Page 5 of 29

Unread postPosted: 16 Jan 2010, 17:47
by energo
Nicely spotted SpudmanWP.

A pdf on the F-35s ALGS framework; Autonomic Logistics Global Sustainment.

Source: http://lean.mit.edu/index.php?option=co ... Itemid=776

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 16 Jan 2010, 20:11
by neptune
energo wrote:Nicely spotted SpudmanWP.

A pdf on the F-35s ALGS framework; Autonomic Logistics Global Sustainment.

Source: http://lean.mit.edu/index.php?option=co ... Itemid=776

B. Bolsøy
Oslo
I have called the Raptor and the Lightning "software a/c". But I am rethinking that the "35" may be an order of magnitude different. After looking at the ALGS, I have started thinking about having 10 - 15 similar (frankenstein) planes downloading the systems logs after each flight into the databases. Applying our predictive and preventative analyses to the data and reporting to the maintenance and operations groups is "stunning!". As the blocks evolve and the the manufacturing increases and the number of flights continue to grow, the database analysis is staggering in potential to refine components, systems and configurations. The thought of 2,500 planes downloading after every flight and auto-analysing is "mind blowing" for maintenance and operations. The impact to manufacturing, parts stocking and distribution, maintenance and maintenance training is going to be revolutionary. The quantum leap from legacy systems to the future (F-35) is comparable to the desktop adding machine to the current quad core laptop. I'm beginning to doubt the ability of the review organizations to appreciate the impact of these features in their comparison of legacy planes and systems to this evolutionary designed system. Kind of like comparing a Spad to a F-18E. :shock:

Unread postPosted: 23 Feb 2010, 02:33
by SpudmanWP
Props to ELP

http://ericpalmer.wordpress.com/2010/02 ... mmunicate/

For finding this October/November 2009 Monthly Assessment Report (production, not flight testing) from the JPO office.

Lots of good info that is not normally seen (contains a decent amount of redaction)

Jul09 - Oct09 are here:
http://www.insidedefense.com/secure/defense_extra.asp

--EDIT---
ELP tracked down the November 2009 one also, attached.

.

Unread postPosted: 02 Mar 2010, 00:16
by lb
Dr Carter orders full rate production moved to 2015. Here is the Feb 24th Memorandum:

JSF - Inventing Joint Strike Fighter - Dr. Paul Bevilaqua

Unread postPosted: 20 Mar 2010, 08:34
by spazsinbad
JSF - Inventing the Joint Strike Fighter Dr. Paul Bevilaqua - Lockheed Martin Skunk Works - 12 Oct 2009

http://www.nps.edu/Academics/Institutes ... ighter.pdf (4.5Mb)

RE: JSF - Inventing Joint Strike Fighter - Dr. Paul Bevilaqu

Unread postPosted: 20 Mar 2010, 09:53
by spazsinbad
This link is not to a document as such but it will help explain (more tomorrow apparently with a video) about the above document:

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-d ... -f-35.html

RE: JSF - Inventing Joint Strike Fighter - Dr. Paul Bevilaqu

Unread postPosted: 22 Mar 2010, 19:22
by spazsinbad
3 videos of lecture here - I guess the PDF above is useful as notes for lecture?:

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-d ... -by-s.html

VIDEO: History of the F-35 by Skunk Works inventor (3 parts) By Stephen Trimble on March 22, 2010

"The DEW Line is pleased to offer a three-part video showing a fascinating (albeit poorly-lit), 1hr lecture on the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, presented last week by Skunk Works engineer Paul Bevilaqua at Johns Hopkins University's applied physics laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. Bevilaqua is credited with the invention of Lockheed Martin's shaft-driven lift-fan, the core technology allowing the short-takeoff-vertical-landing (STOVL) F-35B. The first part of the lecture is below, and click on the jump to view the other two parts."

Lecture part 1 .FLV video 78Mb
Lecture part 2 .FLV video 85Mb
Lecture part 3 .FLV video 43Mb
________________________________

total time 65min / total size 206Mb

Re: RE: JSF - Inventing Joint Strike Fighter - Dr. Paul Bevi

Unread postPosted: 23 Mar 2010, 22:47
by energo
Nice work spazsinbad!


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

RE: Re: RE: JSF - Inventing Joint Strike Fighter - Dr. Paul

Unread postPosted: 01 Apr 2010, 03:21
by SpudmanWP
I came across the 2009 (December 1-3) Aircraft Structural Integrity Program Conference. There are many presentations about the F-35 ground and bird-strike testing.

Webpage: http://www.asipcon.com/Proceedings/2009 ... agenda.asp

I did not upload the "Finite Element Analysis Validation for STOVL" report because it was to large (11mb). Here is the link.
http://www.asipcon.com/Proceedings/2009 ... /P2800.pdf

--update--

I found a good article from the 2008 Conference (again, too large to upload) on Bonded Control Surfaces.
http://www.asipcon.com/2008proceedings/ ... /P1746.pdf

.

RE: Re: RE: JSF - Inventing Joint Strike Fighter - Dr. Paul

Unread postPosted: 01 Apr 2010, 05:38
by spazsinbad
Thanks Spuddie, one graphic caught my eye (similar height drop from a video seen about testing Hornet for Carrier Landings). I guess the graphic is to scale.... from page 4 of "JSF_Brief_20091201_-_ASIP_Conf_-_CTOL_and_STOVL_Static_Tests.pdf"

Re: RE: Re: RE: JSF - Inventing Joint Strike Fighter - Dr. P

Unread postPosted: 01 Apr 2010, 23:58
by LMAggie
SpudmanWP wrote:I came across the 2009 (December 1-3) Aircraft Structural Integrity Program Conference. There are many presentations about the F-35 ground and bird-strike testing.

Webpage: http://www.asipcon.com/Proceedings/2009 ... agenda.asp

I did not upload the "Finite Element Analysis Validation for STOVL" report because it was to large (11mb). Here is the link.
http://www.asipcon.com/Proceedings/2009 ... /P2800.pdf

--update--

I found a good article from the 2008 Conference (again, too large to upload) on Bonded Control Surfaces.
http://www.asipcon.com/2008proceedings/ ... /P1746.pdf

.


These are just a few of the many victories and successes that go unnoticed by the public and the critics. Glad to see them posted for ASIP conference.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: JSF - Inventing Joint Strike Fighter - D

Unread postPosted: 02 Apr 2010, 01:58
by SpudmanWP
This is one of the reasons why I think the JPO should put every Presentation, cleared through it's office, on it's website (with audio if possible) as soon as it is cleared.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2010, 19:41
by SpudmanWP
01 April 2010
LM Fast Facts

Original Location: Available Here

Is there anyone awake at the LM PR dept? You would think they would wait at least till the 2nd before releasing this. :)

Key points:
1. STOVL operations
2. First use of Gen2 Helmet
.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2010, 21:23
by sextusempiricus
SpudmanWP wrote:01 April 2010
LM Fast Facts

Original Location: Available Here

Is there anyone awake at the LM PR dept? You would think they would wait at least till the 2nd before releasing this. :)

Key points:
1. STOVL operations
2. First use of Gen2 Helmet
.


Oh, man, LM's PR department has been living and peddling one long April Fool's for years. I especially liked that they're still quoting this:

• F-35A upper-$40 million
• F-35B mid-$60 million
• F-35C mid-$60 million

And then there was this head-scratcher:

• Software development is on schedule, more than 70 percent complete.
• Software development more than 80 percent complete.

Wow, just, wow...

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2010, 22:33
by SpudmanWP
The devil is in the details.

That cost quote is:
Average Unit Recurring Flyaway Cost (in FY 2002 dollars – the most recent comprehensive estimate)
F-35A upper-$40 million
F-35B mid-$60 million
F-35C mid-$60 million


There is nothing wrong with that estimation. It is based on the REC flyaway in FY2002 dollars. The recent news articles about soaring costs have been in Then Year dollars (with inflation added) and for total program cost, not just REC Flyaway.

As to the Software Development typo, they have been making that typo since Nov '09.

On the Sep 2009 Fast Facts PDF, the 70 percent line was there. In the Nov '09 PDF, they added the 80 percent line, but forgot to delete the 70% one. Both lines have been there ever since Nov '09.