F-35 Program Docs

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spazsinbad

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Unread post10 Apr 2018, 01:58

Thanks Dragon. I can remove the watermark (with Acrobat 2017 Pro) so I'll do that and re-attach here soonish....

addition from below post by dragon
YEAH I get confused by the number/years etc. I'm glad someone in the USofA knows how thisall works including DATES!
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354082274-F-35-SAR-2017-18SAR.pdf
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Last edited by spazsinbad on 10 Apr 2018, 02:16, edited 1 time in total.
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Dragon029

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Unread post10 Apr 2018, 02:11

I just realised we've both uploaded the old FY2018 .pdfs to this site; I can't download the FY2019 one just yet (bring_it_on doesn't have downloading enabled on this file), but here's the file from the source anyway; I'll remove the watermark later:
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04062018_jsf.pdf
F-35 FY2019 SAR [watermarked]
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Dragon029

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Unread post10 Apr 2018, 07:25

And here's a version without the watermarks:
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FY2019 PB F-35 SAR.pdf
FY2019 President's Budget F-35 Selected Acquisition Report
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spazsinbad

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Unread post10 Apr 2018, 07:50

Thanks for that. I'll have to remember that 2018 SAR is fiscal year 2019 or die trying - probably the latter, OUTRAGEOUS!
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Unread post10 Apr 2018, 16:12

Thanks for the fixes and removing the watermark. I only had the one link, and posted it while I was at work.
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Unread post11 Apr 2018, 06:06

Noted discrepancy between navy procurement quantities (pg 46 of SAR) with contract values (pgs 87/89 of SAR) after lot 8. Lot 9 and 10 per navy funding was for 10 and 21. Lot 9 per contract was 42-A, 13-B (7 non-US) and 2-C so 8 instead of 10. Lot 10 per contract was 78-A, 14-B (5 non-US)and 2-C so 11 instead of 21 resulting in a net difference of 13. Lot 11 appears back to consistency, if final, as contract negotiation for 18-B, 8C appears consistent with 26 per navy funding until an amendment changed the total procurement from 74 to 91.
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Unread post20 Apr 2018, 16:05

Latest CRS report:


The F-35 is currently in low-rate initial production, with 280 aircraft delivered as of April 2018. At least 250 of those were in U.S. service. Four to five aircraft are currently delivered each month, with the production rate scheduled to increase to 120 per year by 2019. In keeping with the acquisition plan that overlapped development and production (known as “concurrency”), the F-35 was also in system development and demonstration (SDD), with testing and software development ongoing, from October 2001 until April 11, 2018. The SDD phase will formally continue until the end of Initial Operational Test and Evaluation, when a “Milestone C” full-rate production decision will be made.

Much more at the jump (Report attached)
https://fas.org/sgp/crs/weapons/RL30563.pdf
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RL30563[1].pdf
F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Program
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Unread post09 May 2018, 15:12

LM F-35 Fast Facts 09 May 2018: https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... 2018_2.pdf (1.1Mb)
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f-35_fast_facts_-_may_2018_2.pdf
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Unread post14 May 2018, 16:45

LM F-35 Fast Facts 14 May 2018: https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... y_2018.pdf (1.1Mb)
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f-35_fast_facts_-_may_2018.pdf
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Unread post05 Jun 2018, 20:32

F-35 JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER: Development Is Nearly Complete, but Deficiencies Found in Testing Need to Be Resolved

https://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-18-321
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Unread post05 Jun 2018, 20:40

The GAO should be renamed the COC (Captain Obvious Committee).

The JPO is already working on them and the first C2D2 drop is scheduled in about a month.
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Unread post14 Jun 2018, 09:50

LM F-35 Fast Facts 13 Jun 2018: https://a855196877272cb14560-2a4fa819a6 ... e_2018.pdf (1.1Mb)
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f-35_fast_facts_-_june_2018.pdf
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Unread post20 Jun 2018, 16:29

http://aviationweek.com/combat-aircraft ... ernization
Congress Maintains Support For F-35 Production And Modernization
Jun 14, 2018 Jen DiMascio | Aviation Week & Space Technology
Despite lingering concerns about development of the Pentagon’s $406 billion F-35, the U.S. Congress is poised to pour money into production, retrofits and a new set of software upgrades. The fifth-generation fighter manufactured by Lockheed Martin is rapidly approaching a series of important milestones. Initial operational test and evaluation (IOTE) is scheduled to start in September or October and run through the summer of the following year. Meanwhile, the Navy’s F-35C variant ...

GAO...
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Unread post20 Jun 2018, 17:24

doge wrote:http://aviationweek.com/combat-aircraft/congress-maintains-support-f-35-production-and-modernization
Congress Maintains Support For F-35 Production And Modernization
Jun 14, 2018 Jen DiMascio | Aviation Week & Space Technology
Despite lingering concerns about development of the Pentagon’s $406 billion F-35, the U.S. Congress is poised to pour money into production, retrofits and a new set of software upgrades. The fifth-generation fighter manufactured by Lockheed Martin is rapidly approaching a series of important milestones. Initial operational test and evaluation (IOTE) is scheduled to start in September or October and run through the summer of the following year. Meanwhile, the Navy’s F-35C variant ...

GAO...


Meanwhile, the Navy’s F-35C variant is to be declared operational by February 2019. And by October of 2019, the Pentagon intends to declare the F-35 fully operational.

But it faces challenges in getting there. The U.S. Government Accountability Office’s (GAO) 2018 report on the program points out that before it hits that final production decision, the Pentagon will need to “resolve critical deficiencies.”

Congress is likely to provide money to help that effort. The House Appropriations Committee is so flush it has approved $674.6 billion for the Defense Department in fiscal 2019. And while times are good, the committee plans to allot even more money for F-35 procurement and development than the government requested—$9.4 billion to buy 93 F-35s, which is 16 more aircraft than the administration asked for. And the defense subcommittee, led by Republican Rep. Kay Granger, who represents the Fort Worth, Texas, district where the Joint Strike Fighter is made, recommends spending $1.2 billion for continued development and modernization of the F-35. The bill, approved by the full appropriations committee June 13, must still be passed in the House and reconciled with a companion bill in the Senate.

With that money, the Defense Department still has a lot of work to do. The Pentagon did not initially agree to “fix” all deficiencies with the fighter until after the production decision. Instead, the Pentagon agreed to “resolve” the issues raised in the report. The semantic difference between “resolve” and “fix” allows the Pentagon more flexibility to find alternative solutions rather than simply technical corrections, the military says. “Accordingly, we revised our recommendation,” the GAO noted, urging that the program “resolve” the issues before full-rate production.

Vice Adm. Mat Winter, program executive officer of the F-35 program, elaborates, saying that the U.S. and its international partners track and prioritize the program’s difficulties. “The Department of Defense expects the F-35 program to resolve all critical deficiencies prior to entering Initial Operational Test and Evaluation, with either a fix, a Service Operational Test Agency-approved work-around or a formal acceptance of the deficiency,” Winter says. After operational test and evaluation, the Defense Acquisition Executive will review the program for full-rate production, which would include a plan for any issues that would be deferred until after development of the program officially ends.

Even the hint of allowing potential design flaws to linger into full production gives good-government organizations such as GAO pause, given the F-35’s history. The program embarked on initial production before testing was complete. That practice, known as concurrency, has cost the government at least $1.4 billion. Already, 213 F-35s need retrofits to fix issues spotted during training, and by the time IOTE is completed, the program office estimates 501 aircraft will have been produced. Failing to fix deficiencies before full-rate production could add additional costs, the GAO said.

The GAO wants the F-35 Joint Program Office to identify the steps needed for the combat aircraft to meet reliability and maintainability requirements. The program is close to meeting targets for four of its metrics, but it is still not measuring up, and its performance changed little over the last year, according to the GAO.

Greg Ulmer, general manager of the F-35 program for Lockheed Martin, says the F-35’s reliability keeps improving. “Newer aircraft are averaging greater than 60% availability, with some squadrons consistently at or above 70% availability,” he says. “All variants of the F-35 are currently exceeding the reliability specifications at this point on the maturity growth curve. We support the need for a robust reliability and maintainability program to ensure improvements stay on track to enhance readiness and reduce cost.”

The Senate Armed Services Committee version of a defense policy gives the program a gentle scolding—seeking quarterly updates on the program as it faces sustainment, modification and modernization issues, since the number of aircraft is planned to triple over the next three years. And although the committee is “concerned by the enormous retrofit costs required on the program,” it will authorize additional funding.

In addition to ongoing technical issues, the GAO is urging Congress to withhold money for the start of the F-35’s next big software upgrade, known as Block 4. The Defense Department is asking for $273 million for the modernization effort. The GAO would like Congress to fence funding to compel a report that would provide an independent cost estimate for the upgrades, technology readiness assessments, plans for test and evaluation and systems engineering, a preliminary design review and an approved acquisition strategy.

The Senate is not withholding money to compel the F-35 Joint Program Office to provide information about Block 4 modernization, saying it has received the business case information from the Pentagon. Retrofits to aircraft produced through the first eight production lots would cost $16 million each; F-35s produced in lots 9 and 10 would cost $13 million to upgrade. With that cost in mind, the Senate is now asking which F-35 the services intend to upgrade to the Block 4 configuration.
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rheonomic

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Unread post21 Jun 2018, 03:28

I don't know if this is the right thread to post this or not, but there's going to be a special track at the AIAA AVIATION conference next week on the F-35 design: F-35 Lightning II – From Concept to Cockpit

I believe each talk has a corresponding paper.

The F-35 is the most advanced fighter aircraft ever built. With stealth technology, advanced sensors, weapons capacity and range, the F-35 is the most lethal, survivable and connected fighter aircraft flying in the skies today.

For the first time ever, the F-35 Lightning II – From Concept to Cockpit speaker series, held at AIAA AVIATION FORUM, will provide a comprehensive, behind-the-scenes look at the government and industry effort to deliver the F-35’s transformational capabilities to men and women in uniform.

With 18 papers, presentations, videos and more, the team will tell the entire story behind what it took to design, develop, demonstrate, test and deliver the F-35.
"You could do that, but it would be wrong."
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