battle would be. In particular Roy Blunt who won 2016 with a 3% margin. Luckily for LM, he's only up for re-election in 2022, not 2020. Blunt is on the sub-committee for defense. Hawley won it in 2018 so more time. Nevertheless, this is exactly the issue that could tilt the budget in the senate. If Blunt doesn't intend to run in 2022, then the reps might have an easier time.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Feb 2019, 10:31
by marsavian
Sens. John Cornyn (R-TX), Ted Cruz (R-TX), Susan Collins (R-ME), Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) have sent a letter to President Trump urging him to support the current funding schedule for the F-35 as opposed to investing in what they call the "outdated, fourth-generation F-15X."


All Republican Senators too whose votes he will probably need for more important issues to him. Congress is where either F-15X lives or dies and first shots have now already been fired ...

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Feb 2019, 17:12
by steve2267
doge wrote:https://insidedefense.com/insider/senat ... -fund-f-35
Senators call on Trump to fully fund F-35
By John Liang February 14, 2019 at 3:31 PM

<snip>

The F-35 is the most affordable, lethal, and survivable air dominance fighter, and now is the time to double down on the program."



In the past it has been the JSF -- Joint Strike Fighter -- a strike fighter, or a multi-role fighter. First time I've really noticed "air dominance" attached to the F-35, at least in the US press, that is.

Dumb question: why does Boing need the F-15X? Is it a keep the production line open kind of need, or a keep the engineers busy kind of need? Cuz I don't see it as a busybody engineer type jobs program... what engineering is really left on the F-15X? Isn't this more of a we need to keep our production line warm issue? But even then, isn't there enough work with MQ-25 / T-X and continued Super Duper purchases? (And aren't there still F-15XYZ's still being produced for some ME state customers?)

ETA: If it's an industrial jobs / capacity dealio where you just want to keep the line warm in case you need a bunch... then why not buy half a dozen or a dozen F-16V to keep the Viper line warm in South Carolina until some friendly nation needs a bunch, whether it be India or Slovenia or Poland or or Taiwan whomever... (Slovenia & Poland just plucked out of the air.)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Feb 2019, 18:22
by marsavian
Boeing probably does not need the F-15X at all, it's just an opportunistic business move due to the fact that the F-15C is coming to the end of its life soon and F-35 full scale production is later then originally envisaged so they have offered to plug the 'gap' in fighter numbers. Of course the gap could be made up with more F-35s but then Congress has to specifically bill for it. The DoD/President has now forced their hand basically saying give me 12 more new fighters a year, if not F-15X then state and pay for what you do want e.g. more F-35. Even if the President gets his way the F-15X purchase may not survive a change of Presidency but at least he's putting out there the US need more new build fighters every year going forward.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Feb 2019, 19:13
by quicksilver
“The DoD/President has now forced their hand basically saying give me 12 more new fighters a year, if not F-15X then state and pay for what you do want e.g. more F-35.”

‘Forced their hand...’??

The Congress has been ‘giving’ DoD more F-35s each year for the last few years; the letter from Senators Cornyn et al mentions this reality, and suggests that DoD cannot cut F-35 numbers and expect the Congress to continue to make up for the cuts.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 19 Feb 2019, 14:05
by doge
I found the full text of the letter, so I post it.
https://www.cornyn.senate.gov/sites/def ... _13_19.pdf
The Honorable Donald J. Trump
President of the United States
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20500
Dear Mr. President:
Thank you for your leadership in ensuring our men and women in uniform have the best equipment and resources to perform their missions and return home safely. As you know, the best and most advanced fighter jet in the world is the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, which provides stealth, advanced sensing, coalition interoperability, cyber security, and an ability to overmatch adversaries in a multi-domain fight. The F-35 delivers these capabilities better than any other fighter in the U.S. inventory, and provides our men and women the capability they need to protect and defend against the surface and air threats we are facing today and the growing threats of tomorrow. It is the best chance our men and women have of coming home safely, and we urge you to fully support this program.

Former chief of staff of the USAF, Gen Mark Welch said it best, “America needs the F-35 to stay a step ahead, … It's interoperability among services and partner nations, its survivability against the advanced integrated air defense systems, and its ability to hold any target at risk make the F-35 the only real viable option that I see to form the backbone of our future fighter fleet….“And the reality is -- if a fourth-generation fighter meets a fifth generation fighter, the fourth-generation fighter may be more efficient, but it will be dead. It really is that simple.

As our nation’s only fifth-generation stealth fighter being built today, an investment in additional production and support for the F-35 fighter fleet is critical to ensuring the U.S. maintains air superiority. Further, investment in the F-35 program would allow the Department of Defense (DoD) and our allies to continue bringing costs down by leveraging economies of scale. The good news is the production cost is coming down; by 2020, an F-35A will cost $80 million per jet.

With that in mind, we are extremely concerned that, over the last few years, the DoD has underfunded the F-35 Program and relied on Congress to fund increases in production, sustainment, and modernization. In order to meet the overmatch and lethality goals laid out in the National Security Strategy, the DoD needs to make these investments in the F-35 to affordably deliver and operate this fifth-generation fighter fleet. The F-35 is the most affordable, lethal, and survivable air dominance fighter, and now is the time to double down on the program.

The Fiscal Year 2018 and 2019 defense appropriations bills, which you signed into law, helped reverse the tactical aircraft readiness and modernization deficit, by providing for 90 and 93 F-35 aircraft respectively, and urging the DoD to invest in F-35 to achieve full rate production (80 F-35As, 24 F-35Bs, and 30 F-35Cs per year). To keep this program on track, the DoD must continue increasing production, year-over-year, and the Air Force needs to get to at least 60 F-35As per year in the Fiscal Year 2020 budget request. This is critical to enabling the Air Force to reach 80 F-35As per year in the timeframe necessary to meet the force structure needs required by the threat environment in 2025 and beyond. At this point, additional investment in less capable or older fourth-generation legacy fighters will simply not meet the requirements of current or future threats.

Nonetheless, it is my understanding that the DoD may propose buying outdated fourth-generation F-15 fighters, like the F-15X, for $100 million per jet in the FY20 budget request. At a cost 20% higher than the advanced F-35A, this is far from a good deal. Choosing to invest in these fighters, which we know are neither lethal nor survivable against today’s advanced threats, would be a disservice to servicemembers and taxpayers.

New versions of old F-15s designed in the 1970s-1980s cannot survive against the newest Russian and Chinese fifth-generation fighter and surface to air missile threats, not to mention rapidly developing future threats. This action by the DoD would be a direct departure from the vision you have for a strong national defense. Allowing the DoD and U.S. Air Force to go back on their stated requirement for F-35 would counter the work you have done to restore our military capabilities.

As recently as September 2018, Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson expressed her support for the procurement of the stealthy F-35 platform over fourth-generation aircraft. "We are currently 80 percent fourth-gen aircraft and 20 percent fifth-generation aircraft. In any of the fights that we have been asked to plan for, more fifth gen aircraft make a huge difference, and we think that getting to 50-50 means not buying new fourth gen aircraft, it means continuing to increase the fifth-generation.

In order to ensure the United States servicemembers are equipped with the most lethal aircraft capable of operating in the modern battlefield, we request your support and the support of the DoD in investing our defense funds in proven fifth-generation technology – like the F-35 – rather than technology that will be outdated before it even rolls off the production line. Thank you for your continued commitment to strengthen America’s military, and for your attention to this matter.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 24 Feb 2019, 20:28
by gabriele
Does anyone have line of sight on the make-up of LRIP 11?
The LM slide released at the time does not break down by nations, and i'm having trouble making sense of things. LM says that 91 F-35 for the US are included, of which 14 F-35C. How many F-35A, though? And how many Bs? The LM slide says 25 B are included. One is for the UK. If the USMC has bought less than 24, then it means Italy is getting one or two.

Hasn't the FY2019 budget ended up authorizing 93 F-35? Contract modification for the two missing, or what...?
Thanks for the help.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 24 Feb 2019, 20:32
by Bjorn
53 USAF
1 Italy
6 Norway
8 Australia
8 Netherlands
4 Turkey
10 South Korea
6 Israel
6 Japan
24 USMC
1 United Kingdom
14 USN

Greets,

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 24 Feb 2019, 22:10
by gabriele
Thanks a lot.

Do you think the other 2 F-35 authorized with FY2019 budget will be added with a contract modification later on, or is it possible that they actually end up into LRIP 12...?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 25 Feb 2019, 01:42
by Corsair1963
Hopefully, the US Congress will give the USN far more F-35C's! As they need far more than just "14". Which, is barely enough for a single squadron.... :shock:

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 Feb 2019, 23:05
by SpudmanWP
USN Declares F-35C IOC

The Navy declared today that its F-35C Joint Strike Fighter was operationally ready to deploy and conduct missions around the world.

The initial operational capability (IOC) declaration comes after the Navy’s first F-35C squadron, Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147, conducted aircraft carrier qualifications aboard USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) in early December, received its safe-for-flight operations certification on Dec. 12 and spent the intervening weeks working with the Navy’s test community to prove it could operate and maintain the new stealthy jets.

“The F-35C is ready for operations, ready for combat and ready to win,” Commander of Naval Air Forces Vice Adm. DeWolfe Miller said in a statement today.
“We are adding an incredible weapon system into the arsenal of our Carrier Strike Groups that significantly enhances the capability of the joint force.”


​​​​​​​More at the JUMP
https://news.usni.org/2019/02/28/navy-d ... ke-fighter

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 01 Mar 2019, 00:31
by spazsinbad
Another report here:
The US Navy’s new stealth fighter just hit a major milestone
28 Feb 2019 David B. Larter

"...F-35C Testing and Fielding Timeline
--- • F-35Cs began arriving at Naval Air Station Patuxent River in 2011 for testing, and by November that year a JSF had conducted its first ground-based catapult launch from Pax River. In 2012, the final test jets had arrived at Pax River; a carrier-landing assistance tool began ground-based testing, and the first external weapons test flight took place.

--- • In 2013 the first F-35Cs were delivered to a squadron – Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101, the Navy’s F-35C fleet replacement squadron at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.

--- • On Nov. 3, 2014, an F-35C made its first-ever arrested landing on a carrier, aboard USS Nimitz (CVN-68). The jets then conducted 11 days of sea trials aboard Nimitz, completing Developmental Test-I with Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 23 (VX-23) and meeting all test objectives to prove interoperability between the ship and the planes and carrier suitability for at-sea operations. In September 2015 DT-II was conducted aboard USS Eisenhower (CVN-69).

--- • In September 2017 USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted its first F-35C at-sea operations, and in December USS Lincoln (CVN-72) hosted carrier qualifications for the Navy’s first nine pilots who were set to conduct at-sea F-35C operations.

--- • In August 2018, Lincoln hosted the first integrated air wing operations, where the ship’s crew launched and recovered, towed and maintained both F-35s and other aircraft types at the same time, rather than carefully handling the new airplanes separately. This integrated air wing operation used airplanes from VFA-125, a fleet replacement squadron, and VFA-147.

--- • In December 2018, VFA-147 began its bid for independence – the squadron reached the safe-for-flight milestone, which allowed it to fly and maintain the planes without supervision from the fleet replacement squadron."

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/naval/2019/ ... h-fighter/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Mar 2019, 15:12
by doge
Lightning Keepers!! :D
https://www.lockheedmartin.com/en-us/ne ... fleet.html


Inside the intake!!!! :shock: wow. 8)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Mar 2019, 15:37
by spazsinbad
THANKS 'doge'. Great to see those guys 'doin' their thang'. :D

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Mar 2019, 16:43
by krorvik
And it gives me a special warm feeling seeing those fine folks taking such good care of RNoAF jets.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 17 Mar 2019, 05:15
by gc
Norwegian F-35 successfully completed first AMRAAM missile tests

https://defence-blog.com/news/norwegian ... tests.html

Video at jump

What is the F-35’s typical operating altitude? The f-16 operates at FL200-250 with a combat loadout while the eagle holds significantly higher giving its amraams greater reach. Having a lightning operate as high as an Eagle takes away one of the few air to air missile truck tactical advantage that the Eagle holds over the lightning.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 17 Mar 2019, 06:15
by Dragon029
It'll vary naturally depending on the situation and tasking, but you can probably expect them to operate higher and slightly faster than F-16s on average.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 17 Mar 2019, 16:20
by sprstdlyscottsmn
IIRC Dolby said 10-12,000ft higher and 50-70kt faster than F-16s

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Mar 2019, 04:34
by wrightwing
sprstdlyscottsmn wrote:IIRC Dolby said 10-12,000ft higher and 50-70kt faster than F-16s

10-15k higher and ~ M.12 faster, with an equivalent load, without afterburners.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Mar 2019, 04:49
by sprstdlyscottsmn
And .12M is 69kt

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Mar 2019, 07:59
by wrightwing
sprstdlyscottsmn wrote:And .12M is 69kt

More like 80kts. .103 is 69kts.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Mar 2019, 11:54
by gc
Thats great. FL350 is not too bad.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 20 Mar 2019, 14:04
by sprstdlyscottsmn
wrightwing wrote:
sprstdlyscottsmn wrote:And .12M is 69kt

More like 80kts. .103 is 69kts.

Above 36,000ft the speed of sound is 968ft/s at standard temperature. 0.12 * 968 = 116ft/s. 116 ft/s * 3600 s/hr / 6080 ft/nm gives 68.7nm/hr.

You used the sea level speed of sound.

And I found the quote

"With the F-35, we get more of all this, compared to what we are used to today. To discover how much more was a positive surprise for me. In full war equipment operates F-35 effortlessly 10,000 to 15,000 feet higher than our F-16 can, without using afterburner. The speed in 'cruises' is without further 50 to 80 knots higher. In the F-16, I must use afterburner and take running speed before a missile shot. F-35 "cruiser" both faster and higher. Therefore, I am ready to shoot far anytime."

At altitude 50-80kt is .09-.14M

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Apr 2019, 03:04
by Dragon029
Vago had a program update interview with Winter:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZBMWzCA_Gg


Major take-aways:

1. ALIS 3.0 reduced false alarms in the fleet by "up to" 70%, but there's still issues that need working through.
2. Mission Data Files and Full Mission Simulators have been updated.
3. >390 F-35s have been delivered worldwide to 18 bases and 2 ships.
4. Approx "70%" of all partner and FMS services have delcared IOC (3 US services, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel [I might be missing one or two others]).
5. 131 jets planned to be delivered in CY19, 167 planned for delivery in CY21.
6. F-35 flight operations (as per sustainment plans) are now expected to run until 2077, not 2070.
7. Winter has some concern about cost performance matching volume ramp, but isn't concerned about ramp rate being diminished, etc, especially with new FMS customers coming aboard.
8. CPFH in CY18 for an F-35A was $44K/hr, F-35B was $51K/hr, F-35C was $59K/hr (full ownership CPFH).
9. Winter believes they are on track for an F-35A (full ownership) CPFH to reach $25K/hr by 2025.
10. CPFH reduction will be driven by depot component repair times going from 190-200 days (today) to 45 days by 2025; increased reliability of later-lot F-35s; and also reduced manpower requirements due to airframe and ALIS improvements.
11. Lot 12 is being negotitated, Lot 13 will follow on its heels, Lot 14 negotiations are expected to begin in FY20 (but before the end of CY19 according to Winter).
12. Winter himself has not been involved in any USAF / USN 6th gen acquisition planning discussions, but says he has JPO engineers and ops analysts involved, and thinks F-35 DNA in the form of tech and business lessons learned will be folded into those programs.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Apr 2019, 03:18
by spazsinbad
:applause: Thanks for the video with notes 'Dragon029'. :applause: I like the way VAGO refers to 'other than F-35s' as HERITAGE AIRCRAFT. :doh: SPOT ON! :devil:

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Apr 2019, 04:59
by Corsair1963
GREAT NEWS :D

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Apr 2019, 05:58
by squirrelshoes
3. >390 F-35s have been delivered worldwide to 18 bases and 2 ships.
5. 131 jets planned to be delivered in CY19, 167 planned for delivery in CY21.

Woah there... that might pass the Pierre Sprey limit.

Impossible.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Apr 2019, 16:13
by doge
Dragon029 wrote:

Great job by Dragon029! :applause:
1. ALIS 3.0 reduced false alarms in the fleet by "up to" 70%

To me this looks like a good number. 8) I remember that ALIS's false alarms have been very criticized so far.
8. CPFH in CY18 for an F-35A was $44K/hr

At the same time last year, I remember that the subcommittee's hearing was told that A's CPFH was $50K.
Looks to me that it has now(or last year?) been reduced to $44K.(-$6K reduction)
And I remember that early 2019 this year, by to each media, it was written that A's CPFH is $35K.
Therefore, it looks like between $44K~35K. It can be expect. 8)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2019, 05:23
by doge
Dragon029 wrote:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZBMWzCA_Gg

I found from that YouTube comment.
https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/borin ... t-2019-20/
Boring is the new black: Defence budget 2019–20
3 Apr 2019|Marcus Hellyer
On sustainment, last year ASPI argued (page 43) that one of the big risks was the cost of the F-35A. The JSF program was aiming for a sustainment cost similar to that for legacy aircraft such as the classic Hornet. But if the cost of sustaining the JSF turned out to be more like the costs for the Super Hornet and Growler electronic attack aircraft, the sustainment budget would be under pressure. The 2019–20 budget sheds some light on things: for the first time, the F-35A puts in an appearance in the top 30 sustainment products table. At $41,800 per flying hour in 2019–20, it’s between the classic Hornets at $22,200 and the Super Hornets/Growlers at $79,000 (that’s derived by dividing the sustainment costs (pages 122–123) by annual flying hours (page 65)). It’s early days, so hopefully that will come down as the sustainment system matures.

$41,800---F-35A(RAAF)
$22,200---Legacy Hornet(RAAF)
$79,000--- Super Hornet/Growler(RAAF)
(!?)
I was surprised at the CPFH of Super Hornet(or EA-18G). :shock: (I had thought impression the super hornet was low-priced ...)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2019, 06:33
by Dragon029
I wouldn't read too deeply into it; the RAAF had 1 of 12 Growlers go up in flames at Red Flag last year, and so I wouldn't be surprised if the follow-up has caused a spike in sustainment costs and/or drop in flight hours.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2019, 08:00
by doge
Dragon029 wrote:I wouldn't read too deeply into it; the RAAF had 1 of 12 Growlers go up in flames at Red Flag last year, and so I wouldn't be surprised if the follow-up has caused a spike in sustainment costs and/or drop in flight hours.

It might be...There may be a potential impact of the accident seem likely. (Because EA-18G is a very valuable asset.)



and,,,
New good news from Vice Adm.Mat Winter has arrived! :D
https://insidedefense.com/daily-news/f- ... s-end-year
F-35 on track to achieve 80 percent mission-capable rates by end of year
By Mallory Shelbourne April 4, 2019 at 3:54 PM
The Joint Strike Fighter is on track to meet its 80 percent mission-capable rate requirement by the end of 2019, according to the F-35 program executive officer. After testifying in front of the House Armed Services tactical air and land forces subcommittee today, Vice Adm. Mat Winter told reporters the program is slated to achieve the benchmark because of modifications made to older aircraft and the ability to obtain spare parts. "So we're putting the repairing demand signal into our...

He sees 80% as achievable...!! 8)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2019, 13:15
by Dragon029
F-35 on track to achieve 80 percent mission-capable rates by end of year
By Mallory Shelbourne

April 4, 2019 at 3:54 PM

The Joint Strike Fighter is on track to meet its 80 percent mission-capable rate requirement by the end of 2019, according to the F-35 program executive officer.

After testifying in front of the House Armed Services tactical air and land forces subcommittee today, Vice Adm. Mat Winter told reporters the program is slated to achieve the benchmark because of modifications made to older aircraft and the ability to obtain spare parts.

"So we're putting the repairing demand signal into our U.S. services' artisans . . . in our Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps depots,” Winter said.

"And we're letting our industry partners focus on generating brand-new parts for [the] production line and to the flight line," he continued.

Winter told the panel of lawmakers the Air Force's F-35A is currently at 61 percent mission-capable, while the Marine Corps' F-35B variant is at 64 percent. The F-35C, the Navy's carrier variant that reached initial operational capability in February, is at 84 percent.

Achieving the 80 percent mission-capable goal would put the F-35 program in compliance with a memo issued last year by former Defense Secretary James Mattis. The directive called for the F-35, the Navy's F/A-18 and the Air Force's F-16 and F-22 to reach the 80 percent target by the conclusion of fiscal year 2019.

"We've identified the root causes and the levers needed to ensure the availability and the mission-capable rates for the F-35. We looked across our entire fleet and have taken a full system look," Winter said.

The average mission-capability rates for the F-35 range from 65 to 85 percent when the aircraft is deployed with a "float spares package," according to Winter.

"We need to make sure that we have increased spare parts on the flight line. We need to make sure we can repair parts or accelerate in the depot stand-ups in the United States," Winter told the subcommittee.

"And we've pushed flight-line maintenance authorities to our warfighters on the flight line, where they had to send back parts or send back to get the maintenance completed, they can now do that -- maintain those actions on the flight line," he added.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2019, 15:39
by doge
Dragon029 wrote:

Very grateful to the Full text! :D :thanks:
The F-35C, the Navy's carrier variant that reached initial operational capability in February, is at 84 percent.

84%!? :shock: In the Internet I, I've watched many voices concerned about the Rate% of the C model...
but, This %Rate revealed this time looks very very high to me. :applause: 84%!! It looks like a very good %Rate. 8)

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 10 Apr 2019, 05:28
by spazsinbad
[FICK for F-35 JPO] Milley, Hyten to Lead Joint Chiefs of Staff; Marine Lt. Gen. Smith to Command MCCDC
09 Apr 2019 Megan Eckstein

"...the president nominated Air Force Maj. Gen. Eric Fick to serve as the next director of the Joint Strike Fighter Program, where Fick currently serves as the deputy director. Fick commissioned into the Air Force in 1990 and has served as program executive officer for fighters and bombers; program executive officer for intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR) and special operations forces; commander of the Advanced Combat Systems Group at the Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office; and operations officer and commander of the 46th Test Squadron. He will replace Vice Adm. Mat Winter."

Source: https://news.usni.org/2019/04/09/milley ... more-42922

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Apr 2019, 02:41
by weasel1962
April 2019 fast facts per link below. Managed to reconcile the full 499 orders for lots 1-11 reflected in the updates

https://www.f35.com/assets/uploads/docu ... s_4_19.pdf

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Apr 2019, 19:42
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Martin Inks Long-Term Contracts with More F-35 Suppliers
17 Apr 2019 LM PR

"Lockheed Martin has transitioned additional F-35 suppliers to longer term Performance Based Logistics contracts and Master Repair Agreements to enhance supply availability and reduce sustainment costs....

...Previously under annual contracts, the new multi-year PBLs allow each company to make longer term investments and actions to reduce costs and improve efficiencies. In addition to PBL contracts, Lockheed Martin has established 12 Master Repair Agreements (MRAs) with key suppliers to enhance repair capacity and speed.

The PBLs cover several contracts with BAE Systems, Northrop Grumman and Collins Elbit Vision Systems (CEVS); and the MRAs cover contracts with 12 separate suppliers including Honeywell, GE and Eaton.

The initial multi-year contracts are already delivering benefits. A 2017 PBL contract awarded to BAE Systems for the Electronic Warfare subsystem is helping deliver a 25 percent improvement in the system’s availability throughout global operations.

Enhancing Readiness, Reducing Costs
As the F-35 fleet expands, the F-35 Joint Program Office-led Hybrid Product Support Integration (HPSI) team is implementing the Global Support Solution (GSS) to enhance readiness and reduce costs.

The F-35’s reliability and readiness continues to improve and newer production aircraft are averaging greater than 60 percent mission capable rates with some operational squadrons consistently near 70 percent. Additionally, Lockheed Martin has reduced its portion of operating costs per aircraft by 15 percent since 2015.

The F-35 enterprise’s goal is to deliver 80 percent mission capable rates in the near term, and achieve a $25,000 Cost per Flight Hour (CPFH) by 2025, which is comparable to the cost to sustain legacy aircraft, while providing a generational leap in capability.

As more aircraft enter service, the enterprise is optimizing resources across the fleet and leveraging data across hundreds of thousands of flight hours to achieve these goals. The program is conducting supply chain competitions, building supply chain capacity, synchronizing spare buys, improving parts reliability and maintainability, implementing advanced analytics tools, enhancing the Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS), accelerating modifications of earlier aircraft, and supporting the stand-up of government-led regional warehouses and repair depots."

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/lockhee ... -suppliers

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Apr 2019, 20:04
by spazsinbad
MORE from INSIDE the DE Fence via JSF.mil PDF attached below edited just to make a two pager one page PDF for youse.
F‐35 PEO: $75M Unit Cost By Lot 14 ‘Within The Art Of The Possible’
9 April 2019 Courtney Albon, Inside Defense

"The unit cost of the F‐35A could do as low as $75 million in Lot 14 of low‐rate initial production if the program can improve supply chain and production line performance, the head of the program recently told Inside Defense.

The joint program office has been working with the prime contractor Lockheed Martin and engine-maker Pratt & Whitney to reduce the cost of the F‐35A to $80 million by 2020. Program official have said they think the jet’s price tag could fall even lower, and in an April 5 interview, Program Executive Officer Vice Adm. Mat Winter offered more specifics, telling Inside Defense that an F‐35A in the mid‐to‐high $70 million range is “absolutely within the art of possible.”

“We’d like to be in the $75 [million] to $77 million range for Lot 14,” Winter said. “I would say in the high 70s is achievable for Lot 14.” Winter offered a caveat to that possibility, though, nothing that the program won’t meet its target if supply chain performance production line efficiencies don’t improve.

Suppliers are still not meeting their scheduled deliveries in the volume and price point the program needs – largely because they’re spread too thin building production parts, completing spare parts packages and fixing components in the fleet, Winter said. One way the program is looking to address this is by moving the repair work to the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps depots so that supplier can focus on building the parts.

The program office is also working with the Lockheed and Pratt to fine production‐line efficiencies and reduce the time it takes to build the airframe and engine. Winter noted that he wants to see more automation on both companies’ production lines, saying “the amount of automation that is not present is staggering.”

“They need to truly invest in their people and their capital…to increase the production flow and rate,” Winter said. “The faster you go, the less it cots. The faster you go, the less time you have to make mistakes.” [Que?]

Lockheed Martin spokesman Mike Friedman told Inside Defense in an April 9 email that today’s F‐35 production line features “more advanced manufacturing than any fighter jet production line in the world.” “As we continue to ramp up production, we are evaluating, investing and integrating additional automation to further improve efficiencies and reduce costs,” he added.

Lockheed has reduced the amount of touch labor on its production line by about 75 percent in recent years, Friedman noted. The company expects to increase production by 40 percent in 2019 with the delivery of 131 aircraft."

Source: http://www.jsf.mil/news/releases/PEO_Ap ... erview.pdf

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 19 Apr 2019, 01:28
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Martin Says New F-35 Supplier Contracts Will Reduce Aircraft Costs
18 Apr 2019 Ben Werner

"F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter lead-contractor Lockheed Martin reconfigured a host of its contracts with its suppliers to lower the aircraft price tag, improve readiness and control ongoing maintenance costs. Lockheed Martin moved a raft of suppliers into performance-based logistics contracts or master repair agreements, with the idea being these longer-term commitments allow subcontractors to invest in their production processes, making their operations more efficient, resulting in lower costs for Lockheed Martin....

...Currently, Lockheed Martin states the newer production F-35 aircraft average a better than 60 percent mission capable rate and some operational squadrons report mission capable rates of near 70 percent. The goal is mission capable rates of 80 percent and by 2025 a $25,000 cost per-flight-hour, according to Lockheed Martin.

The Pentagon has for years sought to control the program’s costs as lawmakers on Capitol Hill have frequently balked at the F-35’s high sticker price and initial availability problems. The program had an “albatross of negativity,” Vice Adm. Mat Winter, the director of Joint Strike Fighter program office, said during an episode of the Proceedings podcast….

"The following is the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter Production Status from Vice Adm. Mat Winter, the director of Joint Strike Fighter program office.

As of April 2019, 386 F-35 air systems have been delivered, with about 20 percent going to international partners and customers. Ultimately, international partners and customers are expected to receive 780 F-35 aircraft. [do the math]

The U.S. military will eventually receive 2,456 divvied up among the service branches as follows:
• 1,763 F-35C fighters to the Air Force
• 353 F-35B fighters to the Marine Corps
• 67 F-35C fighters to the Marine Corps
• 273 F-35C fighters to the Navy"


PODCAST: Proceedings Podcast Episode 73 - PEO-JSF Director talks F-35 [EXCELLENT 58 mins]
https://soundcloud.com/naval-institute/ ... talks-f-35

Source: https://news.usni.org/2019/04/18/lockhe ... raft-costs

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 26 Apr 2019, 06:20
by spazsinbad
Government watchdog finds more problems with F-35’s spare parts pipeline [Complibloodycated Best Read @ Source]
25 Apr 2019 Valerie Insinna

"WASHINGTON — Only about half of the F-35s worldwide were ready to fly during an eight-month period in 2018, with the wait for spare parts keeping jets on the ground nearly 30 percent of the time, according to a new report by the Government Accountability Office. Over the past several years, the Defense Department has sought to improve mission capable rates by making improvements to the way it and F-35 contractor Lockheed Martin order, stockpile and repair spare parts. However, GAO’s findings imply that the situation may have gotten worse.

The GAO’s report, released April 25, investigated how spare parts shortages impacted F-35 availability and mission capable rates in 2018, with most data gathered between a May and November sustainment contract period.... [DETAILS]

...lack of improvement may make it more difficult for the U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps to hit an 80 percent mission capable rate by the end of fiscal year 2019, as mandated by then-Defense Secretary Jim Mattis last fall. The military services stopped providing mission capable rates for aircraft last year, citing operational sensitivities. However, the data put forth by the GAO indicates that progress stagnated in the lead up to Mattis’ order.

From May to November 2018, mission capable rates — which measure how many planes possessed by a squadron can perform at least one of its missions — hovered around 50 percent for all versions of the F-35.

But when GAO assessed how many planes were fully mission capable — meaning that they were ready to fulfill all of their mission sets — all variants were far from meeting the 60 percent target. Only 2 percent of F-35C carrier takeoff and landing versions hit the fully mission capable mark, with the F-35Bs slightly better at 16 percent and the F-35A at 34 percent.

The GAO is skeptical that the services will be able to hit the 80 percent mission capable rate goal this year, and it is even more critical of the Defense Department’s plans to fund spares in future years....

No silver bullet for parts shortage issues
Like all complicated problems, there is no single solution for the F-35 spare parts shortage, which is driven by a number of factors.... ...The F-35’s much-maligned Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS) was designed to be able to track parts and automate the process of generating and expediting work orders, however, GAO notes that the system still requires manual workarounds from users in order to accomplish tasks....

...“DOD has identified specific parts shortages that are causing the greatest aircraft capability degradation, and it is developing short-term and long-term mitigation strategies to increase the quantity and reliability of these parts,” the report said. One such component is a coating used on the F-35’s canopy to help it maintain its stealth characteristics, which has been found to peel off at an unexpected rate, creating a heightened demand for canopies.

“To address these challenges, the program is looking for additional manufacturing sources for the canopy and is considering design changes,” the GAO stated. But — somewhat paradoxically — the F-35 has been flying for a long enough time that there is significant parts differences between the first jets that rolled off the production line to the most recently manufactured planes. The GAO found “at least 39 different part combinations across the fleet” on top of variations in software.

“According to the program office, DOD spent more than $15 billion to purchase F-35 aircraft from the earliest lots of production, specifically lots 2 through 5 … but it faces challenges in providing enough spare parts for these aircraft,” the report stated. One problem — the cannibalization of F-35 aircraft for parts — is partially user-inflicted….

...During an interview this February, Lt. Col. Toby Walker, deputy commander of the 33rd Maintenance Group, told Defense News that F-35 maintainers at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., had stopped pulling parts off a cannibalized F-35 and had seen some improvements to mission capable rates as a result. “We’re not continually moving parts from one aircraft to another. We’re relying on the program to provide our parts,” he said. “It was a very strategic plan to do that to increase aircraft availability by not sitting an aircraft down.”...

…[LM:] “These actions are beginning to deliver results and we’re forecasting additional improvement. Newer production aircraft are averaging greater than 60 percent mission capable rates, with some operational squadrons consistently at 70 percent,” the company said. “From a cost perspective, Lockheed Martin has reduced its portion of cost per aircraft per year by 15 percent since 2015. Our goal is to further reduce costs to $25,000 cost per flight hour by 2025, which is comparable to legacy aircraft while providing a generational leap in capability.”"

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/air/2019/04 ... -pipeline/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 26 Apr 2019, 06:30
by spazsinbad
Another article about GAO report here:
http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pag ... eline.aspx

GAO REPORT page: https://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-19-321

F-35 Aircraft Sustainment: DOD Needs to Address Substantial Supply Chain Challenges
GAO-19-321: Published: Apr 25, 2019. Publicly Released: Apr 25, 2019.

FULL REPORT PDF 81 pages: https://www.gao.gov/assets/700/698693.pdf (7.6Mb)

HIGHLIGHTS: https://www.gao.gov/assets/700/698692.pdf (117Kb)
"...Supporting Recent F-35 Shipboard Deployments
The F-35 program was not able to fill the Marine Corps’ afloat spares packages (packages of spare parts designed for aircraft stationed on ships) for the first F-35 deployments aboard the U.S.S. Essex and U.S.S. Wasp in 2018 in time to support those deployments. As a result, the F-35 program pulled spare parts from inventories at Marine Corps Stations Yuma, Arizona, and Iwakuni, Japan. Marine Corps officials stated that these actions reduced F-35 readiness in Iwakuni…"

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 26 Apr 2019, 07:38
by loke
Looking at the projected CPFH for F-35 compared to the SH, it seems a mystery to me that the USN keep buying SH...? Why not SLEP existing birds and accelerate F-35C instead of buying more SH?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 26 Apr 2019, 08:29
by SpudmanWP
loke wrote: Why not SLEP existing birds and accelerate F-35C instead of buying more SH?

Ask the SecDef.. oh Wait.. nevermind......

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 26 Apr 2019, 08:50
by loke
SpudmanWP wrote:
loke wrote: Why not SLEP existing birds and accelerate F-35C instead of buying more SH?

Ask the SecDef.. oh Wait.. nevermind......

I thought the decision to purchase more SH was taken long before Mr. Boing became SecDef? In any case he is not stupid (as demonstrated by the recent investigation), he will recuse himself for all discussions involving Boing products.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 26 Apr 2019, 20:06
by marauder2048
loke wrote:
SpudmanWP wrote:
loke wrote: Why not SLEP existing birds and accelerate F-35C instead of buying more SH?

Ask the SecDef.. oh Wait.. nevermind......

I thought the decision to purchase more SH was taken long before Mr. Boing became SecDef? In any case he is not stupid (as demonstrated by the recent investigation), he will recuse himself for all discussions involving Boing products.


If you are able to define the architecture and mission capabilities and alter the funding profile to achieve that
then it is trivially easy to define things in a way that practically guarantees one outcome.

DODIG was never going to uncover something as vulgar and blatant as "Buy Boeing or I kill the F-35."

*my highlight*

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 27 Apr 2019, 03:43
by eloise
ijUCM4o.png

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 27 Apr 2019, 04:47
by spazsinbad
Thanks. Would be nice to know origin/URL of the graphic please? TAH.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 27 Apr 2019, 06:43
by SpudmanWP
Cognitive EW = Freaking artificial intelligence????

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 27 Apr 2019, 07:42
by magitsu
SpudmanWP wrote:Cognitive EW = Freaking artificial intelligence????

Previous thread from 2016:
viewtopic.php?f=62&t=28880

Article that tries to answer directly to your question:
https://www.c4isrnet.com/c2-comms/2016/ ... c-warfare/

Or this one might be better:
http://interactive.aviationtoday.com/av ... -learning/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 27 Apr 2019, 13:35
by loke
"The Super Hornets the navy is buying are about $66 million a copy," says Gillian. "The F/A-18 continues to enjoy the lowest cost per flight hour of any [fighter] aircraft in the US inventory at $18,000 a flight hour."


https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... te-457459/

Are these numbers for real...?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 27 Apr 2019, 14:24
by viper12
I wonder if it was an early case of cognitive EW when F-35's ignored threats over 2 years ago : https://breakingdefense.com/2016/11/f-2 ... ges-awacs/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 27 Apr 2019, 19:36
by marsavian
loke wrote:
"The Super Hornets the navy is buying are about $66 million a copy," says Gillian. "The F/A-18 continues to enjoy the lowest cost per flight hour of any [fighter] aircraft in the US inventory at $18,000 a flight hour."


https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... te-457459/

Are these numbers for real...?


I think these are raw airframe+engine costs much like the generally quoted F-35 figures. Fully kitted out with all standard equipment you can probably add another $5-10m, the extra numbers are quoted in the DoD documents somewhere. I was more alerted by this rather bold Boeing claim among many others in that article ...

Block III Super Hornets also come with an external Block II Infrared Search and Track (IRST) sensor, which, when used by two aircraft at once, can create a targeting solution for an air-to-air missile. Boeing declines to say what the IRST's range is, but claims it is longer than adversaries' air-to-air radar.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 27 Apr 2019, 23:29
by SpudmanWP
loke wrote:
"The Super Hornets the navy is buying are about $66 million a copy," says Gillian. "The F/A-18 continues to enjoy the lowest cost per flight hour of any [fighter] aircraft in the US inventory at $18,000 a flight hour."


https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... te-457459/

Are these numbers for real...?


I know that USAF jets include a lot into their CPFH numbers, including basing costs. I am willing to bet that no carrier-related costs are included in the F-18.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 Apr 2019, 00:06
by hythelday
Meteor is marked as "Surface Warfare", as in naval surface warfare. Am I the only one unaware of Meteors air-to-sea mode? :D

Also, " multi ship IRST" marked for OCA/DCA: I think this is a solid confirmation of cueing AMRAAMs from BVR using IRST capability, even if it requires several F-35s.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 03 May 2019, 00:12
by Dragon029
https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AS/AS25 ... 190502.pdf

As of April 2019, more than 400 aircraft have been delivered and all LRIP Lot 10 deliveries are now complete.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 May 2019, 11:58
by citanon
F-35A price drop to $80 million for next lot?

https://www.defenseone.com/business/201 ... ef=d-river

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 May 2019, 14:29
by quicksilver
marsavian wrote:
loke wrote:
"The Super Hornets the navy is buying are about $66 million a copy," says Gillian. "The F/A-18 continues to enjoy the lowest cost per flight hour of any [fighter] aircraft in the US inventory at $18,000 a flight hour."


https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... te-457459/

Are these numbers for real...?


I think these are raw airframe+engine costs much like the generally quoted F-35 figures. Fully kitted out with all standard equipment you can probably add another $5-10m, the extra numbers are quoted in the DoD documents somewhere. I was more alerted by this rather bold Boeing claim among many others in that article ...

Block III Super Hornets also come with an external Block II Infrared Search and Track (IRST) sensor, which, when used by two aircraft at once, can create a targeting solution for an air-to-air missile. Boeing declines to say what the IRST's range is, but claims it is longer than adversaries' air-to-air radar.


I’d bet the 66M number is CFE only.

Update: I checked. The P-5 sheet does include some unspecified GFE, but is also non-specific about what items are CFE.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 08 May 2019, 18:56
by energo
29. April GAO report:

https://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-19-341

Action Needed to Improve Reliability and Prepare for
Modernization Efforts

What GAO Found
The F-35 program has made slow, sustained progress in improving the aircraft’s
reliability and maintainability (R&M). The F-35 aircraft (see figure) are assessed
against eight R&M metrics, which indicate how much time the aircraft will be in
maintenance rather than operations. Half of these metrics are not meeting
targets. While the Department of Defense (DOD) has a plan for improving R&M,
its guidance is not in line with GAO’s acquisition best practices or federal internal
control standards as it does not include specific, measurable objectives, align
improvement projects to meet those objectives, and prioritize funding. If the R&M
requirements are not met, the warfighter may have to settle for a less reliable
and more costly aircraft than originally envisioned.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 09 May 2019, 02:49
by Corsair1963
GAO/CBO Reports are rarely worth the paper they're printed on........

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 28 May 2019, 07:23
by weasel1962
In typical fashion, just 1 month after tying LRIP 1-11 numbers neatly, someone just had to order 2 more. Now 501 per May 2019 fast facts.

https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... 5_2019.pdf

weasel1962 wrote:April 2019 fast facts per link below. Managed to reconcile the full 499 orders for lots 1-11 reflected in the updates

https://www.f35.com/assets/uploads/docu ... s_4_19.pdf

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 30 May 2019, 16:34
by spazsinbad
Middle East demand could boost F-35 sales to 4,600 units: Lockheed
29 May 2019 Garrett Reim

"Lockheed Martin believes that worldwide sales of the F-35 Lightning II stealth fighter could reach 4,600 units, a 15% increase from its previous projection.

The company said as recently as 24 May that it projected the F-35 to have a lifetime sales potential of 4,000 aircraft. The current programme of record for the F-35 is around 3,200 examples; though that count includes planned purchases as well as signed orders.

Ultimately, interest in the combat aircraft, including potential orders from Middle Eastern countries, could boost the programme’s total lifetime sales, said Marillyn Hewson, chief executive of Lockheed Martin, at an investors conference on 29 May...."

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... -u-458548/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 04 Jun 2019, 02:05
by spazsinbad
F-35 Enterprise Delivers 400th F-35 and Fleet Surpasses 200,000 Flight Hours
03 Jun 2019 LM PR

"FORT WORTH, Texas, June 3, 2019 – The F-35 fleet has achieved 200,000 flight hours across global operations, a significant milestone demonstrating the program’s progress and growing maturity. Within the same week, the F-35 Joint Program Office and Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) also delivered the 400th production F-35....

...The 400th production aircraft is a U.S. Air Force F-35A, to be delivered to Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The production total is comprised of 283 F-35A, 87 F-35B and 30 F-35C deliveries. The 200,000 flight hours includes all F-35s in the fleet comprised of developmental test jets, training, operational, U.S. and international aircraft. Among the three variants, approximately 125,850 hours were flown by the F-35A, 52,410 hours by the F-35B and 22,630 by the F-35C....

...To date, 400 F-35s have been delivered and are now operating from 17 bases worldwide. More than 780 pilots and over 7,500 maintainers are trained. Ten nations are flying the F-35, eight countries have F-35s operating from a base on their home soil, seven services have declared Initial Operating Capability, and three services have announced their F-35s have been used in combat operations."

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/f-35-en ... ight-hours


Also: https://aviationweek.com/defense/handsh ... ice-target
"...If finalized, the “handshake” agreement would lower the cost of a currently $89.3 million F-35A by 8.8%, or $7.86 million each, from LRIP 11 to LRIP 12...."

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 10 Jun 2019, 22:14
by citanon
New contract. 8.8% price drop:

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa- ... SKCN1TB27T

The Pentagon said over three years the agreement will be worth $34 billion for 478 F-35 fighter jets. It is preliminary and a final deal is expected to be sealed in August for the 12th batch of jets, one of the most expensive aircraft ever produced.

The preliminary agreement details the first year, and lays out agreed upon options for two additional years. The options are there because official purchases cannot be made until the U.S. Congress approves an annual budget for those years.

This year’s agreement will lower the cost of each F-35A, the most common version of the aircraft, to $81.35 million, Under Secretary of Defense Ellen Lord said, down from $89.2 million under a deal inked in August 2018.

Under the options covering the second and third years of the purchase, the price of each jet will drop below $80 million, Lord said. In those later years production would be around 160 jets per year.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 10 Jun 2019, 22:46
by SpudmanWP
I still laugh when I think of all the members of the ABJ crowd who claimed that the F-35 would never get cheaper than $100 mil.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 10 Jun 2019, 22:47
by sprstdlyscottsmn
there has to be something missing. That is an average of $71M across all variants. You can't build a new F-16V for that price. Okay you can, but that's about it.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 10 Jun 2019, 23:05
by SpudmanWP
I think there is a typo somewhere as NO WAY IN HELL it "averages" $71 mil, especially given the higher cost of the F-35B/C versions.

What I think is happening is that the "Less than $80 mil" quote is accurate but the total "handshake" cost only relates to LM's portion, not P&W's.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 10 Jun 2019, 23:32
by SpudmanWP
I am amazed (no I'm not) that no journalist did a quick napkin calc and then asked why the "average" was $71 when they had the chance.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 11 Jun 2019, 01:06
by Corsair1963
Lockheed, Pentagon reach handshake agreement on next F-35 lot, paving the way for an $80M jet next year

By: Aaron Mehta and Valerie Insinna

WASHINGTON — Lockheed Martin and the U.S. Department of Defense have reached a handshake agreement on the next lot of F-35 joint strike fighters, an agreement that for the first time includes options for customers to purchase additional aircraft over the next few years.

In a statement, Pentagon acquisition head Ellen Lord called the agreement, worth $34 billion over lots 12, 13 and 14 for 478 aircraft, a “historic milestone.”

The agreement includes 157 jets in lot 12, and comes with an estimated 8.8 percent Unit Recurring Flyaway cost savings from the previous lot. While the Pentagon did not provide costs per aircraft in its news release, that would amount to about $81 million per F-35A conventional takeoff and landing model compared to $89.2 million for an F-35A in lot 11.

Lord estimated that the cost will drop around 15 percent from lot 11 to lot 14 across all variants, which could peg an A model at around $76 million.

“This framework estimates the delivery of an F-35A for less than $80M in Lot 13, one year earlier than planned," Lord said. "This agreement symbolizes my commitment to aggressively reduce F-35 cost, incentivize Industry to meet required performance, and to deliver the greatest capabilities to our warfighters at the best value to our taxpayers.”

The price of the F-35B short takeoff and landing variant and F-35C carrier variant also dropped in lot 12, said Greg Ulmer, Lockheed Martin’s F-35 head.

[...]

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/air/2019/06 ... iyear-buy/

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 11 Jun 2019, 01:09
by Corsair1963
The F-15EX is looking less and less attractive.....Going to be hard to sell that to Congress! :wink:

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 11 Jun 2019, 03:53
by SpudmanWP
The HASC only authorized two until dev is done IIRC. By that time this whole thing could blow over as actual Block 4.1 F-35s are rolling off the line.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 11 Jun 2019, 04:31
by Corsair1963
Well, the House Democrats don't want to spend more than $733 Billion on the Defense Budget. While, the Republicans requested $750 Billion. Yet, the Democrats have control of the House. (the Senate - Republicans)


So, odds are they will settle on a compromise of some sort??? Which, means something will have to be cut! Not saying the F-15EX but it would make sense....

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 18 Jun 2019, 10:43
by spazsinbad
Greg Ulmer LM Provides Valerie Insinna Info Cheapest F-35 Ever https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFROj6-oJWg


Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2019, 14:56
by doge
:salute: Thank you for your hard work, Vice Adm. Winter!
http://www.jsf.mil/news/Releases/PressR ... 1-2019.pdf
F-35 Lightning II Program
Release – 07.11.2019
New Program Executive for F-35 Lightning II Office
Outgoing F-35 Program Executive Officer Reflects on Program Accomplishments
With a commitment to carry the program forward, a new leader took charge of the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program Office during a ceremony at the U.S. Navy Memorial, July 11, Washington D.C.

A veteran of leading multifaceted defense acquisition programs, Lt. Gen. Eric Fick assumed the watch from Vice Adm. Mat Winter, as the Program Executive Officer for the F-35 program. The F-35 Lightning II Joint Program Office is the Department of Defense’s agency responsible for developing and acquiring the F-35A/B/C, the nextgeneration strike aircraft weapon system for the United States Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and twelve allied and partner nations.

General Fick entered the Air Force in September of 1990 after graduating from the University of Notre Dame with a Bachelor’s degree in Aerospace Engineering. He has served as a logistics plans and programs officer, F-16 mechanical systems engineer, computational fluid dynamics research engineer, Joint System Program Office Chief of Test, Air Staff Branch Chief, and as the Deputy Chief of the Air Force Senate Liaison Office. General Fick has commanded at the squadron and group level and served twice as an Air Force Program Executive Officer. Additionally, he has logged more than 350 hours in the T-38, F-15, F-16, and other military and civilian Experimental aircraft.

Prior to his current assignment, as Deputy PEO, General Fick was the Director of Global Reach Programs for the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition, where he was responsible for the $5.6 billion airlift, air refueling, training, and special operations.

As deputy PEO for the past two years, Fick became quite familiar with the current state of the program and its vast complexity. Fick thanked Winter for his determined leadership, vision and success across the program during his lead.

"Since he took helm of the F-35 program in 2017, Vice Admiral Winter has been passionate about ensuring the F35 Program’s three lines of effort: Production, Development and Sustainment, were met to the highest standards, while meeting the challenges with vigor and constantly striving for excellence. His acquisition leadership has been steadfast, effective and decisive," said Fick. "His leadership skills with key F-35 enterprise stakeholders, steered us on a course for the ultimate mission accomplishment – bringing the best weapons system possible to the warfighter."

As the F-35 PEO, Winter was responsible for overseeing the $428 billion program which simultaneously developed, tested and fielded three next generation strike fighter aircraft for the U.S. Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, eight international partners and four foreign military sale countries.

Winter's departure as PEO also coincides with his retirement after 35 years of United States Navy service. With the change in PEO from U.S. Navy to U.S. Air Force, the program's Service Acquisition Executive switches from Air Force to Navy, with Assistant Secretary of the Navy, James Geurts, assuming the duties.

“We have proven the F-35’s lethality as it has effectively carried out combat missions and participated in several multinational exercises, where it dominates the battlespace”, said Winter. “Our commitment remains to deliver affordable, effective F-35 air systems that ensure the taxpayer’s investment provides the warfighter with the tools to keep our nation safe. The F-35 Enterprise is growing its strategic importance around the world.”

“As the operational tempo increased, the requirement to modernize the F-35 Fleet becomes critical. We are embracing true agile acquisition processes, and are transitioning from a developmental and initial production environment to a full-rate production and continuous software modernization environment, delivering technically feasible, operationally relevant capability,” added Winter.

"It has been an honor to serve alongside so many great leaders and support our nation and allies," said Winter. "The F- 35 weapon system is now operational and forward deployed around the world. The size of the fleet continues to grow and we are rapidly expanding its capability. The F-35 is a game-changer for the air combat superiority of the United States and its allies and partners, - and will be for decades to come - I know the program is in good hands as we transition leadership today to Lt. Gen. Fick."

Winter reflects on his tenure with the program

"The F-35 program is more than a program; it is truly a global enterprise built upon a broad spectrum of stakeholders joined together by a common goal - to support the warfighter with dominating capabilities," Winter explains. "When I first became the F-35 program PEO, I gave our warfighters, stakeholders, and JPO teammates my commitment to provide timely continuous communications, make prudent transparent decisions, and deliver on our commitments through crisp, accountable execution. These core tenets of my commander's intent focused our thinking as we transitioned to the follow on development phase, ramped up to full rate production and expanded global sustainment operations for the growing F-35 fleets and forces.”

“As the ‘quarterback’ for the joint force, the F-35 provides new transformational capabilities that will fundamentally change the way our nation’s military operates around the globe,” said Winter. “More than a fighter jet, the F-35’s ability to collect, analyze and share data is a powerful force multiplier that enhances all airborne, sea, and groundbased assets in the battlespace, while ensuring our warfighters can execute their mission and return home safe.”

“The F-35 program plays a central role in our National Defense Strategy which calls for building a more lethal joint force, strengthening global alliances, and reforming business practices to enhance affordability. The F-35 weapons system is a multi-mission, next-generation strike fighter that provides our warfighters unmatched, gamechanging technology in the domains of sensing, stealth, penetration, strike and interoperability.”

“The unique F-35 Partnership brings together our three U.S. Services (USAF, USMC, USN), with our eight Partner nations (UK, IT, NLD, TUR, CAN, AUS, DNK, NOR), and four Foreign Military Sales customers (ISR, JPN, ROK, BEL); each of whom are integral to the planning and execution of the complete F-35 program. The F-35’s projected service life extends out for more than 50 years (2075+), and to ensure the aircraft remains combatready and ahead of adversaries, the enterprise will continually deliver enhanced capability to the warfighter with a focus on affordability and speed,” said Winter.

Pride in the accomplishments and hard work of the F-35 Enterprise

The F-35 weapons system is meeting all of its performance requirements. In 2018, the F-35 program completed the most comprehensive, rigorous, and safest developmental flight test program in aviation history. More than 9,200 sorties, 17,000 flight hours, and 65,000 test points were achieved to verify the design, durability, software, sensors, weapons capability and performance for all three F-35 variants. Ninety-one F-35s were delivered during calendar year 2018, a nearly 40% increase from the previous year. More than 55 aircraft have been delivered so far this year and we’re on track to deliver 131 in 2019.

The F-35 global alliances and capabilities continue to grow. Milestones for the program’s International Partners from May 2017 to July 2019 include: First Aircraft Arrivals (FAA) for Norway, the United Kingdom, Japan, and Australia; declarations of Initial Operating Capability (IOC) for Israel, Italy and the United Kingdom; and training for Korean Maintenance personnel began in January at Eglin AFB in Florida.

In 2019, F-35 flight testing continues in support of phased capability improvements and modernization of the F-35 air system. This agile framework, known as Continuous Capability Development and Delivery (C2D2), provides timely, affordable, incremental warfighting capability through technically feasible, operationally relevant improvements to maintain air dominance against evolving threats to the United States and its allies.

More than 400 F-35s are currently in the global fleet, and by the end of 2019 there will be almost 500 air systems delivered. Production ramp-up will continue as operational testing concludes this summer and the program enters a full-rate production decision in the fall. To prepare for this major production ramp, production experts from across the United States government are working with industry partners to lean out production process flow, increase production quality, deliver parts on time and at reduced cost. To achieve these efficiencies, the program has incorporated a number of performance initiatives and incentives across the entire supply chain to support F35 production lines in Italy, Japan and the United States.

The F-35A unit cost now sits under $89 million, the lowest price to date for the program

Driving down cost is critical to the success of this program and the cost of each fighter is steadily declining. For the twelfth consecutive year, the average cost of an F-35 was lowered. More specifically, unit costs for the F-35B and F35C were lowered to $115.5 million and $107.7 million, respectively; representing a 5.7% and 11.1% reduction from previous lot aircraft – making these unit costs the lowest to date. In fact, the most common variant of the fighter now costs no more to build than the latest version of the Cold War fighters it is replacing. While at the helm, Winter’s leadership drove the price down about 14% across all 3 variants and 3 production lots.

Goals and Challenges

The F-35 Enterprise is embracing true agile acquisition processes, and is transitioning from a developmental and initial production environment to a full-rate production and continuous modernization environment, while simultaneously sustaining a substantial growth of global operations. -- This environment requires the F-35 Program to remain focused, with a true sense of urgency, to build on successes and become more agile to support the warfighter.

“To support the F-35 global fleet and the Secretary of Defense’s directive to attain an 80 percent mission capability rate for the operational fleet by the end of 2019, government, international allies, and industry representatives are increasing spare part supplies, accelerating depot activations, and implementing reliability and maintainability improvement plans to ensure maintainers get the parts they need, when they need them, to sustain F-35s more efficiently,” said Winter. “To speed up repairs and lower costs, we are leveraging government capabilities at fleet readiness and air logistics centers and we are empowering flight line workers with greater authority to streamline standard maintenance actions. Though these combined sustainment and logistic actions and initiatives will improve overall F-35 readiness for the warfighter, we still face considerable challenges to realize these goals.”

“2018 was a very good year and thus far, 2019 has already surpassed last year’s accomplishments with many more to come. However, challenges remain to affordability and timely capability delivery. The threats and adversaries we face today are more complex and advanced than ever before. The F-35’s success is of vital importance to our National security. The F-35 enhances our international alliances and is a critical nexus for future coalition operations. It is a vast, complex, rapidly growing and accelerating program that is moving in the right direction,” added Winter. “Our steadfast focus is on the continued advancement, development, delivery, and sustainment of an affordable global F-35 weapons system that supports the peace and, if called upon to do so, swiftly and decisively wins the fight every time.”

“As my tour as the Program Executive Officer of the F-35 Joint Program Office comes to an end, I could not be more proud of the teams’ efforts across the Enterprise. We are in a great place for the program – and the momentum that has driven us forward, will no doubt continue to deliver affordable, effective capabilities to our warfighter,” Winter concluded.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 14 Sep 2019, 18:40
by bjr1028
Corsair1963 wrote:The F-15EX is looking less and less attractive.....Going to be hard to sell that to Congress! :wink:



Air Force will fight tooth and nail for them. This is a proxy fight about F-X.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 14 Sep 2019, 21:16
by marsavian
bjr1028 wrote:
Corsair1963 wrote:The F-15EX is looking less and less attractive.....Going to be hard to sell that to Congress! :wink:


Air Force will fight tooth and nail for them. This is a proxy fight about F-X.


Could you elaborate and expand on this please ? Are you saying F-X will be in competition with F-35 or that F-X will eventually replace all F-15 and the more to be replaced the better for F-X ?

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 15 Sep 2019, 23:48
by Corsair1963
bjr1028 wrote:
Corsair1963 wrote:The F-15EX is looking less and less attractive.....Going to be hard to sell that to Congress! :wink:



Air Force will fight tooth and nail for them. This is a proxy fight about F-X.



I hate to break it to you but the USAF never wanted the F-15EX. It was pushed on them by the OSD... :doh:

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Sep 2019, 00:45
by sferrin
This.

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 16 Sep 2019, 08:55
by weasel1962
Sep 1 fast facts. 425 delivered, 890 pilots and 8230 maintainers trained.
https://www.f35.com/assets/uploads/docu ... 9_2019.pdf

New commercial, nice vid.
https://www.f35.com/news/detail/the-f-3 ... -connected

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 29 Oct 2019, 23:48
by Dragon029
An agreement for Lots 12-14 have finally been signed; the F-35A is now down to $77.9 million flyaway.

https://www.f35.com/news/detail/pentago ... by-12.8-pe

Image

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 13 Nov 2019, 17:00
by marsavian

Re: F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 14 Nov 2019, 07:29
by SpudmanWP
Subcommittees on Readiness and Tactical Air and Land Forces Joint Hearing: “F-35 Program Update: Sustainment, Production, and Affordability Challenges”

Homepage (with video)
https://armedservices.house.gov/hearing ... 8024D80798

Congressional Library with biography and statement PDFs.
https://www.congress.gov/event/116th-co ... 84?s=3&r=3