Overview of F-35 test flights

Unread postPosted: 08 May 2007, 21:19
by Lieven
I'm trying to keep an overview of all AA-1 test flights. If you have any updates, special remarks about a certain flight or new dates please post them here.

  • #1: 15 Dec 2006 (Jon Beesley) [<a href="f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-6861.html">forum discussion</a>]
  • #2: 08 Jan 2007 [<a href="f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-7080.html">forum discussion</a>]
  • #3: 10 Jan 2007
  • #4: 23 Jan 2007
  • #5: 24 Jan 2007
  • #6: 29 Jan 2007
  • #7: 30 Jan 2007
  • #8: 05 Mar 2007
  • #9: 13 Mar 2007 (First afterburner take-off and first 360º rolls)
  • #10: 04 April 2007 (First HMD flight)
  • #11: 05 April 2007
  • #12: 11 April 2007 (Jeff Knowles' first flight) [<a href="f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-8014.html">forum discussion</a>]
  • #13: 12 April 2007 (Jon Beesley - First touch-and-go landing)
  • #14: 18 April 2007 [<a href="f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-8111.html">forum discussion</a>]
  • #15: 26 April 2007 (Jeff Knowles) [<a href="f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-8111.html">forum discussion</a>]
  • #16: 26 April 2007 (Jeff Knowles)
  • #17: 27 April 2007 (Jon Beesley) (1st time > 1 flight test in 24 hrs)
  • #18: 02 May 2007
  • #19: 03 May 2007 (Jeff Knowles - In-flight power failure) [<a href="f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-8137.html">forum discussion</a>]
  • #20: 07 Dec 2007 (Tested engine performance and aircraft handling qualities at up to 20,000 feet as pilots and crew prepare for air refueling in the coming weeks)
  • #21: 13 Dec 2007 (We think Jon Beesley was PIC and the chase plane was an Edwards AFB test F-16. Probably another fuel dump flight.)
  • #22: 18 Dec 2007 (Beesley)
  • #23: 19 Dec 2007 (Knowles)
  • #24: 08, 09 or 10 Jan 2008 (Knowles as PIC and Beesley as chase.)
  • #25: 10 Jan 2008 (Beesley)
  • #26: 30 Jan 2008 (Lt. Col. James "Flipper" Kromberg, the first military service pilot to evaluate the F-35 Lightning II - <a href="news_article2729.html">news article</a>)
  • #27: 30 Jan 2008 (Knowles)

Note that I will update this first post here with any updates that may follow below.

RE: Overview of the AA-1 test flights

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2007, 07:20
by SnakeHandler
Since you're making up a master list, could you include the milestone events on each flight?

RE: Overview of the AA-1 test flights

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2007, 04:40
by habu2
The latest edition of Code One (V22#2) does that - up to a point. The list is not complete or official. I'll paraphrase from the text:

#1 - subsystem performance, air data system issue
#2 - first gear cycle, first formation flight (with gear up)
#3 - first military power takeoff
#4 - first low altitude maneuvering
#5 - first afterburner engine transient
#6 - fuel dump test, higher AoA maneuvers
#7 - speed brake operation (control surface deflection)
#8 - software fix for air data system issues seen on flight #1
#9 - first afterburner takeoff, close formations, power approaches, maneuver blocks to 16 deg AoA at 20Kft
#10 - first HMD flight, full stick 360 deg rolls, snap engine transients in AB, 15 kt crosswind landing
#11 - lower altitude maneuver blocks, speed brake maneuvers
(Flights 1-11 flown by Beesley)
#12 - Jeff Knowles first flight
#13 - Beesley, 30K ft altitude, touch & go landing, 17 deg AoA maneuver block

That's as far as the article goes... it's not online yet but should be soon, I've had my issue for more than a week.

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2007, 07:49
by dwightlooi
@ habu

Somebody said this...
Read the latest Code One Magazine by Lockheed. They were able to cruise in the high subsonic region at about 40 percent of available mil power. You can interpolate from there. I still don't like the 28k pound empty weight, but I love the fact that it'll carry 20k pounds of dinosaurs internally.


Can you shed some light as to what what the Code One Article actually says? It it mentions it at all that is.

Unread postPosted: 19 Oct 2007, 16:40
by SnakeHandler
Yeah, that was me. Basically all it said about available power was that. Oh, it also said that he was "pleasantly surprised" to find out that at Mil it took about a 30 degree climb to keep it at 250. I was just alluding to how much excess power it has. The PW220 powered Vipers need full AB to get a 30 degree climb on takeoff (in a clean jet) and need at least full Mil to get in the high subsonic at altitude for comparison.

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2008, 22:19
by Lieven
Any dates for flight 22 and 23?

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2008, 23:55
by Raptor_claw
Lieven wrote:Any dates for flight 22 and 23?

Flight 22 - Dec 18 (Jon, I think)
Flight 23 - Dec 19 (Knowles)
Flight 24 - Jan 08 (Knowles)
Flight 25 - Jan 10

Unread postPosted: 24 Jan 2008, 18:34
by LMAggie
Flight 22 was Beesley, Flight 25 was Beesley, and Flight 26 will be a newbie.

Unread postPosted: 31 Jan 2008, 16:48
by Ztex
Flight 27?
January 30, 2008

Unread postPosted: 31 Jan 2008, 19:24
by LMAggie

Unread postPosted: 05 Feb 2008, 03:53
by LMAggie
Turnaround time between flight 26 and 27 was 60 minutes.

Unread postPosted: 05 Feb 2008, 23:50
by Corsair1963
SnakeHandler wrote:Yeah, that was me. Basically all it said about available power was that. Oh, it also said that he was "pleasantly surprised" to find out that at Mil it took about a 30 degree climb to keep it at 250. I was just alluding to how much excess power it has. The PW220 powered Vipers need full AB to get a 30 degree climb on takeoff (in a clean jet) and need at least full Mil to get in the high subsonic at altitude for comparison.


Very interesting.............I can't tell you how many posts I've read that complain that the F-35 is either over weight or underpower or both!


Note: Haven't at least two of the Test Pilots remarked about the awesome power of the F-35. Especially, with the gear up......... :wink:

Unread postPosted: 06 Feb 2008, 00:01
by Corsair1963
SnakeHandler wrote:Yeah, that was me. Basically all it said about available power was that. Oh, it also said that he was "pleasantly surprised" to find out that at Mil it took about a 30 degree climb to keep it at 250. I was just alluding to how much excess power it has. The PW220 powered Vipers need full AB to get a 30 degree climb on takeoff (in a clean jet) and need at least full Mil to get in the high subsonic at altitude for comparison.




Do you have a link to your article? :D

Unread postPosted: 06 Feb 2008, 23:53
by LMAggie
Flights 28 (Beesley) and 29 (Kromberg) today.

Unread postPosted: 07 Feb 2008, 00:59
by checksixx
Corsair1963 wrote:[Do you have a link to your article? :D


I believe Beesley said that following his first F-35 flight. Check the Code One site for that article.

www.codeonemagazine.com

Unread postPosted: 12 Feb 2008, 17:22
by LMAggie
Flight 30 was Feb 7 with Kromberg as PIC. Its getting hard to keep up.

Unread postPosted: 13 Feb 2008, 02:24
by seruriermarshal
LMAggie wrote:Flight 30 was Feb 7 with Kromberg as PIC. Its getting hard to keep up.


What's meaning with that ?

:?:

Unread postPosted: 13 Feb 2008, 02:47
by checksixx
I think he means that Kromberg was pilot in command on flight 30 and that its getting hard to keep track with all the flying going on.

Unread postPosted: 13 Feb 2008, 02:57
by seruriermarshal
So a fail for Flight 30 ?

Unread postPosted: 13 Feb 2008, 04:03
by LMAggie
checksixx wrote:I think he means that Kromberg was pilot in command on flight 30 and that its getting hard to keep track with all the flying going on.


Yep.

Unread postPosted: 13 Feb 2008, 19:15
by LMAggie
Flight 31 today with Knowles. I'm stopping once AA:1 goes to EAFB. lol

Unread postPosted: 13 Feb 2008, 20:30
by checksixx
seruriermarshal wrote:So a fail for Flight 30 ?


Okay, what are you asking? Is there a language barrier here that we should be made aware of?

Unread postPosted: 13 Feb 2008, 21:14
by Corsair1963
checksixx wrote:
seruriermarshal wrote:So a fail for Flight 30 ?


Okay, what are you asking? Is there a language barrier here that we should be made aware of?



Your not the only one lost here??? :wink:

Unread postPosted: 16 Feb 2008, 06:45
by LMAggie
Flight 32 with Beesley on 2/14/08.

Unread postPosted: 06 Mar 2008, 14:26
by LMAggie
After some scheduled downtime for maintenance, flight 33 was yesterday ( 3/5/08 ) with Beesley. I think KC135 tanker support is supposed to show up next week.

Tanker

Unread postPosted: 08 Mar 2008, 02:45
by brancwp
The Tanker is suppose to show up Monday with aerial refueling qualification most of next week.

RE: Tanker

Unread postPosted: 13 Mar 2008, 00:22
by brancwp
Today Jon Beesley few 1.6 hours with a tanker. 5 connects/disconnects performed to rate HQ. He said it was twice as easy to refuel as the F-16. No actual fuel was transfered. This was flight 34.

Unread postPosted: 13 Mar 2008, 02:37
by elp
Great news !! :applause: :thumb:

Unread postPosted: 13 Mar 2008, 04:48
by Corsair1963
I wonder in what way the F-35 was easier to refuel than the F-16? (i.e. more stable?)

Unread postPosted: 13 Mar 2008, 04:50
by Corsair1963
elp wrote:Great news !! :applause: :thumb:



I have to say I am a little surprised by your applause? I was sure by your many comments. That you were in the Anti-JSF Club.......... :?

Unread postPosted: 13 Mar 2008, 07:47
by Ozzy_Blizzard
Corsair1963 wrote:
elp wrote:Great news !! :applause: :thumb:



I have to say I am a little surprised by your applause? I was sure by your many comments. That you were in the Anti-JSF Club.......... :?


I wasnt aware they made a club? is there a pro JSF club, can i join? Whats the annual membership rates? Do i get any free stuff? :roll:

This whole "your with us or you against us" line pretty effectively stiffles any objective debate and critisizm of the platform. If anyone is crtical, hell their just part of the "anti JSF" club.

Unread postPosted: 13 Mar 2008, 22:27
by Corsair1963
Ozzy_Blizzard wrote:
Corsair1963 wrote:
elp wrote:Great news !! :applause: :thumb:



I have to say I am a little surprised by your applause? I was sure by your many comments. That you were in the Anti-JSF Club.......... :?


I wasnt aware they made a club? is there a pro JSF club, can i join? Whats the annual membership rates? Do i get any free stuff? :roll:

This whole "your with us or you against us" line pretty effectively stiffles any objective debate and critisizm of the platform. If anyone is crtical, hell their just part of the "anti JSF" club.



If, your comments are balanced expressing both the pros and cons. I would agree.........Yet, many seem to view such complex programs as black and white. :wink:

Unread postPosted: 13 Mar 2008, 23:34
by LMAggie

Unread postPosted: 15 Mar 2008, 23:36
by habu2
LM Press Release

link to hi-res photo

note position of rudder control surfaces

Unread postPosted: 21 Mar 2008, 02:15
by brancwp
AA-1 flight 36 was accomplished yesterday. LtCol Kromberg was airborne at 10:29 and landed at 11:51 for a 1.4 hour sortie. Maneuvers accomplished include MIL power takeoff, climb to 15k feet, 5 approaches, 3 touch and go's, 1 go-around, and 1 full stop landing.

Unread postPosted: 21 Mar 2008, 02:46
by Corsair1963
brancwp wrote:AA-1 flight 36 was accomplished yesterday. LtCol Kromberg was airborne at 10:29 and landed at 11:51 for a 1.4 hour sortie. Maneuvers accomplished include MIL power takeoff, climb to 15k feet, 5 approaches, 3 touch and go's, 1 go-around, and 1 full stop landing.



Now we just need to get the F-35B and F-35C flying! :wink:

Unread postPosted: 21 Mar 2008, 04:53
by LMAggie
Corsair1963 wrote:
brancwp wrote:AA-1 flight 36 was accomplished yesterday. LtCol Kromberg was airborne at 10:29 and landed at 11:51 for a 1.4 hour sortie. Maneuvers accomplished include MIL power takeoff, climb to 15k feet, 5 approaches, 3 touch and go's, 1 go-around, and 1 full stop landing.



Now we just need to get the F-35B and F-35C flying! :wink:


Its just around the corner!

Unread postPosted: 21 Mar 2008, 15:15
by checksixx
LM...when are we going to see more pictures of the B model? There is only two up on JSF.mil....

Unread postPosted: 21 Mar 2008, 16:31
by Corsair1963
checksixx wrote:LM...when are we going to see more pictures of the B model? There is only two up on JSF.mil....




Really, LM needs to do everything and anything to keep the F-35 in the public eye! Especially, with all the doom and gloom going on these day! That of course doesn't count Boeing trying to get the US Goverment to purchase more Super Hornets for the Navy!!!!

Unread postPosted: 21 Mar 2008, 17:45
by Raptor_claw
checksixx wrote:LM...when are we going to see more pictures of the B model? There is only two up on JSF.mil....


There are a few pics on teamjsf - nothing too exciting or real new ...

http://images.teamjsf.com/main.php

Check the "F-35B Rollout" in the 'Events' album, and the "STOVL Move" under 'Productions and Milestones'

There were also supposed to be more A1 air refueling pics posted there, but they haven't showed up yet.

Unread postPosted: 21 Mar 2008, 18:30
by checksixx
Yeah...the rollout is old news. JSF.mil has had the following two pictures up for a bit now...just want to see more...lol.

Image
Image

Unread postPosted: 24 Mar 2008, 04:55
by LMAggie
checksixx wrote:LM...when are we going to see more pictures of the B model? There is only two up on JSF.mil....


When public relations decides to post them. :D Right now the company is focused on getting the plane in the air. Having photo shoots is distracting and inhibits productivity. They want mechanics and FTEs around the airplane and thats it. However, I imagine once it gets painted, there will be some photos.

Unread postPosted: 24 Mar 2008, 05:15
by Corsair1963
LMAggie wrote:
checksixx wrote:LM...when are we going to see more pictures of the B model? There is only two up on JSF.mil....


When public relations decides to post them. :D Right now the company is focused on getting the plane in the air. Having photo shoots is distracting and inhibits productivity. They want mechanics and FTEs around the airplane and thats it. However, I imagine once it gets painted, there will be some photos.



I agree yet you can't forget politics! Personally, I think LM needs to keep the F-35 in the public eye as much as possible! :idea:

Unread postPosted: 28 Mar 2008, 01:54
by dwightlooi
Well, the tails looks a lot smaller... than on the AA-1. I know they are supposed to be smaller, but they just look even smaller than I expected.

Unread postPosted: 28 Mar 2008, 05:19
by sferrin
dwightlooi wrote:Well, the tails looks a lot smaller... than on the AA-1. I know they are supposed to be smaller, but they just look even smaller than I expected.


The got rid of that ugly GD front landing gear door too. :thumb:

Unread postPosted: 02 Apr 2008, 05:22
by Ztex

Unread postPosted: 02 Apr 2008, 13:19
by LMAggie
Ztex wrote:AA-1 flew today...gear down? 15 minute flight?

http://www.fencecheck.com/forums/index.php/topic,689.msg183417.html#msg183417

??


Ya, they swapped landing gear for some tests.

Unread postPosted: 02 Apr 2008, 16:18
by elp
Yup. The test was planned that way.

Unread postPosted: 03 Apr 2008, 18:53
by lamoey
so what's different with this landing gear?

Unread postPosted: 03 Apr 2008, 19:05
by Raptor_claw
lamoey wrote:so what's different with this landing gear?


Nothing - it's the same gear, there was no 'swap'. But, yes, it was a dedicated gear test, and the short mission was as planned.

Unread postPosted: 07 Apr 2008, 14:52
by Ztex
Good to hear!

As always, thanks for the info.

Z

Unread postPosted: 16 Apr 2008, 02:06
by brancwp
It was a test of the alternate gear extension capability.

Unread postPosted: 02 May 2008, 16:46
by asiatrails
First Maintainers for Lockheed Martin F-35 Heading for Test Sites



FORT WORTH, Texas, May 2 /PRNewswire/ -- The first group of maintenance
crews for the F-35 Lightning II have successfully completed classroom
instruction and certification training in preparation for F-35 test-site
stand up at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., and Naval Air Station Patuxent
River, Md.

"F-35 flight testing will quickly begin escalating as more and more
aircraft come off the line, and we're pleased that our maintainers will be
poised at the test sites to keep all the F-35s in top flying condition,"
said Kimberly Gavaletz, Lockheed Martin vice president of F-35 Autonomic
Logistics/Global Sustainment.

In the late May/early June time frame, the first F-35A conventional
takeoff and landing (CTOL) test aircraft will deploy temporarily to Edwards
Air Force Base for expanded flight test activities. The aircraft will
return to Lockheed Martin's (NYSE: LMT) Fort Worth plant this summer. The
first F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft will transfer
to Naval Air Station Patuxent River by early 2009, where it will begin
long-term STOVL-mode flight testing.

F-35 flight-line mechanics from Lockheed Martin, Pratt & Whitney and
the United States and United Kingdom military services completed systems
training and task certifications for the F-35 CTOL and STOVL variants,
including 27 separate pre-deployment certification courses. The training,
conducted under the direction of Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman,
covers vehicle systems, propulsion, avionics, fiber optics, low observable
(stealth), the Autonomic Logistics Information System
(maintenance/prognostics/support/logistics) and other aspects of the
aircraft and its associated systems.

Approximately 500 certified maintainers will be assigned to the 13
flight-test aircraft that will deploy to Edwards and Patuxent River over
the next five years. The first class combining students assigned to both
test sites concluded on April 11.

The first F-35A has completed 40 flights and has exceeded performance
and reliability expectations. The aircraft is currently in a scheduled
period of maintenance and software updates that will enable an expanded
flight envelope. All 19 flight-test and ground-test aircraft are in
production flow or on the flightline, and assembly has begun on the first
two production-model F-35s.

The F-35 is a supersonic, multi-role, 5th generation stealth fighter.
Three F-35 variants derived from a common design, developed together and
using the same sustainment infrastructure worldwide will replace at least
13 types of aircraft for 11 nations initially, making the Lightning II the
most economical fighter program in history.

Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 with its principal industrial
partners, Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems. Two separate, interchangeable
F-35 engines are under development: the Pratt & Whitney F135 and the GE
Rolls-Royce Fighter Engine Team F136.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin employs about 140,000
people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design,
development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced
technology systems, products and services. The Corporation reported 2007
sales of $41.9 billion.


F-35 and Lightning II are trademarks of Lockheed Martin Corporation.

For additional information, visit our Web site:
http://www.lockheedmartin.com

F-35 photographs and information also available at:
http://www.teamjsf.com

Unread postPosted: 21 May 2008, 15:55
by Ztex
Any word on AA-1 flights this week? (today?)

I had heard that it may be out and about...

Z

Unread postPosted: 23 May 2008, 04:11
by Ztex
Well...the answer is...AA-1 flew this afternoon...

any word of further flights or departure for Edwards?

Thanks
Z

Unread postPosted: 27 May 2008, 13:39
by brancwp
Jon Beesley flew AA-1 May 22 following the 50-hour engineering inspection work of the last two months. During his one hour flight (#41), Jon conducted a MIL power takeoff, flying qualities regression testing, doublets & sideslips, and a simulated emergency descent.
Graham Tomlinson is suppose to fly it twice this week.
BF-1 could fly as early as Friday.

Unread postPosted: 27 May 2008, 16:50
by dwightlooi
brancwp wrote:Jon Beesley flew AA-1 May 22 following the 50-hour engineering inspection work of the last two months. During his one hour flight (#41), Jon conducted a MIL power takeoff, flying qualities regression testing, doublets & sideslips, and a simulated emergency descent.
Graham Tomlinson is suppose to fly it twice this week.
BF-1 could fly as early as Friday.


Uh... it took two months to do 50 hours worth of inspection work? I would have thought that 50 hours is what you pull in a week!

Unread postPosted: 27 May 2008, 17:21
by Guysmiley
I think the "50-hour" is referring to an inspection after 50 hours of flight.

Unread postPosted: 28 May 2008, 21:39
by brancwp
Yes 50 hour inspection and some software updates. Lots of things completely taken apart and inspected for wear and tear.

AA1 Flight 42 Graham Tomlinson was airborne at 10:32 today for his maiden flight in AA-1 and landed at 11:07 for a 0.6 hour flight.

Unread postPosted: 29 May 2008, 06:04
by Ztex
brancwp wrote:BF-1 could fly as early as Friday.


Woot!

Any heads up as to when this is supposed to happen would be nice....

Thanks for the info!

Z

Unread postPosted: 02 Jun 2008, 14:17
by brancwp
Thursday May 29th Graham Tomlinson made flight 43 in AA-1 (his 2nd) which lasted 1.1 hours. There were no problems and AA-1 should fly again June 4th.

BF-1 did taxi testing Friday and will likely be doing high speed taxi testing late this week.

Unread postPosted: 14 Aug 2008, 09:35
by Lieven
While AA-1 remains grounded since completing its 45th flight on July 23, aircraft BF-1, the first Stovl F-35B, has logged nine flights since its June 11 debut and has about 15 more flights in conventional takeoff and landing mode before it too ceases flying, for scheduled upgrades.

Unread postPosted: 12 Sep 2008, 16:50
by SnakeHandler
Where are the jets in the testing pipeline now?

Unread postPosted: 12 Sep 2008, 18:45
by F16NDI
Both AA-1 and BF-1, I think are back in the air because I'm getting JOAP samples from both jets, unless only ground runs are being done for an hour at a time.

Unread postPosted: 29 Nov 2008, 01:07
by SnakeHandler
Any news?

Unread postPosted: 29 Nov 2008, 01:58
by F16NDI
AA-1 hasn't flown very much since doing it's MACH run, BF-1 is going through some up grades, BF-2 has a heart beat P/W brought a JOAP sample from it's first GND run earlier this past week

Unread postPosted: 28 Feb 2009, 00:39
by energo
AA-1 returned to flight at the FW facilities yesterday.

http://www.fencecheck.com/forums/index. ... c=689.2160

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 02 Mar 2009, 22:01
by energo
AA-1 Returns To Flight

AA-1 returned to the skies last week with two Code 1 flights (70, 71). The Feb. 24. sortie lasted 1.6 hours and was the first F-35 flight for 2009. The weapon bay doors were opened for the first time in flight, making this a milestone event for the program.

Source: Lockheed Martin.


Regards
B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 03 Mar 2009, 05:22
by Ztex
BF-2 and AA-1 both flew last week.

http://www.fencecheck.com/forums/index. ... #msg216611

AA-1 should do more flying this week.

Unread postPosted: 03 Mar 2009, 05:47
by StolichnayaStrafer
YIPPEE!!! :applause:

Unread postPosted: 19 Mar 2009, 15:53
by energo
AA-1 Flights 71, 72 and 73

The Feb. 26, Flight 71 was accomplished Code 1 with a 1.1 hour sortie. After a maximum power takeoff, AA-1 accomplished weapon door closed flutter, flying qualities, throttle transients and landing gear cycle.

Flight 72. AA-1 completed flight 72 last Wednesday (March 4th) with mock weapons on board and returned Code 1 after 1.3 hours, logging 99.5 hours to date. Profile included a maximum power takeoff, weapon door open flying qualities (FQs) testing, a touch and go prior to a straight in landing.

Flight 73. On March 10 Slim (Jeff Knowles) got AA-1 airborne for a 1.0 hour sortie, returning Code 1. On this flight AA-1 surpassed the 100 flight hour mark, with a total flight time of 100.5 hours. The primary objectives achieved were weapons bay doors closed/full bay loadouts (GBU-31’s and AIM-120’s) and flutter flying qualities, before a straight in landing

Source: Lockheed Martin

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 20 Mar 2009, 05:20
by Ztex
AA-1 flew again today.

Also heard that BF-1 did some sort of hover testing today as well... :)

Unread postPosted: 21 Mar 2009, 16:47
by energo
Ztex wrote:AA-1 flew again today.

Also heard that BF-1 did some sort of hover testing today as well... :)


Things are ramping up indeed. :-)


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 21 Mar 2009, 16:55
by energo
Cumulative Flight 90

FORT WORTH, Texas, March 19th, 2009 - Maj. Joseph T. "O.D." Bachmann today became the first U.S. Marine Corps pilot to fly the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II, logging the flight-test program’s 90th mission. He is the fifth pilot to fly the stealthy, multi-role fighter.

Bachmann departed the runway at Lockheed Martin's Fort Worth plant at 11:29 a.m. CDT and flew the aircraft to 15,000 feet, checking handling qualities and engine response before landing one hour and 15 minutes later.

"The plane performed wonderfully," said Bachmann, a member of the F-35 Integrated Test Force and one of the team test pilots who will fly the F-35B Lightning II at the Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., test site, beginning this summer. "The U.S. Marine Corps will be getting an aircraft with extraordinary capabilities that is very easy to fly. Today is another step toward delivery of the first jets to Marines on the front line."

Link to Lockheed Martins full press release:

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/pres ... light.html


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 23 Mar 2009, 20:06
by energo
Flight 74 and Flight 75 (cumulative Flight 90)

On March 17th Jon Beesley successfully completed Flight 74 for a 1.2 hour sortie, returning Code 1. The flight profile included a MAX power takeoff, flying qualities with weapons bay doors open, throttle transients and landing gear extension before a straight in landing. This flight concluded all remaining planned technical objectives for AA-1. On Wednesday, the GBU-31s and AIM-120s were downloaded from the bays.

AA-1 conducted Flight 75 on Thursday March 19 for a 1.3 hour sortie, landing Code 1. This was the first flight flown by our Marine Corps JSF pilot, OD Bachmann. Flight profile included a Military Power takeoff, Flying Qualitys (FQ) and throttle transients, descending formation, Power Approach ( PA) FQs, touch and go and a full stop landing.

AA-1 has now returned 59 out of 75 times Code 1.

The CATBird returned to flight also on Thursday. On Friday, CATB Mission Systems test flight (Flight 47) was conducted for 2.1 flight hours. CNI (Communication, Navigation, Identification), RADAR and EW (Electronic Warfare) testing was performed.

Source: Lockheed Martin

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 23 Mar 2009, 20:23
by Corsair1963
Starting to really pick up steam now.......... :notworthy:

Unread postPosted: 31 Mar 2009, 20:10
by strykerxo
Great play by play action energo, keep it comming.

Does anybody know the statis of the F-35C's first flight?

Unread postPosted: 01 Apr 2009, 19:16
by StolichnayaStrafer
Hopefully soon... then before you know it, we'll be seeing Carrier traps and takeoffs!

GO LM!!! :applause:

Unread postPosted: 02 Apr 2009, 04:26
by Corsair1963
Everything is going very well.............Yet, I won't feel comfortable until they release next years defense budget. :shrug:

Unread postPosted: 02 Apr 2009, 21:22
by StolichnayaStrafer
Ew... negative vibes. :doh:

Unread postPosted: 15 Apr 2009, 21:42
by energo
AA-1 Flights 76-79 (cumulative flight 94)

On March 24, Maj. O.D. Bachman completed AA-1 Flight 76 for a 1.3 hour sortie, returning Code 1. The profile included a maximum power takeoff, Flying Qualities (FQs), Aerial Refueling, formation, throttle transients,
Power Approach and a touch and go before a straight in landing.

Flight 77, a 1.2 hour sortie, was conducted on March 31. Flown by Doc Nelson, the flight accomplished military power takeoff, Flying Qualities (FQs) and throttle transients, descending formation and Power Approach (PA) FQs.

Flight 78 - also flown by Doc Nelson - occurred on April 1 for a 1.4 hour sortie. The flight accomplished a maximum power takeoff, Flying Qualities and Aerial Refueling, with three touch-and-go's before a straight-in landing.

AA-1 Flight 79 was completed on Wednesday April 8, by Jeff (Slim) Knowles, flying for 1.1 hours. The profile included a military power takeoff, Flying Qualities, auto maneuvers and a straight in landing.

Source: Lockheed Martin

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 15 Apr 2009, 21:53
by energo
strykerxo wrote:Great play by play action energo, keep it comming.

Does anybody know the statis of the F-35C's first flight?


Howdy Strykerxo,

Update here: http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... 103#149103


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 28 Apr 2009, 18:41
by energo
AA-1 Flights 80-81

On Tuesday April 14 Flight 80 was accomplished for a 1.6 hour sortie. The profile included a military power take off, Flying Qualities (FQ), performance testing and formation followed by three touch-and-go’s to a straight-in landing.

Flight 81, on April 15, was a 1.5 hour sortie including a military power takeoff, performance testing and auto maneuver rolls followed by a touch-and-go to a straight-in landing.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 29 Apr 2009, 05:35
by Ztex

Unread postPosted: 29 Apr 2009, 20:57
by energo
AA-1 Flights 82-83 (Eglin flights - cumulative flight 98 )

Flight 82 on April 22, took AA-1 to Eglin AFB for its first official visit to the base. Jeff "Slim" Knowles performed a straight-in to a low approach and a closed pattern to a full stop, and the jet landed Code 1.

Flight 83. On Thursday April 23, Dave "Doc" Nelson took the jet to the skies for almost an hour at Eglin. Profile included a miliary take off and several fly-bys with two F-16 chase airplanes at speeds up to 300 knots, a few touch and goes, landing Code 1.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 30 Apr 2009, 10:51
by shuck
energo wrote:AA-1 Flights 82-83 (Eglin flights - cumulative flight 98 )

Flight 81 on April 22, took AA-1 to Eglin AFB for its first official visit to the base. Jeff "Slim" Knowles performed a straight-in to a low approach and a closed pattern to a full stop, and the jet landed Code 1.

Flight 83. On Thursday April 23, Dave "Doc" Nelson took the jet to the skies for almost an hour at Eglin. Profile included a miliary take off and several fly-bys with two F-16 chase airplanes at speeds up to 300 knots, a few touch and goes, landing Code 1.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo


When AA-1 went to Edwards CA on October 1st 2008 was this Flight 51?

Unread postPosted: 30 Apr 2009, 12:21
by energo
shuck wrote:When AA-1 went to Edwards CA on October 1st 2008 was this Flight 51?


Actually, the ferry to Edwards would be Flight 55.

A more complete overview on the test flights will be posted in the future.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 14 May 2009, 19:34
by energo
jacarlsen wrote:Does anybody know how many people have flown the F-35 now? Who has the most hours?

And what is Jon Beesley doing? I saw him in a program about the F-22 and he said that testing was so hard work that he didn't know if he had it in him to do it again.


So far six pilots have flown the F-35.
In chronological order:

1. Jon Beesley (Chief test pilot, LM)
2. Jeff "Slim" Knowles (LM)
3. Lt Col. James "Flipper" Kromberg (USAF)
4. Graham "G.T." Tomlinson (BAE Systems)
5. Maj. Joseph T. "O.D." Bachmann (USMC)
6. David "Doc" Nelson (LM)

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 14 May 2009, 19:45
by energo
AA-1 Flight 84 (return from Eglin AFB)

AA-1 returned to Fort Worth on Thursday May 7. "Slim" Knowles took off from Eglin AFB at 1:38 and landed at FTW at 3:16 pm, for a 1.6 hour sortie. The jet returned Code 1 and has now flown for 84 sorties and accumulated 115 flight hours.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 15 May 2009, 08:37
by shuck
Did Dave Nelson make his first JSF flight on 31st March 2009 in AA-1

Unread postPosted: 15 May 2009, 17:35
by energo
shuck wrote:Did Dave Nelson make his first JSF flight on 31st March 2009 in AA-1


Affirmative. Nelson became the second pilot to have flown both the F-22 and F-35, the first being Jon Beesley.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Re: F-35 vs F-22

Unread postPosted: 29 Jun 2009, 11:21
by energo
steve8341 wrote:I'm estimating that by the time 800 F-35's are built the production will cease due to a much less costly (true this time) and greatly capable UAV availability to replace the bloated F-35.


Welcome to F-16.net! Note that this thread is an overview of the flight tests. Feel free to use the regular forum threads for general discussions. Thank's!

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 03 Jul 2009, 20:24
by energo
Flight 100 (AA-1 flight 85)

AA-1 returned to flight Tuesday June 23 as Jon Beesley flew its 85th mission and the 100th F-35 flight overall. The sortie lasted for 1.4 hours and the jet returned Code 1.


AA-1 flight 86-87 (Cumulative flight 101-102)

On Wednesday June 24, Slim Knowles flew an hour long sortie and on Thursday Maj. "O.D." Bachman flew for 1.4 hours, returning Code 1.

Flight objectives included exercise of the aircraft’s automaneuver flight test aid, thermal management system test profiles, weapons bay door open flying qualities and pilot proficiency in support of upcoming return to flight of BF-1 and BF-2.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 09 Jul 2009, 22:01
by Ztex
Is BF-2 getting close to STOVL flights? An F-18 has been seen on the LM ramp...

Unread postPosted: 10 Jul 2009, 01:25
by Corsair1963
Does anybody know when the first F-35C is scheduled fly???

Unread postPosted: 10 Jul 2009, 01:35
by SpudmanWP
According to this slide from May 2009, sometime this fall.

Image

Unread postPosted: 10 Jul 2009, 04:21
by Corsair1963
Well, it should be coming off the production line in the near future then???

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2009, 22:11
by energo
BF-2 flight 2 (Cumulative flight 103)

BF-2's second flight was accomplished Monday July 13. Jeff Knowles was the pilot for the 0.8 hour late afternoon sortie. Engine start up was uneventful and the aircraft passed IBIT on the first attempt. Landing gear retraction was accomplished at 185 KCAS. Flying qualities and propulsion transients were performed during the flight. Landing was uneventful.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2009, 22:15
by spazsinbad
Some info about above flight & / photos here: (or links to same)

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... f6f6bf99b4

Unread postPosted: 21 Jul 2009, 14:54
by Ztex
BF-2 flew yesterday evening 7/21/09

Unread postPosted: 22 Jul 2009, 02:56
by energo
BF-2 flight 3 (Cumulative flight 104)

After weather delays, BF-2 took to the air for its third flight at 5:35 p.m. Monday July 20. Up-and-away flying qualities performed at 10,000 and 15,000 feet. Landing gear transients also performed. Landing at 6:35 p.m. for a one-hour flight. Pilot was Jon Beesley.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 05 Aug 2009, 05:31
by energo
BF-2 flight 4 (Cumulative flight 105)

BF-2 flight 4 occurred on Tuesday July 21 for a 1.3 hour flight. Flying qualities tests and propulsion system transients were accomplished up to an altitude of 30000 feet, the highest the aircraft has been to date.

BF-2 flight 5 (Cumulative flight 106)


On Thursday July 24 BF-2 conducted a 1.1 hour sortie. The flight accomplished flying qualities with aerial refueling (AR) probe, AR close trail formation, power approach (PA) throttle transients, simulated approach in Approach Power Control (APC), a touch-and-go in APC followed by an alternate gear extension to a straight-in approach and full stop landing.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 05 Aug 2009, 06:35
by Tinito_16
AFAIK there haven't been missile release tests on the F-35... is this correct? And if so when will these tests be done?

Unread postPosted: 05 Aug 2009, 07:09
by SpudmanWP
Per the latest sch, weapon separation tests will begin in 2010 for F-35B and 2011 for A & C.
.
Image

Unread postPosted: 12 Aug 2009, 23:30
by energo
BF-2 flight 6 and 7 (Cumulative flight 107 and 108)

On Thursday July 30 and Friday July 31 BF-2 completed two airworthiness flights including Aerial Refueling (AR) pre-requisite testing. The Thursday sortie accomplished an Integrated Power Package and engine start and lasted 1.2 hours. Part of the tests also included flutter checkout, speedbrake, partial autopilot assessment and fuel dump testing. The Friday July 31 sortie included AR Flying Qualities and ferry performance testing.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 14 Aug 2009, 17:16
by Ztex
BF-2 Flight 9
8.13.09

LM says...

Thursday's successful mission is the first in a short series of tests that will clear the STOVL F-35B variant for extended-range flights, particularly to its primary test site at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.


When was flight 8?

Unread postPosted: 01 Sep 2009, 15:18
by Ztex
8.31.09 The SECDEF was in town for a visit to Lock Mart...so the new toy came out to play a bit...he made several passes with a couple of breaks over the base.

Image

Unread postPosted: 09 Sep 2009, 14:15
by spazsinbad
F-35B Back in the Air for STOVL Tests Posted by Graham Warwick at 9/8/2009

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... 7c18aba2c0
OR
http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/ ... 090909.xml

"The first STOVL F-35B, aircraft BF-1, returned to the air with a hour-long flight on Friday, restarting the countdown to the first vertical landing - in October would be my guess. BF-1 was down for an extended period of modifications resulting from previous flight and hover-pit tests, and proved reluctant to return to flight.".......

Unread postPosted: 09 Sep 2009, 17:20
by SnakeHandler
You are entitled to your opinion, I guess. Even though it's wrong.

Unread postPosted: 10 Sep 2009, 22:52
by energo
AA-1 flight 88 (SecDef Gates’ visit)

On Monday August 31, Doc Nelson got airborne in AA-1 for a 1.3 hour sortie. After performing an AB takeoff, Doc transitioned to the test range with the F-16 chase. After some flying qualities testing, Doc executed two low approaches before completing a straight in to a full stop landing.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 10 Sep 2009, 23:11
by energo
BF-1 flight 15 (return to flight)

On Friday September 4, BF-1 conducted its 15th flight with Jon Beesley as pilot. With a MIL power takeoff the one-hour flight mainly consisted of flying qualities maneuvering and gear cycling. Power Approach Flying Qualities maneuvers were conducted before a straight in approach to a full stop landing.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 11 Sep 2009, 15:45
by Ztex
Vitriol aside...

AA-1 left Fort Worth for Edwards yesterday....so long to a cool machine!

Image

Image

Unread postPosted: 25 Sep 2009, 05:12
by Ztex
BF-1 flew today? ...9.24.09

Unread postPosted: 21 Oct 2009, 22:01
by energo
BF-1 Flight 16
O.D. Bachman flew Flight 16 on Saturday Sept. 19 with a F/A-18 chase aircraft. This was the second of two planned functional check flights and the 1.4 hour sortie included flying qualities and engine throttle transients at altitudes up to 30,000 feet.

BF-1 Flights 17, 18
On Sept. 24, Flight 17 was flown for a 0.9 hour sortie. Objectives achieved included baseline doors closed/gear down Flying Qualities (FQs) maneuver blocks and Parameter Identification test maneuvers.

On Sept 25, Flight 18 was flown for a 1.1 hour sortie, landing Code 1. The primary objective of this flight was to achieve STOVL doors open initial transitions with the Auxiliary Air Inlet, Lower Lift Fan, Roll Post and 3 Bearing Swivel Nozzle doors open and gear down. The team accomplished an FQ maneuver block with the doors open, doors closed Parameter Identification maneuvers and a CV recovery profile to investigate CV regeneration resistor temperature while flying in close formation. The flight comcluded with a straight in approach to a full stop landing.

BF-1 Flights 19, 20, 21
BF-1 accomplished three STOVL door initial transition test flights for a total of 2.6 flight hours, providing engineers with important information related to airflow off the STOVL when the lift fan is not engaged, and structural loads.

Flight 19 was flown on Sept. 29 for 0.8 hours and performed STOVL doors initial transition testing maneuvers. Flight 20 was flown on Sept. 30 for 0.8 hours conducting tests at 5K/245 Knots Calibrated Air Speed. Flight 21 was flown on Oct. 2 for 1.0 hour duration with maneuvers at 5K/10 and 12 degrees AOA.

BF-1 Flights 22, 23, 24
Team JSF achieved an important breakthrough with three flights of BF-1 this week. Following a flight on Thursday, Oct. 16, two flights were flown in CTOL-mode, doors-open flights on Saturday, Oct. 17. Also performed were two taxi tests at 30 and 60 kts with the lift fan clutch engaged.

Acknowledged as the best day of flight operations for BF-1 since its first flight in 2008, Jon Beesley and Graham Tomlinson completed the CTOL-mode, doors-open test points, demonstrating a 45-minute quick aircraft turnaround, the fastest yet. The taxi tests were the first time where the lift fan were engaged in an untethered configuration.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 21 Oct 2009, 22:09
by Ztex
Very cool! thanks for the progress reports!

Unread postPosted: 21 Oct 2009, 22:45
by energo
Ztex wrote:Very cool! thanks for the progress reports!


Glad you enjoyed it. And likewise, great shots of AA-1!

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 22 Oct 2009, 00:00
by sextusempiricus
Energo, I have no idea where you get your progress reports but great job. I hadn't heard anything about BF-1 and figured it was still grounded. Any idea when it is finally flying to Pax?

Unread postPosted: 22 Oct 2009, 06:51
by SpudmanWP
Too bad they could not fly AA-1 at the Edwards 2009 show... it would have stolen it :)

Unread postPosted: 22 Oct 2009, 16:52
by elp
The BF-1 flight to Pax should be soon I would think.

Good job Energo on ferreting out this info.

Unread postPosted: 05 Nov 2009, 22:14
by energo
Howdy,

Split the thread into "F-35 program updates" for general news and comments on the program:
http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-13143.html

:cheers:

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 11 Nov 2009, 21:27
by VarkVet
energo wrote:Howdy,

Split the thread into "F-35 program updates" for general news and comments on the program:
http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-13143.html

:cheers:

B. Bolsøy
Oslo


E man ... since I'm in the AOR ... are you?

Lets meet up at Bone Daddys, or something?

PM me

Unread postPosted: 16 Nov 2009, 21:31
by energo
AF-1 First Flight (Cumulative flight 130)

Nov. 14 2009. Piloted by Lockheed Martin test pilot David "Doc" Nelson, the F-35A, called AF-1, left Lockheed Martin's Fort Worth plant and flew to 20,000 feet and Mach 0.6. Nelson raised and lowered the landing gear, performed 360-degree rolls and lifted the nose to 20 degrees angle of attack during an 89-minute flight.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 16 Nov 2009, 21:41
by energo
Current flight status
As of Monday November 16.

Overall: 130 flights
AA-1: 90 flights
BF-1: 27 flights
BF-2: 12 flights
AF-1: 1 flight


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 17 Nov 2009, 00:22
by gosmack
Awesome! AF-1 has the first flight down. Can't wait to see more. Any idea on the C model?

Unread postPosted: 17 Nov 2009, 09:58
by shuck
AA-1 to Edwards CA was this flight 89 and who was the ferry pilot please?

Unread postPosted: 18 Nov 2009, 09:57
by energo
shuck wrote:AA-1 to Edwards CA was this flight 89 and who was the ferry pilot please?


Actually, AA-1 flight 89 on Sept. 9. was a pilot proficiency flight at Fort Worth.
The ferry to EAFB was flight 90 on Sept. 10. A 2.8 hour flight accompanied by a tanker.
Jeff “Slim” Knowles piloted both flights.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 18 Nov 2009, 10:31
by shuck
energo wrote:
shuck wrote:AA-1 to Edwards CA was this flight 89 and who was the ferry pilot please?


Actually, AA-1 flight 89 on Sept. 9. was a pilot proficiency flight at Fort Worth.
The ferry to EAFB was flight 90 on Sept. 10. A 2.8 hour flight accompanied by a tanker.
Jeff “Slim” Knowles piloted both flights.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo


Thanks for that ... was it also Jeff Knowles who took BF-01 to Pax?

Unread postPosted: 23 Nov 2009, 21:04
by spazsinbad
More F-35s to Test? Posted by Graham Warwick at 11/23/2009 11:51 AM CST

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

"We could learn as early as this week what the Pentagon plans to do in a bid to prevent the F-35 development program going massively over budget and schedule. Acquisition chief Ashton Carter met with program officials over the weekend and the prevailing rumor going in was that the Pentagon would add money and aircraft in Fiscal 2011 to accelerate flight testing and get the program back on track to complete development in 2013.

Remember that two aircraft were removed from the flight-test program two years ago as part of a "mid-course review" that increased reliance on integration labs and flying testbeds. The mission-system test aircraft were cut to replenish the management reserve within the program budget, which had been eroded by the SWAT redesign, assembly delays and other issues.

Even if the Pentagon adds money and aircraft to the test program, don't expect any sudden acceleration. Lockheed Martin still has to get all the test aircraft flying - and keep them flying, which has so far not proved that easy. No sooner had the first F-35B arrived at Pax River on Nov. 15 to begin STOVL flight testing when the aircraft went down for 10-12 days' maintenance to remove and replace the time-expired transparency-removal detonation chord bonded to the canopy. The down time was anticipated, and the work planned for Pax, says Lockheed.

Diverting early production aircraft to the test program would seem likely to impact the build-up of the training unit at Elgin, which is scheduled to receive its first CTOL F-35As in July 2010. But one report suggests the additional test aircraft would be Navy carrier-capable F-35Cs, the final version to fly and last to enter service. That would add mission-system test aircraft only towards the end of the development program, but would avoid impacting training, which has to start in 2010 to meet the Marine Corps' 2012 initial operational capability deadline."

Unread postPosted: 29 Nov 2009, 19:39
by -blaze-
Hello I would read the whole thread but I would be here for hours so im just going to ask, I hear the F-35 project is most likely going to be scraped is this true? If so what would the reason be Budget, Plane not good (Yeah right) Thanks al ot in advance

Trolling or dumb as a post

Unread postPosted: 30 Nov 2009, 04:08
by Gums
Salute!

Previous post by "newbie" blaze is either:

1) Blatant trolling, or
2) A post by someone who's failed to read the whole thread as it would "take hours" - because he is as dumb as a post.

Gums recommends the moderators either ban this dude or counsel him/her about protocol and meaningless posts.

Thanks to energo and others, this is the best thread to find out about what is REALLY happening with the pre-production test phase/progress.

Gums sends ....

SDD Flight Status as of 1 Dec 09?

Unread postPosted: 02 Dec 2009, 05:58
by neptune
Current flight status As of Monday November 16.

Overall: 130 flights
AA-1: 90 flights
BF-1: 27 flights
BF-2: 12 flights
AF-1: 1 flight


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

The two tanking flights for BF-02, were these since 16 Nov?

What is the current flight statuses, please?
When does AA-01 play target fodder? :?:

RE: SDD Flight Status as of 1 Dec 09?

Unread postPosted: 11 Dec 2009, 16:11
by spazsinbad
neptune, is Edwards AFB the target fodder site?

http://startelegram.typepad.com/sky_tal ... ry/page/2/

November 09, 2009 F-35 moves by stealth

"AA-1, the original prototype, made 90 [flights] before it was ferried out to Edwards Air Force Base some time ago."

Unread postPosted: 12 Dec 2009, 01:53
by energo
AF-1 flights 1, 2, 3

AF-1 made its inaugural flight on Nov. 14 with a 1.7 hour sortie. Test pilot David "Doc" Nelson flew to 20 thousand feet, 300 knots calibrated airspeed, 0.6 Mach and 20 degrees angle of attack during the flight. Gear was raised and lowered, sideslip and bank maneuvers, full stick 360-degree rolls, and formation flying were conducted.

AF-1 conducted its second and third flights on Nov. 19. The first sortie was for 1.6 hours and utilized a maximum power takeoff. Hot pitting was then used to pump approximately 10,000 pounds of fuel onboard, the first time Hot Pit operations were used to turn a jet for two successful sorties.

The second sortie was a 0.7 hour flight and was with a military power take off. The combined flight time of both sorties was 2.3 hours. Amongst the airworthiness objectives achieved included was Flying Qualities (FQs), Power Approach Controll, Landing gear and throttle transitients and fuel dump at altitudes up to 30K feet, Mach 0,9 and 20 degrees AOA.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 13 Dec 2009, 18:22
by SpudmanWP
re: weapons tests.... BF-3 is due to proceed with weapon tests mid 2010, AF-1
in mid 2011, and CF-2 in late 2011.

Image

Unread postPosted: 14 Dec 2009, 04:49
by Vipernice
That picture reminds me of what has been delayed and especially looking at items in 2009.

Weren't we told the BF-1 should be flying again this week ?

Has any other JSF flown since that November 19 sortie by AF-1 ?

Unread postPosted: 14 Dec 2009, 06:30
by Raptor_claw
BF-2 returned to flight today - Flight #13 on Sunday the 13th. (And no, nothing bad happened.)

Unread postPosted: 14 Dec 2009, 07:16
by Vipernice
Raptor_claw wrote:BF-2 returned to flight today - Flight #13 on Sunday the 13th. (And no, nothing bad happened.)


Thanks.

Unread postPosted: 14 Dec 2009, 07:45
by seruriermarshal
Any pics about BF-2 flight #13 ?

Unread postPosted: 15 Dec 2009, 21:53
by spazsinbad
neptune asked: "When does AA-01 play target fodder?"

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-d ... ivers.html

"It's also almost time to bid farewell to the AA-1 flight test aircraft, the non-weight-optimized design that has recorded 90 test sorties since debuting two years ago. Flight 91, scheduled later this week, will ferry AA-1 from Edwards AFB to China Lake, where it will be destroyed to complete live fire testing."

Unread postPosted: 17 Dec 2009, 23:33
by energo
Raptor_claw wrote:BF-2 returned to flight today - Flight #13 on Sunday the 13th. (And no, nothing bad happened.)


Thank's. Confirmed flight 14 also today.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 19 Dec 2009, 05:27
by Ztex
seruriermarshal wrote:Any pics about BF-2 flight #13 ?


A couple of pice at Fence Check...with the new paint job...

http://www.fencecheck.com/forums/index.php/topic,689.msg240886.html#msg240886

AA-1 is Done

Unread postPosted: 20 Dec 2009, 01:28
by muddflap
AA-1 completed it's last flight into China Lake. Ready for LFT&E.

Unread postPosted: 20 Dec 2009, 02:49
by seruriermarshal
Thanks Ztex , that's great pics .

:D

Unread postPosted: 21 Dec 2009, 08:52
by energo
Fellows!

Forgive us for humbly splitting off a few of your treasurable posts into the Program Updates thread. We have made it a sticky to encourage :ontopic: opinions and expressions about news and stuff not related to the flight tests. :cheers: FOX-3! http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopi ... rt-45.html


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 22 Dec 2009, 09:47
by energo
Also confirmed BF-2 flight 15 on friday Dec 18.

That's three BF-2 flights in six days.

Details pending.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 22 Dec 2009, 10:26
by sextusempiricus
BF-2 is clearly performing better than BF-1. LM obviously built a lemon with BF-1, and should just put it out of its misery already and cut its losses.

Unread postPosted: 24 Dec 2009, 22:06
by neptune
Christmas comes early for Joint Strike Fighter

Stephen Trimble at the DEW-Line; http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-dewline/

Lockheed Martin confirms the BF-1 -- an F-35 flight test aircraft -- yesterday, 23 Dec. ended a 33-day, post-ferry hiatus, finally logging its first flight from the US Navy test center at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, Maryland. The F-35 first arrived at Pax River on 15 November.

The short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing (STOVL) variant's pre-Christmas sortie came as slight surprise, as Lockheed passed word only two days ago that BF-1's next flight may not come for another week. It was not immediately clear if yesterday's flight counted towards the roughly 12-sortie-series required to complete the first vertical landing, a long-awaited milestone event for the program. :applause:

Unread postPosted: 25 Dec 2009, 04:33
by seruriermarshal
thanks neptune

Unread postPosted: 07 Jan 2010, 21:22
by Pecker
BF-2 flew to Pax River NAS on Dec 29, direct with ferry support.

And rumours are flitting about that BF-1, far from being a lemon, made significant progress in it's part of the flight test programme today.....

Unread postPosted: 13 Jan 2010, 13:01
by energo
AA-1 flight 91 (final flight and ferry to China Lake)

After three years of service and completing Jet Blast Deflector tests at Edwards AFB, AA-1 made its 91st and final flight to Naval Air Weapons Center China Lake, Calif. on Dec. 27. AA-1 was accompanied by a dual F-16 and F-18 chase planes and the aircraft landed Code 1. It is being hangared until final movement to the Live Fire site for the later live firing tests.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 14 Jan 2010, 03:31
by neptune
Graham Warwick on ARES Blog reported; 7 Jan 10; Lead STOVL pilot Graham Tomlinson engaged the shaft-driven lift fan at 5,000ft and 210kt, slowed to 180kt, then accelerated back to 210kt and converted back to conventional-flight mode.

The lift system was engaged for 14 minutes of the 48-min flight.

"Everything worked and plane landed with no gripes. GT [Tomlinson] said flying with the fan on is way smoother than flying doors-open with the fan off." :D

Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 15 Jan 2010, 11:57
by energo
BF-1 flights 25-30 (PAX ferry, first STOVL engagements, 140 overall flights)

BF-1 flight 25 was a 1.8 hour ferry-confidence mission on Nov. 6 prior to the PAX ferry. Pilot was David "Doc" Nelson.

On Nov. 13, chief test pilot Jon Beesley ferried BF-1 from Fort Worth to Dobbins Air Force Base, Marietta. Weather delayed traveling on to the Patuxent River (PAX) Naval Air Station, Md., on Nov 14 as planned. BF-1 completed the second leg of its ferry, on Nov. 15. The two ferry flights accumulated 2.7 flight hours.

On Dec. 23 BF-1 conducted Flight 28, a 1.1 hour sortie, completing BF-1’s first local flight since its arrival at the naval facility. It included a Military power takeoff, a climb to 15,000 feet for throttle and gear transients, Flying Qualities, open STOVL doors and Upper Lift Fan door opened to 65 degrees for the first time concluding with a straight in approach to a full stop landing.


On Thursday Jan. 7 F-35 Lead STOVL Pilot Graham Tomlinson flew BF-1 flight 29 on its first STOVL transition flight. Tomlinson took off at 1:53 p.m. EST, climbed to 5,000 feet and engaged the shaft-driven LiftFan propulsion system (Mode 4) at 210 knots, then slowed to 180 knots with the system engaged before accelerating to 210 knots and converting back to conventional flight.

The first clutch engagement completed in 14 seconds from command to locked clutch and the STOVL propulsion system was engaged for a total of 14 minutes during the flight. Tomlinson landed at 2:41 p.m. EST and the jet was Code 1.

On Saturday Jan. 9 BF-1's second lift-fan engagement flight slowed the aircraft to 150 knots. Thomlison was very appreciative of the conversion to Mode 4 (lift fan engaged) and back to Mode 1. There was less vibration in Mode 4 than with STOVL doors open in Mode 1.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 26 Jan 2010, 19:58
by energo
BF-1 flight 31, BF-2 flight 17 (142 overall flights)

On Saturday January 23 the program completed its first back-to-back flights of BF-1 and BF-2 in close succession at Patuxent River Naval Air Station.

BF-1 flew a 1.2 hour sortie accomplishing its mission objectives of STOVL transitionts down to 150 knots while the 1.4 hour flight by BF-2 included aerial refueling testing with a KC-130 tanker.

The upcomming test flights for BF-1 include STOVL transitions down to 2000 feet and 120 knots while BF-2 testing will focus on aerial refueling data collection.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

RE: Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 28 Jan 2010, 01:37
by seruriermarshal
First U.K. Service Pilot Flies The Lockheed Martin F-35

PATUXENT RIVER, Md., January 27th, 2010 -- A Royal Air Force officer on Tuesday became the first active-duty service pilot from the United Kingdom to take to the skies in a Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] F-35 Lightning II, also known as the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF).

RAF Squadron Leader Steve Long piloted BF-2, the second short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) F-35B, over Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., logging the aircraft's 18th mission. Long departed at 9:55 a.m. EST and flew the aircraft to 20,000 feet, before landing 1.3 hours later. Both the RAF and the Royal Navy plan to operate the F-35B.

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/pres ... force.html

Lead F-35B test pilot Graham Tomlinson flew aircraft BF-1 down to 120kt in STOVL mode today, Jan. 27. on the fourth flight from Pax River in which the propulsive-lift system has been engaged.

BF-2, meanwhile, has logged 19 flights, three of them since arriving at Pax on Dec. 29. The aircraft flew twice on Jan. 26, once for 1.3h piloted by RAF active-duty pilot Sgn Ldr Steve Long, and again for 0.9h on an aerial refuelling sortie piloted by Lockheed's Jeff Knowles.

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

RE: Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 03 Feb 2010, 09:38
by spazsinbad
http://startelegram.typepad.com/sky_tal ... flies.html

"Another F-35 flies - BF-3 February 02, 2010
One day after being publicly chastised, if you will, by the secretary of defense for its lack of performance on the F-35 joint strike fighter, Lockheed Martin got its fifth F-35 test airplane in the air Tuesday for the first time.

First flight of the F-35B model (BF-3) short-takeoff and vertical landing jet had been held up for several days by the recent spate of cold, overcast weather.

The jet took off at 4:02 p.m. CST. During the one-hour flight, F-35 Chief Test Pilot Jon Beesley tested the aircraft’s handling, engine functions, landing gear and basic flight systems.

BF-3 joins two other F-35Bs and one F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) aircraft currently undergoing active flight testing.

BF-3 was built and instrumented to conduct flight sciences test work and will be used primarily to evaluate vehicle systems and expand the aircraft’s aerodynamic and structural-loads envelope. It will deploy later this year to Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., where it will carry and release most of the weapons the F-35B will employ in combat. - Bob Cox"

RE: Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 03 Feb 2010, 19:47
by spazsinbad
STOVL F-35 - Progress Report Posted by Graham Warwick at 2/3/2010

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

"Lockheed Martin flew the third F-35B STOVL test aircraft - BF-3 - on Feb.2. It is the fifth JSF to fly, and F-35 chief test pilot Jon Beesely was at the controls for the hour-long flight from Fort Worth.

F-35 program general manager Dan Crowley says BF-3 should ferry to Pax River this month to join BF-1 and BF-2. The fourth F-35B - BF-4, the first JSF mission-system test aircraft - is on the flight line at Fort Worth.

BF-4 has been loaded with the first block of mission-system software - Block 0.5 - which has been turned on several times on the ground without any problems, says Crowley, adding: "We've had no problems with software stability."

At Pax, Crowley says, BF-1 has seven flights to go to the first vertical landing (engine supplier Pratt & Whitney says six, but may not be counting the actual VL flight). He expects the long-awaited feat to be accomplished in "mid- to late February".

After four flights in powered-lift STOVL "Mode 4", with the lift system engaged, BF-1 has flown down to 3,000ft and 120kt, which puts the aircraft into the "semi-jetborne" flight regime, says Crowley, where propulsion and flight control is integrated."

RE: Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 10 Feb 2010, 03:40
by LMAggie
BF-3 flew for the third time today. Very robust jet.

RE: Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 10 Feb 2010, 05:10
by seruriermarshal
thanks LMAggie , any news about BF-3 flew second .

Re: RE: Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 10 Feb 2010, 06:57
by fiskerwad
LMAggie wrote:BF-3 flew for the third time today. Very robust jet.


Loud, too. I'm about 10 miles ATCF and it is noticeably louder than anything else. But it's a good sound.
fisk

RE: Re: RE: Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 10 Feb 2010, 07:00
by SpudmanWP
F-35 = "Sound of Freedom" :)

RE: Re: RE: Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 10 Feb 2010, 07:27
by sextusempiricus
Great news on BF-3. That's exactly what people like me are looking for. At least those of us who want to see the F-35 succeed. Notice, LMAggie, I am not among those buffoons who think that the F-35 will be anything less than an exceptional aircraft once and if its development is successfully completed.

RE: Re: RE: Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 10 Feb 2010, 17:43
by underhill
For the record - it is tiresome to hear the presentation of any flight-test accomplishment, no matter what, as a refutation of the trolls, naysayers, skeptics, deniers, conspiracists, Communists, Albigensian heretics, bourgeois revisionists and Freemasons (have I missed anyone?) conspiring to bring the program down.

The trolls. naysayers &c have predicted (more accurately than the program's leaders) that it will be late and will cost more than expected (they have been right about this too - Nunn-McCurdy is a few weeks away).

They point out that the jet was mainly designed for bombing missions and that the rest of the world appears to have a different idea of what a fighter should look like - which are also irrefutable facts - and that there is a valid debate on how well a four-AAM, moderately agile stealth jet will do against a faster, more heavily armed adversary.

But none of the trolls &c has ever said the jet won't fly.

Just putting this stuff on the record, hopefully to pre-empt the whoops of erotic fulfillment from the fans when VL takes place.

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 10 Feb 2010, 18:45
by Pecker
underhill wrote:as a refutation of the trolls, naysayers, skeptics, deniers


Don't forget "buffoons"......i think that's what triggered your latest diatribe.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 10 Feb 2010, 21:31
by underhill
I forgot the Trilateral Commission, too.

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 10 Feb 2010, 21:32
by energo
Gentlemen, please reserve this thread for posts about the flight tests. Thank's! :salute:

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 11 Feb 2010, 15:52
by energo
BF-3 flights 1-5


Flight 1
BF-3 completed its first flight in Fort Worth on Feb. 2. Chief Test Pilot Jon Beesley tested the basic handling qualities of the aircraft, its systems, functionality, basic communication and navigation operations. All systems operated successfully and the aircraft completed its 1 hour sortie landing code 1. This was also the first flight using the Generation 2 Helmet Mounted Display System helmet.

Flight 2
BF-3's second flight was completed on Feb 7. The aircraft flew a 1h 20m air worthiness flight to evaluate the aircrafts systems, propulsion and handling qualities. Early indications are that the aircraft is performing as designed.

Flight 3
On Feb. 9 BF-3 completed a 1 hour flight.

Flight 4
On Feb. 16 BF-3 completed a 3.1-hour endurance flight in preparation for PAX ferry.

Flight 5 (PAX ferry)
Pilot Jeff Knowles ferried BF-3 to PAX on its fifth flight on Wednesday Feb 17.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: BF-01 7 Jan 10 Flight

Unread postPosted: 11 Feb 2010, 20:05
by energo
BF-2 flights 18-20

On Tuesday Jan. 26 BF-2 flew two sorties in one day.

Flight 18
Flight 18 at PAX was piloted by the programs first international pilot, RAF Squadron Leader Steve Long. Long is also the third military pilot to fly the F-35. The 1.3 hour sortie included a military power takeoff, flying up to 20,000 feet, flying qualities, landing gear cycling and a straight-in approach to a full stop landing.

Flight 19
BF-2s second flight (19) that day was a 0.9 hour sortie with Aerial Refueling testing as primary objective.

Flight 20
On Feb. 4 BF-2 completed a 2.5 hour Air Refueling flight with pilot Slim Knowles.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 16 Feb 2010, 23:12
by Ztex
BF-3 flew again today....they were up with a KC-130 for a long flight.

Image

Image

Image

Unread postPosted: 17 Feb 2010, 16:36
by energo
Ztex wrote:BF-3 flew again today....they were up with a KC-130 for a long flight.


Excellent captures! The echelon really gives a good impression of the F-35s visual size relative to the Hornets. Keep up the good work! :thumb:

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 17 Feb 2010, 22:24
by LMAggie
BF-3 is now at PAX:

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/press_releases/2010/100217ae_f35bf-3_pax.html

...and BF-1 flew two sorties today.

Unread postPosted: 17 Feb 2010, 22:34
by LMAggie
...and one of those BF-1 flights ended with a slow landing in STOVL mode. :cheers: Congrats to the BF-1 team and onward to VL...

Unread postPosted: 17 Feb 2010, 23:59
by energo
LMAggie wrote:...and one of those BF-1 flights ended with a slow landing in STOVL mode. :cheers: Congrats to the BF-1 team and onward to VL...


No longer any need for a snow plow!

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 18 Feb 2010, 00:09
by sweetpete
I cant wait I just got hired on with this program at Edward's, very exciting! Looking very forward to a new airframe, I will miss the 16's but can't get far enough away from 18's.

Pete

Unread postPosted: 18 Feb 2010, 03:19
by seruriermarshal
Wow , nice news and pics ,thanks energo, Ztex, LMAggie .

Unread postPosted: 18 Feb 2010, 04:10
by Corsair1963
Clearly, the flight test program is gaining steam. Fun on how the critics hardly mention it.

Unread postPosted: 18 Feb 2010, 05:58
by fiskerwad
sweetpete wrote:I cant wait I just got hired on with this program at Edward's, very exciting! Looking very forward to a new airframe, I will miss the 16's but can't get far enough away from 18's.

Pete


Congrats, Pete! Enjoy the ride.
fisk
:applause:

Unread postPosted: 19 Feb 2010, 02:41
by LMAggie
...another BF-1 slow landing today...

Unread postPosted: 26 Feb 2010, 20:17
by energo
BF-1 flight 32
On Feb. 17. BF-1 accomplished a 0.5 hour flight. Objectives included STOVL engage and slow landing.

BF-1 flight 33
Feb. 18 was a 0.8 hour sortie with objectives including handling qualities.

BF-1 flight 34
Feb. 18 was a 0,7 hour sortie with objectives including STOVL doors testing and slow landing.

BF-1 flight 35
Feb. 19 was a 0.3 hour flight, objectives including handling qualities.

Pilot for all four flights was STOVL lead pilot Graham Thomlison (BAE Systems).

BF-2 flight 21
Feb. 20, a 0.7 hour sortie and first flight of U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Col. Fred Schenk, the second USMC pilot to fly on the program.

BF-2 flight 22
Feb. 24, a 1.1 hour flight including handling qualities and touch-and-go. Pilot was RAF Squadron Leader Steve Long.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 27 Feb 2010, 13:24
by energo
Updated F-35 pilot rooster, in chronological order:

1. Jon Beesley (Chief test pilot, LMCO)
2. Jeff "Slim" Knowles (LMCO)
3. Lt Col. James "Flipper" Kromberg (first USAF pilot)
4. Graham "G.T." Tomlinson (first international and lead STOVL test pilot, BAE Systems)
5. Maj. Joseph T. "O.D." Bachmann (first USMC pilot)
6. David "Doc" Nelson (LMCO)
7. Sqn. Ldr. Steve Long (first UK service pilot, Royal Air Force)
8. Lt. Col. Fred Schenk (USMC)


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 02 Mar 2010, 00:57
by LMAggie
BF-1 flight 37 was Saturday.
BF-3 flight 8 was today.

Unread postPosted: 02 Mar 2010, 00:59
by SpudmanWP
LMAggie, what do you think of Carter's desire to use 3 LRIP F-35s as part of SDD and building an additional F-35C for SDD?

Unread postPosted: 02 Mar 2010, 06:40
by LMAggie
Personally, I think it would be a smart move if it were to happen. It is the only way to recover schedule slips caused in the factory/flightline. The LRIP birds would be temporary loaners so there not much cost or force impact to the govt. I think 'CF-X' is the only real impact cost wise.

Unread postPosted: 02 Mar 2010, 06:54
by SpudmanWP
Someone on another board mentioned that SDD airframes had unique wiring & sensors that are not applicable to ITO&E (where the borrowed LRIP F-35 will go after SDD) F-35s and vice versa.

What would be involved in making a LRIP F-35 a SDD F-35 and then to an ITO&E F-35?

Unread postPosted: 02 Mar 2010, 09:59
by energo
LMAggie wrote:BF-1 flight 37 was Saturday.
BF-3 flight 8 was today.


Indeed, thank's!

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 02 Mar 2010, 10:37
by seruriermarshal
Thanks for information , any news about AF-1 and BF-4 ?

Unread postPosted: 02 Mar 2010, 16:33
by energo
BF-1 flight 37
Saturday Feb. 27. Info to come.

BF-3 flight 6
Feb. 20.

BF-3 flight 7
Feb. 24.

BF-3 flight 8 (overall flight 159)
March 1. BF-3 accomplished a 2.7 hour sortie with Doc Nelson as the pilot.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 02 Mar 2010, 19:33
by Pecker
energo wrote:BF-1 flight 37
Saturday Feb. 27. Info to come.

BF-3 flight 6
Feb. 20.

BF-3 flight 7
Feb. 24.


BF-1 flight 37
Saturday Feb. 27. 0.4hr sortie, flying qualities and slow landing.

BF-3 flight 6
Feb. 20. Pilot familiarisation.

BF-3 flight 7
Feb. 24. Pilot familiarisation.

Unread postPosted: 02 Mar 2010, 21:29
by LMAggie
Good question about the 'orange wire.' It really depends on the kind of tests expected to be performed. Flight science and vehicle systems instro is typically more intrusive than mission systems instro. I don't see any reason why instro would keep you from fighting a war, as long as all of the production wiring is installed and working.

Unread postPosted: 03 Mar 2010, 05:57
by johnwill
SpudmanWP said "What would be involved in making a LRIP F-35 a SDD F-35 and then to an ITO&E F-35?"

An SDD airplane requires much redesign of an LRIP airplane to accomodate the sensors, wiring, and data system. Sensors (thousands) require space, access, bracketry, etc. Wiring requires routing holes, bracketry, etc. Special routing holes usually require local beef-up to maintain structural strength. The data system (sensor power supplies, signal conditioning, recording equipment, telemetering equipment) usually displaces some production equipment, requires power and control cabeling, bracketry, etc. For example, the F-16 data package replaced the ammo drum and gun. All these mods must be made to an LRIP airplane before it could perform SDD missions.

Then, to convert and SDD airplane to IOT&E, the data package would have to be removed so the displaced production equipment could be reinstalled. It would probably not be necessary to remove the sensors and wiring, but the extra weight would impact airplane performance.

Unread postPosted: 03 Mar 2010, 06:15
by SpudmanWP
Thanks for the SDD info. I guess we will have to wait till May to see how LM will handle it.

Unread postPosted: 03 Mar 2010, 06:22
by LMAggie
On F-35, the mission systems birds have omitted many of the VS test sensors so that really helps cut down on extra wiring (weight). Also on mission systems birds, the data acquisition system is a separate store that is stowed in the internal weapons bay. Its easily removeable, and no A/C components have to be removed. You definately will have the weight-penalty for the extra wiring going to the components being monitored.

However, as johnwill mentioned, flight sciences aircraft are much more integrated into the jet. The air data boom itself requires massive internal real estate.

I'd be curious to see if the govt took the instro-ed LRIP jets after LM's testing and put them permanently in the EAFB test squadron. You know you're gonna need instroed jets at EAFB full time, might as well get one already instroed and compatible with the TM facilities there.

Unread postPosted: 03 Mar 2010, 18:37
by f35phixer
there will be about 20 -25 OT jets that will have DART pod installed. this will be MS data, that's what OT wants, to analyze that data for mission suit/effect etc. We will use the SDD FS jets for all VS envelope expansion requirements. Yes, FOT&E will use SDD jets to continue testing jets. What will be interesting is WHO'S will they be. NO MORE TSPIR is a GREAT THING! I can only hope, we get these jet, we run the test plan etc etc...

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2010, 01:33
by LMAggie
BF-1 back in the air today; flight 38.

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2010, 03:12
by VarkVet
LMAggie wrote:BF-1 back in the air today; flight 38.


Today is Saturday?

Sounds like a lot of people getting paid overtime with such a cost critical program? Well everybody but the active duty Navy chase crew!

Why couldn’t that sortie wait until Monday?

Tax Payer
:oops:

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2010, 03:24
by seruriermarshal
LMAggie wrote:BF-1 back in the air today; flight 38.


Great News , thanks for send it .

:D

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2010, 05:12
by SpudmanWP
VarkVet wrote:Why couldn’t that sortie wait until Monday?


They probably have other flights scheduled for Monday ;)

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2010, 05:22
by Ztex
VarkVet wrote:
LMAggie wrote:BF-1 back in the air today; flight 38.


Today is Saturday?

Sounds like a lot of people getting paid overtime with such a cost critical program? Well everybody but the active duty Navy chase crew!

Why couldn’t that sortie wait until Monday?

Tax Payer
:oops:


Wait...so everyone is freaking out that the program is behind schedule and therefore is costing a bunch extra...and then they work on Saturday, trying to do what they can to catch up and some one freaks out about that??

:roll: :roll:

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2010, 05:40
by SpudmanWP
Dammed if you do, Dammed if you don't.

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2010, 06:04
by LMAggie
VarkVet wrote:
LMAggie wrote:BF-1 back in the air today; flight 38.


Today is Saturday?

Sounds like a lot of people getting paid overtime with such a cost critical program? Well everybody but the active duty Navy chase crew!

Why couldn’t that sortie wait until Monday?

Tax Payer
:oops:


JSF is working 24/7. That's how many factories/businesses work. And for the guy that screams for JSF to just get it done to complain about flying on Sat is just hilarious. I mean...wow...

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2010, 17:52
by SpudmanWP
When flights happen, after the fact, are hardly secret.

Just ask the of people who camp out outside the field watching for activity. Anyone with a pair of binoculars or a zoom lens could tell you the same thing.

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2010, 20:54
by gosmack
Agreed. It's one thing to give specific facts on the flights themselves. i.e. Flight XXX AF-1 was taken up to 48,000 feet at Mach .9 to explore the envelope of 9+ G flying qualities. We obviously don't want anyone to have specific classified data on aircraft performance or systems.

When each post relates to the length of the flight, who flew the jet, and a very basic description of what was accomplished isn't exactly classified data. There are plenty of people waiting at the fences of the airfield, watching/taking pictures/keeping track of the flight test program. If the test flights themselves were this secretive, then we wouldn't have youtube videos of BF-1 performing a STOL landing, or updates from Lockmart about flight test milestones, let alone interviews with test pilots.

As long as no classified data is being released, this isn't harmful. I think many would agree the F-35 needs as much good press as possible. Not saying there is anything wrong with it. The jet is amazing, but there are plenty of people who think otherwise.

Unread postPosted: 08 Mar 2010, 13:32
by fiskerwad
VarkVet wrote:
LMAggie wrote:BF-1 back in the air today; flight 38.


Today is Saturday?

Sounds like a lot of people getting paid overtime with such a cost critical program? Well everybody but the active duty Navy chase crew!

Why couldn’t that sortie wait until Monday?

Tax Payer
:oops:


That would be true for the union guys, Vark, but the salaried guys I worked with were salary-exempt meaning exempt from OT pay. With LM's current policy of working at least 10% OT for free I'm sure the salaried guys wish they were part of the bargaining unit.
fisk

Unread postPosted: 11 Mar 2010, 10:31
by Lieven
Off topic OPSEC posts were moved to a <a href="f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-13724.html">separate thread</a> and so will future posts about OPSEC. If anyone has an issue with a particular post, just click the 'Report this post to a moderator' link and we'll take action if needed.

And as a gentle (and I'm sure also completely unnecessary) reminder to all people who are actually involved with the program <a href="f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-3389.html">Warning regarding classified information</a>.

Unread postPosted: 11 Mar 2010, 16:29
by energo
BF-1 flight 38
Saturday March 6, a 0.7 hour flight with Jon Beesley as pilot. This was Beesleys first STOVL-mode flight and the second pilot to convert to STOVL-mode.

BF-1 flight 39
Monday March 8, 0.7 hour sortie.

BF-1 flight 40
Wednesday March 10. Graham Tomlison pilted a 1.4 hour flight. Accomplished were four takeoffs, three hot pit refuelings, flight at 40 knots and four slow landings down to 75 knots. It officially counts as one test flight as the engine was not shut down between landings. Full story and Video

BF-3 flight 9
Also on March 10 RAF Sqd. Ldr. Steve Long piloted BF-3 for a 1 hour flight.

BF-3 flight 10
Also March 10. Lt. Col Schenk flew a 1.2 hour sortie.

Source: Lockheed Martin



B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 11 Mar 2010, 20:28
by neptune
Sean Meade at Aviation Week ARES Blog has the video of the March 10 flight of BF-01.

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/defense :cheers:

Unread postPosted: 30 Mar 2010, 14:39
by loke
I hope that there have been some test flights since 11 March!?

Has LM stopped announcing them?

Unread postPosted: 30 Mar 2010, 16:07
by Conan
loke wrote:I hope that there have been some test flights since 11 March!?

Has LM stopped announcing them?


A pretty important one was made on the 18th of March that was publicised quite widely...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wcC7Ps9cHsY

:D

Unread postPosted: 31 Mar 2010, 08:27
by loke
Conan wrote:
loke wrote:I hope that there have been some test flights since 11 March!?

Has LM stopped announcing them?


A pretty important one was made on the 18th of March that was publicised quite widely...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wcC7Ps9cHsY

:D

Ah, thanks, I did notice that one however I failed to notice the date.

My question should perhaps then be rephrased "I hope that there have been some test flights since 18 March".

Or have they stopped announcing all test flights, and announce only some of them, like the March 18 test flight?

Unread postPosted: 07 Apr 2010, 20:19
by Shaken
I'm sure our buddy Energo will update the recent flights list near future, but I can at least point out his front page article on BF-04's April 7th first flight (the first mission systems-equipped F-35).

http://www.f-16.net/news_article4053.html

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2010, 01:05
by SpudmanWP
Here is a list of BF-4's Block 0.5 MS functionality.

Image

Unread postPosted: 21 Apr 2010, 10:02
by loke
Shaken wrote:I'm sure our buddy Energo will update the recent flights list near future, but I can at least point out his front page article on BF-04's April 7th first flight (the first mission systems-equipped F-35).

http://www.f-16.net/news_article4053.html

Seems clear that either Energo does not have time to keep up, or LM has decided to not publish all test flights anymore.


FORT WORTH, Texas, April 20 /PRNewswire/ -- The seventh Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) F-35 Lightning II flight test aircraft took to the skies for the first time today, with the overall objective of validating the F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variant's weapons suite.


http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-lockheed-martin-f-35a-will-test-weapons-91665819.html

Seven a/c -- starting to look better now! :D

Unread postPosted: 21 Apr 2010, 10:19
by energo
loke wrote:Seems clear that either Energo does not have time to keep up, or LM has decided to not publish all test flights anymore.


Hi Loke!

I can assure that we are keeping track of the flights, but you're right; it is time consuming to piece things together accurately. In particular as the number of flights and test planes increases. Could be a full time job soon!

Quick update on yesterday:

* AF-2 first flight
* AF-1 flew twice
* Overall flights: 175

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 21 Apr 2010, 10:45
by sextusempiricus
energo wrote:
loke wrote:Seems clear that either Energo does not have time to keep up, or LM has decided to not publish all test flights anymore.


Hi Loke!

I can assure that we are keeping track of the flights, but you're right; it is time consuming to piece things together accurately. In particular as the number of flights and test planes increases. Could be a full time job soon!

Quick update on yesterday:

* AF-2 first flight
* AF-1 flew twice
* Overall flights: 175

B. Bolsøy
Oslo


So AF-1 is actually back in the air!? Well, that's good to know. Looks like maybe LM is starting to get that they either fly this baby more or they're going to get hung by their gonads...

Unread postPosted: 21 Apr 2010, 13:49
by seruriermarshal
energo wrote:
loke wrote:Seems clear that either Energo does not have time to keep up, or LM has decided to not publish all test flights anymore.


Hi Loke!

I can assure that we are keeping track of the flights, but you're right; it is time consuming to piece things together accurately. In particular as the number of flights and test planes increases. Could be a full time job soon!

Quick update on yesterday:

* AF-2 first flight
* AF-1 flew twice
* Overall flights: 175

B. Bolsøy
Oslo


Great news energo , thanks for that .

:D

Unread postPosted: 21 Apr 2010, 15:04
by Ztex
Good news indeed!

I was out at the field waiting for something to happen yesterday...I guess my timing was off. rats....

Unread postPosted: 21 Apr 2010, 15:25
by LMAggie
sextusempiricus wrote:
energo wrote:
loke wrote:Seems clear that either Energo does not have time to keep up, or LM has decided to not publish all test flights anymore.


Hi Loke!

I can assure that we are keeping track of the flights, but you're right; it is time consuming to piece things together accurately. In particular as the number of flights and test planes increases. Could be a full time job soon!

Quick update on yesterday:

* AF-2 first flight
* AF-1 flew twice
* Overall flights: 175

B. Bolsøy
Oslo


So AF-1 is actually back in the air!? Well, that's good to know. Looks like maybe LM is starting to get that they either fly this baby more or they're going to get hung by their gonads...

Yes LM just realized that this week and decided it was a good day to fly. :doh:

Unread postPosted: 21 Apr 2010, 23:11
by sextusempiricus
LMAggie wrote:
sextusempiricus wrote:
energo wrote:
loke wrote:Seems clear that either Energo does not have time to keep up, or LM has decided to not publish all test flights anymore.


Hi Loke!

I can assure that we are keeping track of the flights, but you're right; it is time consuming to piece things together accurately. In particular as the number of flights and test planes increases. Could be a full time job soon!

Quick update on yesterday:

* AF-2 first flight
* AF-1 flew twice
* Overall flights: 175

B. Bolsøy
Oslo


So AF-1 is actually back in the air!? Well, that's good to know. Looks like maybe LM is starting to get that they either fly this baby more or they're going to get hung by their gonads...

Yes LM just realized that this week and decided it was a good day to fly. :doh:


You're right, LMAggie, the recent spate of first flights has nothing to do with the beating LM has been getting lately. How silly of me to think that...

Unread postPosted: 24 Apr 2010, 13:55
by seruriermarshal
F-35A AF-1 and F-35A AF-2 flew yesterday .

Unread postPosted: 26 Apr 2010, 19:47
by Ztex
Looks like AF-1 flew (no demo but....during the airshow!!! ) this weekend.

Unread postPosted: 28 Apr 2010, 02:04
by seruriermarshal
yeah , F-35A AF-1 flew Sunday .

Unread postPosted: 28 Apr 2010, 02:14
by LMAggie
The skies above Ft Worth have been very busy lately. :applause:

Unread postPosted: 28 Apr 2010, 22:18
by energo
LMAggie wrote:The skies above Ft Worth have been very busy lately. :applause:


11 flights by AF-1 and AF-2 in just about one week. :thumb:


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 30 Apr 2010, 06:40
by seruriermarshal
F-35A AF-2 flew again .

Unread postPosted: 01 May 2010, 04:26
by seruriermarshal
F-35A AF-1 , F-35A AF-2 , F-35B BF-2 flew 29 April
F-35 five flights 30 April
Overall flights: 197

Unread postPosted: 01 May 2010, 19:19
by energo
seruriermarshal wrote:F-35A AF-1 , F-35A AF-2 , F-35B BF-2 flew 29 April
F-35 five flights 30 April
Overall flights: 197


Thank's for the update! To add to that: 27 of 29 planned flights accomplished in April, and 60 of 58 planned so far this year.

B. Bolsøy/Oslo

? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 12 May 2010, 15:12
by neptune
energo wrote:
seruriermarshal wrote:F-35A AF-1 , F-35A AF-2 , F-35B BF-2 flew 29 April
F-35 five flights 30 April
Overall flights: 197


Thank's for the update! To add to that: 27 of 29 planned flights accomplished in April, and 60 of 58 planned so far this year.

B. Bolsøy/Oslo


What is the latest update for the overall flights? :?:

Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 12 May 2010, 15:41
by energo
neptune wrote:
energo wrote:
seruriermarshal wrote:F-35A AF-1 , F-35A AF-2 , F-35B BF-2 flew 29 April
F-35 five flights 30 April
Overall flights: 197


Thank's for the update! To add to that: 27 of 29 planned flights accomplished in April, and 60 of 58 planned so far this year.

B. Bolsøy/Oslo


What is the latest update for the overall flights? :?:


As of Monday: 206 flights and 264.1 flight hours.

B. Bolsøy/Oslo

RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 13 May 2010, 03:36
by sprstdlyscottsmn
averaging just over a flight per day per airframe and having a 70% code 1 return? Correct me if I'm wrong, but for a flight test program isn't this amazing?

Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 13 May 2010, 22:45
by f35phixer
sprstdlyscottsmn wrote:averaging just over a flight per day per airframe and having a 70% code 1 return? Correct me if I'm wrong, but for a flight test program isn't this amazing?


all I'm going to say is we're not getting many test point flown !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

flights yes, not many TEST POINTS, depends who's metric we go by as to being successful test flight :evil:

RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 13 May 2010, 23:08
by rivetspacer
And how excay do you know this information?

Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 13 May 2010, 23:20
by neptune
f35phixer wrote:
sprstdlyscottsmn wrote:averaging just over a flight per day per airframe and having a 70% code 1 return? Correct me if I'm wrong, but for a flight test program isn't this amazing?


all I'm going to say is we're not getting many test point flown !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

flights yes, not many TEST POINTS, depends who's metric we go by as to being successful test flight :evil:


Not many weeks ago, I and others were complaining about "Hangar Queens". Now, we have passed 200 flights :cheers: and other than "fam. flights" for new pilots, we would expect all test flights to be flying test points. Not sure I understand boring holes in the sky, if you are not flying a test point? :bang: Unless these are maintenance Test Hops, but we are at 70% code 1 :poke: "Two turnin', two burnin", Neptune.

Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 14 May 2010, 00:23
by sextusempiricus
f35phixer wrote:
sprstdlyscottsmn wrote:averaging just over a flight per day per airframe and having a 70% code 1 return? Correct me if I'm wrong, but for a flight test program isn't this amazing?


all I'm going to say is we're not getting many test point flown !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

flights yes, not many TEST POINTS, depends who's metric we go by as to being successful test flight :evil:


Thank you, f35phixer - who, as most of you should know, is IN the F-35 program - for asserting what I and other skeptics suspected two weeks ago: lots of hops, to look good on paper and say, "See, we're picking up the pace of testing," but not many test points flown, due to an overly cautious approach to flight testing, in the best case, or to accumulate flights largely as a PR stunt, in the worst case. I feel for folks like f35phixer, who, through no fault of their own, are hostage to LM's incompetent and dare I say almost criminal corporate mismanagement of the program.

RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 14 May 2010, 01:12
by spazsinbad
sexyempty, as if you know. Talk about jump on the f35phixer bandwagon now. At least you are off the SweetyPie bandwagon.

RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 14 May 2010, 01:25
by dragorv
1st... for those of us who don't know, what exactly is a "test point"?

Even if the flights aren't finding new data every single day, the plane is still flying and is apparently performing excellently. Wouldn't you take that over no flights at all?

Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 14 May 2010, 01:31
by LMAggie
f35phixer wrote:
sprstdlyscottsmn wrote:averaging just over a flight per day per airframe and having a 70% code 1 return? Correct me if I'm wrong, but for a flight test program isn't this amazing?


all I'm going to say is we're not getting many test point flown !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

flights yes, not many TEST POINTS, depends who's metric we go by as to being successful test flight :evil:


First of all, this info is FOUO as stated in the FTRT tool. And if you don't have access to FTRT or Moose, then there's really no way you would know this.

Second of all, you are mistaken. Hoffschwelle has the V16 planned vs actual metrics; I suggest you take a look at them and I think you would be surprised by the fleet level activity. Maybe you are referring to one or a few flights, but other flights are getting MORE than planned.

However, you bring up a very valid point. We put a lot of emphasis on flights which really mean nothing. It demonstrates maturity of the design, but test points are what close out SDD and deliver capability to the warfighter.

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 14 May 2010, 01:39
by LMAggie
dragorv wrote:1st... for those of us who don't know, what exactly is a "test point"?

Even if the flights aren't finding new data every single day, the plane is still flying and is apparently performing excellently. Wouldn't you take that over no flights at all?


A test point is either a maneuver, or a set of maneuvers, that validates a requirement for the customer. When you've flown all of your test points, then you've demonstrated to the customer that you are giving them the product that you promised.

However, flights are very beneficial. You learn alot about the aircraft every time you start up and shut down. You also find the 'bugs' alot quicker that way, which makes the majority of the test program more efficient.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 14 May 2010, 03:34
by f35phixer
we don't have time or money to just fly. we have test plans and envelope we MUST expand for ITC pilots to get to IOC.

yes flying does bring maturity into the platform. But it is envelope we need we're not going to the corners we need to.

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 14 May 2010, 03:38
by dragorv
LMAggie wrote:A test point is either a maneuver, or a set of maneuvers, that validates a requirement for the customer. When you've flown all of your test points, then you've demonstrated to the customer that you are giving them the product that you promised.

However, flights are very beneficial. You learn alot about the aircraft every time you start up and shut down. You also find the 'bugs' alot quicker that way, which makes the majority of the test program more efficient.


That's what I had assumed about the flights, that you never learn nothing. Thank you!

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 14 May 2010, 03:56
by seruriermarshal
as a test point :

Data from the sensors already ran through BF-4's fusion engine on its April 7 first flight and Lockheed will step up the amount of data fusion as sensors are added and moving to higher software block numbers.

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 14 May 2010, 04:07
by LMAggie
f35phixer wrote:we don't have time or money to just fly. we have test plans and envelope we MUST expand for ITC pilots to get to IOC.

yes flying does bring maturity into the platform. But it is envelope we need we're not going to the corners we need to.


agree 100%

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 16 May 2010, 06:07
by sprstdlyscottsmn
Thank you Aggie and Phixer for the perspective. If he jets are coming down code one then maintenance must be happy.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 17 May 2010, 13:00
by f35phixer
agree, the jets are performing well ! And bodes GREAT for BF-04 that all VS systems continue to operate with no issues. We've had more MS issues with flight science jets then i've wanted to deal with :lol:

Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 20 May 2010, 01:58
by sferrin
sextusempiricus wrote:
f35phixer wrote:
sprstdlyscottsmn wrote:averaging just over a flight per day per airframe and having a 70% code 1 return? Correct me if I'm wrong, but for a flight test program isn't this amazing?


all I'm going to say is we're not getting many test point flown !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

flights yes, not many TEST POINTS, depends who's metric we go by as to being successful test flight :evil:


Thank you, f35phixer - who, as most of you should know, is IN the F-35 program - for asserting what I and other skeptics suspected two weeks ago: lots of hops, to look good on paper and say, "See, we're picking up the pace of testing," but not many test points flown, due to an overly cautious approach to flight testing, in the best case, or to accumulate flights largely as a PR stunt, in the worst case. I feel for folks like f35phixer, who, through no fault of their own, are hostage to LM's incompetent and dare I say almost criminal corporate mismanagement of the program.



What exactly does "f35phixer" claim to be? I'd think anybody in the loop (who values their career anyway) would keep their mouths shut.

Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 20 May 2010, 03:38
by sextusempiricus
sferrin wrote:
sextusempiricus wrote:
f35phixer wrote:
sprstdlyscottsmn wrote:averaging just over a flight per day per airframe and having a 70% code 1 return? Correct me if I'm wrong, but for a flight test program isn't this amazing?


all I'm going to say is we're not getting many test point flown !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

flights yes, not many TEST POINTS, depends who's metric we go by as to being successful test flight :evil:


Thank you, f35phixer - who, as most of you should know, is IN the F-35 program - for asserting what I and other skeptics suspected two weeks ago: lots of hops, to look good on paper and say, "See, we're picking up the pace of testing," but not many test points flown, due to an overly cautious approach to flight testing, in the best case, or to accumulate flights largely as a PR stunt, in the worst case. I feel for folks like f35phixer, who, through no fault of their own, are hostage to LM's incompetent and dare I say almost criminal corporate mismanagement of the program.



What exactly does "f35phixer" claim to be? I'd think anybody in the loop (who values their career anyway) would keep their mouths shut.


Ah, so you think that the best way to get ahead in the world is to keep your mouth shut when you see something's wrong? How despicable. Well, that's certainly worked for LM's PR machine, you know, hiding the truth and all...

RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 20 May 2010, 03:53
by rivetspacer
And what is "The truth and all?"
what proof do you have of such speculation?
There is quite a bit of transparency, I'm curious what you "know" to be truth.

RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 20 May 2010, 05:13
by geogen
rs -

With all due respect, it's better not to engage or invite certain folks, if you know what I mean. And while I personally have the highest respects for your service (as you imply, per your public claim), I will unfortunately have to continue to counter the inherently flawed Program (and strategic Tacair recap policy accordingly) as it currently stands. God speed.

RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 20 May 2010, 13:10
by rivetspacer
Your right

Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 20 May 2010, 23:58
by f35phixer
sferrin wrote:
sextusempiricus wrote:
f35phixer wrote:
sprstdlyscottsmn wrote:averaging just over a flight per day per airframe and having a 70% code 1 return? Correct me if I'm wrong, but for a flight test program isn't this amazing?


all I'm going to say is we're not getting many test point flown !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

flights yes, not many TEST POINTS, depends who's metric we go by as to being successful test flight :evil:


Thank you, f35phixer - who, as most of you should know, is IN the F-35 program - for asserting what I and other skeptics suspected two weeks ago: lots of hops, to look good on paper and say, "See, we're picking up the pace of testing," but not many test points flown, due to an overly cautious approach to flight testing, in the best case, or to accumulate flights largely as a PR stunt, in the worst case. I feel for folks like f35phixer, who, through no fault of their own, are hostage to LM's incompetent and dare I say almost criminal corporate mismanagement of the program.



What exactly does "f35phixer" claim to be? I'd think anybody in the loop (who values their career anyway) would keep their mouths shut.


I'm a janitor, OK !

RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 21 May 2010, 05:14
by LMAggie
...and I deliver the office supplies!

RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 21 May 2010, 13:37
by popcorn
I'm a janitor, OK !
...and I deliver the office supplies!

Great stuff LOL

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: ? Update on overall flights?

Unread postPosted: 21 May 2010, 14:38
by fiskerwad
LMAggie wrote:...and I deliver the office supplies!


Does that include the red Swingline staplers!? LOL!
fisk

Unread postPosted: 23 May 2010, 03:28
by VarkVet
One and Two arrived Monday and started flying again on Hump Day”
Sweet … we may have a product
I was actually surprised :notworthy:

Unread postPosted: 23 May 2010, 04:33
by seruriermarshal
VarkVet wrote:One and Two arrived Monday and started flying again on Hump Day”
Sweet … we may have a product
I was actually surprised :notworthy:


You take any photo ?

Unread postPosted: 01 Jun 2010, 22:09
by Ztex
BF-4 flew again today...

Did a touch and go too..

Image

Image

Image

Unread postPosted: 01 Jun 2010, 22:13
by spazsinbad
CF-01 First Taxi Test: http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/photos/p ... a1413a668b

"CF-01 First Taxi Test
by Sean Meade
The Joint Strike Fighter program’s CF-01 on the ground in Fort Worth, Texas, on May 28, awaiting its first flight. The carrier (“C”) variant of the F-35 program is the last to be developed and is intended to replace F/A-18s among other U.S. Navy aircraft. This prototype should relocate to Patuxent River, Md., later in the year. Credit: Carl Richards"

Image

Unread postPosted: 01 Jun 2010, 23:21
by f35phixer
Ztex wrote:BF-4 flew again today...

Did a touch and go too..

Image

Image

Image


come on babe, come to papa :D

Unread postPosted: 01 Jun 2010, 23:22
by f35phixer
spazsinbad wrote:CF-01 First Taxi Test: http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/photos/p ... a1413a668b

"CF-01 First Taxi Test
by Sean Meade
The Joint Strike Fighter program’s CF-01 on the ground in Fort Worth, Texas, on May 28, awaiting its first flight. The carrier (“C”) variant of the F-35 program is the last to be developed and is intended to replace F/A-18s among other U.S. Navy aircraft. This prototype should relocate to Patuxent River, Md., later in the year. Credit: Carl Richards"

Image


Now i'm happy, see that gentleman, that's what you call a nose gear !!!

Unread postPosted: 01 Jun 2010, 23:44
by dragorv
I love the look of it. Great pictures!

Unread postPosted: 02 Jun 2010, 00:53
by seruriermarshal
Great pics , thanks guys !

Unread postPosted: 02 Jun 2010, 02:15
by LMAggie
BF-4 = solid airplane . A sign of great things to come!

Unread postPosted: 02 Jun 2010, 06:16
by seruriermarshal
LMAggie , any more information about F-35C ? Will it fly tomorrow ?

Unread postPosted: 03 Jun 2010, 02:27
by LMAggie
seruriermarshal wrote:LMAggie , any more information about F-35C ? Will it fly tomorrow ?

Can't say anything more than 'close'. In true diva fashion, she will decide when she's ready.

Unread postPosted: 03 Jun 2010, 03:48
by madrat
I'm more excited for this ship to sail than any previous airframe. This one should be pretty good.

Unread postPosted: 03 Jun 2010, 04:55
by seruriermarshal
LMAggie wrote:
seruriermarshal wrote:LMAggie , any more information about F-35C ? Will it fly tomorrow ?

Can't say anything more than 'close'. In true diva fashion, she will decide when she's ready.


Thanks , hope Soon can take more photos and videos about CF-1 .

:)

Unread postPosted: 03 Jun 2010, 17:17
by bjr1028
Needs to take a trip to the paint shop first.

Unread postPosted: 03 Jun 2010, 20:03
by LMAggie
bjr1028 wrote:Needs to take a trip to the paint shop first.

No, it will fly green like some of the previous airplanes have for first flight.

Unread postPosted: 04 Jun 2010, 01:19
by f35phixer
:D :) :o :shock: 8) :lol: :wink: :!: :applause: :crazypilot: :pint: :cheers: :salute: :thanks: :inlove:

that's all i'm going to say !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Unread postPosted: 04 Jun 2010, 01:54
by munny
sweet! All 3 can fly :)

Unread postPosted: 05 Jun 2010, 19:14
by f35phixer
f35phixer wrote::D :) :o :shock: 8) :lol: :wink: :!: :applause: :crazypilot: :pint: :cheers: :salute: :thanks: :inlove:

that's all i'm going to say !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


noooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo :x

Wire Issues Stall 1st Flight of F-35 Carrier Model

Unread postPosted: 05 Jun 2010, 19:49
by neptune
f35phixer wrote:
f35phixer wrote::D :) :o :shock: 8) :lol: :wink: :!: :applause: :crazypilot: :pint: :cheers: :salute: :thanks: :inlove:

that's all i'm going to say !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


noooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo :x


Wire Issues Stall 1st Flight of F-35 Carrier Model By JOHN REED @ Defense NEWS

Wiring problems have delayed the first flight of the carrier version of the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter by "several days," said a spokesman for Lockheed Martin, the aircraft's prime contractor. The plane, an F-35C known as CF-1, was slated to take its first flight from Lockheed Martin's facility at Fort Worth, Texas, on June 2. Company spokesman Chris Geisel described the problems, discovered during preparation for the first flight, as minor.
"The fix is straightforward and is not related to the aircraft's design," Geisel said. Lockheed expects to move forward with the jet's first flight in "the next several days," he added. :cry:

As of June 1, the company said it was three test flights ahead of schedule for 2010, having completed 93 total flights with its conventional takeoff-and-landing F-35A and its short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing F-35B. :cheers:

RE: Wire Issues Stall 1st Flight of F-35 Carrier Model

Unread postPosted: 06 Jun 2010, 10:58
by f35phixer
yes we have had wiring ISSUES from the very beginning on these jets, it's been very frustrating but as stated easily fixed !

But I'm really talking about BF-04.

Unread postPosted: 06 Jun 2010, 20:10
by VarkVet
Interesting, JSF has herpes? :shrug:

Source: jsf.mil

Unread postPosted: 06 Jun 2010, 20:55
by LMAggie
I think that's where the drag chute braces tie into the substructure. I think this picture is AA-1, and for some reason it always had protruding head fasteners where the drag chute fitting would tie in. The drag chute fitting is only used during high AOA testing (which was never done on AA-1 which makes it even stranger). Hopefully someone else can back me up on this.

Unread postPosted: 06 Jun 2010, 20:58
by LMAggie
BTW, a strange new airplane flew today from NAS JRB. :wink:

Unread postPosted: 06 Jun 2010, 21:12
by VarkVet
LMAggie wrote:BTW, a strange new airplane flew today from NAS JRB. :wink:


Sweet :applause:

I hope live feeds are available when she does her first carrier landing and launch :thumb:

Unread postPosted: 06 Jun 2010, 21:24
by Ztex
WOOT!

Congrats!

Unread postPosted: 06 Jun 2010, 21:27
by VarkVet
LMAggie wrote:I think that's where the drag chute braces tie into the substructure


Makes sense!

Pretty important test to find departure/recovery limits!

Unread postPosted: 06 Jun 2010, 23:53
by seruriermarshal
LMAggie wrote:BTW, a strange new airplane flew today from NAS JRB. :wink:


Wow F-35C make it first fly !

Unread postPosted: 07 Jun 2010, 01:25
by sextusempiricus
This is very good news for the program. Congrats to all involved, and kudos for working on a Sunday. Here are a couple of links with pics:

http://www.fencecheck.com/forums/index. ... icseen#new

http://www.bensware.com/photos/events/F35CCF1First/

Unread postPosted: 07 Jun 2010, 01:47
by sextusempiricus
BTW, the F-35 will never be a good-looking aircraft, but the C model is definitely the least bad-looking of the three. The larger wings and tails certainly make it look much better.

Unread postPosted: 07 Jun 2010, 06:01
by SpudmanWP
..deleted

Unread postPosted: 07 Jun 2010, 17:39
by neptune
VarkVet wrote:
LMAggie wrote:BTW, a strange new airplane flew today from NAS JRB. :wink:


Sweet :applause:

I hope live feeds are available when she does her first carrier landing and launch :thumb:


Congrats!

:cheers: :D

Same for EMALS and JPALS

I'm hoping that while at PAX they will also test at Lakehurst on EMALS.

With EMALS, JPALS and F-35C the US Navy is moving an order of magnitude to a new generation for aviation. 8)

Unread postPosted: 07 Jun 2010, 23:06
by neptune
JSF Carrier Variant Meets First Flight Goals By Graham Warwick graham_warwick@aviationweek.com
-Handling qualities of the F-35C Joint Strike Fighter “exceeded expectations” on the June 6 first flight, says Lockheed Martin test pilot Jeff Knowles. Knowles says the aircraft approached at 135 kt., compared with 155 kt. for the smaller-winged F-35A and B variants at the same 40,000-lb. gross weight. Takeoff rotation speed was 15-20 kt. slower, he says. The 57-min. first flight focused on gear-down handling and formation flying with the F/A-18 chase aircraft in “an early look at handling around the carrier”, says Knowles, adding “The approach was very stable, with good roll response.” The landing gear and arrestor hook were cycled and throttle slams conducted to check engine operation. This was the first flight of a production-configuration Pratt &amp; Whitney F135 engine, says Tom Burbage, executive vice president and general manager, F-35 program integration. The aircraft is expected to complete up to 15 flights from Lockheed’s Fort Worth, Texas, plant then undergo structural-coupling and ground-vibration testing before ferrying to the U.S. Navy’s Patuxent River, Md., test center in October. Two more F-35Cs are on the flight line and expected to ferry to Pax by year-end. Burbage says drop testing of an F-35C ground-test article at Vought Aircraft Industries is about 80% complete, including high sink rates with external stores, with no loading or structural issues.
- The first JSF mission-system test aircraft, BF-4, is planned to ferry to Pax River today to join the first three F-35B short-take-off-and-landing test aircraft.
- The first conventional-takeoff-and-landing F-35A mission-system test aircraft, AF-3, is expected to fly this week and ferry to Edwards AFB, Calif., next month to join AF-1 and 2.
- In its mark-up of Fiscal 2011 defense authorization legislation, the House Armed Services Committee has tied F-35 funding to key test milestones, including flying the first F-35C and delivering 12 development aircraft to service test centers by the end of 2010. The final two of those 12 aircraft, AF-4 and BF-5, have been completed, says Burbage, acknowledging test aircraft have been up to six months late. AF-4 is planned to ferry to Edwards in the third quarter, while BF-5 is to be delivered to Pax by year-end.

Congrats to program personnel for success from the hardwork. Looks like that janitor at NAS/ JRB FW may need help emptying ashtrays, real soon. Best Wishes. :D

Unread postPosted: 08 Jun 2010, 00:20
by seruriermarshal
So they 'll take F-35A AF-3 fly this week .

:)

Unread postPosted: 08 Jun 2010, 01:41
by popcorn
Pardon my ignorance but will A, B and C variants have to through all the identical test points in addition to the unique testing requirements specific to each model (eg. vertical landing for B, catapult takeoff/arrested landing for C)? What areas of the test program would benefit from commonality?

Unread postPosted: 08 Jun 2010, 02:12
by LMAggie
popcorn wrote:Pardon my ignorance but will A, B and C variants have to through all the identical test points in addition to the unique testing requirements specific to each model (eg. vertical landing for B, catapult takeoff/arrested landing for C)? What areas of the test program would benefit from commonality?


Mission systems.....which is a huge chunk of testing.

Unread postPosted: 08 Jun 2010, 03:09
by popcorn
LMAggie wrote:
popcorn wrote:Pardon my ignorance but will A, B and C variants have to through all the identical test points in addition to the unique testing requirements specific to each model (eg. vertical landing for B, catapult takeoff/arrested landing for C)? What areas of the test program would benefit from commonality?


Mission systems.....which is a huge chunk of testing.

Thanks, I did some surfing to better understand what is meant by "mission systems" .. definbitely a huge chunk as you put it... good reading article and impressive amount of work already done beforehand..
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/pres ... -test.html

Unread postPosted: 08 Jun 2010, 03:15
by f35phixer
sextusempiricus wrote:BTW, the F-35 will never be a good-looking aircraft, but the C model is definitely the least bad-looking of the three. The larger wings and tails certainly make it look much better.


I have to say when you are up close and look nose on she is a beauty, i LOVE the look of her. DEADLY !

Unread postPosted: 09 Jun 2010, 01:33
by popcorn
f35phixer wrote:
sextusempiricus wrote:BTW, the F-35 will never be a good-looking aircraft, but the C model is definitely the least bad-looking of the three. The larger wings and tails certainly make it look much better.


I have to say when you are up close and look nose on she is a beauty, i LOVE the look of her. DEADLY !


Compared to the alternative X-32, the F-35 is incredibly beautiful.. :D

Unread postPosted: 14 Jun 2010, 21:57
by energo
BF-2 flight 30 (first STOVL supersonic flight)

Full story

F-35 Joint Strike Fighter short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) variant flew faster than the speed of sound for the first time June 10, achieving a significant milestone.

The aircraft accelerated to Mach 1.07 (727 miles per hour) on the first in a long series of planned supersonic flights.

The supersonic milestone was achieved on the 30th flight of the F-35B known as BF-2. U.S. Marine Corps pilot Lt. Col. Matt Kelly climbed to 30,000 feet and accelerated to Mach 1.07 in the off-shore supersonic test track near Naval Air Station Patuxent River. Future testing will gradually expand the flight envelope out to the aircraft's top speed of Mach 1.6, which the F-35 is designed to achieve with a full internal weapons load of more than 3,000 pounds. All F-35s are designed to launch internal missiles at maximum supersonic speed, as well as launch internal guided bombs supersonically. During the flight, Kelly accomplished 21 unique test points, including several Integrated Test Blocks to validate roll, pitch, yaw and propulsion performance.

BF-2 is the third F-35 to achieve supersonic flight. Two F-35A conventional takeoff and landing variants also have broken the sound barrier.

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 14 Jun 2010, 22:39
by madrat
Didn't one of the X-35's go supersonic so this would make four of the -35's to go supersonic, right?

Unread postPosted: 14 Jun 2010, 22:48
by spazsinbad
X-35B did a short take-off, supersonic flight and vertical landing, pilot (then) Major Tomassetti USMC.

http://www.airspacemag.com/military-avi ... ion_X.html

"The sortie was to consist of a short takeoff, climbing to 25,000 feet, making a supersonic dash, and returning to the field for a vertical landing. Each event, in and of itself, was not a breakthrough achievement and had been accomplished on a previous X-35B sortie, but putting them all together on one flight would be an aviation first. Previous STOVL aircraft achieved supersonic speeds when they had been put in a steep dive, but today we would up the ante by making a level supersonic dash."
&
"...at 80 knots, after only 200 feet, I vectored the thrust to 60 degrees and the aircraft leapt off the ground. I completed the post-takeoff checks, climbed through 5,000 feet, and converted the aircraft from STOVL mode back to CTOL ..."

Unread postPosted: 01 Jul 2010, 20:31
by joost
BF-1 did it's second vertical landing at PAX the 30th of June, piloted by Graham Tomlinson according to Graham Warwick.

Joost

AF-3 First Flight

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2010, 00:28
by neptune
Lockheed Martin F-35A Becomes Second Variant To Fly With Mission Systems
FORT WORTH, Texas, July 7th, 2010 -- The ninth Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] F-35 Lightning II stealth fighter entered flight testing on Tuesday, becoming the second test jet to fly with the next-generation avionics package that will populate all operational F-35s. The F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variant, known as AF-3, flew for 42 minutes during its first flight.

F-35 Test Pilot Bill Gigliotti took off at 6:20 p.m. and initiated a series of flying-qualities tests in a flight focused on propulsion and vehicle systems operation. Some mission systems data were collected before the flight was curtailed by storms in the area.
:beer:

Flight Test Program Mid-Year Review 2010

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2010, 00:35
by neptune
F-35 Flight Test at the Half-Year Mark
Posted by Graham Warwick at 7/7/2010 2:12 PM CDT

While we weren't looking, the F-35 flight test program has quietly been making a bit of progress - not enough to get Lockheed Martin off the hook, but a trend in the right direction.

The first CTOL F-35A mission-systems test aircraft made its first flight at Fort Worth yesterday evening (July 7). Aircraft AF-3 is the second to be equipped with the radar and other mission avionics - the first was BF-4, the fourth STOVL F-35B, which first flew in April.

AF-3 is the ninth F-35 to fly and joins the fleet at the mid-point of a year in which Lockheed has committed to complete at least 394 flights in an effort to get the long-delayed test program under way. The company ended June with 136 flights in the first six months, 18 more than planned, but just a third of the way to its goal for 2010.

Seven aircraft logged 43 flights in June, against a plan of 28 - a pace of flying that, if maintained, would enable Lockheed to meet its target. And with AF-3 now flying, and three more expected to fly this year, a total of 394 flights looks acheivable. But whether the company can complete the "right" 394 flights is less certain.

That's because generating test flights with the STOVL aircraft continues to be a challenge, largely because of mechanical issues. In the first six months, the four F-35Bs now at Patuxent River logged 75 flights, for an average of just over three per month per aircraft. The two F-35As now at Edwards joined (or rejoined) the test program in April and logged 56 flights - an average of just over nine flights per month per aircraft.

To be fairer and look just at June, the two F-35As each flew nine times, while the four F-35Bs flew a total of 19 times - ranging from seven flights for BF-3 to just two for BF-2. And the first F-35C carrier variant logged six flights over the three weeks since its first flight on June 6.


The good news is that flight testing has uncovered few problems so far. When I visited Pax in June, the STOVL test pilots mentioned an oscillation when refuelling behind a KC-130 and a shimmy when going supersonic, both quickly fixed with flight control tweaks. They all praised the aircraft's ease of flying, particularly in STOVL mode.

Lockheed is working to overcome the availability issues as it aims to average 12 flights per month per aircraft across the test fleet. But with some key milestones for the STOVL aircraft this year ahead of initial sea trials in March 2011, flight testing could remain a concern for the program in the near term. You can read more in the upcoming July 19 issue of Aviation Week & Space Technology.

:cheers:

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/defense

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2010, 11:46
by StolichnayaStrafer
It is very nice to see things moving right along now. Faith and patience will see them going operational soon! :wink:

Re: Flight Test Program Mid-Year Review 2010

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2010, 12:12
by fiskerwad
neptune wrote:<snip>
The good news is that flight testing has uncovered few problems so far. When I visited Pax in June, the STOVL test pilots mentioned an oscillation when refuelling behind a KC-130 and a shimmy when going supersonic, both quickly fixed with flight control tweaks. They all praised the aircraft's ease of flying, particularly in STOVL mode.



Is anyone else impressed that instead of finding problems, LM is "tuning" the flying characteristics of the aircraft?

Is anyone also impressed that tweaking the flight controls takes care of the "bothersome" oscillations and shimmies?

Great news!
fisk
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke's Third Law

RE: Re: Flight Test Program Mid-Year Review 2010

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2010, 12:27
by f35phixer
That's what we do in flight test. We do try to break the jet! M&S only finds some much, We Find, Fix, Fly, Verfiy it's fixed :D Move on to the next spot in the sky!

Flight Test Week ending 11 Jul 10

Unread postPosted: 12 Jul 2010, 04:39
by neptune
By BOB COX rcox@star-telegram.com

http://www.star-telegram.com/2010/07/11 ... z0tR1zJKVM

"Overall we're happy with the way things are going this year," said John Kent, Lockheed F-35 program spokesman.

By week's end, the test program had completed 146 flights this year compared with the 128 planned, a pace that, if, sustained, would enable the full-year goal of 394 flights to be met or exceeded. Another measure of progress is the number of specific tests (test points) achieved: 1,438 completed compared with 1,255 planned.

The 42-minute flight Tuesday of the AF-3, an F-35A conventional takeoff model like those that will be built for the U.S. Air Force, went well until stormy weather cut it short. A second flight later in the week was scrubbed because of the heavy overcast; initial flight tests are conducted under visual flight rules.

Testing of the two F-35A models at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., is going very well, Kent said, while the four F-35B models at Patuxent River, a more complex aircraft, have had a higher incidence of technical problems. "They're things we're glad to have found early," Kent said. "Nothing systemic, just glitches that we've had to fix." :D

F-35 flight summary - passing 300 sorties

Unread postPosted: 21 Jul 2010, 22:15
by energo
F-35 flight summary - passing 300 sorties

2010 year to date, as of July 20:

AF-1 - 30
AF-2 - 34
AF-3 - 4
BF-1 - 25
BF-2 - 15
BF-3 - 27
BF-4 - 17
CF-1 - 14

Total - 166 of 144 planned
Test points - 1604 of 1405 planned

Program overall flights - 303

See also F-35 testing ahead of schedule


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Re: F-35 flight summary - passing 300 sorties

Unread postPosted: 22 Jul 2010, 22:40
by neptune
energo wrote:F-35 flight summary - passing 300 sorties

2010 year to date, as of July 20:

AF-1 - 30
AF-2 - 34
AF-3 - 4
BF-1 - 25
BF-2 - 15
BF-3 - 27
BF-4 - 17
CF-1 - 14

Total - 166 of 144 planned
Test points - 1604 of 1405 planned

Program overall flights - 303

See also F-35 testing ahead of schedule


B. Bolsøy
Oslo


Quietly working away at completing the 2010 goals and schedules. Awesome! :cheers: What a great time the pilots, engineers and maintainers are having. I'm envious of the challenges and opportunities. :notworthy: Best Wishes and thanks Energo!

Re: F-35 flight summary - passing 300 sorties

Unread postPosted: 23 Jul 2010, 07:05
by VarkVet
neptune wrote:Quietly working away at completing the 2010 goals and schedules. Awesome! :cheers: What a great time the pilots, engineers and maintainers are having. I'm envious of the challenges and opportunities. :notworthy: Best Wishes and thanks Energo!


Oh stop it ... GOT GUN?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXg6J9upaCg

Unread postPosted: 23 Jul 2010, 07:28
by VarkVet

Unread postPosted: 24 Jul 2010, 02:12
by VarkVet
AF-3 got number 5 in today ... was trying for 6 then weather came in.

:(

Unread postPosted: 28 Jul 2010, 03:39
by spazsinbad
STOVL F-35 not flying so often July 27, 2010 - Bob Cox

http://startelegram.typepad.com/sky_tal ... often.html

"Give Lockheed Martin CEO Bob Stevens some props for telling the truth, warts and all. Stevens, in the midst of reassuring Wall Street investment analyst Monday that all is well with the the F-35 program, dropped one morsel that was known to some degree, but not in detail.

Flight testing of the F-35B STOVL model intended for the Marines is lagging behind schedule at the Navy's Patuxent River flight test center.

At the end of June, Stevens said, only 74 of 95 test flights planned for the first six months had been conducted. Lockheed spokesman John Kent updated that information after the call, saying 91 flights had been completed as of Tuesday. The goal is to have completed 125 F-35B flights by the end of July.

Stevens said the component “failure rates are higher than predicted” and that Lockheed and the military test managers are working to understand why failures are occurring and how to improve their design and manufacture. Failing components are cooling fans that hold down fuel temperatures, lift fan doors actuators and other switches. Stevens said there have been no failures of key components of the STOVL propulsion systems, the engine or the lift fan system.

The lagging pace of test flights puts more pressure on a program already in the spotlight and facing an aggressive flight testing pace over the next few years to begin to compensate for the already years-long delays in development and soaring cost estimates.

By contrast, testing of the two other models is going well. The two F-35A aircraft being flown at Edwards Air Force Base in California and the one F-35C model, being flown at Fort Worth still, are both completing flights well ahead of plan."

http://startelegram.typepad.com/.a/6a00 ... f85970c-pi (large photo F-35B stol/hover mode)

BF-01 3rd of 50 VL; 270710

Unread postPosted: 29 Jul 2010, 02:08
by neptune
RT @amanda__maureen: JUST SAW THE 3RD EVER F-35 VERTICAL LANDING!, http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-dewline/
:applause:
ARES Blog; Graham Warwick wrote: BF-1, the first F-35B and the one having the most problems, is the only aircraft instrumented and cleared for STOVL flight testing. It has to perform about 50 vertical landings to clear the rest of the fleet to begin STOVL ops. Fleet clearance is needed by year-end for at-sea testing to begin in March 2011. So the pressure is on.,
http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... 329aef79a7 :2c:

F-35 Testing - Behind the Progress

Unread postPosted: 05 Aug 2010, 18:57
by neptune
VarkVet wrote:AF-3 got number 5 in today ... was trying for 6 then weather came in.

:(


Graham Warwick @ Aviation Week

Lockheed Martin has launched an investigation into parts failures that have slowed flight testing of the STOVL F-35B, but the simpler CTOL F-35A continues to rack up flights. Overall the program logged 49 flights in July, against 41 planned, for a year-to-date total of 185 against 159 planned (target for the year being 394).

But the four F-35Bs at Pax River logged only 22 of those flights, eight short of the plan for the month, and the STOVL fleet ended July with a year-to-date total of 96 flights against 124 planned. August has started well, however, with four STOVL flights so far - and, more importantly, four vertical landings in the past week.

Lockheed says the F-35B reliability and flight rate is improving, but it will surely be a challenge to clear the fleet for STOVL operations by year end to pave the way for initial ship operations in March 2011. Testing has been slowed by maintenance issues with cooling fans, lift-fan door actuators, valves and power system components.

The two F-35As and sole F-35C now flying have been much more reliable by comparison. To address the parts failures on the STOVL aircraft, Lockheed says it has "implemented a series of improvement actions with our suppliers, including root-cause and corrective-action processes, executive-level reviews and potential withholding of performance fees."

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/defense/

JSF Jocks; ARES Blog @ AW

Unread postPosted: 24 Aug 2010, 14:53
by neptune
JSF Jocks
Posted by Guy Norris at 8/20/2010 12:50 PM CDT

U.S. Air Force test pilot Lt. Col. Hank "Hog" Griffiths believes he may have flown faster in an F-35 Joint Strike Fighter than anyone else.

Griffith says in June he took the F-35A to 583 KCAS (exceeding Mach 1.2). “I may be the first to fly this fast in the jet so far,” he muses. “The jet handles well, and she just wants to fly fast. It has a monster engine. It looks like an aircraft that’s built around an engine.”

Griffiths, who is also 461st Flight Test Squadron Commander and F-35 Integrated Test Force (ITF) director at Edwards AFB, was the pilot of one of the two F-35As flown to the desert base in May for the start of developmental test and evaluation (DT&E). Griffith was accompanied by Lockheed Martin F-35 Chief Test Pilot Jon Beesley who flew the jets, known as AF-1 and AF-2, nonstop in the first multi-ship, long-range F-35 flight.

Not surprisingly, Griffith is clearly a huge fan of the CTOL version which he says is racking up test points three times faster than scheduled. By the time of my visit earlier this week, the two F-35As had completed 53 sorties and 536 unique test points. The plan called for the pair to have completed 17 sorties and 150 test points by now, meaning that progress is being achieved at roughly three times the expected rate.

But can this be sustained? Griffith believes the answer is yes, but cautions that the more complex testing of the radar and electronic warfare configured aircraft next year could pose more challenges to the rate. Lockheed Martin’s target for the overall ITF test rate is 12 flights per month per aircraft. “That’s really three times per week, but already with the reliability of AF-1 and AF-2 we can schedule a flight every day,” he says.

AF-1 and 2 are focused on flight sciences objectives, including envelope expansion, loads testing, flutter clearance and flying qualities. “Our objective by the end of 2010 is to clear the envelope to 40,000-ft, subsonic with 80% of the potential design limit load,” Griffith says. In June, initial supersonic testing for loads and flutter was completed to around Mach 1.2/580 KCAS and 39,000-ft. Air refueling clearance tests at 15,000-ft are also getting underway, work having already cleared the refueling envelope at 20,000-ft and 30,000-ft.

Even when loaded internally with two 2,000lb GBU-31 Joint Direct Attack Munitions and two AIM-120 AMRAAMs, Griffith says the sheer power of the Pratt & Whitney F135 is evident. “The engine has a lot of thrust. It’s been fun to outrun the F-16 (chase aircraft). They can’t keep up. If we go to full military power the F-16 has to go to afterburner to keep up.”

The current flight tests with weapons are for captive carriage purposes only, as actual weapons tests will come in later phases of the program next year following the arrival (later this year) of AF-3 and AF-4 – the first to come configured with block 0.5 missions systems software. In the meantime Griffith says captive carry tests of AIM-9X Sidewinder air-to-air missiles are likely before long. The overall task of the initial test fleet at Edwards includes development, test and evaluation of propulsion, aerial refueling, logistical support, weapons integration and flight-envelope expansion.

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest


"..racking up test points three times faster than scheduled. ,,, the two F-35As had completed 53 sorties and 536 unique test points...vs. The plan to have completed 17 sorties and 150 test points" :D

Curious, how is the "Sea" Lightning doing?.. and when is it expected to move to PAX? :?:

"B" Lightning? flying or "Hanger Queen"?? :?: :?:

RE: JSF Jocks; ARES Blog @ AW

Unread postPosted: 24 Aug 2010, 15:23
by thg
F-22 Lessons Drive Faster F-35 Testing

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/ ... annel=awst

Flight-testing of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter here is running almost three times faster than expected, forcing program officials to accelerate follow-on support testing to keep pace.

At the same time, program officials also confirm plans to add extra resources to the flight tests here, just as they are at the U.S. Navy’s test center at NAS Patuxent River, Md., to ensure the program stays on a revised schedule that extends development by 13 months.

Since ferrying from Lockheed Martin’s Fort Worth facility on May 17, the two initial conventional-takeoff-and-landing (CTOL) F-35As have completed 53 sorties, 36 beyond the 17 they were slated to have finished by now. “We’ve also executed 536 unique test points out of a planned 150,” says Lt. Col. Hank Griffith, commander of the 461st Flight Test Sqdn. and director of the F-35 Integrated Test Force (ITF).

Maj. Gen. David Eichhorn, commander of the Air Force Flight Test Center here, says the F-35A is “exceeding expectations at this point in the program” and that the accelerated test rate is linked directly to aircraft performance and availability. “We want to run as fast as the aircraft will let us,” he says. As a result, tests of inlet rigs and weapons bay door opening at Lockheed Martin will be conducted sooner than originally planned. “Now they are having to move that analysis forward. So maybe it is possible we could continue and finish early,” Griffith says.

“It’s a testament to the health and reliability of the CTOL aircraft as well as the experienced people here in the test team,” says Griffith, who notes that lessons from the F-22 test program are paying dividends. As well as recruiting people to work on the F-35 directly from the F-22, Griffith says early planning between the ITF and Lockheed Martin helped avoid the extended preflight-test delays experienced early on in the F-22 program.

“With the F-22, we didn’t start the flight test for a long time because they basically had to finish building it. So with the F-35, we worked very closely with Lockheed Martin to understand the traveled work,” Griffith says, referring to items that may have had to be completed here. As it turned out, the initial pair of aircraft arrived “squawk-free” and test-ready. “We flew the first test mission two days after we arrived and in the first two weeks we did nine sorties,” he adds. In addition, maintenance and support personnel from here traveled to Patuxent River to gain experience on the F-35 before delivery.

However, tempering the exuberance of this initial “honeymoon” phase, Eichhorn is also pragmatic. “I’m cautiously optimistic, but you never know what’s around the next corner in flight test. Once you get into the missions systems, it’s a different side of flying.” There are “things that need to be tweaked, and things that need to be changed, and we’re working that as a team with Lockheed Martin and the government,” he says.

“The F-35 is a typical test program and we’re running into the typical things you’d run into. What we don’t know yet is the cumulative effect of those things,” Eichhorn says. Griffith describes the issues as “normal program hiccups,” but says the overall performance of the aircraft has been solid, with sustained test sorties. Although the integrated power pack (IPP) is mentioned as the cause of a “few issues,” Griffith says that even these “have not really impacted us at all.” The IPP combines the auxiliary and emergency power units and environmental control system to save weight, and it is required to start the engine and power the aircraft.

Thermal management, another potential concern for the F-35 test team, has not been an issue. “We’ve been operating the jet out in the sun for three hours and never overheated,” says Griffith, noting that chilled fuel has been available but not used. However, the litmus test of the power and thermal management system, of which the IPP is a subsystem, will come during upcoming tests of the first fully equipped systems aircraft, AF-3. Cooling requirements will be more acute on it because it will be configured with Block 0.5 mission system software, airborne radar and electronic warfare systems.

AF-3 is undergoing anechoic tests at Lockheed Martin and is expected to ferry here in October. Although the initial systems tests will begin in the relatively cooler winter weather here, the higher temperatures in the spring and summer of 2011 will be the true test, Griffith says. “Come and ask me the same question this time next year,” he says. AF-4, the second systems aircraft, will arrive by year-end, but will have its radar removed for weight and balance reasons before being used for high angle-of-attack testing.

The F-35s were delivered here to undertake developmental test and evaluation (DT&amp;amp;amp;amp;E) for propulsion, aerial refueling, logistical support, weapons integration and flight-envelope expansion. They form part of an extended ITF that also includes the Navy’s test center, where four short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing (Stovl) F-35Bs are based, as well as Lockheed Martin’s Fort Worth site.

The first two aircraft, AF-1 and -2, are focused on flight sciences objectives, including envelope expansion, loads testing, flutter clearance and flying qualities. “Our objective by the end of 2010 is to clear the envelope to 40,000 ft. subsonic with 80% of the potential design limit load,” Griffith says. In June, initial supersonic testing for loads and flutter was completed to Mach 1.2/580 KCAS and 39,000 ft. Air refueling clearance tests at 15,000 ft. are also getting underway. The refueling envelope has already been cleared at 20,000 and 30,000 ft.

The ITF here will eventually include eight F-35As, two more than initially planned under the revised resource allocation. The two extra low-rate initial production aircraft will join the program in 2011. Recruiting is also underway to staff additional operational test positions. “We’re trying to get about a year ahead to keep up with the pace of the test program,” says Eichhorn.More people will be added to support the growing numbers of chase aircraft and tanker aircraft. Lockheed Martin will lead an industry team effort to add 112 maintenance and test operations employees. The total is expected to grow to 740, including industry and government personnel, says Griffith.

Planning for the establishment of the JSF Operational Test Team (JOTT) here from 2012 also continues, with signs of a strengthened bond between the developmental and operational test teams. “We’ve grown closer together. The JOTT team is already integrated with test planning and the weapons scenarios we will use in DT&amp;amp;amp;amp;E,” says Griffith. The unit will include 20 CTOL, carrier and Stovl variants, two of which will be U.K. aircraft. Eichhorn says that despite the increasing indications of harmony, the “integrated developmental and operational testing is still a work in progress.”

RE: JSF Jocks; ARES Blog @ AW

Unread postPosted: 01 Sep 2010, 23:29
by spazsinbad
F-35B delays lead to re-phased flight test schedule By Stephen Trimble DATE:01/09/10 SOURCE:Flight International

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/20 ... edule.html

The F-35 programme will likely reshuffle the flight test schedule again as Lockheed Martin continues to struggle with the reliability of the short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing variant (STOVL).
It is not immediately clear if the possible "rephasing" of the flight test schedule would result in a new overall delay for any of the three F-35 variants. Addressing a group of market analysts on 1 September, Lockheed Martin CEO Robert Stevens says a recent push to improve the reliability of the F-35B STOVL variant has fallen short of expectations.
As a result, an ongoing technical baseline review commissioned by the F-35 joint programme office is focusing on the viability of a dramatically reduced flight test schedule adopted earlier this year.
"I'm quite sure we're going to see a re-phasing of the STOVL flight test programme to recognise actual performance to date," Stevens says.
The previous schedule called for Lockheed to complete more than 1,200 flight tests by all three variants in Fiscal 2010. Earlier this year, government officials relaxed that number significantly , dropping the overall number to 394 flight tests in FY2010 and about 1,000 in FY2011.
But the STOVL version has failed to keep pace with the government's reduced expectations.
Stevens says that a series of reliability improvements has delivered positive results for the flight test programme, but not enough to overcome the increasing delays.
"We're catching up but not at the rate at which we had [predicted] in the initial plan," Stevens says.
The results of the technical baseline review will be finalised by November, Stevens says.
Re-phasing the flight tests will allow Lockheed to "move resources and talent in place to improve the flow of reliable parts and recover flight tests and test points", he says.
By the end of July, Lockheed's four STOVL flight test aircraft had completed 74 out of 95 scheduled flights.
Stevens had attributed to the flight test delays to poor reliability on key components, such as thermal cooling fans, door actuators and power system switches.
The F-35B's reliability problems do not require "fundamental engineering" changes and the aircraft "has a good flying character", Stevens says."

Re: RE: JSF Jocks; ARES Blog @ AW

Unread postPosted: 02 Sep 2010, 04:59
by neptune
spazsinbad wrote:....By the end of July, Lockheed's four STOVL flight test aircraft had completed 74 out of 95 scheduled flights"....


Better than 75%, for the most complex JSF design. :salute:

Of these, what ratio was STO/ or VL vs. CTOL?? :?:

BTW has BAE shipped the first two RAF parts sets to Ft. Worth? :pint:

Neptune..two turnin', two burnin'; check6 :crazypilot:

Re: RE: JSF Jocks; ARES Blog @ AW

Unread postPosted: 08 Sep 2010, 01:15
by energo
Flight test update

August summary:

F-35A: 22 of 9 planned
F-35B: 26 of 28 planned
F-35C: 0 of 0 planned (CF-1 in final finishes, heading to NAS PAX ca. October)

As of Sept. 3:
Year to date flights (CY 2010): 239 to 202 planned
Year to date test points: 2410 to 1943 planned
Total flights: 376


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

RE: Re: RE: JSF Jocks; ARES Blog @ AW

Unread postPosted: 08 Sep 2010, 01:22
by SpudmanWP
Is the F-35A number in error? Only 9 flights planned?

If the F-35B is only 2 flights (for August) behind due to the parts problems, that is not too shabby.

Re: RE: Re: RE: JSF Jocks; ARES Blog @ AW

Unread postPosted: 08 Sep 2010, 01:25
by energo
SpudmanWP wrote:Is the F-35A number in error? Only 9 flights planned?

If the F-35B is only 2 flights (for August) behind due to the parts problems, that is not too shabby.


Spud,

F-35A flights are verified; 22 of 9 planned in August.
F-35B catching up, though still a bit behind schedule: 26 of 28 planned.


B. Bolsøy

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: JSF Jocks; ARES Blog @ AW

Unread postPosted: 08 Sep 2010, 03:21
by SpudmanWP
Thanks for the confirmation.

I wonder why they only had 9 F-35A flights planned.

Re: RE: JSF Jocks; ARES Blog @ AW

Unread postPosted: 08 Sep 2010, 13:17
by seruriermarshal
energo wrote:Flight test update

August summary:

F-35A: 22 of 9 planned
F-35B: 26 of 28 planned
F-35C: 0 of 0 planned (CF-1 in final finishes, heading to NAS PAX ca. October)

As of Sept. 3:
Year to date flights (CY 2010): 239 to 202 planned
Year to date test points: 2410 to 1943 planned
Total flights: 376


B. Bolsøy
Oslo


Any Detail ?

Re: RE: JSF Jocks; ARES Blog @ AW

Unread postPosted: 09 Sep 2010, 02:47
by neptune
energo wrote:Flight test update

August summary:

F-35A: 22 of 9 planned
F-35B: 26 of 28 planned
F-35C: 0 of 0 planned (CF-1 in final finishes, heading to NAS PAX ca. October)

As of Sept. 3:
Year to date flights (CY 2010): 239 to 202 planned
Year to date test points: 2410 to 1943 planned
Total flights: 376

B. Bolsøy
Oslo




Hope you will tell me the "final finishes" were the beautiful "B.A." Blue and Gold trim!

Go Navy! :cheers:

Lockheed CEO: F-35B 'Rephasing' Possible

Unread postPosted: 11 Sep 2010, 03:31
by neptune
Lockheed CEO: F-35B 'Rephasing' Possible

By Amy Butler@AviationWeek

........By year-end, 251 Stovl flights are expected. At the end of August, 122 were executed of 153 that should have been conducted by that time, says Tom Burbage, Lockheed Martin executive vice president for F-35 program integration. “Where we are short is in some specific testing, mostly in Stovl vertical landing unique test points.”.....Officials at the training center at Eglin AFB, Fla., say they expect their first Block II aircraft to arrive in spring 2012.....Much of this ongoing delay is a result of parts reliability problems for BF-01, the only Stovl test aircraft instrumented to conduct vertical landing trials. BF-01 is needed to clear the envelope for vertical landing, after which other Stovl aircraft can contribute to more flight testing. Five vertical landings were executed in August. Ten have been done since the first one in March. Also, last month 26 Stovl flights were conducted, the most in any month to date, Burbage says.......Contributing to the lackluster results are many small components such as electrical connectors or engine lubrication pumps. Cooling fans required for vertical lift have also been an issue......Each of the aircraft’s components must pass initial qualification testing as well as a full qualification for the aircraft’s expected life. “In many cases [they] don’t pass those tests and have to be redesigned,” Burbage says.

About 80% of the parts on the aircraft have completed qualification requirements. Of those, 100% passed for safety-of-flight; half were deemed suitable for the life of the aircraft. The remainder must be redesigned.

The target-sortie-generation rate for each test aircraft is 13 flights per month. Last month, each aircraft averaged six, Burbage says.....
Of 394 flights planned for the three variants for the year, 233 had been flown by the end of August. Burbage says 2,361 test points were complete by that time; a total of 3,772 are expected by the end of the year.

More than 290 flights have been executed on the Combined Avionics Testbed aircraft, which is vetting Block I of the JSF software, he adds.....

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/ ... calreports

Semper Fi, Can Do! :2c:

RE: Lockheed CEO: F-35B

Unread postPosted: 11 Sep 2010, 11:17
by SpudmanWP
It's good to see Block 1 in the CATB.

Does anyone know when it was released to CATB as according to this slide it's about a year behind schedule (depending on when it was put into CATB).

Image

RE: Lockheed CEO: F-35B

Unread postPosted: 11 Sep 2010, 11:31
by spazsinbad
Spud, no answer to your question - however lengthy CATB article at Code One recently: "CATBird is currently being used to test the Block 1 avionics hardware and software.":

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=50

RE: Lockheed CEO: F-35B

Unread postPosted: 11 Sep 2010, 11:45
by SpudmanWP
Yeah, I saw that. The earliest ref that I could find about CATB and Blk1 was when they tested the EOTS aboard CATB in mid August.

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/pres ... 5EOTS.html

During the current Block 1.0 software system test, EOTS operated in an integrated mode and collected aircraft navigation data for sensor alignment.


The past 12-18 months have been real sparse when it comes to detailed F-35 info. I am having PPT withdraws ;)

I got my hopes up when they released the FOIA info. I am surprised that there has not been any new info considering that the page says:

All agencies are required by statute to make certain records created as of November 1, 1996, available online or in another magnetic, optical or other electronic media. The Electronic Reading Room contains records such as (1) final opinions and orders; (2) final statements of policy that have not been published in the Federal Register; (3) certain administrative manuals; and (4) frequently requested records that are of general public interest or are likely to be the subject of repeated requests.


Do we need to start a campaign of monthly FOIA requests?

Re: RE: Lockheed CEO: F-35B

Unread postPosted: 12 Sep 2010, 03:16
by neptune
SpudmanWP wrote: Do we need to start a campaign of monthly FOIA requests?


I would prefer not to FOIA the effort but, news is rather sparse and even though the "Bee" is falling behind schedule, these are SDD aircraft.

The occaisional "Good News" is great but we wish to know the progress of the published schedules and test point numbers to assure us that the program is advancing. We have enough "Chicken Littles" out here to cause doubt and our concern is real. Public, routine, periodic progress reports are a norm that should be expected. It's better to provide them, than to have them required. :2c:

RE: Re: RE: Lockheed CEO: F-35B

Unread postPosted: 12 Sep 2010, 22:18
by spazsinbad
F-35's Unequal Progress Posted by Graham Warwick at 9/12/2010

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest
Lockheed Martin has begun engine runs on the first production F-35 as the Joint Strike Fighter program continues its Jekyll and Hyde progress. AF-6, one of two F-35A CTOL jets in the first low-rate initial production lot, completed high-power runs last week [Sep. 8].

Thanks to the performance of the F-35A development jets, the JSF test program is running well ahead of plan for the year - 233 flights by the end of August against a plan of 196. But that disguises the fact that STOVL testing is well behind schedule, because of reliability issues with the F-35B test jets, with 122 flights by the end of August against a plan of 153 (and a target of 251 by year-end).

You can read Amy Butler's story on STOVL testing here: (seen above in this thread page)
http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/ ... calreports

If you factor in the 14 flights completed by the first F-35C carrier variant (against a plan of just 4), that means the two F-35As now at Edwards AFB have logged 97 flights this year against a plan of 39 - almost 2.5 times the scheduled rate. The smooth-running As are definitely "Jekylls" to the balky F-35B "Hydes".

The imbalance wasn't quite so bad in August, as availability of the STOVL jets improved. The two As at Edwards logged 22 flights against a plan of 9, while the four Bs at Pax logged 26 flights against a plan of 28 - the highest monthly totals yet. But even that rate will not get the STOVL program back on schedule by year-end.

A critical measure is how quickly the first F-35B - aircraft BF-1 - is expanding the vertical landing envelope so the rest of the test fleet can be cleared for STOVL operations. That will require about 50 vertical landings - of which only 10 have been accomplished so far. Missing the target for fleet clearance by year-end could delay the first at-sea STOVL tests, planned for May 2011.

Inside Defense reports that STOVL testing faces challenges getting back on schedule because of operating limitations that prevent the aircraft flying in "common weather conditions such as steady wind, wet tarmac and nearby lightning" I sense the ultra-cautious hand of Naval Air Systems Command in those restrictions.

Meanwhile, the remaining JSF test jets are getting closer to flying. AF-3 is in final finishes and scheduled to fly in October; AF-4 is being prepared for engine runs and BF-5 for display checks, and both are planned to fly in the fourth quarter."

Re: RE: Re: RE: Lockheed CEO: F-35B

Unread postPosted: 13 Sep 2010, 05:56
by qwe2008
spazsinbad wrote:Meanwhile, the remaining JSF test jets are getting closer to flying. AF-3 is in final finishes and scheduled to fly in October; AF-4 is being prepared for engine runs and BF-5 for display checks, and both are planned to fly in the fourth quarter."


anything about CF-2 and CF-3?

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Lockheed CEO: F-35B

Unread postPosted: 13 Sep 2010, 15:29
by Lightndattic
AF-6 Completed high power runs- Meaning full power engine runs?

While AF-4 is being prepped for engine runs?

When are they going to get the sequence straight?

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Lockheed CEO: F-35B

Unread postPosted: 15 Sep 2010, 00:00
by spazsinbad
Further F-35 Stovl ''Rephasing'' Possible Sep 14, 2010 By Amy Butler - Washington

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/ ... ne=Further F-35 Stovl ''Rephasing'' Possible

The likelihood that ongoing delays of short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing (Stovl) F-35 testing will force slippage in the 2012 in-service date for the U.S. Marine Corps is growing as Lockheed Martin continues to struggle with some parts reliability issues affecting the Harrier replacement.

By year-end, 251 Stovl flights are expected. At the end of August, 122 were executed of 153 that should have been conducted by that time, says Tom Burbage, Lockheed Martin executive vice president for F-35 program integration. “Where we are short is in some specific testing, mostly in Stovl vertical landing unique test points.”

The bottleneck prompted Lockheed Martin CEO Robert Stevens to acknowledge a potential “re-phasing” for the Stovl flight-test plan, during a teleconference this month with investors. Acknowledging the restructuring to the program announced this year, Stevens adds that “the early corrective actions . . . are showing some beneficial outcomes [but] my sense is that it is not going to be enough.” The multinational Joint Strike Fighter will eventually comprise the lion’s share of the company’s profits.

The Marine Corps, however, stands by its plans to declare initial operational capability (IOC) with a Block II F-35 in 2012. “The Marine Corps is not changing its current IOC date,” says Maj. Carl Redding, a service spokesman. The U.S. Air Force and Navy are expecting to declare their aircraft operational in 2016.

Further delays in Stovl testing could have a dangerous ripple effect on the program, however. There is little margin to ensure that enough of the flight-testing envelope and software work will be ready to allow pilots to begin training in time for a 2012 IOC. Officials at the training center at Eglin AFB, Fla., say they expect their first Block II aircraft to arrive in spring 2012.

Much of this ongoing delay is a result of parts reliability problems for BF-01, the only Stovl test aircraft instrumented to conduct vertical landing trials. BF-01 is needed to clear the envelope for vertical landing, after which other Stovl aircraft can contribute to more flight testing. Five vertical landings were executed in August. Ten have been done since the first one in March. Also, last month 26 Stovl flights were conducted, the most in any month to date, Burbage says.

He points out that while the company is seeing improvement in BF-01’s performance, the company is “not quite over that hurdle” for reliability yet. Contributing to the lackluster results are many small components such as electrical connectors or engine lubrication pumps. Cooling fans required for vertical lift have also been an issue.

Each of the aircraft’s components must pass initial qualification testing as well as a full qualification for the aircraft’s expected life. “In many cases [they] don’t pass those tests and have to be redesigned,” Burbage says.

About 80% of the parts on the aircraft have completed qualification requirements. Of those, 100% passed for safety-of-flight; half were deemed suitable for the life of the aircraft. The remainder must be redesigned.

The target-sortie-generation rate for each test aircraft is 13 flights per month. Last month, each aircraft averaged six, Burbage says.

While each parts supplier is responsible for designing parts to withstand the stresses of vertical flight for the life of the aircraft, it is the prime contractor’s responsibility to ensure that the aircraft as a whole meets its requirements. There are “some parts that just fail when you get them on the aircraft until you understand the root cause,” Burbage says, noting that experts are still characterizing the thermal and acoustic environment for these specific items during vertical landings.

Meanwhile, government officials are conducting a thorough independent technical baseline review for the entire program, which includes the conventional-takeoff-and-landing and carrier variant aircraft. This is due to the Pentagon’s Defense Acquisition Board in November.

Burbage says it is likely to include alternate paths for the program depending upon varying levels of funding. Government officials are also building the first cost estimate for the aircraft, including the operating price.

Of 394 flights planned for the three variants for the year, 233 had been flown by the end of August. Burbage says 2,361 test points were complete by that time; a total of 3,772 are expected by the end of the year.

More than 290 flights have been executed on the Combined Avionics Testbed aircraft, which is vetting Block I of the JSF software, he adds.

As a result of the restructuring earlier this year, Lockheed Martin is required to stand up an additional facility for testing software to ensure this portion of the program stays on schedule. Burbage says the equipment for this laboratory will be delivered in mid 2011 and be ready to conduct testing by fourth-quarter 2011.

Lockheed Martin has also brought in a new chief engineer and production manager. The company is also bringing in some fresh management to the program. Ron Bessire is the new chief engineer as well as a vice president on the program. The new vice president of production is Frank Dougherty."

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Lockheed CEO: F-35B

Unread postPosted: 16 Sep 2010, 00:29
by seruriermarshal
F-35 Flight Test Update 2

Posted 14 September 2010

The previous installment of the F-35 Flight Test Update ended with the first vertical landing of an F-35B. Since then, US Marine Corps and Lockheed Martin pilots flying the short takeoff/vertical landing version of the F-35 have gone on to complete an additional nine vertical landings. More than sixty flights have been completed in BF-1, the first F-35B. The F-35B fleet has accumulated more than 200 hours of flight time in more than 160 flights.

The first carrier-capable version of the F-35, the F-35C, was flown for the first time on 6 June 2010. After completing thirteen more flights, the aircraft, called CF-1, was pulled from the flight schedule for ground vibration testing. It is expected to be in the air again in October.

For the conventional takeoff and landing versions, F-35A AF-2 completed its first flight and was ferried with AF-1 to Edwards AFB, California. AF-3, which is equipped with mission systems, also completed its first flight and will soon join the F-35A fleet in California.

Overall, twelve company and military pilots are currently qualified to fly the F-35. Fourteen total F-35 pilots have flown more than 500 hours on more than 360 flights (as of 26 August 2010) in the current System Development and Demonstration phase of the program. The F-35 flight envelope has been expanded to 39,000 feet and Mach 1.2.

F-35 mission systems continue to be refined in ground-based laboratories and on the Cooperative Avionics Test Bed, a converted 737 that acts as an airborne laboratory. The CATBird, as the unique aircraft is called, has completed more than 130 flights, most of which have been in direct support of mission system testing for the F-35. The flights include deployments for testing at Edwards AFB, California, and Eglin AFB, Florida. (For more on this test asset, please see CATBird—The Flying Avionics Test Bed, also in this issue.)

1 April 2010: AF-1 New Paint
AF-1, the first optimized Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning II conventional takeoff and landing test aircraft, rolls out of the F-35 Final Finishes Facility sporting a new fin flash paint scheme on its vertical stabilizers. While at the facility, the aircraft also received highly accurate robot-applied coatings. AF-1 was flown twice in 2009 before entering an intensive period of ground testing.

7 April 2010: BF-4 First Flight
The first F-35 equipped with mission systems, BF-4, is flown for the first time. During the flight from Fort Worth, Texas, Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson climbed to 15,500 feet, verified engine response at varying throttle settings, performed a series of flight-qualities maneuvers, and checked the operation of the aircraft’s mission systems. The F-35’s avionics, or mission systems, process, apply, and transfer data from an array of off-board sensors providing increased situational awareness to the pilot as well as to other air and surface forces.

20 April 2010: AF-2 First Flight
Lockheed Martin test pilot Jeff Knowles is at the controls for the first flight of AF-2. Taking off from NAS Fort Worth JRB, Knowles flies the aircraft to 15,000 feet and performs a series of test points during the one-hour mission, including throttle transients, landing gear cycles, speed brake cycles, and autopilot checks.

20 April 2010: AF-1 Completes Two Flights In One Day
Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson flies AF-1 for its third flight. He follows the 1.4-hour morning flight with a 1.5-hour flight in the afternoon. The second flight of the day is the fourth for the aircraft.

23 April 2010: F-35 ITF Director Completes First F-35 Flight
US Air Force pilot Lt. Col. Hank Griffiths, director of the F-35 Integrated Test Force at Edwards AFB, California, completes his first flight in the F-35. Griffiths performs several test points on the 1.6-hour flight in AF-2 at Fort Worth, Texas.

27 April 2010: AF-1 Aerial Refuels
Lockheed Martin test pilot Jon Beesley completes a 2.5-hour air refueling qualification mission on the eighth flight of AF-1. The mission includes flying quality checks in formation with a KC-135 tanker at 20,000 feet. Beesley performs boom tracking, simulated emergency separations, precision contacts, and disconnects. The boom operator transfers 4,300 pounds of fuel to AF-1 during the flight.

4 May 2010: F-35B Flies With Internal Weapons
BF-2 is flown with an AIM-120 and GBU-12 during its twenty-fourth test flight. This flight is the first time an F-35B has flown with weapons in its internal weapon bay.

5 May 2010: 200th Test Flight
The F-35 program logs its 200th test flight when Lockheed Martin lead STOVL pilot Graham Tomlinson takes off in a short takeoff/vertical landing F-35B and flies for forty-four minutes near NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. Tomlinson evaluates airframe loads during powered approach with the landing gear down and cycles the landing gear at different speeds and g loads.

11 May 2010: AF-1 And AF-2 Fly Together
F-35A AF-1 and AF-2 are flown in tandem during aerial refueling testing in preparation for a ferry flight to Edwards AFB, California.

16 May 2010: More Refueling Tests
Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson takes AF-2 through a series of additional aerial refueling tests during its sixteenth flight. The aircraft makes contact with the KC-135 tanker four times. The flight lasts 1.3 hours, and the tanker transfers 3,600 pounds of fuel to AF-2.

17 May 2010: AF-1 And AF-2 Arrive At Edwards
F-35A AF-1 and AF-2 are flown nonstop from Fort Worth, Texas, to Edwards AFB, California, signaling an expansion of F-35 flight test operations. The arrival is the first in a series that will increase the Edwards F-35 test fleet to at least eight aircraft. US Air Force pilot Lt. Col. Hank Griffiths and Lockheed Martin test pilot Jon Beesley fly the jets for this first multiship, long-range F-35 flight. While assigned to Edwards, the F-35s will undergo ground and flight test activities, including propulsion tests, aerial refueling, logistical support, weapons integration, and envelope expansion.

28 May 2010: CF-1 Completes First Taxi Test
Lockheed Martin test pilot Jeff Knowles takes the first F-35C, called CF-1, on its first taxi test in Fort Worth, Texas.

6 June 2010: F-35C First Flight
Lockheed Martin test pilot Jeff Knowles is at the controls for the first flight of CF-1 from NAS Fort Worth JRB, Texas. He takes the first F-35C to 12,000 feet and performs a set of maneuvers to evaluate handling characteristics and throttle transients to evaluate engine performance. At 10,000 feet, Knowles cycles the gear and extends the arresting hook. The aircraft is flown in formation with chase aircraft from 10,000 feet down to 5,000 feet. Knowles flies a simulated approach and waveoff before landing the aircraft.

7 June 2010: BF-4 Arrives At Pax River
The first F-35 equipped with mission systems joins the fleet at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. Piloted by Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson, BF-4 becomes the fourth F-35 to arrive and begin testing at the Naval Air Systems Command site.

10 June 2010: F-35B Goes Supersonic
The F-35B is flown faster than the speed of sound for the first time. The supersonic milestone is achieved on the thirtieth flight of BF-2 as US Marine Corps pilot Lt. Col. Matt Kelly climbs to 30,000 feet and accelerates to Mach 1.07 near NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

22 June 2010: AF-3 Completes Taxi Testing
Lockheed Martin test pilot Bill Gigliotti performs the last in a series of taxi tests in AF-3 in preparation for its first flight.

25 June 2010: BF-1 Completes Fiftieth Test Flight
Lockheed Martin lead STOVL pilot Graham Tomlinson completes the fiftieth test flight of BF-1. The flight, from NAS Patuxent River in Maryland, involves several conversions to hover mode.

30 June 2010: BF-1 Completes Second Vertical Landing
Lockheed Martin lead STOVL pilot Graham Tomlinson performs a ninety-knot short takeoff in BF-1 on its fifty-first flight and completes the second vertical landing.

6 July 2010: AF-3 First Flight
The third conventional takeoff and landing variant, AF-3, completes its first flight. Piloted by Lockheed Martin test pilot Bill Gigliotti, AF-3 takes off from NAS Fort Worth JRB, Texas. AF-3 is the ninth F-35 to fly and the second test jet to fly with the avionics package that is used in all operational F-35s.

17 July 2010: CF-1 Completes Airworthiness Testing
The first F-35C completes a series of fourteen airworthiness flights and enters a planned downtime for ground vibration tests.

20 July 2010: 300 F-35 Flights
The F-35 flight test program marks the 300th test flight. US Marine Corps pilot Lt. Col. Matt Kelly completes the 2.7-hour flight in BF-4 from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

29 July 2010: AF-2 Begins Wet Runway Tests
AF-2, with Lockheed Martin test pilot Jeff Knowles as the pilot, begins a series of wet runway tests at Edwards AFB, California.

30 July 2010: Two Vertical Landings In Same Day
US Marine Corps pilot Lt. Col. Fred Schenk completes two sorties on BF-1’s fifty-seventh test flight (Note: A single test flight can have multiple takeoffs and landings). The flight includes two short takeoffs, one at eighty knots and another at ninety knots, and two vertical landings.

30 July 2010: CATBird Ferries To Edwards
The Cooperative Avionics Test Bed, known as CATBird, is ferried to Edwards AFB, California, for two weeks of mission system testing. The aircraft completes some of its longest flights (more than four hours) at Edwards.

21 August 2010: 100th Pax River Flight
Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson flies BF-3 on the 100th F-35 test flight out of NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

27 August 2010: AF-1 Completes Fifty Flights
US Air Force pilot Lt. Col. Hank Griffiths completes the fiftieth test flight for AF-1. The one-hour flight, from Edwards AFB in California, is used to evaluate flying qualities.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Lockheed CEO: F-35B

Unread postPosted: 16 Sep 2010, 01:26
by spazsinbad
smarshal, thanks. Interesting info re short takeoffs (minus 20-30 knots for an SRVL perhaps? - already we know that an SRVL is slated for 60 Knots into wind): [edit] before first vertical landing there were several 60-80 Knots rolling vertical landings down the main runway AFAIK.

"30 June 2010: BF-1 Completes Second Vertical Landing
Lockheed Martin lead STOVL pilot Graham Tomlinson performs a ninety-knot short takeoff in BF-1 on its fifty-first flight and completes the second vertical landing.

30 July 2010: Two Vertical Landings In Same Day
US Marine Corps pilot Lt. Col. Fred Schenk completes two sorties on BF-1’s fifty-seventh test flight (Note: A single test flight can have multiple takeoffs and landings). The flight includes two short takeoffs, one at eighty knots and another at ninety knots, and two vertical landings."

Re: RE: Lockheed CEO: F-35B

Unread postPosted: 18 Sep 2010, 00:52
by SpudmanWP
SpudmanWP wrote:Do we need to start a campaign of monthly FOIA requests?


I contacted the same agency that released the MARS reports earlier this year and they have several more FOIA requests that they are working on for the more recent MARS reports (post Nov 2009).

I will keep you updated.

F-35 Photos

Unread postPosted: 18 Sep 2010, 18:59
by neptune
AF-01 Completes 50
US Air Force pilot Lt. Col. Hank Griffiths completes the fiftieth test flight for AF-1. The one-hour flight, from Edwards AFB in California, is used to evaluate flying qualities.

Posted 27 August 2010

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/news_ite ... tem_id=172

:salute:

RE: F-35 Photos

Unread postPosted: 21 Sep 2010, 01:43
by seruriermarshal
F135 Engine Exceeds 19,000 Hours as Short Take Off Vertical Landing Variant Nears Initial Service Release Certification
Erin Dick
Pratt & Whitney Military Engines
860.726.8387
erin.dick@pw.utc.com

Stephanie Duvall
Pratt & Whitney Military Engines
860.614.0783
stephanie.duvall@pw.utc.com

EAST HARTFORD, Conn., Sept. 20, 2010 – The Pratt & Whitney F135 engine has surpassed 19,000 hours and the Short Take Off Vertical Landing (STOVL) variant is in the final stages of testing prior to receiving Initial Service Release Certification from the U.S. government later this year. Both of these significant program milestones continue the long list of accomplishments achieved by the Pratt & Whitney F135 engine this year. Pratt & Whitney is a United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX) company.

“The F135 journey continues and I am very pleased with the progress we’ve made this year,” said Bennett Croswell, vice president of F119/F135 engine programs. “I’ve been involved with this program since concept demonstration, and when I look back on the last 10 years, the accomplishments we’ve seen, the history we’ve made powering the first ever supersonic, stealthy military jet capable of vertical lift operations, I could not be prouder to be a part of this propulsion team.”

Pratt & Whitney has delivered all 29 test engines as well as 9 production F135 engines to the customer. The engine has successfully powered more than 350 F-35 flights including several vertical lift operations accumulating nearly 500 flight test hours. Also this year the F135 powered the F-35 STOVL variant through supersonic flight and the first production F135 engine has been installed in a production F-35. Throughout the year, through the achievement of all these major program milestones, the F135 engine is demonstrating excellent reliability, performance and thrust response. The F135 has achieved 20 percent thrust over specifications on both test and production engines.

“With the Conventional Take Off and Landing variant F135 receiving ISR certification earlier this year, and the STOVL F135 variant scheduled to receive ISR certification later this year, 2010 will mark the accomplishment of the last of the major F135 engine development program milestones,” Croswell said

Pratt & Whitney has designed, developed and tested the F135 to deliver the most advanced fifth generation fighter engine for the U.S. Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy, as well as eight international partner countries. The F135 is derived from proven technology of the only operational fifth generation fighter engine, the Pratt & Whitney F119. The F119 recently completed 8,650 total accumulated cycles, or TACs, representing the first time a fifth generation fighter engine has demonstrated the ability to meet full life requirements. The F135 has been further enhanced with technologies developed in several Air Force and Navy technology programs.

The F135 is the only engine powering the F-35 Lightning II flight test program. The F135 propulsion system has proven it can meet diverse aircraft requirements, and the ground and flight test experience demonstrates the maturity and the associated reliability of the F135 engine for armed forces around the world.

Pratt & Whitney is a world leader in the design, manufacture and service of aircraft engines, space propulsion systems and industrial gas turbines. United Technologies, based in Hartford, Conn., is a diversified company providing high technology products and services to the global aerospace and building industries.

This press release contains forward-looking statements concerning future business opportunities. Actual results may differ materially from those projected as a result of certain risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to changes in the U.S. Government funding related to the F-35 and F135 programs, changes in government procurement priorities and practices or in the number of aircraft to be built; challenges in the design, development, production and support of technologies; as well as other risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to those detailed from time to time in United Technologies Corporation's Securities and Exchange Commission filings.

RE: F-35 Photos

Unread postPosted: 22 Oct 2010, 00:22
by spazsinbad
F-35 Flight Test Update Posted by Graham Warwick at 10/21/2010

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

"It's been quiet on the flight-test news front in Joint Strike Fighter-land, where they have been preoccupied by the UK's implosion. They still have several aircraft that must fly this year to stay on track, so I though I would provide a progress report. Here it is:

AF-3 - the third US Air Force CTOL test jet is in final finishes and expected to return to flight by mid-November. AF-3 is the first F-35A mission-system test aircraft, but rather than update it to the latest Block 1 software before flying it, Lockheed plans to ferry it to Edwards AFB with the original Block 0.5 load. The reason - AF-3 will go through radar cross-section tests at Edwards and Lockheed wants it to be pristine, straight out of final coatings, and the block update requires some panels to be opened, spoiling the finish.

AF-4 - in engine runs and expected to fly before the end of October.

AF-6 - the first low-rate initial production aircraft is complete and expected to fly in the first half of November.

AF-7 - the second of the two LRIP 1 aircraft is on the flight line.

AF-8 - the first LRIP 2 aircraft has just rolled off the assembly line.

BF-1 - the first STOVL F-35B test jet has had its auxiliary-inlet door hinges replaced and is flying again at Pax River (no news yet on whether it has resumed vertical-landing tests).

BF-4 - the first F-35B mission-system test aircraft is still on the ground at Pax, going through the Block 1 update.

BF-5 - the F135 engine has had to be removed and returned to Pratt & Whitney after it self-ingested a plastic part from a heat exchanger during ground runs. The aircraft may not fly this year as planned.

CF-1 - the first F-35C carrier variant was expected to return to flight today (Oct. 21) after completing final finishes. UPDATE - CF-1 did fly today.

CF-2 and -3 - are off the assembly line and expected to fly in the first quarter of next year, completing the 12 development-aircraft deliveries (with an additional CV test jet planned later).

CATBird - the distributed aperture system is being fitted to the 737avionics testbed, which is expected to resume Block 1 mission-system testing at the beginning of November.

As for overall test progress, AF-2 completed the program's 300th flight this year at Edwards on Oct. 20. So far for the month, the F-35As at Edwards and F-35Bs at Pax are running fairly close to plan."

Unread postPosted: 05 Nov 2010, 23:34
by energo
Update on the flight tests:

F-35 expands envelope and marks 460 test flights

November 4, 2010 (by Bjørnar Bolsøy) - Good progress is being made in F-35 flight testing by the CTOL and CV versions. F-35B STOVL mode flights have resumed, but the variant is still behind schedule.

Despite a smoother flight record, it is neither the CTOL nor the CV model that holds the current speed and g-load records for the F-35. That honor befalls the F-35B STOVL. Recently the jet accomplished Mach 1.32 and 7 g's, the STOVL's maximum design limit.

The record Mach number was achieved in the BF-2 test aircraft at NAS Patuxent River on October 18. Flight objectives was to expand the STOVL flutter and flying-qualities, and supersonic flight envelope at 30,000 feet. Pilot was RAF Squadron Leader Steve Long, and the flight included two sorties and hot pit refueling.

The flight test program has picked up steam and is ahead of plan despite some recent challenges. Some 200 flights have been completed since June and overall the program has logged 460 flights to date. Flights have resumed well after they were suspended in early October to fix a software issue with the jets fuel boost pumps. BF-1 STOVL mode operations were also suspended due to an issue with the auxiliary air inlet (AAI) door hinge. A fix has been implemented and Lockheed confirms that the STOVL restrictions have been lifted and that flights have resumed.

Despite the AAI issue, the STOVL jets have been flying conventional flights. But progress has been slowed due to component reliability issues and the jets are still behind the flight plan. Lockheed says steps are being taken to address root causes and improve tempo. This includes obtaining more spare parts to keep the aircraft flight-ready.

Still, the flight testing managed to stay slightly ahead the plan for the October month. The CTOL jets logged 22 flights against a plan of 17. The STOVL jets flew 27 times against 28 planned, and the CV jet flew three times, two short of the five planned. In all 52 flights were completed against a plan of 50 in October. A further 51 flights are planned for November with a total of 394 due by year's end.

Overall this year, 321 flights have been completed, which is 28 ahead of plan. The CTOL is 66 flights ahead of plan, the CV three flights ahead, however the STOVL lags 41 flights behind the plan.

This years 300th sortie was flown on October 20 at Edwards AFB. Lockheed Martin test pilot Jeff Knowles completed a 2.1 hour sortie in the AF-2 jet with objectives including a negative-g loads test point, gear swings and acceleration to Mach 1.05 at 30,000 feet to validate turn performance.


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 09 Nov 2010, 18:13
by spazsinbad
F-35C Arrives at Pax Posted by Graham Warwick at 11/9/2010

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

"The first F-35C Joint Strike Fighter carrier variant, aircraft CF-1, arrived at the U.S. Navy's Patuxent River test center in Maryland on Nov 6 (http://www.youtube.com/user/LockheedMar ... end=2&ob=1). It joins four F-35B short take-off and vertical landing test jets at Pax.

Also on Nov 6 at Pax, STOVL test aircraft BF-4 became the first JSF to fly with Block 1.0 mission-system software, which adds capabilities to the Block 0.5 load that is flying on the other test jets. Two more blocks have still to come during development.

And as we heard last week, the first two production F-35As, aircraft AF-6 and -7, are being diverted to Edwards AFB for flight testing rather than delivered to Eglin AFB for pilot training.

The intent is to build hours on the aircraft before pilot training begins. AF-6 and -7 are on the flight line at Fort Worth, being fitted with telemetry, and are expected to be delivered in April 2011.

The next production F-35A, aircraft AF-8, is off the assembly line at Fort Worth and is still planned to be delivered to Eglin, where flight training is now expected to begin in summer 2011."

Re: RE: F-35 Photos

Unread postPosted: 10 Nov 2010, 16:14
by qwe2008
spazsinbad wrote:F-35 Flight Test Update Posted by Graham Warwick at 10/21/2010

AF-4 - in engine runs and expected to fly before the end of October.



??
this is 11/11/2010 already.

RE: Re: RE: F-35 Photos

Unread postPosted: 13 Nov 2010, 08:27
by spazsinbad
Another 'take' on current flight testing from LM as of 04 Nov 2010

F-35 LIGHTNING II OCTOBER 2010 FLIGHT TEST UPDATE

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/products/f35/

"FORT WORTH, Texas, Nov. 4, 2010 – The F-35 Lightning II flight test program continues to track ahead of plan on both the conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variant and the carrier variant (CV), while the short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) variant flight completions remain behind schedule. Overall, the program has completed 321 flights this year, 28 flights ahead of plan through October.

The F-35 flight test team completed 52 flights against a plan of 50 in October. The CTOL aircraft logged 22 flights against a plan of 17; STOVL jets flew 27 times against a plan of 28; and the CV jet flew three times against a plan of five. Additionally, the STOVL jet flew supersonically, and at Mach 1.3 has flown faster than any other variant to date, and achieved 7 g’s, the highest load condition to date and maximum design g’s for the STOVL.

The CTOL variant is 66 flights ahead of plan and the CV is three flights ahead of plan; however, the STOVL variant is 41 flights behind plan for the year. STOVL aircraft component reliability continues to be the principal challenge. F-35 program officials are pursuing a multi-faceted approach to improve tempo, including working to obtain higher levels of spare parts from suppliers to keep the aircraft in a flight-ready condition, while completing the analysis and corrective action planning to address the root cause of any issues. The plan calls for 51 flights in November, toward the total of 394 for 2010."

F-35B Formation Flight

Unread postPosted: 17 Nov 2010, 02:34
by neptune
F-35B Formation Flight

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/news_ite ... tem_id=240

Lt. Col. Fred Schenk is at the controls of F-35B BF-1 and Lt. Col. Matt Taylor of BF-3 for the first formation flight of two F-35Bs. The formation was flown on the seventy-seventh flight of BF-1 and the sixty-fourth flight of BF-3 on 10 November 2010 from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. :cheers:

Unread postPosted: 23 Nov 2010, 20:01
by Scorpion82
Don't know whether it was posted elsewhere, but at least it fits here:
Lockheed Martin F-35 team logs 500th flight

PATUXENT RIVER, Md., November 18th, 2010 -- On Thursday, Nov. 18, the F-35 Lightning II program notched its 500th flight when BF-4, an F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing variant, took off from Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., on a three-hour test mission to evaluate avionics software. For calendar year 2010, the program has logged 366 flights to date. (Lockheed Martin photo by Andy Wolfe)


So congratulations to the test team for the 500th successful flight in the air with the F-35.

Edit:
It was 500th flight not hour.^^

Unread postPosted: 23 Nov 2010, 20:13
by spazsinbad
F-35 Flight Test Update 3 By Eric Hehs Posted 22 November 2010

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=63

"...Overall, fifteen company and military pilots are currently qualified to fly the F-35. Eighteen total F-35 pilots have flown more than 700 hours on more than 490 flights (as of 15 November 2010) in the current System Development and Demonstration phase of the program...."

Unread postPosted: 23 Nov 2010, 20:14
by spazsinbad
F-35 Flight Test Update 3 By Eric Hehs Posted 22 November 2010

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=63

"The previous installment of the F-35 Flight Test Update ended with F-35A AF-1 completing its fiftieth flight on 27 August 2010. Since then, the aircraft has been flown an additional thirty flights and a total of more than 140 flight hours. AF-2, which is operating with AF-1 from Edwards AFB, California, has accumulated more than sixty flights and 100 hours.

US Marine Corps and Lockheed Martin pilots flying the F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing version of the Lightning II have completed almost 300 flight hours in a total of 216 flights.

The first F-35 carrier variant, the F-35C, was flown for the first time on 6 June 2010 and took to the air again on 21 October after a period of extensive ground testing. The aircraft was subsequently ferried from Fort Worth, Texas, on 6 November to its new home with the Integrated Test Force at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. The ferry flight was the twentieth mission for the first F-35C.

Overall, fifteen company and military pilots are currently qualified to fly the F-35. Eighteen total F-35 pilots have flown more than 700 hours on more than 490 flights (as of 15 November 2010) in the current System Development and Demonstration phase of the program. The F-35 flight envelope has been expanded to 39,000 feet and to Mach 1.3.

23 September 2010: Open Weapon Bay Testing Begins On F-35A
Lockheed Martin test pilot Jeff Knowles completed the first open weapon bay flight tests on F-35A in a 1.5-hour mission from Edwards AFB, California. The mission included 360-degree rolls at 20,000 and 30,000 feet.

23 September 2010: Fifty Flights For BF-2
US Marine Corps pilot Lt. Col. Matt Kelly completed the fiftieth flight for F-35 BF-2. The 1.3-hour flight, from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, involved performing accelerations and decelerations at 30,000 feet to test the air data system as well as performing flying quality test points and envelope expansion.

1 October 2010: First F-35C Gets Coated
F-35C CF-1 rolled out of the F-35 Final Finishes Facility in Fort Worth, Texas, in full color after receiving its highly accurate robot-applied coatings. The first carrier variant of the Lightning II was flown fourteen times before entering an intensive period of ground testing.

18 October 2010: BF-2 Flown To Mach 1.3
Royal Air Force Squadron Leader Steve Long took BF-2 to Mach 1.3 on the airplane’s fifty-fifth flight. The test point was accomplished during a 1.5-hour flight from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. The flight also involved hot pit refueling, flutter testing, flying qualities, and performing other propulsion test points in conventional mode.

21 October 2010: First F-35C Returns To Flight
F-35C CF-1 returned to flight after receiving its final finishes. Lockheed Martin test pilot Jon Beesley flew the aircraft on its fifteenth flight from NAS JRB Fort Worth.

25 October 2010: BF-3 Pulls Seven g’s
F-35B BF-3 flew through seven g’s on its fifty-eighth test flight. The flight, from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, consisted of two sorties separated by hot pit refueling.

6 November 2010: First F-35 Flight With Block 1 Software
US Marine Corps pilot Lt. Col. Matt Taylor was at the controls of F-35B BF-4 for the first flight of an F-35 with Block 1 software. The new software forms the foundation of all subsequent software blocks. It enables information fusion from the F-35’s radar, electronic warfare system, distributed aperture system, and electro-optical targeting system, as well as information fusion from other sensors. It also provides initial weapons-release capability. The first flight occurred at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

6 November 2010: First F-35C Ferried To Pax
F-35C CF-1 arrived at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. The aircraft, piloted by Lockheed Martin test pilot David Nelson, departed NAS Fort Worth JRB, Texas, and completed successful aerial refueling during the flight from a KC-130 tanker from VX-20. The tanker is based at NAS Patuxent River.

Eric Hehs is the editor of Code One."

Unread postPosted: 23 Nov 2010, 21:45
by Scorpion82
edit misread

Unread postPosted: 23 Nov 2010, 21:48
by spazsinbad
:roll: :D :shock: 500th flight is not the same as 500 hours but is at or near 700 hours total AFAIK.

Longest JSF flight, todate?

Unread postPosted: 23 Nov 2010, 22:04
by neptune
spazsinbad wrote::roll: :D :shock: 500th flight is not the same as 500 hours but is at or near 700 hours total AFAIK.


What is the flight time of the longest duration flight (todate) for the JSF, including ferrys? I see references to 1.3 and 1.5 hrs and some of the ferrys were RON, etc. :?:

RE: Longest JSF flight, todate?

Unread postPosted: 23 Nov 2010, 22:52
by spazsinbad
Does a 'hot refuelling' sortie count for the longest duration flight?

Re: RE: Longest JSF flight, todate?

Unread postPosted: 24 Nov 2010, 03:33
by neptune
spazsinbad wrote:Does a 'hot refuelling' sortie count for the longest duration flight?


Yes, for this purpose. Chock to Chock. Similar to "touch and gos". :)

RE: Re: RE: Longest JSF flight, todate?

Unread postPosted: 24 Nov 2010, 15:03
by f35phixer
BF4 500th was a LONG DAY / Flight :D 4+hours start up to shut down! Brief to Debrief made for a VERY LONG day, But it's great !!!!

Re: RE: Re: RE: Longest JSF flight, todate?

Unread postPosted: 26 Nov 2010, 05:59
by qwe2008
f35phixer wrote:BF4 500th was a LONG DAY / Flight :D 4+hours start up to shut down! Brief to Debrief made for a VERY LONG day, But it's great !!!!


4+hours in 1 flight.
with air refuel or not?

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Longest JSF flight, todate?

Unread postPosted: 26 Nov 2010, 06:28
by spazsinbad
From previous page:
"Lockheed Martin F-35 team logs 500th flight

PATUXENT RIVER, Md., November 18th, 2010 -- On Thursday, Nov. 18, the F-35 Lightning II program notched its 500th flight when BF-4, an F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing variant, took off from Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., on a three-hour test mission to evaluate avionics software."

http://multivu.prnewswire.com/player/42 ... rtin-f-35/
OR
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/products/f35/

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Longest JSF flight, todate?

Unread postPosted: 26 Nov 2010, 07:37
by bumtish
That would be with a maximum of 13,326 lb internal fuel?

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Longest JSF flight, todate?

Unread postPosted: 26 Nov 2010, 14:22
by f35phixer
"4+hours start up to shut down" From IPP on to SHUTDOWN... We did a HOT PIT,

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Longest JSF flight, todate?

Unread postPosted: 26 Nov 2010, 19:40
by spazsinbad
f35phixer, thanks for clarification. Other online sources mention 2.7 hours or 2 hours and 50 minutes for (other than already mentioned) long flights only.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Longest JSF flight, todate?

Unread postPosted: 02 Dec 2010, 23:39
by Ztex
Just FYI..AF-3 flew with a tanker today.

AF-03 ready for Edwards?

Unread postPosted: 03 Dec 2010, 03:28
by neptune
Ztex wrote:Just FYI..AF-3 flew with a tanker today.


1,000 nm to Edwards from Carswell with a 1,200 nm range. Is it to join 1&2 before Christmas :?:

RE: AF-03 ready for Edwards?

Unread postPosted: 03 Dec 2010, 04:21
by SpudmanWP
AF-3 is going to Edwards initially for RCS testing. Once that is done they are going to update it to Blk1 before it joins AF-1 & AF-2.

Re: RE: AF-03 ready for Edwards?

Unread postPosted: 03 Dec 2010, 05:18
by neptune
SpudmanWP wrote:AF-3 is going to Edwards initially for RCS testing. Once that is done they are going to update it to Blk1 before it joins AF-1 & AF-2.


update to block 1 at EDW or back in FW?

RE: Re: RE: AF-03 ready for Edwards?

Unread postPosted: 03 Dec 2010, 05:40
by SpudmanWP
That was not mentioned, but it sounds like it can be done at EDW.

the block update requires some panels to be opened


http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... 45b453a678

RE: Re: RE: AF-03 ready for Edwards?

Unread postPosted: 09 Dec 2010, 19:48
by spazsinbad
F-35 partly recovers flight test record in 2010, but fresh obstacles await By Stephen Trimble 09/12/10 Flight International

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/20 ... acles.html

"The Lockheed Martin F-35 will pass the fourth anniversary of its first flight on 15 December with a test programme surging forward but facing new challenges in 2011, says chief test pilot Jon Beesley.

Set for retirement on 1 February, Beesley has overseen a dramatic expansion of sorties flown in 2010. After completing about 130 sorties in the first three years of flight testing combined, Lockheed expects that seven aircraft representing all three F-35 variants should surpass an unofficial goal of 394 tests this year alone.

As the test fleet finally swells to 14 aircraft by July - a roughly six-month delay - programme officials are preparing to meet fresh problems.

In particular, three aircraft flying with Block 1 software will strain the F-35's thermal management system as never before, Beesley says. The aircraft's electrical and power system radiates heat that must be cooled or dumped into "heat sinks", such as fuel. The challenge is most acute when the F-35 taxis on hot days.

"So far the (F-35's thermal management) concept seems to have worked well," Beesley says, but adds: "When it gets to be 105°F (40.6°C), that's when you want to look at it. It's a great question to ask by the end of next summer and see how did it go."

Another key challenge will be overcoming the "struggling" short take-off and vertical landing F-35B variant. BAE Systems test pilot Graham Tomlinson memorably completed the first vertical landing on 18 March, but such tests have been halted since September after Lockheed found unexpected wear on auxiliary inlet door hinges.

That restriction could be lifted during the week of 13 December, Beesley says, although Lockheed must first "go through a few more wickets" to receive approval from the F-35 joint programme office.

The F-35B is now scheduled to begin vertical landing tests aboard an amphibious carrier in "the fall" of 2011, Beesley says. That means the schedule has slipped by six months since July, when programme officials disclosed the milestone was due in March 2011.

But perhaps the biggest challenge of all will be to sustain the momentum of test sorties per aircraft. The two conventional take-off and landing aircraft currently flying have averaged about 10 sorties per month, Beesley says.

Last June, a senior Lockheed official projected that the total number of test flights would grow from nearly 400 in 2010 to about 1,000 next year. Beesley, however, is non-committal about a goal for flight-test numbers.

"I don't know what the goal is next year," Beesley says. "I very seldom think about number of flights. That might be the most meaningless metric there is."

RE: Re: RE: AF-03 ready for Edwards?

Unread postPosted: 14 Dec 2010, 21:01
by neptune
And Then There Were Three
Posted by Graham Warwick at 12/14/2010 11:05 AM CST

A third F-35A, the first to be equipped with the mission system, arrived at Edwards AFB in California on Dec. 11 to begin flight testing. Aircraft AF-3, fresh out of final finishes, is earmarked initially for radar cross-section testing.

Lockheed Martin, meanwhile, says it passed its 394-flight test target for 2010 on Dec. 6, taking the program total to 531 flights since the F-35 first flew on Dec. 15, 2006. Two F-35As, four F-35Bs and one F-35C logged 60 flights in November against a plan of 51.

That sounds like progress, and it is, but it's worth remembering that, in September last year, the JSF program office leadership was pojecting that 12 aircraft would be flying by now, each logging 12 test sorties a month. That goal is unlikely to be achieved until well in 2011. :pint:

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

RE: Re: RE: AF-03 ready for Edwards?

Unread postPosted: 16 Dec 2010, 10:24
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Martin F-35 Program Achieves Overall 2010 Flight Test Target

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/pres ... ached.html

"FORT WORTH, Texas, December 15th, 2010 -- On Thursday, Dec. 9, the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II program team reached its 2010 goal of 394 test flights jointly established by the Joint Strike Fighter Program Office and Lockheed Martin. Since the first flight of the F-35 on Dec.15, 2006, the program has logged a total of 531 flights, expanding the performance envelope of the three F-35 variants and testing the mission systems.

“We exceeded our 394-flight goal and expect to meet our overall test-point goal this year by reaching ahead and working 2011 test points,” said J.D. McFarlan, Lockheed Martin vice president of F-35 Test and Verification. “While we are still behind on our overall STOVL variant testing, we are working through a plan to get us back on track.”

In November, the program completed 60 flights against a plan of 51. Both the F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) and the F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variants exceeded their monthly flight targets. The F-35C carrier variant (CV) jet fell just two flights short of its plan."

Re: RE: Re: RE: AF-03 ready for Edwards?

Unread postPosted: 16 Dec 2010, 11:49
by energo
A few words on the test points:

F-35 achieves flight test goal


[..]

The eight test jets have flown some 300 flights since June. This is despite a fleet wide grounding in October due to a software issue with the fuel boost pumps as well as challenges with the F-35B STOVL jet, which has slowed the type's flight test progress. Overall the program has logged 531 flights to date.

As of December 12 3698 test points had been completed of a planned 3772 by the end of the year. The CTOL and CV remains ahead of plan while the STOVL trails behind. A break down for each jet: CV; 462 against 270 planned, CTOL; 1343 against 1064 planned, and STOVL; 1893 against 2438 planned.

AF-3 arrived at Edwards AFB on December 11 after a 1,200-mile ferry flight from Lockheed's Fort Worth plant in Texas. The flight was piloted by Lockheed Martin test pilot Bill "Gigs" Gigliotti and included a tanker rendezvous to refuel. The jet is the first fully low-observable compliant F-35 and will mainly test the F-35's advanced technologies and mission systems. A wide range of systems will be tested, such as the APG-81 AESA radar and AN/ASQ-239 "Barracuda" electronic warfare system, as well as other sensors and avionics as flight testing progresses.



B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 21 Dec 2010, 11:40
by bandit66
So AF-4/6/7/8 BF-5 and CF-2/3 are all still on the ground at LM? Presumably AF-6/7/8 are EG coded and no pics still? Is AF-4 coded or just the usual markings like 2/3?

Test Flights and Test Points; update?

Unread postPosted: 30 Dec 2010, 18:37
by neptune
energo wrote:A few words on the test points:.....

The eight test jets have flown some 300 flights since June. .....
B. Bolsøy
Oslo


Energo, any end of the year tabuations (by type) of flights and test points? :?:

Happy New Year to All! :D

RE: Test Flights and Test Points; update?

Unread postPosted: 31 Dec 2010, 08:06
by bandit66
AF-4 had its fist flight today, apparently everything went well!!!

Re: RE: Test Flights and Test Points; update?

Unread postPosted: 31 Dec 2010, 12:00
by qwe2008
bandit66 wrote:AF-4 had its fist flight today, apparently everything went well!!!


good news!

do you have any pic?

RE: Re: RE: Test Flights and Test Points; update?

Unread postPosted: 31 Dec 2010, 12:30
by qwe2008
AF-4 flys with block 0.5 or 1.0?

Re: RE: Test Flights and Test Points; update?

Unread postPosted: 31 Dec 2010, 18:48
by energo
qwe2008 wrote:
bandit66 wrote:AF-4 had its fist flight today, apparently everything went well!!!


good news!

do you have any pic?


Here you go :)


AF-4 on its first flight on December 30th, 2010. Pilot was Lockheed Martin test pilot Bill 'Gigs' Gigliotti. [Lockheed Martin photo by Neal Chapman]

Unread postPosted: 01 Jan 2011, 00:47
by StolichnayaStrafer
WOOHOO, nice way to end 2010 and ring in the New Year!!! :applause:

Unread postPosted: 01 Jan 2011, 06:23
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Sneaks Another F-35 Under the Wire Posted by Graham Warwick at 12/31/2010

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

"On the eve of the New Year, Lockheed Martin got another F-35 test aircraft flying, with AF-4 - a CTOL F-35A - making the program's 410th and last flight on 2010 on Dec. 30. That means nine development-test aircraft are flying, but leaves three still to get airborne.

On paper, the F-35 test program looks more successful than expected in 2010, with 410 flights versus a plan of 394 - but dig down and look at test points rather than test flights and the results were a mixed bag. Although the program ended the year close to its plan of acheiving almost 3,800 test points, they did not add up quite as expected.

The CTOL F-35A ended the year 50% ahead of plan on test points because aircraft AF-1 and -2 at Edwards AFB kept on flying, averaging 10 flights a month from June onwards. The F-35C carrier variant ended the year 125% ahead of plan, which was modest anyway because only one aircraft, CF-1, is flying.

The STOVL F-35B, however, ended the year 18% behind plan on test points because mechanical realibility issues prevented the four aircraft at NAS Patuxent River achieving the same flight rate as the F-35As. More critically, the program achieved less than half the test points required for two key objectives: ready for training (RFT) flight clearance and initial ship trails.

Both objectives were planned to be accomplished in 2010, but will now slip to the middle of 2011. Initial ship trials, orginally scheduled for March, are now planned between late August and November. That window is based on when the LHD-class amphibious assault ship USS Wasp can be modified with instrumentation to measure the ship environment during STOVL operations.

To achieve clearance for ship trails, the F-35B must complete 40 vertical landings in a range of conditions. The program has only done 10 since March 2010, seven of which count towards the total required. STOVL-mode testing was suspended in September, when premature wear on auxiliary-inlet door hinges was discovered. Vertical landings are expected to resume in January.

Auxiliary doors are aft of the lift-fan door (here open to 65deg)

Image

Hinge wear has been traced to higher-than-predicted airloads on the auxiliary doors. Components have been redesigned, but the main fix is to change the operation of the large lift-fan door forward of the auxiliary-inlet doors. Flight tests have shown that, when the lift-fan door is fully open, loads on the auxiliary doors are reduced.

Originally, the lift-fan door was scheduled to open to 65deg below 120kt in semi-jet-borne flight, and to 35deg above that airspeed. Now the door will stay fully open to 165kt to reduce the loads on the auxiliary-inlet doors. Lockheed's JD McFarlan, who is now in change of the test program, says the change does not significantly impact short take-off performance.

Investigation of the hinge-wear problem also revealed a lot of variation of the loads on the auxiliary doors caused by aircraft sideslip, so McFarlan says the flight-control software has been adjusted to tailor the slideslip characteristics in semi-jet-borne flight.

Following these changes, aircraft BF-2 is expected to make its first vertical landing early in the New Year. Along with BF-1, the original STOVL-mode test aircraft, BF-2 will then take up the task of clearing the F-35B test fleet for initial ship trails. This is now expected to be completed by the summer."

Unread postPosted: 02 Jan 2011, 20:31
by energo
Another great shot:


AF-4 on its first flight on December 30th, 2010. Pilot was Lockheed Martin test pilot Bill 'Gigs' Gigliotti. [Lockheed Martin photo by Carl Richards]


Thank's to Solomon

B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Unread postPosted: 04 Jan 2011, 21:40
by spazsinbad
F-35 Begins Year With Test Objectives Unmet Jan 4, 2011 By Graham Warwick - Washington

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/ ... dline=F-35 Begins Year With Test Objectives Unmet

“Flight testing of Lockheed Martin’s F-35 Joint Strike Fighter enters 2011 at a stepped-up pace, but with many key 2010 objectives still unmet and significant program changes looming.

While the program exceeded its year-end target of 394 flights, the objectives of clearing the conventional-takeoff-and-landing (CTOL) variant to begin pilot training, and the short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing (Stovl) version for training and initial ship trials, were not accomplished as planned in 2010.

Testing required to obtain “ready for training” (RFT) flight clearance for the CTOL F-35A is expected to be completed in January, says J.D. McFarlan, vice president of F-35 test and verification. RFT is required to fly the first production F-35s, which are not covered by a development flight-test clearance.

The first low-rate initial production (LRIP) batch of F-35As, aircraft AF-6 and -7, are slated to be delivered to Edwards AFB, Calif., by May to help with development testing, while the LRIP 2 batch, beginning with AF-8, will be delivered to the Eglin AFB, Fla., training center.

RFT clearance for LRIP 1 and 2 involves a limited flight envelope of 350 kt., Mach 0.8 and 4g, plus initial mission-system functionality, says McFarlan. Additional testing planned for 2011 will expand the flight envelope for LRIP 3 aircraft to 550 kt., Mach 0.95 and 7g, and add mission-system capability. Aircraft have already been flown to 580 kt., Mach 1.3 and 7g during risk-mitigation tests, he says.

For the Stovl F-35B, RFT clearance involves both conventional-flight and powered-lift modes, including initial ship clearance, and has been pushed into 2011 by delays caused by mechanical-reliability issues with the test aircraft. These are being overcome, says McFarlan, with the monthly flying rate increasing over the second half of 2010.

While the F-35As at Edwards have each been averaging 10 flights a month since June, the F-35Bs at NAS Patuxent River, Md., have struggled to match their productivity. “But the last few months have shown Stovl is capable of that rate,” he says, with three aircraft each flying nine times in November.

“Stovl has not caught up, but the pace is quickening,” says McFarlan. Failure-prone cooling fans have been replaced and a unreliable upper lift-fan door actuator redesigned, and no problems were experienced in the last quarter, he says.

Vertical landings, halted since September after the discovery of wear on auxiliary inlet-door hinges, are set to resume this month. McFarlan says some hinge components have been redesigned and operation of the lift-fan door rescheduled to reduce airloads on the auxiliary doors during semi-jet-borne flight.

The lift-fan door was programmed to open to 65 deg. below 120 kt., and to 35 deg. above that airspeed. But with the large door fully open, loads on the auxiliary-inlet doors behind it are reduced, so the schedule has been changed to keep the lift-fan door open 65 deg. up to 165 kt. during a short takeoff, he says.

The program has logged only 10 vertical landings since March 2010, seven of which count toward the 40 required for initial ship clearance. Originally set for March, ship trials are now slated between August and November. This window is based on when the LHD-class amphibious assault carrier can be modified with instrumentation to measure the ship environment during Stovl operations.

Flight testing so far shows the up-and-away handling qualities for all three variants are good, including during aerial refueling and crosswind landings, McFarlan says. Mission-system software stability has been good “and we are pleased with the sensor performance. There is tremendous capability in the radar and electronic warfare system.”

Nose wander in transonic maneuvers has been tackled with changes to control-surface scheduling and air-data calibration, and updated flight-control software was released at the end of the year. This is expected to also correct discrepancies between predicted and measured sideslip angles and control-surface loads. Engines with design changes to reduce screech and allow use of full augmentor are being installed.

Wing roll off has been experienced during transonic maneuvering in the CTOL F-35A, but was expected and planned solutions have worked so far, McFarlan says, including scheduling of leading- and trailing-edge flap positions and rates. Roll off occurs when the shockwaves on the wing do not move symmetrically as angle of attack changes.

The same solutions will be tested on the Stovl F-35B and F-35C carrier variant (CV), which because of its larger wing has been fitted with pop-up spoilers as a precaution. “We will try the aerodynamic techniques first,” McFarlan says. F-35C test objectives for 2011 include RFT clearance and land-based catapult and arrestor testing at NAS Lakehurst, N.J.

Overall, F-35 flight testing ended 2010 close to its goal of more than 3,700 test points, but while the CTOL F-35A and F-35C CV were well ahead of plan, Stovl and mission-system testing fell short. More than half the test points required for Stovl RFT and ship clearance remain to be accomplished in 2011.

A major replan of the F-35 program is to be announced by early February.

Unread postPosted: 05 Jan 2011, 06:19
by Ztex
Did AF-4 get up today?

Unread postPosted: 06 Jan 2011, 10:27
by seruriermarshal
yeah it fly in Fort Worth again .

BF-2, Descends To Its First Vertical Landing

Unread postPosted: 11 Jan 2011, 17:26
by neptune
BF-2, Descends To Its First Vertical Landing

NAVAL AIR STATION PATUXENT RIVER, Md., Jan. 10, 2011 - The second F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing jet, BF-2, descends to its first vertical landing on Thursday, Jan. 6, 2011, at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md. U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Col. Fred Schenk piloted the aircraft during the flight. (Lockheed Martin photos by Phaedra Loftis)

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/products/f35/

:cheers: :thumb:

RE: BF-2, Descends To Its First Vertical Landing

Unread postPosted: 18 Jan 2011, 15:58
by neptune
5 vertical landings in 8 days for F-35B

By Dave Majumdar@ Marine Corp News - Staff writer
Posted : Monday Jan 17, 2011 17:21:01 EST

A series of five vertical landings over eight days shows that the troubled F-35B Joint Strike Fighter is getting back on track, analysts said.

The tests, performed between Jan. 6 and 13, are among the 42 that must be completed before the aircraft can be tested at sea onboard an amphibious assault ship.

The 2011 schedule for F-35 flight testing has yet to be finalized, said John Kent, a spokesman for F-35 prime contractor Lockheed Martin.

Prior to Jan. 6, short take-off and vertical-landing operations had been suspended due to problems with doors located on the upper surface of the aircraft.

Related reading
• Lockheed says it’s fixed key F-35B issue
Analysts agreed that this series of vertical landings signals the problematic vertical landing variant is starting to recover from a series of technical glitches that resulted in schedule slips and the redesigns of some ancillary equipment and structural elements of the aircraft. These elements include components in the propulsion system, an insufficiently robust structural bulkhead and hinges on some doors on the top surface of the aircraft.

“I think it does [signal that the program is getting back on track]. This program has never been quite as troubled as many critics thought. I think it’s probably progressed more smoothly than other fighter development program with the possible exception of the F-16,” said Loren Thompson, an analyst at the Lexington Institute, Arlington, Va. The F-16’s development proceeded so smoothly because of the simple nature of the original version of that aircraft, he said.

Comparatively, the earlier development of Lockheed Martin’s other fifth-generation fighter, the F-22 Raptor, faced far greater difficulties, Thompson said. He said that the challenges faced by the F-35 are common teething problems encountered in most developmental programs.

“Lockheed Martin, they definitely learned from the F-22 experience. The Air Force is sort of vindicated in taking an F-35 design that based in large part on the F-22 system,” Thompson said.

Analyst Richard Aboulafia at the Teal Group, Fairfax, Va., said that the technical challenges facing the F-35 can be turned around within the two-year probationary span allotted by Defense Secretary Robert Gates to fix the program.

“The problem with this program, given two years of leeway, is not technological. It’s budgetary and political,” he said.

The Air Force conventional take-off version and Navy carrier variant are doing well in testing, both Aboulafia and Thompson said. Both variants are ahead of schedule in their flight tests.

“We started getting the F-35B back on track toward the end of last year, when we resolved some of the key component issues and began achieving flight rates similar to those of the [conventional take-off] jets, but the [vertical landings] this month certainly have moved the needle for us in terms of STOVL-mode flight. We are seeing excellent results,” said Lockheed’s Kent. :)


http://www.marinecorpstimes.com/news/20 ... b-011711w/

RE: BF-2, Descends To Its First Vertical Landing

Unread postPosted: 28 Jan 2011, 01:59
by neptune
Lockheed’s F-35 considers goal of 872 flights in 2011

By Stephen Trimble@FlightGlobal

Lockheed Martin is currently in talks to more than double this year the number of flight tests for the F-35 programme compared to 2010.

During Lockheed's year-end earnings webcast with stock market analysts on 27 January, chief executive Robert Stevens said the test requirements for 2011 are still being discussed with the joint programme office.

"But we are currently looking at 872 flights in total," Stevens said, noting the F-35 test fleet has recorded 36 flights in the first 27 days of the year.

Until Stevens' statement, Lockheed and programme officials had not disclosed this year's flight test goal.

Last year, the F-35 completed 410 test flights during the calendar year, resulting in 547 flights since the first takeoff by the AA-1 flight test aircraft in December 2006.

If the F-35 programme sticks with the 872 flight test goal, the cumulative total of 1,455 flight tests would retire about 30% of the programme's total number of flight tests on schedule.

The number, however, reflects the slower pace of progress expected after two programme restructurings since 1 February last year caused by testing and manufacturing delays.

Last June, programme officials expected to complete about 1,000 flight tests in 2011, which was already lowered from the previous year's plan.

Lockheed has delivered 10 of the 13 flight test aircraft in the original programme.

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/20 ... -2011.html

Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 28 Jan 2011, 21:12
by neptune
Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35
Posted by Graham Warwick@Ares; at 1/28/2011 9:53 AM CST

Lockheed Martin flew the fifth STOVL F-35B yesterday (Jan 27), taking the number of aircraft in the development flight-test program to 10 :D . The fourth CTOL F-35A, meanwhile, was ferried to Edwards AFB on Jan 22.

Under the current plan, two more development aircraft remain to fly, F-35C carrier variants CF-2 and -3. They are expected to ferry to NAS Patuxtent River by June. But construction of a third CV test jet, CF-5, has begun and more aircraft of all three variants will be added to the flight-test program under the replan now being put in place.

Lockheed's CEO, Roberts Stevens, told analysts yesterday that the company is planning to complete 872 test flights this year, more than double the 410 flights achieved in 2010. In addition to the four CTOL, five STOVL and three CV test jets, the first two production F-35As, AF-6 and -7, will fly in the test program this year.

But Stevens also warned that Lockheed may not be able to lower the F-35's cost in Fiscal 2012 because of the Pentagon's plan to trim procurement to 32 from 45 - to help pay for the extra development resources and time provided under the replan.

With 32 aircraft purchased in Fiscal 2011, production rate will remain flat through 2012 and Lockheed will not move down the learning curve as fast as it has over the first four production lots. The Pentagon plans to return to a 1.5-times ramp rate in 2013, but the near-term cut will make it harder to meet the unit-cost targets.

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 14 Feb 2011, 16:21
by energo
Quick 2011 flight test update

As of February 10:

Total flights: 71
CTOL flights: 27
STOVL flights: 40
CV flights: 4
Vertical landings: 20
Overall program flights: 618
Overall vertical landings: 30

::UPDATE::

As of February 14:

Total flights: 78
Vertical landings: 22
Overall program flights: 624
Overall vertical landings: 32


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

RE: Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 14 Feb 2011, 18:02
by hobo
I don't see any bad news there.


I guess Bill gets a day off.

RE: Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 15 Feb 2011, 01:39
by seruriermarshal
Bill talk about money .

RE: Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 15 Feb 2011, 03:53
by dragorv
Video of the 1st Navy pilot test flight of the F-35C-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHvCa5MN ... dded#at=64

RE: Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 15 Feb 2011, 04:19
by spazsinbad
dragorv: Thanks - great video showing pilot dressing & using ladder etc. with a long landing base turn/straightaway to touchdown from above.

Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 15 Feb 2011, 05:26
by popcorn
energo wrote:Quick 2011 flight test update

As of February 10:

Total flights: 71
CTOL flights: 27
STOVL flights: 40
CV flights: 4
Vertical landings: 20
Overall program flights: 618
Overall vertical landings: 30

::UPDATE::

As of February 14:

Total flights: 78
Vertical landings: 22
Overall program flights: 624
Overall vertical landings: 32


B. Bolsøy
Oslo

Nice to see the B at the head of the class for once.. hope it stays tht way.
So 10 more vertical landings and it can proceed to ship trials?

Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 15 Feb 2011, 16:03
by Lightndattic
popcorn wrote:Nice to see the B at the head of the class for once.. hope it stays tht way.
So 10 more vertical landings and it can proceed to ship trials?


IIRC, The availability of a ship to be modified to test landing on is going to hold that up for now.

Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 23 Feb 2011, 17:57
by neptune
[quote="energo...As of February 14:..Vertical landings: 22...Overall vertical landings: 32...[/quote]

Any VL by a/c other than BF-1&2? :?:

Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 23 Feb 2011, 20:58
by Pecker
neptune wrote:Any VL by a/c other than BF-1&2? :?:


None at this time.

Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 24 Feb 2011, 15:31
by Lightndattic
neptune wrote:[quote="energo...As of February 14:..Vertical landings: 22...Overall vertical landings: 32...


Any VL by a/c other than BF-1&2? :?:[/quote]

They are the only ones outfitted with the test equipment needed to open the VL envelope for the other airframes.

Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 24 Feb 2011, 21:59
by neptune
Lightndattic wrote:
neptune wrote:[quote="energo...As of February 14:..Vertical landings: 22...Overall vertical landings: 32...


Any VL by a/c other than BF-1&2? :?:


They are the only ones outfitted with the test equipment needed to open the VL envelope for the other airframes.[/quote]

Actually testing the waters to see if BF-3 had snuck into the VL arena, unannounced. BF-3 was briefly mentioned earlier with BF-2 as being instrumented for VL, alas not yet! Keep 'em flying! :)

RE: Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 28 Feb 2011, 15:38
by neptune
First Production F-35 Flies
Posted by Graham Warwick@Ares; at 2/25/2011 5:54 PM CST

The first production F-35, CTOL aircraft AF-6, made an hour-long first flight today (Feb. 25) from Lockheed Martin's Fort Worth plant, flown by test pilot Bill Gigliotti.

AF-6 and AF-7, the second F-35A in the two-aircraft LRIP 1 low-rate initial production batch, will be ferried to Edwards AFB, where they will be used to assess the maturity and suitability of the initial flight envelope and mission-system functionality to begin training.

AF-6 would have flown earlier, but the post-production decision to use both it and AF-7 in the behind-schedule flight-test program meant the aircraft had first to be instrumented. Still, I am sure someone will can us how late this particular milestone is.


http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

RE: Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 01 Mar 2011, 01:25
by spazsinbad
F-35B [BF-02] test aircraft completes milestone flight

http://www.navair.navy.mil/press_releas ... ew&id=4511

"PATUXENT RIVER, Md. -- On Feb. 26, 2011, an F-35B test aircraft (BF-2) completed its 100th flight with Lockheed Martin test pilot David "Doc" Nelson at the controls. The 100th flight for BF-2 accomplished further short take-off envelope expansion in preparation for shipboard testing later this year. The F-35B is the Marine Corps variant of the Joint Strike Fighter and is capable of short take-offs and vertical landings undergoing test and evaluation at NAS Patuxent River. Photo courtesy Lockheed Martin."

HI-REZ: http://www.navair.navy.mil/press_releas ... 8_12_1.jpg

Image

RE: Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 03 Mar 2011, 06:34
by neptune
CORRECTED - Pentagon wants price cut on next F-35 contract

Pentagon wants price cut on next F-35 contract
Tue, Mar 1 2011

(Corrects penultimate paragraph to show program has completed 33 or 34 vertical landings, not test flights, this year)

* Pentagon sees pressure on Lockheed to cut costs

* Official looking for "lowest price" possible

By Andrea Shalal-Esa
WASHINGTON, March 1 (Reuters) - The U.S. Defense Department said on Tuesday it wants further price cuts when it negotiates the next contract to buy F-35 fighter jets from Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N).

....The troubled Marine Corps version of the F-35, which Gates put on a two-year probation, had already completed 33 or 34 vertical landings this year, three times the number completed in all of 2010, he said... (Editing by Steve Orlofsky, Dave Zimmerman)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/ ... 0820110302

If we have 33 or 34 to add to the 10 or 11 VL from last year, then we would be over the magic 40 VL goal set for "boat" testing. Does anyone have an accurate number in excess of 40 and a date? :?:

RE: Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 03 Mar 2011, 08:21
by spazsinbad
Perhaps you forget 'the boat' has to be available also. Probably now 'boat availability' will determine the test time? FROM:

http://defense-update.com/wp/20110226_f ... +Update%29

"... The F-35B will begin test operations from U.S. Marine Corps amphibious assault ships this fall (2011)...."
___________

USS WASP LHD 1

http://www.uscarriers.net/lhd1history.htm

"...September 17 [2010], LHD 1 began an eight-month Continuous Maintenance Availability on Aug. 23 to undergo a series of modifications and assessments as it prepares to be the first ship to carry the new fighter F-35B. USS Wasp was selected this year to be the test platform for the F-35B Lightning II, the short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) variant of the JSF, but is unlikely that will conduct scheduled initial at-sea testing in March 2011 because of slow progress with vertical landings.

October 8 [2010], Capt. Brenda M. Holdener relieved Capt. Lowell D. Crow as the 17th commanding officer of the Wasp during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

January 13, 2011 USS Wasp arrived in BAE Systems Shipyard to begin a scheduled Phased Maintenance Availability (PMA)."

Re: RE: Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 03 Mar 2011, 16:16
by Lightndattic
neptune wrote:If we have 33 or 34 to add to the 10 or 11 VL from last year, then we would be over the magic 40 VL goal set for "boat" testing. Does anyone have an accurate number in excess of 40 and a date? :?:


Even if the total count is 40+, not all of those are counted towards the total needed before the VL testing is wrapped up. The VLs have to meet certain criteria before it can be counted toward the requirement.

From Here: http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

BF-2 was instrumented for STOVL-mode flight tests after the first F-35B, aircraft BF-1, encountered mechanical reliability issues that slowed testing. Ship clearance was planned by the end of 2010, with STOVL trials on the USS Wasp scheduled for March, but by year-end BF-1 had logged only 10 VLs, seven of which counted towards the total required.

So BF-2 is off to a brisk start, accomplishing its first VL on Jan 6 and completing five within a week. Just any old VL won't do - to clear the envelope each has to satisfy specific test objectives: wind speed and direction, for example. So of the three VLs on Jan 13, two were with the wind at 10kt from 45deg port and one with a 15kt headwind.

Hitting the test points is crucial because, as Lockheed Martin has already discovered, as the aircraft slows from wingborne to semi-jetborne to jetborne flight the airflow around (and airloads on) the STOVL F-35's many doors are complex and dynamic - and difficult to predict precisely. That's what development is about.
[/b]

RE: Re: RE: Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 03 Mar 2011, 20:00
by spazsinbad
From above URL: http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

"...Sea trials are paced by the need to instrument the Wasp to measure the ship environment during STOVL operations. The timing for STOVL clearance and ship modification now puts the initial sea trials out in the August to November [2011] timeframe...."

RE: Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2011, 18:49
by spazsinbad
F-35s 'Blacken the Skies' by Graham Warwick at Feb/7/2011

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

"Lockheed Martin has flown the second production F-35, with US Air Force CTOL F-35A aircraft AF-7 completing a 1.3-hr flight from Fort Worth on March 4. AF-7 is the second of two aircraft in the first low-rate initial production batch and along with AF-6 - flown last week - will be used for maturity testing and operational assessment.

Lockheed says 11 development and two production aircraft have now logged 683 flights (and, at the latest count, 56 vertical landings for the STOVL F-35B - 46 of them this year). Two development aircraft, F-35C carrier variants CF-2 and -2 still remain to be flown, however."

BIG PIC: http://sitelife.aviationweek.com/ver1.0 ... a.Full.jpg

Image

RE: Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2011, 19:47
by neptune
AF-06 tail number is 07-0744 and AF-7 tail number is 07-0745. Inquiring; 07 is the year of order and 0744 is the manufacturing sequence number :?: 56 VL??, the door hinges must be working now. Congrats to the program.

RE: Re: Steps Forward, Step Back for F-35

Unread postPosted: 07 Mar 2011, 20:21
by SpudmanWP
Yup, the LRIP-1 jets were part of the FY2007 budget.

AF-7 up again

Unread postPosted: 09 Mar 2011, 23:15
by Ztex
AF-7 (USAF 07-745) on flight #2 today....

Image

Image

Re: AF-7 up again

Unread postPosted: 10 Mar 2011, 00:36
by seruriermarshal
Ztex wrote:AF-7 (USAF 07-745) on flight #2 today....

Image

Image


Nice pic Ztex

:notworthy:

RE: Re: AF-7 up again

Unread postPosted: 10 Mar 2011, 01:38
by SpudmanWP
As of March 8th, the whole program is 24 out of 55 flights for the month of March.

In Feb it had 65 flights (highest monthly total so far).

F-35A had 25 for a planned 18
F-35B had 34 for a planned 17
F-35C had 6 for a planned 5

BF-2 became the first F-35 to complete 100 flights.

Things are ramping up nicely :)

Lockheed reports F-35 testing progress

Lockheed Martin issued a brief update on F-35 flight testing late Tuesday that shows the program is gaining some momentum, although it's hard to tell how much since we don't have a way of measuring it against the latest schedule.

As of Tuesday, the program has already completed better than 40 percent of the test flights planned for March, 24 out of 55.

In February, the program accomplished 65 test flights, the highest monthly total yet. The four F-35A models now flying at Edwards Air Force Base completed 25 flights compared to the 18 planned.

Progress was very good at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, where the five F-35B models completed 34 flights, compared to a planned 17 and the lone F-35C completed six flights, one more than planned. The STOVL F-35Bs at Pax have now completed 57 vertical landings, 47 of them so far this year, a sign that the reliability of that model seems to have improved significantly.

Test aircraft BF-2 in February became the first F-35 to complete 100 test flights.

Read more: http://blogs.star-telegram.com/sky_talk ... z1G9UYfW8t

RE: Re: AF-7 up again

Unread postPosted: 10 Mar 2011, 03:17
by popcorn
The skepticism/cynicism level around the web seems at an all-time low with the SDD program gaining momentum :D

RE: Re: AF-7 up again

Unread postPosted: 23 Mar 2011, 04:34
by spazsinbad
F-35 Flight Test Update 4 By Francesca DeGirolami Posted 22 March 2011

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=69

"The previous installment of the F-35 Flight Test Update ended with the ferry of the first carrier variant, F-35C CF-1, to NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, on 6 November 2010. The F-35 Lightning II program completed 410 flights in 2010. As of mid-March 2011, 150 flights have been completed for the year to date. The program has completed a total of 697 flights since first flight in 2006.

The fourth production-representative conventional takeoff and landing variant, F-35A AF-4, was flown for the first time 30 December 2010. The aircraft was then ferried to Edwards AFB, California, on 22 January 2011. F35A AF-4 is the fifth (including AA-1, the first F-35) to be ferried to Edwards for testing. The first production aircraft, F-35A AF-6, completed its inaugural flight on 25 February. It will continue flight tests in Fort Worth, Texas, before it is accepted by the US Air Force. The aircraft will then head to Edwards AFB to support developmental testing.

F-35B BF-2, the second short takeoff/vertical landing aircraft, made its first vertical landing on 6 January. F-35B BF-5 was flown for the first time on 27 January and is the last STOVL assigned to developmental flight testing. As of mid-March, the five F-35Bs flying at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, have completed a total of 316 flights and seventy-three vertical landings.

Lockheed Martin test pilot Al Norman was named chief test pilot for the F-35 program at the end of February. Norman has more than 6,000 hours of flight time in more than seventy different types of aircraft."

RE: Re: AF-7 up again

Unread postPosted: 23 Mar 2011, 05:45
by 1st503rdsgt
So when are they going to quit babying the things? My newly restored 71 Camaro seems run better the more I flog it. :twisted: Yeah, I know the test copies are too valuable to take stupid risks with, and they're grounded, but this is getting tedious.

RE: Re: AF-7 up again

Unread postPosted: 23 Mar 2011, 19:23
by SpudmanWP
The screech issue kept them form pushing the upper speed limits. Once all the SDD F-35s get their engines updated then we will start seeing some higher top speeds being reported.

F-35 Flying Again

Unread postPosted: 24 Mar 2011, 02:49
by neptune
SpudmanWP wrote:The screech issue kept them form pushing the upper speed limits. Once all the SDD F-35s get their engines updated then we will start seeing some higher top speeds being reported.


Once the "screech" is fixed, "Program officials do not expect the grounding to have an impact on the overall flight test schedule. Lockheed has committed to complete 872 flight tests this year, 2011. :D

RE: F-35 Flying Again

Unread postPosted: 30 Mar 2011, 23:03
by spazsinbad
Seven F-35 Flights In One Day Posted 29 March 2011

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/news_ite ... tem_id=285

"The F-35 flight test program completed a record seven flights in one day on 29 March 2011. Four of the flights occurred at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, where F-35B BF-1 completed two flights and BF-2 and CF-1 completed one flight each. Three more occurred at Edwards AFB, California, where F-35A AF-1, AF-2, and AF-3 completed one flight each. AF-1’s mission, its 109th, was the longest of the seven flights at 3.1 hours."

ORIGINAL Large Photo:
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/images/n ... 4_8314.jpg

Image

F-35B test aircraft accomplish formation test

Unread postPosted: 01 Apr 2011, 02:18
by neptune
PATUXENT RIVER, Md. - At a test range near Naval Air Station Patuxent River,
Md., two F-35B test aircraft accomplish a formation test point March 17.
Lockheed Martin test pilot David "Doc" Nelson flew BF-2 and Royal Air Force
Squadron Leader Steve Long piloted BF-3. The F-35B and F-35C variants are
undergoing test and evaluation for delivery to the Marine Corps and Navy
respectively. :D
http://www.navair.navy.mil/press_releas ... ew&id=4536

RE: F-35B test aircraft accomplish formation test

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2011, 01:13
by neptune
Monday, April 4th, 2011

Lockheed Martin F-35 Flight Test Program Shows Progress in First Quarter

Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] F-35 Lightning II test jets made considerable flight test progress during the first quarter of 2011, conducting 199 test flights versus a plan of 142 flights. Additionally, the F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) variant logged six times more vertical landings in the first quarter than in all of 2010. The test program remained ahead of plan despite the grounding of various test fleet aircraft for 4-15 days during the period as officials investigated the cause of a dual generator/starter failure during a flight on March 9th.

The following totals and highlights provide a snapshot of flight test activity in the first quarter:

Conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL: F-35A) aircraft conducted 82 flights against the plan of 62.
STOVL (F-35B) aircraft conducted 101 flights against a plan of 62.
Carrier variant aircraft accomplished 16 flights of 18 planned.
Two production-model aircraft, AF-6 and AF-7, flew for the first time in preparation for delivery to the U.S. Air Force this year. AF-6 and AF-7 flew seven times in the first quarter.
The STOVL variant performed 61 vertical landings (compared with 10 vertical landings in all of 2010). BF-1 performed the first touch-and-go maneuver in VL mode this quarter.
From the start of flight testing in December 2006 through March 31, 2011, F-35s have flown 753 times, including production-model flights.

http://f-35.ca/2011/lockheed-martin-f-3 ... t-quarter/

RE: F-35B test aircraft accomplish formation test

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2011, 18:27
by neptune
STOVL F-35 Makes Headway Towards Sea Trials
Posted by Graham Warwick at 4/5/2011 10:29 AM CDT

In numbers terms, the F-35B STOVL variant of the Joint Strike Fighter has made rapid flight-test progress since the beginning of the year, racking up 61 vertical landings compared with just 10 in 2010. Improving mechanical reliability and adding aircraft to STOVL-mode flight testing appears to be paying off.

There is still work to be done to clear the F-35B for initial sea trials, now planned for late October or early November. According to Lockheed, two more vertical-landing (aka VL) test points are required: a pirouette VL to test side loads on the landing gear; and a 20kt-crosswind VL (for which the weather will have to cooperate).

In addition, 17 more unique short take-offs in different conditions and a fuel-purge test are required before the aircraft can be cleared for sea trials. Ship operability is one of the key characteristics that will determine whether the STOVL F-35 survives the two-year probation period imposed by defense secretary Robert Gates earlier this year.

Probation does not affect testing, but limits F-35B procurement to six each in FY2012 and 2013. Other key characteristics that will drive the decision on whether the F-35B will exit probation near the end of 2012 include weight, and specifically vertical-lift bring-back payload - roughly 3,000lb of unused weapons and fuel. The F-35B is meeting the spec, Lockheed says, but margin is tight.


http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

1- Are the Brits, still paying for the Short Rolling Landing Test for the "Bee"?, and when is the test results report scheduled? And is the test requirement in "excess" of the 3,000# bring back?

2- Now that the "Bee" is flying and making ground, is the USAF finally going to admit that the "Aaa" is less capable in the CAS replacement role of the A-10C and the "Bee" is the "right" a/c for that mission. Will the Army (the Client) have a say in the CAS type assignments? The ugly head of commanality rises again.

3- Is the 8,000m laser guided 70mm rocket a "Bee" candidate for the CAS role.

RE: F-35B test aircraft accomplish formation test

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2011, 19:04
by HaveVoid
What exactly would make the B superior in CAS role if you don't mind my asking? As they all have the same sensor suite, I would think the internal cannon of the A would make it more suited for the CAS role if anything.

RE: F-35B test aircraft accomplish formation test

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2011, 19:33
by SpudmanWP
Austere basing would allow the B to respond faster to CAS needs and have a higher sortie rate. This was shown to be true in ODS with the forward deployed Harriers.

Re: RE: F-35B test aircraft accomplish formation test

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2011, 19:59
by neptune
HaveVoid wrote:What exactly would make the B superior in CAS role if you don't mind my asking? ..


The cannon is certainly a formidable weapon; as both are equipped with different versions. The CAS role does not require the internal weapons for stealth and thus can be armed with several different weapon types; missles, bombs, (perhaps rockets?) for surface attack. The often banned cluster bomb can be used to deny areas to the enemy. The most significant difference is the ability to hover and deploy precision or surgical weapons; even the rocket has an 8,000 meter range and can be laser guided. The "Bee" can be forward based as "SpudmanWP" responded and can hurry to the scene and hang around longer before returning to it's forward basing. Shorter runs equals more frequent return trips after re-arming and/or refueling; more persistence. Couple all this capability with the ISR tools and CAS for the "Bee" will write a new book on support for the "ground pounders". Fast movers are a welcome relief for folks under pressure and are greatly appreciated but the "hanging around" ability of the "Bee" is not unrecognized. :)

RE: Re: RE: F-35B test aircraft accomplish formation test

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2011, 20:21
by 1st503rdsgt
Infantrymen don't really care what platform their CAS comes from. But we generally prefer assets that can hang around for awhile, so aircraft (be they birds or fast-flyers) that can be based nearby are the best. I'm guessing that the F-35B fits the bill, even without an internal gun.

RE: Re: RE: F-35B test aircraft accomplish formation test

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2011, 20:27
by SpudmanWP
For most of the CAS missions where the need to maintain a VLO signature is not needed, the F-35B can carry the external gun which has more ammo than the internal one on the F-35A.

RE: Re: RE: F-35B test aircraft accomplish formation test

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2011, 20:48
by spazsinbad
Why is this 'Overview of test flight' thread being taken over by a CAS discussion? Buehler? Anyone? :D I'll start a new thread now.

GO here for CAS & STOVL testing discussion:
F-35B Ship Tests/Bringback & Endless CAS Discussion :-)
http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... 349#194349

RE: Re: RE: F-35B test aircraft accomplish formation test

Unread postPosted: 05 Apr 2011, 23:07
by SpudmanWP
I have a request of Energo (and others who might have the information). While surfing the net, I came across a 2007 schedule for testing the JSF. Now obviously the program is behind that schedule. What I decided to find out is what would it take to make up that slippage and what timeframe would be needed. Here is the 2007 schedule.

Image

I took that information and plugged it into Excel along with what information I could find on quarterly updates. I am missing most of the flight totals (but was able to to extrapolate some) for FY2010. If anyone has the flight totals for Dec 31st 2009, March 31st 2010, June 31st 2010, or Sep 31st 2010 it would be helpful to validate that section of my graph.

Anyways, It looks like the program has "turned the corner" that it should have done in the 1st Qtr of FY2010 (they are 15 months behind the curve now). I have figured out that they need a 21% increase in flight tests per quarter to meet the 5000 tests by the end of FY2013. Over the past year they have easily beat that %/Qtr increase, but I need the data I asked for above to verify the exact %/Qtr increase. Here is what I have so far.

Image

Also, does anyone have the latest, full-program flight test schedule (like the 1st graph above)?

RE: Re: RE: F-35B test aircraft accomplish formation test

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2011, 05:04
by alloycowboy
That makes for some real interesting reading spudman. But you have another variable you need to contend with. The F-35 test pilots have been knocking off more test points per flight then planned. So they might not need as many test flights as planned. The problem with dealing with test flight rates is that it only takes one component failure to ground the whole fleet and eat all the schedule cushion that everyone has worked so hard to create.

RE: Re: RE: F-35B test aircraft accomplish formation test

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2011, 12:08
by SpudmanWP
I would also like to add the planned schedule each time it was changed. Anyone have those either?

RE: Re: RE: F-35B test aircraft accomplish formation test

Unread postPosted: 16 Apr 2011, 08:36
by qwe2008
As of April 5, 2011, the F-35 flight test program has conducted 769 flights total, including 222 flights in 2011.
*Flight numbers include production-model flights.

As of April 5, 2011, the F-35B variants have completed 64 vertical landings (10 in 2010).

The first five Low Rate Initial Production aircraft have exited the factory and are undergoing ground testing prior to flight.

2010 Estimated Average Unit Recurring Flyaway Cost
• F-35A CTOL $65 million

Unread postPosted: 18 Apr 2011, 02:38
by underhill
Yeah, leave the dreaming kiddies in their peaceful slumber.

Unread postPosted: 18 Apr 2011, 04:10
by SpudmanWP
I decided to take another look at my numbers and discovered a miscalculation. The rate of improvement (Blue line) only needs to be 5% (not 21%) to get to a realistic completion of the 2007 sch about 1 year behind the curve. I also added a projection if the current rate never changed (Orange line).

Image

I am still looking for an updated current schedule through completion of the JSF program if anyone has it.

Unread postPosted: 18 Apr 2011, 20:26
by neptune
SpudmanWP wrote:..The rate of improvement (Blue line) only needs to be 5% ..


Sorry to not add to the data but, couldn't resist commenting on your parade raining, it appears to be approaching a tropical storm. I'm not sure which, I'm more impressed with; the black hole in the sky, the mission systems or the maintenance computer system; each is a quantum step in improvement.

Unread postPosted: 18 Apr 2011, 21:03
by SpudmanWP
???? What parade was I raining on? I do not understand what you were trying to day.

The purpose of the BLUE line was to show what the progression would be like if they improved the rate of testing acceleration by only 5% each quarter. The ORANGE line represents flight testing if they did not change from a 206 flights per qtr schedule (not going to happen) and was used to see the slope of current testing.

For example, last quarter was 206 flights and if it improved by 5% each quarter then the next few quarters would be 216, 227, 238, 250, 263, etc. This would lead the program to finish the 5000 (2007 plan) flights only 1 year behind the 2007 schedule. Considering the progress that the program has made (qtr to qtr) over the past year, my 5% was being very conservative compared to what they have been demonstrating.

btw, I know this is a simplistic way to track testing progress, but we don't have much choice since they do not publish the testing points schedule like they do for the flight tests.

Unread postPosted: 19 Apr 2011, 01:10
by neptune
SpudmanWP wrote:???? What parade was I raining on? ....


Kudos and continue the good work. I agree with what you are indicating and proposing. The "Nay Sayer Parade" is looking rather dismal, in view of your charts and assumptions.

I hope the program succeeds; my personal interest is in the pipeline and heading to Naval Air Station Whiting Field, this summer. They should enter into a F-35C squadron about the time they are planning for the second carrier tour. Things are looking good! :)

Unread postPosted: 19 Apr 2011, 01:21
by SpudmanWP
Ah, ok.. only one cup of coffee today, so I was a little slow to pick the reference up ;)

Unread postPosted: 19 Apr 2011, 05:46
by LMAggie
I think you should take the orange line, but add the percentage of jets yet to be utilized by the test sites.

Unread postPosted: 19 Apr 2011, 09:39
by SpudmanWP
Since last qtr was 206, what do you think the stabilized rate (for all airframes) will be?

Unread postPosted: 20 Apr 2011, 16:52
by LMAggie
Of course the program has made assumptions on predicted flight rates but like most data it is reserved for the need-to-know community.

But using the flight rate from the first quarter is a fair assumption for your exercise. You'll need to increase that flight rate to account for the additional test assets that will be used at the test sites (I wouldn't count the ft worth birds because their productivity is limited due to shakedown/infant mortality issues).

Unread postPosted: 20 Apr 2011, 17:14
by popcorn
I thought I read somewhere that it would depend on the actual results if it would actually be necessary to conduct the additional test flights imposed earlier this year. Should the test results be sufficiently convincing, the number of additional flights ordered may actually be reduced?

Unread postPosted: 20 Apr 2011, 17:37
by LMAggie
popcorn wrote:I thought I read somewhere that it would depend on the actual results if it would actually be necessary to conduct the additional test flights imposed earlier this year. Should the test results be sufficiently convincing, the number of additional flights ordered may actually be reduced?

It really depends on the ground rules and assumptions they use to make the flight test schedule. Depending on the way the sausage is made, that may not effect the predictions.

From a test & evaluation philosophy perspective you rarely reduce your test scope because you've already laid out a test plan that is written to achieve a desired level of confidence in the system. You are extremely lucky if you can demonstrate spec compliance confidence with less testing than you planned for. Increasing test scope is definitely more often the case (whether it be fighter jets or cell phones). In the aerospace industry it's called the refly factor and is another way to look at your schedule.

Unread postPosted: 21 Apr 2011, 00:31
by SpudmanWP
Most of the additional test flights are due to the delay in certifying the simulation labs. Once that is done, then they can remove the flights associated with their respective labs.

Unread postPosted: 03 May 2011, 14:51
by neptune
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/pres ... flies.html

Second F-35C Completes Inaugural Flight

FORT WORTH, Texas, May 2nd, 2011

--The second F-35C Lightning II carrier variant takes off on its first flight from Naval Air Station (NAS) Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base Friday, April 29. Lockheed Martin F-35 Test Pilot Bill Gigliotti piloted the jet on its first flight. The supersonic F-35C, known as CF-2, is scheduled to fly to NAS Patuxent River, Md., later this year, where it will join the first F-35C and four F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing jets to continue flight testing. :)

Unread postPosted: 10 May 2011, 12:53
by qwe2008
http://www.f-16.net/news_article4338.html

F-35s have completed more than 865 flights since flight-testing began in late 2006.

F-35s have completed 547 flights by 2010 end.
so F-35s have completed more than 300 flights this year.

Unread postPosted: 11 May 2011, 20:46
by neptune
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/news_ite ... tem_id=319

F-35B STOVL Mode Gear Up

Posted 11 May 2011

USMC Lt. Col. Fred Schenk took the F-35B into STOVL mode with gears up for the first time on 6 May 2011. The test, which occurred on Flight 118 for the aircraft (BF-1), was part of the envelope expansion for the F-35B.

Unread postPosted: 12 May 2011, 19:23
by neptune
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/pres ... stone.html

Lockheed Martin F-35 Program Flight Test Update

May 11th, 2011

-- Since the last F-35 flight test program update issued March 31, Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] F-35 Lightning II aircraft have conducted 125 test flights, bringing the total number of flights for the year to 331.

Several flight test key milestones were accomplished since the last report:

The F-35 program flew the most flights ever recorded on one day (May 6) when a combined total of eight test flights were completed at all three of its flight test locations. (Edwards AFB, Calif.; Fort Worth, Texas, and Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.)

The U.S. Air Force accepted into its fleet the first of a planned 1,763 production-model F-35 Lightning II stealth fighters when AF-7 was delivered to Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., on May 6. It is the first aircraft from Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) lot one delivered.

The first F-35A production aircraft that will be delivered to Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., accomplished its first flight on May 6. Known as AF-8, the aircraft will be delivered to Eglin for pilot and maintainer training later this year. This jet is the first aircraft to fly from Low Rate Initial Production lot two.

The second F-35C carrier variant (CV), known as CF-2 completed its first flight April 29. Later this month it is scheduled to be delivered to the F-35 test fleet at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., (PAX).

The program recorded the 300th System Development and Demonstration flight of 2011 on May 6.
At Edwards, F-35s passed the 250 flight mark of the conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variant on May 5. The first test jets, AF-1 and AF-2, arrived there on May 17, 2010.
Two more F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) jets, BF-3 and BF-4 performed their first vertical landings. BF-4 flew its mission on April 27 and BF-3 on April 29. STOVL jets have conducted 94 vertical landings to date in 2011.

The following totals and highlights capture the overall flight test activity since March 31, and cumulative totals for 2011:

F-35A (CTOL) aircraft conducted 57 flights. In 2011, CTOL jets have flown 146 times.
F-35B (STOVL) aircraft conducted 43 flights. In 2011, STOVL aircraft have completed 144 flights and 84 vertical landings.
F-35C (CV) aircraft accomplished 25 flights. In 2011, CV jets have flown 41 times.
From the start of flight testing in December 2006 through Tuesday, F-35s flew 878 times :D .

The F-35 Lightning II is a 5th generation fighter, combining advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled operations and advanced sustainment. Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 with its principal industrial partners, Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems.

Unread postPosted: 12 May 2011, 20:14
by Shaken
neptune wrote:http://www.codeonemagazine.com/news_item.html?item_id=319

F-35B STOVL Mode Gear Up


When is this part of the envelope used? I'm guessing this allows picking up the gear quickly on takeoff and that it is not an attempt to add "VIFFing" to the Bravo's repertoire.

Would there be a case to be in this configuration on approach? I'm guessing not.


Either way, it makes for an interesting picture. The B usually looks a pick-a-part lot, with all the doors, gears and nozzles akimbo. It doesn't look half-bad in this configuration. (I'm of the opinion the C is the prettiest of the family, made more elegant by the big wing.)

-- Shaken - out --

Unread postPosted: 12 May 2011, 20:35
by spazsinbad
The F-35B can only enter STOVL mode below 250 knots. It is a test with gear up. Make of it what you will.

Unread postPosted: 18 May 2011, 20:38
by SpudmanWP
More good news about the rate of flight tests.

http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articl ... -more.html

PATUXENT RIVER, Md. --- Naval Air Systems Command announced May 17 that the test aircraft for the carrier variant of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter have exceeded test and evaluation program goals so far this year.

According to the announcement, the F-35C test aircraft, 'CF-1,' currently at Naval Air Station Patuxent River has completed 36 test flights as of May 11, nearly half the program's goal for the year of 85.

"CF-1's been flying well, even with a number of planned and unplanned maintenance periods," said U.S. Marine Corps Col. Roger Cordell, military site director. "It's a great sign for the fleet that the aircraft is doing well so early in the test program."

In April, CF-1 completed 13 flights, tying a record for the number of test flights for any aircraft at Naval Air Station Patuxent River. Additionally, the integrated test team has completed seven CF-1 test flights this month.

"The team has been doing a great job staying on top of maintenance requirements," said Jim McClendon, Lockheed Martin site director vice president. "Just last week, CF-1 flew six flights in six days, which is a great accomplishment in any test program, let alone test and evaluation for a brand new aircraft."

Coupled with this week's arrival of the second carrier variant, CF-2, and arrival of CF-3 later this year, the F-35C test program is making rapid progress toward initial carrier suitability testing this year at Joint Base Lakehurst-McGuire-Dix in New Jersey.

First carrier suitability testing this summer is scheduled to include the first catapult launches, and the F-35C is scheduled to commence shipboard testing in 2013.

The F-35C is the carrier variant of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, with larger wing control surfaces and reinforced landing gear to operate in the maritime environment. The F-35C is undergoing test and evaluation to evaluate flutter, loads and mission systems at NAS Patuxent River prior to eventual delivery to the fleet. (ends)

Unread postPosted: 20 May 2011, 23:10
by spazsinbad
New JSF Flight Test Data by Amy Butler May/20/2011

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

"Thus far, the F-35 flight test force has executed 808 total flights totaling 1,227 total flight hours, according to Steve O’Bryan, director of business development for the program at Lockheed Martin.

Senior F-35 leadership, including government Joint Program Office director Vice Adm. David Venlet and Lockheed’s executive VP Larry Lawson, are emphasizing improved flight test performance for the program since last year. Also, the per-sortie productivity has exceeded predictions, allowing the test team to burn through objectives more quickly than anticipated.

These results appear to be contributing to a renewed sense of confidence in the program. See Aviation Week’s article out Monday on this issue (subscriber only). This data thus far does not, however, overshadow the huge debate that continues in Washington about the per-unit cost of the aircraft as well as the ~$1 trillion figure associated with maintaining the fleet.

Meanwhile, AF-8 and AF-9 are being readied for delivery to the schoolhouse at Eglin AFB, Fla., for training. This will likely take place next month.

Below are flight test results [HOURS?] per tail number for the test fleet as of May 17, 2011. This data excludes flights of AA-1 (the pre-production test aircraft now undergoing live fire testing) and the CATbird (Lockheed Martin’s avionics test bed).

Subtotals by Tail Number

AF-1: 132 Total Flights/236.8 Total Flight Hours

AF-2: 120 Total Flights/217.7 Total Flight Hours

AF-3: 33 Total Flights/58.2 Total Flight Hours

AF-4: 30 Total Flights/48.7 Total Flight Hours

AF-6: 8 Total Flights/12.7 Total Flight Hours

AF-7: 8 Total Flights/15.2 Total Flight Hours

BF-1: 124 Total Flights/113.7 Total Flight Hours

BF-2: 115 Total Flights/150.6 Total Flight Hours

BF-3: 110 Total Flights/159.7 Total Flight Hours

BF-4: 51 Total Flights/91 Total Flight Hours

BF-5: 6 Total Flights/7.8 Total Flight Hours

CF-1: 65 Total Flights/105.3 Total Flight Hours

CF-2: 6 Total Flights/10.3 Total Flight Hours

Subtotals by F-35 variant

F-35A: 331 Total Flights/589.3 Total Flight Hours

F-35B: 406 Total Flights/522.8 Total Flight Hours

F-35C: 71 Total Flights/115.6 Total Flight Hours

O'Bryan also adds that while 10 vertical landings took place in 2010, the team has achieved 100 in 2011."

Unread postPosted: 21 May 2011, 20:49
by neptune
In 2011 F-35 has completed;

1- 352 test flights
2- more than 2,880 test points
3- more than 100 vertical landings
4- and 200 short takeoffs :D

In the current schedule; the F-35 is currently ahead on test flights and test points and three production-model jets have been delivered this month, May 2011. :D

Unread postPosted: 24 May 2011, 03:16
by neptune
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/pres ... letes.html

Final F-35 Flight Test Aircraft Completes First Flight

FORT WORTH, Texas, May 23rd, 2011

-- The final F-35 Lightning II flight test aircraft, a carrier variant designated CF-3, launches from Naval Air Station (NAS) Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base on May 21 on the way to completing its first test flight. CF-3 continues its flight testing in Fort Worth, preparing to fly to NAS Patuxent River, Md., later this year. Once there, it will join two other carrier variant aircraft and four short takeoff/vertical landing aircraft as part of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps flight test program.
:cheers:

Unread postPosted: 24 May 2011, 04:23
by fang
CF-3 is Final F-35 Flight Test Aircraft ? Not CF-4?

Unread postPosted: 24 May 2011, 15:27
by neptune
fang wrote:CF-3 is Final F-35 Flight Test Aircraft ? Not CF-4?

..for now...

cf-4 was cancelled :oops:

cf-5 was added to SDD;

"The program anticipates the remaining CV flight sciences test aircraft, CF-2 and CF-5, will ferry to Patuxent River NAS, Maryland, in February 2011 and
late 2013," :)

http://www.aviationweek.com/media/pdf/C ... 5%20AR.pdf

Unread postPosted: 25 May 2011, 09:55
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Martin's Time to Shine: Wednesday May 25, 2011

http://www.airforce-magazine.com/Pages/default.aspx

"Lockheed Martin is 20 percent ahead of it's flight plan for all three variants of the F-35 strike fighter and 33 percent ahead of planned test points, Bob Stevens, company chairman and CEO, told reporters Tuesday. "There will not be another rebaseline of this program...." Full Story here but repeated in this thread due content: http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-15622.html

Unread postPosted: 02 Jun 2011, 23:09
by Ztex
12 days after first flight CF-03 left Fort Worth on it's ferry flight to PAX River...
wow.

Image

Image

with tanker support of course...
Image

Unread postPosted: 02 Jun 2011, 23:20
by neptune
Wow, indeed! Go Herky Bird!

Unread postPosted: 03 Jun 2011, 14:56
by Lightndattic
Ztex wrote:12 days after first flight CF-03 left Fort Worth on it's ferry flight to PAX River...
wow.

Image

Image


I was under the impression that the main gear oleos had to compress in order to fit the longer stroke main gear in the wells. The 2nd pic clearly shows they are still extended going in.

Unread postPosted: 06 Jun 2011, 00:37
by gtg947h
Doesn't mean they have to compress all the way--looks to me (using the angle of the scissor link) that they did compress to some degree.

Unread postPosted: 11 Jun 2011, 04:30
by qwe2008
F-35 Lightning II Program Status and Fast Facts--20110606

As of June 6, 2011, the F-35 flight test program has conducted 940 flights total, including 395 flights in 2011
• All three variants are progressing through their flight test programs
• Six Aircraft Delivered to Flight Test
• First Two Production Aircraft (AF-6 and AF-7) Delivered to Edwards AFB, Calif.
• Flew Most Flights on One Day in Program History (10) – May 25
• Passed 350 System Development and Demonstration Flights for 2011
• Passed 110 Vertical Landings for Program
• CTOL Passed 300 Flight Mark at Edwards AFB
• AF-8/AF-9 First Flights, Delivery to Eglin AFB, Fla., set for June 2011
• Two mission systems F-35s have begun in-flight avionics testing, and have achieved sensor fusion
• Integration and verification of the Mission Systems suite continues in parallel on our cooperative avionics test bed aircraft, and in our ground-based laboratories

------------------------------------------------------------
System Development and Demonstration (SDD)

Six Jets at Edwards AFB, Calif.
• AF-1–FF Nov. 14, 2009; Ferry May 17, 2010
• AF-2 –FF April 20, 2010; Ferry May 17, 2010
• AF-3 –FF July 6, 2010; Ferry Dec. 11, 2010
• AF-4 - FF Dec. 30, 2010; Ferry Jan. 22, 2011
• AF-6 – FF Feb. 25, 2011; Ferry May 13, 2011
• AF-7 – FF March 4, 2011; Ferry May 6, 2011

Seven Jets at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.
• BF-1– FF June 2008; Ferry Nov. 15, 2009; First VL March 18, 2010
• BF-2 – FF Feb. 25, 2009; Ferry Dec. 29, 2009; First VL Jan. 26, 2011
• BF-3– FF Feb. 2, 2010; Ferry Feb. 17, 2010; First VL April 29, 2011
• BF-4– FF April 6, 2010; Ferry June 7, 2010; First VL April 27, 2011
• CF-1– FF June 6, 2010; Ferry Nov. 6, 2010
• CF-2– FF April 29, 2011; Ferry May 16, 2011
• CF-3– FF May 21, 2011; Ferry June 2, 2011

One Jet Currently in Fort Worth
• BF-5 (FW) – FF Jan. 27, 20 (will ferry to PAX in Summer 2011)

**FF = first flight; VL = vertical landing

------------------------------------------------------------
Training
• AF-8 – FF May 6, 2011; Ferry to Eglin AFB, Fla., set for June 2011
• AF-9- FF May 13, 2011; Ferry to Eglin AFB, Fla., set for June 2011

Unread postPosted: 11 Jun 2011, 05:06
by spazsinbad
PDF here: F-35 Lightning II Program Status and Fast Facts--20110606 translation 6 June 2011

http://f-35.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/ ... 6-2011.pdf (45Kb)

Unread postPosted: 23 Jun 2011, 12:43
by qwe2008
As of June 6, 2011, the F-35 flight test program has conducted 940 flights total, including 395 flights in 2011

---------------
it's June 23 now, JSF has already conducted 1,000th flight?

Unread postPosted: 01 Jul 2011, 03:19
by spazsinbad
1,000th F-35 Flight 20 June 2011

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/news_ite ... tem_id=389

"Lt. Col. Leonard Kearl was at the controls for the 1,000th F-35 flight on 20 June 2011. The 1.8-hour flight, completed in F-35A AF-6, originated from Edwards AFB, California."

BigPic: http://www.codeonemagazine.com/images/n ... 4_5144.jpg

Image

Unread postPosted: 09 Jul 2011, 09:26
by spazsinbad
F-35 Flight Test Update 5 7 July 2011

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/galleries.html

"Since March 2011, the F-35 program has completed more than 200 additional flights and, as of late June 2011, had surpassed 1,400 flight hours and 1,000 total flights."

Unread postPosted: 14 Jul 2011, 22:30
by spazsinbad
Update: F-35 Flight Test Update 5 14 July 2011 By Denni Cravins

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=75

"The previous installment of the F-35 Flight Test Update wrapped up with the F-35 program reaching 1,000 cumulative flight hours during an AF-1 and AF-4 formation flight at the US Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards AFB, California, on 8 March 2011. Since then, the program has completed more than 200 additional flights and, as of late June, had surpassed 1,400 flight hours and 1,000 total flights. Five F-35s have surpassed 100 total flights, and sixteen F-35s are flying at four locations, the newest of which is the 33rd Fighter Wing, the F-35 training center at Eglin AFB, Florida. A total of twenty-five pilots have flown the F-35, and twenty-one of them are currently flying the aircraft.

F-35A AF-1 expanded the flight envelope to Mach 1.53. F-35C CF-3 joined the test force at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. CF-2 began jet blast deflector testing at Lakehurst, New Jersey, in preparation for carrier trials. By mid-2011, the F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing variant had logged ten times more vertical landings than in all of 2010. F-35B pilots have also performed more than 230 short takeoffs since arriving at NAS Patuxent River in late 2009."

Unread postPosted: 15 Jul 2011, 03:19
by neptune
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/news_ite ... tem_id=397

100 Flights For F-35C

Posted 9 July 2011

The F-35C fleet reached 100 total flights when F-35C CF-2 flew back to NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, after completing jet blast deflector training at the Naval Air Engineering Center at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey.

Unread postPosted: 20 Jul 2011, 21:46
by seruriermarshal
Lockheed Martin Delivers Second F-35 Production Jet In A Week
FORT WORTH, Texas, July 20th, 2011 -- It was wheels up Wednesday morning for Lockheed Martin’s second F-35A Lightning II production jet delivery in a week. Maj. Joseph T. “OD” Bachmann (Marine Corps) piloted the aircraft, known as AF-8, to Eglin Air Force Base where it arrived at 11:50 a.m. CDT. AF-8 joins AF-9 which Lockheed Martin delivered to the 33rd Fighter Wing last Thursday. The jets will be used for training F-35 pilots and maintainers who are slated to begin course work at the base’s new F-35 Integrated Training Center this fall. AF-8 is the eighth F-35 to be delivered in 2011.

Unread postPosted: 24 Jul 2011, 04:30
by spazsinbad
JBD Testing A Key Step For Joint Strike Fighter Aviation Week & Space Technology Jul 18, 2011 p. 84
by Amy Butler | Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J.

http://www.navair.navy.mil/lakehurst/nl ... esting.pdf (125Kb)

"...As of June 30, Lockheed Martin officials say the F-35 program has accomplished 18% more flights than the planned 378 and 30% more test points than the planned 2,996. They break down by variant as follows:
  • F-35A conventional version with 208 flights (180 planned).
  • F-35B Stovl with 170 flights (138 planned).
  • F-35C with 70 flights (60 planned).
Test-point statistics are:
  • F-35A with 1,578 (1,533 planned).
  • F-35B with 1,528 (1,072 planned).
  • F-35C with 765 (391 planned).

The Stovl version has also executed 116 vertical landings to date."

Unread postPosted: 24 Jul 2011, 16:17
by SpudmanWP
Looks like they ramped up the testing rate a little. I'm assuming that these numbers are for the year, not just the 2nd quarter. In the 1st quarter of the year they flew 206 SDD flights and 242 this quarter, a 17.5% increase.

Unread postPosted: 26 Jul 2011, 23:13
by Ztex
F-35A 08-0751 (AF-13) in the pattern at NFW today.


Image

Image

Image

Unread postPosted: 27 Jul 2011, 01:45
by spazsinbad
From LM FAST FACTS dated 13 July 2011:

https://ex.democracydata.com/243F8CB0E1 ... cc798e.pdf

"As of July 12, 2011, the F-35 flight test program has conducted 1,011 System Development and Demonstration (SDD) flights total, including AA-1 and 464 flights in 2011"

Unread postPosted: 27 Jul 2011, 12:30
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Martin F-35 Flight Test Progress Report

"FORT WORTH, Texas, July 26th, 2011 -- Lockheed Martin’s F-35 flight test program moves closer to achieving year-end milestones since the last update issued June 13. The F-35 Lightning II 5TH Generation multirole fighter conducted 107 test flights, bringing the total number of flights for the year to 518.

Overall, the F-35 program remains ahead of goals for test flights. Through July 25, the program accomplished 518 flights versus a plan of 476.

Several flight test and production key milestones were accomplished since the last report:

  • The fifth Lockheed Martin F-35B Lightning II short take off/vertical landing (STOVL) flight test aircraft was delivered to the Marine Corps arriving at Naval Air Station (NAS) Patuxent River, Md., on July 16.
  • AF-9, the first production F-35 delivered to Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Fla., arrived July 14 and AF-8, the second Eglin jet, was delivered July 20.
  • AF-8 is the eighth F-35 delivered in 2011. The jets will be used for activities in concert with training F-35 pilots and maintainers at the new F-35 Integrated Training Center.
  • Jet Blast Deflector (JBD) testing was performed by F-35C Lightning II carrier variant (CV) aircraft CF-2 at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. from June 25-July 8. CF-2 successfully completed this portion of tests required to ensure the F-35C is compatible aboard an aircraft carrier.
  • AF-6 and AF-7 commenced Maturity Flight testing of the training syllabus software at Edwards AFB. This software will be used for training at Eglin AFB this fall.
    Four F-35s completed their first flights since the last update: AF-10 on June 26,
  • AF-11 on July 1, AF-12 on July 8, and AF-13 on July 14.
  • AF-2 completed the 1,000th test flight (including AA-1) for the F-35 System Development and Demonstration (SDD) test program on July 6.
  • AF-3, at Edwards AFB, completed the 500th SDD flight for 2011 on July 21.
    122 vertical landings have been performed to date.

Cumulative flight test activity totals for 2011 are provided below:

  • F-35A conventional take off and landing (CTOL) jets have flown 250 times.
  • F-35B short take off/ vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft have completed 187 flights.
  • F-35C carrier variant (CV) jets have flown 81 times.
    From the start of flight testing in December 2006 through July 25, 2011, F-35s flew 1,065 times, including the production-model flights and AA-1, the original flight test aircraft.

Source: Source: http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/pres ... eport.html

Unread postPosted: 25 Aug 2011, 13:14
by neptune
F-35 in STOVL mode

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lockheedma ... hotostream

F-35B test aircraft BF-1 on flight 147, Aug. 22, 2011. Lt. Col. Fred Schenk pilots the aircraft in short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) mode.

Unread postPosted: 25 Aug 2011, 13:57
by qwe2008
As of August 3, 2011, the F-35 flight test program has conducted 1,101 System Development and Demonstration (SDD) flights total, including AA-1 (the original flight test aircraft) and 554 flights in 2011

total VL, 130.

Cumulative flight test activity totals as of Aug. 3, 2011 are provided below:
o F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) jets have flown 268 times.
o F-35B short takeoff/ vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft have completed 197 flights.
o F-35C carrier variant (CV) jets have flown 89 times.
o From the start of flight testing in December 2006 through August 3, 2011, F-35s flew 1,101 times, including the production-model flights and AA-1, the original flight test aircraft.

Unread postPosted: 09 Sep 2011, 16:28
by qwe2008
• As of September 5, 2011, the F-35 flight test program has conducted 1,154 System Development and Demonstration (SDD) flights total, including AA-1 (the original flight test aircraft) and 607 flights in 2011.

• BF-1 performed a 40 foot hover in calm winds and two vertical landings (VL) for the 150th vertical landing to date on Aug. 31, 2011.

• AF-10 and AF-11 delivered to Eglin AFB, Fla., on Aug. 31, 2011. They join AF-8 and AF-9 assigned to the 33rd Fighter Wing.

• Static testing was completed on the F-35C Lightning II carrier variant (CV) ground article CG-1 at Lockheed Martin Fort Worth, Texas on Aug. 29, 2011. With this achievement, the F-35 Program has accomplished its static structural testing milestone for 2011.

• Jet Blast Deflector (JBD) testing was completed by F-35C Lightning II carrier variant (CV) aircraft CF-2 at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. from June 25-August 13, 2011. CF-2 successfully completed this portion of JBD tests required to ensure the F-35C is compatible aboard an aircraft carrier.

• AF-6 and AF-7 commenced Maturity Flight testing of the training syllabus software at Edwards AFB. This software will be used for training at Eglin AFB this fall.

• Cumulative flight test activity totals as of Sept. 5, 2011 are provided below:
o F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) jets have flown 294 times.
o F-35B short takeoff/ vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft have completed 217 flights.
o F-35C carrier variant (CV) jets have flown 96 times.

• AF-7 completed last flight of currently required CTOL maturity flights on Aug. 31, 2011.

Unread postPosted: 20 Sep 2011, 16:48
by neptune
Lockheed Martin F-35 Flight Test Progress Report 20 Sep 2011

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/pres ... tests.html

FORT WORTH, Texas, September 20th, 2011 -- Lockheed Martin’s [NYSE: LMT] F-35 flight test program moves closer to reaching year-end milestones since the last update issued July 26. Since then, the F-35 Lightning II 5TH Generation multirole fighter conducted 124 test flights, bringing the total number of flights for the year to 642

...

-BF-1 performed a 40 foot hover in calm winds and two vertical landings (VL) for the 150th VL to date on Aug. 31.
-AF-10 and AF-11 were delivered to Eglin AFB, Fla., Aug. 31. They join AF-8 and AF-9 assigned to the 33d Fighter Wing.
-Static testing was completed on the F-35C Lightning II carrier variant (CV) ground article CG-1 at Lockheed Martin Fort Worth, Texas, Aug. 29. With this achievement, the F-35 Program has accomplished its static structural testing milestone for 2011.
-Jet Blast Deflector (JBD) testing was completed by F-35 CV aircraft CF-2 at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. from June 25-August 13. CF-2 successfully completed this portion of JBD tests required to ensure the F-35C is compatible aboard an aircraft carrier.
-AF-7 completed its last flight of currently required conventional take off and landing (CTOL) maturity flights on Aug. 31.

Unread postPosted: 02 Nov 2011, 23:02
by spazsinbad
F-35 Flight Test Update 6 By Sydney Carroll 02 November 2011

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=83

"....BF-2’s flight to the ship brought the 2011 flight total to more than 700, flight hours to more than 1,100, and the vertical landing count beyond 180. By the end of September, F-35B pilots had flown more than 300 short takeoffs in 2011 alone. In the F-35C, pilots had accomplished nearly twenty-five catapult launch tests at Lakehurst. At Edwards AFB, California, the required conventional takeoff and landing maturity flights were completed by the end of August. A total of twenty-seven pilots have flown the F-35. Twenty-one pilots are still flying the aircraft."

MORE AT THE URL JUMP!

Unread postPosted: 02 Nov 2011, 23:50
by codeonemagazine
Just uploaded the last image to that gallery. Lots of new shots.

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/gallery_ ... ry_style=3

--C1

Unread postPosted: 03 Nov 2011, 00:06
by spazsinbad
'codeonemagazine' thanks. Some terrific new photos of events in that new URL stream above. How about some more videos of F-35B ops aboard USS Wasp no music longer than a few seconds please? Tah.

Unread postPosted: 21 Nov 2011, 20:13
by spazsinbad
F-35 Surpasses 2011 Testing Goals (So Where Are All The News Stories?) Loren B. Thompson, Ph.D. Nov 21, 2011

http://www.lexingtoninstitute.org/f-35- ... a=1&c=1171

"Aviation Week & Space Technology reports today that the nation's biggest weapons development program has surpassed its testing goals for calendar year 2011, and is on track to do the same in 2012. The goal for 2011 was 872 flight tests, and as of last Thursday [17 Nov 2011], 875 had been completed.....

Not worth jumping the URL but youse can if youse want to.... :D

Unread postPosted: 21 Nov 2011, 23:24
by SpudmanWP
The F-35 SDD program just passed it's goal (in test Flights) for 2011 and the current pace of tests will let them achieve 2012 goals as well.

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/ ... calreports

Unread postPosted: 21 Nov 2011, 23:53
by neptune
spazsinbad wrote:[b..Not worth jumping..:D


.. test points, .not quite.. in the order planned.. 500 more in the CV .. than the plan and .100 more of CTOL .. and Stovl to accomplish.”?? :shock: :?:

ARE THESE CORRECT?? ONE WOULD HAVE THOUGHT THE CTOL WOULD HAVE BEEN AHEAD AND THE CV BEHIND??

. major objective of .. 2011 .. clear . envelope for flight training. “We have done that, and delivered several updates to that envelope,” .. Training on the F-35A at Eglin AFB, Fla., has yet to begin. :wink:

IS THIS TO BE A CHRISTMAS PRESENT??

Unread postPosted: 22 Nov 2011, 00:58
by SpudmanWP
Or they were very pessimistic on the F-35C's schedule and were surprised on it's performance.

Unread postPosted: 22 Nov 2011, 01:09
by spazsinbad
Any info on the HOOK Redesign for F-35C?

Unread postPosted: 07 Dec 2011, 04:40
by spazsinbad
F-35 clearly not ready for prime time by Bob Cox December 06, 2011

http://blogs.star-telegram.com/sky_talk ... inter.html

“...One of the big problems is with the tail hook arresting gear mechanism on the F-35C that is supposed to bring the planes to a screeching halt in landings aboard Navy carriers.

The tail hook mechanism failed all eight landing attempts in tests and requires significant and, apparently, challenging redesign of the system and perhaps the aircraft structure itself. “If this change is not successful there is risk for significant air-frame structures redesign and or impacts to over-all” radar signature, the report said....”

Unread postPosted: 07 Dec 2011, 04:43
by SpudmanWP
What was the problem? Did it rip off, lose grip on the cable, etc?

Unread postPosted: 13 Jan 2012, 00:54
by spazsinbad
LM Press Release: Also POINTED at here: http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-16712.html

For the record:
Lockheed Martin F-35 Program Exceeds 2011 Flight Test Goals By Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Published: Jan. 12, 2012

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/pres ... goals.html

"FORT WORTH, Texas, Jan. 12, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) F-35 System Development and Demonstration 2011 flight test program resulted in the completion of more test flights and test points than in any year.

The 2011 flight test plan called for the accumulation of 872 flights and 6,622 test points by Dec. 31. For the year, the SDD program flew 972 flights and tallied 7,823 test points. The F-35A Conventional Takeoff and Landing (CTOL) variant flew 474 flights and accomplished 3,600 test points. The F-35B Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing (STOVL) variant accomplished 333 flights and 2,636 test points. The F-35C Carrier Variant (CV) flew 165 flights and tallied 1,587 test points. Along with this, the STOVL executed 268 vertical landings. The cumulative 2011 milestones were achieved through a combination of planned test flights and test points along with test flights and test points added throughout the year.

"The success of the flight test program is the result of a team of dedicated government and contractor professionals," said Larry Lawson, Lockheed Martin's F-35 program executive vice president and general manager. "The test team continues to gain momentum and they will build upon this success for an even better 2012. I couldn't be prouder of the team."

The overall F-35 SDD flight test program plan calls for the verification of 59,585 test points through developmental test flights by Dec. 31, 2016. Through 2011, the flight test team has accomplished 12,728 test points or 21.4 percent of overall testing requirements.

"These achievements speak to the rapid maturation of the F-35 program and to our team's commitment to performing with excellence," said J.D. McFarlan, vice president of F-35 Test and Verification. "We will now turn towards 2012, expanding the flight envelope as we continue to demonstrate the F-35's excellent flight characteristics for all three variants."

Major flight test achievements in 2011 include:
A major highlight for October was the completion of F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) ship suitability testing aboard the USS WASP (LHD-1) off the coast of Virginia. The test began when BF-2 executed the first shipboard vertical landing on Oct. 3. The next day, BF-2 executed the first short takeoff from the WASP. During the third week of sea trials, BF-2 and BF-4 operated simultaneously on the ship. Combined, they accomplished 72 short takeoffs and 72 vertical landings during the three-week testing period.

The mission systems test aircraft performed Block 1A and Block 1B software testing including demonstrating Communication Navigation and Identification (CNI) range and accuracy and integrated Electro-Optical Targeting System testing that included Tactical FLIR (Forward Looking Infra-Red) and combat laser firing. The software also displayed imagery from the Distributed Aperture System on the Helmet Mounted Display. Further testing accomplished radar search and target tracking, Synthetic Aperture Radar Mapping, Electronic Warfare testing, and multi-sensor fusion of four sensors. In addition, baseline Radar Cross Section signature testing was accomplished on three mission system aircraft.

On Nov. 18, CF-3, an F-35C test aircraft, conducted the first F-35 launch from the Navy's new Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS). Testing the F-35C on EMALS marked the beginning of the process to integrate the carrier variant with the future carrier fleet aircraft launching system.

The F-35B STOVL jets conducted 268 vertical landings (VLs) in 2011 compared to 10 VLs in 2010. F-35B aircraft also completed 395 short takeoffs (STOs) last year.

AF-1 achieved the F-35's maximum design limit speed of Mach 1.6 for the first time on Oct. 25.

Jet Blast Deflector (JBD) testing was performed by F-35C Lightning II carrier variant (CV) aircraft CF-2 at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. from June 25-July 8. CF-2 successfully completed this portion of tests required to ensure the F-35C is compatible aboard an aircraft carrier.

AF-6 and AF-7 completed Maturity Flight testing of the training syllabus software at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., designed to simulate operating an F-35 without a mission control room.

The F-35 program successfully performed aerial refueling testing with KC-135 and KC-10 aircraft...."

Unread postPosted: 15 Jan 2012, 23:19
by luke_sandoz
SpudmanWP wrote:The F-35 SDD program just passed it's goal (in test Flights) for 2011 and the current pace of tests will let them achieve 2012 goals as well.

"

Headline in the Ottawa Citizen . . they just can't resist torquing a headline


"Lockheed Martin Says in 2011 the F-35 Exceeded The Number of Flight Tests For Its Testing Plan"

Lockheed Martin DID exceed the Plan.

Unread postPosted: 15 Jan 2012, 23:32
by neptune
spazsinbad wrote:...The F-35 program successfully performed aerial refueling testing with KC-135 and KC-10 aircraft...."


The USAF KC-10 has both a flying boom and also a separate hose and drogue system manufactured by Cobham plc.

Which F-35 refueled from the KC-10 and on what date (missed this :) )?

Unread postPosted: 18 Feb 2012, 21:12
by spazsinbad
F-35 Program Status and Fast Facts http://f-35.ca/publications-en/

http://f-35.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/ ... 6-2012.pdf (55Kb)

Program Status
• Cumulative flight test activity totals for 2011 as of December 31, are provided below:
o F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) jets have flown 474 times.
o F-35B short takeoff/ vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft have completed 333 flights.
o F-35C carrier variant (CV) jets have flown 165 times.
________________________________

System Development and Demonstration (SDD) and Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP)
Six Jets at Edwards AFB, Calif.

• AF-1–FF Nov. 14, 2009; Ferry May 17, 2010
• AF-2 –FF April 20, 2010; Ferry May 17, 2010
• AF-3 –FF July 6, 2010; Ferry Dec. 11, 2010
• AF-4 - FF Dec. 30, 2010; Ferry Jan. 22, 2011
• AF-6 – FF Feb. 25, 2011; DD250: May 12, 2011; Ferry May 13, 2011
• AF-7 – FF March 4, 2011; DD250: May 5, 2011; Ferry May 6, 2011

Eight Jets at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.
• BF-1– FF June 2008; Ferry Nov. 15, 2009; First VL March 18, 2010
• BF-2 – FF Feb. 25, 2009; Ferry Dec. 29, 2009; First VL Jan. 26, 2011
• BF-3– FF Feb. 2, 2010; Ferry Feb. 17, 2010; First VL April 29, 2011
• BF-4– FF April 6, 2010; Ferry June 7, 2010; First VL April 27, 2011
• BF-5 – FF Jan. 27, 2011; Ferry July 16, 2011
• CF-1– FF June 6, 2010; Ferry Nov. 6, 2010
• CF-2– FF April 29, 2011; Ferry May 16, 2011
• CF-3– FF May 21, 2011; Ferry June 2, 2011

Nine Jets at Eglin AFB, Fla.
• AF-8 – FF May 6, 2011; DD250: July 17, 2011; Ferry: July 20, 2011
• AF-9 –FF May 13, 2011; DD250: July 8, 2011; Ferry: July 14, 2011
• AF-10 – FF June 29, 2011; DD250: Aug. 15, 2011; Ferry: Aug. 31, 2011
• AF-11 – FF July 1, 2011; DD250: Aug. 2, 2011; Ferry: Aug. 31, 2011
• AF-12 – FF July 8, 2011; DD250: Sept. 2, 2011; Ferry: Oct. 19, 2011
• AF-13 – FF July 14, 2011; DD250: Oct. 21, 2011; Ferry: Oct. 26, 2011
• BF-6 – FF Oct. 26, 2011; DD250: Dec. 30, 2011; Ferry: Jan. 11, 2012
• BF-8 – FF Nov. 29, 2011; DD250: Jan. 8, 2012; Ferry: Jan. 11, 2012
• BF-7 – FF Dec. 21, 2011; DD250: Jan. 16, 2012; Ferry: Jan. 19, 2012
____________________

Propulsion* (uninstalled thrust ratings)
F135-PW-100
40,000 lbs Max.
25,000 lbs Mil.

F135-PW-600
38,000 lbs Max.
26,000 lbs Mil.
40,500 lbs Vertical

F135-PW-100
40,000 lbs Max.
25,000 lbs Mil.

Unread postPosted: 24 Feb 2012, 14:13
by qwe2008
Lockheed Martin F-35 Flight Test And Production Progress Report FORT WORTH, Texas,
Feb. 23, 2012 --

Lockheed Martin’s [NYSE: LMT] F-35 program continues to build on its 2011 flight test success.
For 2012, the baseline F-35 System Development and Demonstration (SDD) flight test plan calls for the accumulation of 1,001 test flights and 7,873 test points.
However, growth in test point requirements throughout the year is anticipated, and the plan will be adjusted as needed.

As of Feb. 20, the F-35 Lightning II 5th Generation multirole fighter had conducted 114 flight tests and achieved 773 test points. A portion of the earned test points came from work added to the flight test baseline plan. Lockheed Martin has delivered three F-35s to the Department of Defense (DOD) year to date.

Since Jan. 1, the F-35 program accomplished several flight test and production milestones:

On Jan. 9, AF-4, an F-35A Conventional Takeoff and Landing (CTOL) test aircraft, reached the highest altitude to date in an F-35; 43,000 feet Mean Sea Level (MSL).
Lockheed Martin ferried the first two production model F-35B Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft to the U.S. Marine Corps on Jan. 11. The aircraft, known as BF-6 and BF-8, are now assigned to the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing's Marine Fighter/Attack Training Squadron 501 residing with the host 33d Fighter Wing at Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Fla.
Demonstrating the ongoing maturation of the F-35 integrated sensor suite, AF-3, an F-35A CTOL test jet, completed the first low Distributed Aperture System (DAS) approach on Jan. 17.
On Jan. 18, the first night flight in the history of the Lockheed Martin F-35 program was completed at Edwards AFB, Calif. Piloted by Lockheed Martin test pilot Mark Ward, AF-6, an F-35A CTOL test jet, took off at 5:05 p.m. PST and landed after sunset at 6:22 p.m.
With the ferry flight of BF-7, an F-35B STOVL, Eglin AFB, Fla., became home of the largest F-35 fleet in the DOD on Jan. 19. BF-7 was the 23rd F-35 Lightning II delivered to the DOD.
On Jan. 20, citing the tremendous progress the F-35B STOVL variant made in 2011, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta rescinded probation for the F-35B, almost a full year ahead of schedule.
The F-35 SDD fleet including AA-1, the original test aircraft, crossed the 2,500 flight hour threshold on Jan. 25.
On Feb. 16 at Edwards AFB, Calif., AF-1, an F-35A CTOL test jet, flew the first external weapons test mission in program history.
Cumulative flight test activity totals for 2012 through Feb. 20 are provided below:

F-35A CTOL jets have flown 46 times.
F-35B STOVL aircraft have completed 45 flights.
F-35C Carrier Variant (CV) jets have flown 23 times.
From the start of flight testing in December 2006, F-35s have flown 1,704 times, including the production-model flights and AA-1, the original flight test aircraft. For video highlights of the F-35 program, click here.

The F-35 Lightning II is a 5th Generation fighter, combining advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled operations and advanced sustainment. Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 with its principal industrial partners, Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security company that employs about 123,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The Corporation's net sales for 2011 were $46.5 billion.

Unread postPosted: 24 Feb 2012, 15:49
by spazsinbad
Just for the record the PR above is repeated here earlier: http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopi ... t-105.html

Unread postPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 17:05
by neptune
AF-14 First Flight

Lockheed Martin test pilot Bill Gigliotti flew the ninth production model of the F-35 Lightning II, F-35A AF-14 (Air Force serial number 09-5001), on its inaugural flight on 2 March 2012 from NAS Fort Worth JRB. The aircraft is the first produced under the third Low Rate Initial Production contract. :)

Unread postPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 17:07
by neptune
AF-15 First Flight
Lockheed Martin test pilot Al Norman flew the tenth production model of the F-35 Lightning II, F-35A AF-15 (Air Force serial number 09-5002), on its inaugural flight on 3 March 2012 from NAS Fort Worth JRB. The aircraft is the second produced under the third Low Rate Initial Production contract.

:)

Unread postPosted: 27 Mar 2012, 20:15
by neptune
F-35B BF-10 First Flight
Lockheed Martin test pilot Bill Gigliotti flew F-35B BF-10 (Navy Bureau Number 168061), on its inaugural flight on 15 March 2012 from NAS Fort Worth JRB. The aircraft will be assigned to VMFAT-501 at Eglin AFB, Florida.

F-35B BF-11 First Flight
Lockheed Martin test pilot Al Norman flew F-35B BF-11 (Navy Bureau Number 168062), on its inaugural flight on 21 March 2012 from NAS Fort Worth JRB. The aircraft will be assigned to VMFAT-501 at Eglin AFB, Florida.

Unread postPosted: 27 Mar 2012, 20:17
by neptune
First Aerial Refueling At Night

The F-35 flight test program aerial refueled for the first time at night on 22 March 2012. USAF Lt. Col. Peter Vitt was the pilot for the flight from Edwards AFB, California. The mission, which lasted 3.1 hours, marked Flight 103 for F-35A AF-4. The aircraft was refueled from an Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2012, 14:17
by spazsinbad
Navy Test Pilot Knows His ABCs Lexington Park, MD - April/5/2012
http://www.thebaynet.com/news/index.cfm ... y_ID/27026
OR
http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=4964

"...On March 23, Lt. Christopher Tabert completed the government acceptance flight for AF-14, a production-level F-35A Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) for the U.S. Air Force.

In doing so, he became the only military test pilot to fly the A, B and C versions of the F-35, said Marine Corps Col. Art Tomassetti, vice commander of the 33rd Fighter Wing, Air Education and Training Command at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla....

...“The ability for a pilot to move seamlessly across the F-35 variants really puts the ‘Joint’ in JSF,” Tomassetti said. “We’ll be able to leverage the capability in training and in future joint operations.”

For Tabert, the differences between the models are slight.

“The flying qualities of the A felt a lot like the B and C,” Tabert said. “You really can’t tell much of a difference between the three from the cockpit.”

Even though Tabert started testing the F-35 only nine months ago, he already has a number of milestones on the aircraft under his belt: the first steam catapult launch; the first weapons pit drop for an inert 1,000 pound GBU-32 GPS-guided bomb; a supersonic flight; and the first launch from the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launching System."...

VIDEO [captions]: http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... E9C213A6B0

YOUTUBE: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... ke76DI5iNw

Unread postPosted: 27 Apr 2012, 07:08
by spazsinbad
I guess some actual numbers will appear soon - binawhile. :D

Lockheed Martin (LMT) Q1 2012 Earnings Call April 26, 2012

http://seekingalpha.com/article/533741- ... transcript

"...Finally, let me turn to the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. Year-to-date, performance in the flight test program is ahead of plan. On the conventional takeoff and landing aircraft, we are slightly ahead of plan for both the number of flights conducted and the number of test points earned. On the short takeoff and vertical landing aircraft, we are ahead of plan by about 60% on flights and about 22% on test points earned. And on the carrier variant, we're also ahead of plan by about 31% on flights and 32% on test points earned...."

Unread postPosted: 02 May 2012, 23:38
by spazsinbad
Some numbers...

P&W Delivers 50th F135 Engine for the F-35 JSF 03 May 2012

http://www.asdnews.com/news-42495/P&W_D ... 35_JSF.htm

"...To date [03 May 2012], the F135 propulsion system has powered more than 330 vertical landings, 2,000 test flights producing more than 3,000 flight hours...."

Unread postPosted: 08 May 2012, 19:58
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Martin Corporation : F-35 Lightning II Flight Test Update May/08/2012

http://www.4-traders.com/LOCKHEED-MARTI ... -14317640/
OR
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/p ... -test.html

"FORT WORTH, Texas, May 8, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Lockheed Martin's [NYSE: LMT] F-35 Lightning II flight test program continues to make progress during the first four months of 2012. In March, the program completed 123 test flights totaling 223 flight hours, setting a record for the most System Development and Demonstration (SDD) flights and flight hours for a single month.

During the time period, the SDD fleet surpassed the 15,000 total test point threshold, completing approximately 25 percent of the SDD program's entire requirement of more than 59,000 test points. Overall the F-35 test program remains ahead of the 2012 flight test plan, which calls for the accumulation of 1,001 test flights and 7,873 baseline test points as well as additional points beyond the original plan.

Through April 30, the program completed 373 flights against a plan of 281 and achieved 2,810 test points - 2,307 of which were baseline points earned against a plan of 2,151. At Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., 30 local area orientation flights were completed totaling 39.5 flight hours as progress toward F-35 pilot training checkout continues.

Another aspect of flight testing is the progressive check out of the latest version of mission system software known as Block 2A. To date, more than 90 percent of Block 2A airborne software code is complete with more than 85 percent of that code currently being flight or lab tested. Block 2A flight test is being conducted at Edwards AFB and will continue through this year. Block 2A is scheduled for "ready for training" in the summer of 2013.

"The 2012 F-35 flight test program execution continues to build momentum," said Orlando Carvalho, F-35 executive vice president and general manager. "From flight envelope expansion to night refueling to external weapons testing, our flight test program is off to a good start this year. We are working to build on this success and deliver unprecedented 5th generation fighter performance capabilities - including radar-evading stealth, supersonic speed, extreme agility and the most comprehensive integrated sensor package of any fighter aircraft in history - to our Armed Forces and allies."

The F-35 program has accomplished many flight test, production and training milestones since Jan. 1:

-- On Jan. 17, demonstrating the ongoing maturation of the F-35 integrated sensor suite, AF-3, an F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) test jet, completed the first low Distributed Aperture System (DAS) approach.

-- On Jan. 18, the first night flight in the history of the F-35 program was completed at Edwards AFB, Calif.

-- On Feb. 16, at Edwards AFB, Calif., AF-1, an F-35A CTOL test jet, flew the first external weapons test mission in F-35 program history.

-- On March 6, the 33d Fighter Wing at Eglin AFB, Fla., flew its first local F-35 Lightning II sortie, marking a major milestone.

-- On March 22, AF-4, an F-35A CTOL jet, completed the first night refueling mission when it successfully connected to an Air Force KC-135 tanker and received fuel through the F-35's boom receptacle.

-- On March 28, BF-4, an F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) test jet based at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., completed the first F-35 flight with two unarmed air intercept missiles known as AIM-120 Instrumentation Measurement Vehicles (IMVs). The IMVs are used to measure environmental influences such as temperature, vibration and acoustics of the aircraft on the weapon to ensure they do not impact the weapon's ability to be carried and employed by the aircraft.

-- On April 1, the first F-35 Lightning II for the Netherlands rolled out of the F-35 production facility. The Netherlands will use this CTOL jet, known as AN-1, for training and operational tests for pilots and maintainers.

-- On April 5, the program completed in-flight refueling of an F-35B STOVL while configured with external weapons at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md. The mission tested the flying qualities of the aircraft while maneuvering with external weapons.

-- On April 10, two F-35A CTOLs from the 33d Fighter Wing assigned to Eglin AFB, Fla., completed the unit's first formation flight. The mission was part of a continuing process to validate pilot syllabus objectives in preparation for future training.

-- On April 11, an F-35A CTOL from the 33d Fighter Wing assigned to Eglin, AFB, Fla., completed the unit's first air-to-air refueling mission with a KC-135R Stratotanker.

-- On April 13, BK-1, the United Kingdom's first F-35 Lightning II production aircraft, flew its inaugural flight. The U.K. Ministry of Defence will use this short takeoff/vertical landing jet for training and operational tests at Eglin AFB, Fla., beginning later this year.

-- On April 18, for the first time, two F-35C Lightning II carrier variant test aircraft launched together and conducted formation flying at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md. The mission tested flying qualities of the aircraft while taking off, landing and flying in formation for more than one hour.

-- On April 21, the program completed the first in-flight refueling of F-35A CTOL aircraft while configured with external weapons at Edwards AFB, Calif. The two-hour mission tested the flying qualities of the aircraft while maneuvering with external weapons.

Cumulative flight test activity totals for 2012 through April 30 are provided below:

-- F-35A CTOL jets have flown 164 times.

-- F-35B STOVL aircraft have completed 122 flights, 114 of which began with a short takeoff. Additionally, F-35B STOVL aircraft have conducted 49 vertical landings.

-- F-35C carrier variant (CV) jets have flown 87 times.

Cumulative flight test activity totals for the duration of the program through April 30 are provided below:

-- F-35A CTOL jets have flown 811 times.

-- F-35B STOVL aircraft have completed 711 flights, 533 of which began with a short takeoff. F-35B STOVL aircraft have also conducted 328 vertical landings.

-- F-35C CV jets have flown 279 times.

Since December 2006, F-35s have flown 2,066 times and accrued more than 3,000 cumulative flight hours. This total includes 91 flights from the original test aircraft, AA-1; 1,801 SDD test flights; and 174 production-model flights. For video highlights of the F-35 program."
https://www.f35.com/building-the-f-35/t ... tests.aspx

Unread postPosted: 17 May 2012, 05:03
by neptune
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/f35_news ... tem_id=693

Eglin Dozen

Posted 15 May 2012

The twelfth F-35 Lightning II destined for the training fleet at Eglin AFB, Florida, was ferried from the Lockheed Martin facility in Fort Worth, Texas, on 15 May 2012. US Marine Corps pilot Lt. Col. Fred Schenk piloted the aircraft "BF-11" (Bureau Number 168062) on the ninety minute flight. The F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing production jet will be used for pilot and maintainer training at the F-35 Integrated Training Center at Eglin. It is assigned to Marine Fighter/Attack Training Squadron 501 (VMFAT-501), "VM-06". :)

Unread postPosted: 18 May 2012, 05:12
by tally
May 17 brought first flights. Yes, flightS. AF-17 as 09-5004/OT "31 TES" and AF-18 as 09-5005/OT.

Unread postPosted: 18 May 2012, 15:24
by qwe2008
tally wrote:May 17 brought first flights. Yes, flightS. AF-17 as 09-5004/OT "31 TES" and AF-18 as 09-5005/OT.


the tail code is "OT", not "EG"?

Unread postPosted: 18 May 2012, 18:40
by SpudmanWP
F-35 problems on their way to being fixed.
http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... ed-372074/

The F-35 Lightning II is making good progress through flight testing this year, a top Lockheed Martin official says. Most of the biggest challenges faced by the programme should be well on their way to being fixed by the later part of the year.

One major issue that has recently popped up on the US Navy's F-35C variant is that the aircraft's tail-hook has had to be redesigned. That is because the existing design has failed to catch an arresting cable during trials. Lockheed is working on a new improved hook design that should fix the problem.

"We have modified the hook point with a lower center of gravity," says Steve O'Bryan, Lockheed's vice president for F-35 programme integration and business development. Additionally, "we've redesigned the hold-down damper."

The new design is scheduled for its preliminary design review in "the summer." That will be followed by a critical design review in the fourth quarter.

After the new hook design undergoes shore-based qualification trails, the F-35C will undergo sea trials on a carrier in late 2013 or early 2014.

Lockheed is also set to test fixes to the jet's troublesome helmet-mounted display (HMD) this summer, O'Bryan says. Lockheed has reached an agreement with the US government on the HMD requirements, which will help the company to fix imagery lag on the helmet by tweaking the system's software, he says.

The company is also adding micro inertial measurement units (IMU) to the helmet and pilot's seat to dampen out jittery images. "We're going to fly those micro-IMUs this summer," O'Bryan says.

Lockheed hopes that the new ISIE-11 camera, which replaces the existing ISIE-10 cameras, will resolve jet's night vision acuity problems. The new system will undergo testing at MIT's Lincoln Labs later this summer. The system will now consist of two ISIE-11 cameras, one of which will be mounted in the helmet and another on the canopy bow, and imagery pumped in from the F-35's six distributed aperture system (DAS) infrared cameras.

"We're optimistic, we've got a good plan," O'Bryan says.

Meanwhile, the pilots have started to test the imagery from the distributed aperture system. Initial results look to be very promising, O'Bryan says. But there will need to be tweaks as flight tests reveal potential issues.

Other avionics tests are proceeding well. The F-35 has already started testing the Link-16 data-link and will soon start to test the variable message format link which is needed for the close air support mission. There are also ongoing tests with the radar, electronic warfare, and infrared targeting system, which are needed for the release of the Block 2A training software.

On the flight sciences side, the US Marine Corps short take-off vertical landing (STOVL) F-35B test programme is further along than that of the F-35C. The previously troubled B-model is now running 20% ahead of this year's planned test schedule, O'Bryan says.

The F-35B has flown at altitudes over 49,000ft and has hits speeds of Mach 1.4. That's just shy of the F-35's required 50, 000 ft ceiling and Mach 1.6 design speed limit, he says. The B-model has also flown at its maximum airspeed of 630 knots and has achieved its maximum 7G limit.

"It's about over 50% complete with its clean-wing full-envelop test points," O'Byan says.

The F-35C is also about 20% ahead of this year's flight test plan, O'Bryan says. Like the F-35B, the C-model has flown out to 630 knots, but the naval variant is required to hit 700 knots. The C-model has also flown at 45, 000 ft and at speeds of Mach 1.4. It has also hit its maximum 7.5G limit.

That means the USN version has completed about 40% of its clean configuration flight envelope test points, O'Bryan says.

Out at Edwards AFB, California, F-35A will have completed 45% of the totality of its flight test points by the end of the year. By the fourth quarter, the F-35A should have competed its first full lifetime of durability testing, O'Bryan says. There have thus far been no new issues that have arisen as a result of the tests.

'That, I'm happy to say, is going well," he says.

The all versions of the jet have started flying with external stores. Later this year, the aircraft will enter into high angle of attack testing up to 50 angle of attack, O'Bryan says. The programme will also start wet runway tests, engine air starts, and weapons releases.

Unread postPosted: 18 May 2012, 22:19
by neptune
tally wrote:May 17 brought first flights. Yes, flightS. AF-17 as 09-5004/OT "31 TES" and AF-18 as 09-5005/OT.


It would be nice to see the 53rd Wing get a couple of F-35s for EW testing and tactics; but it is not likely until the pilot/ maintenance training squadron (359th Training Squadron) has a full complement of a/c. :)

Unread postPosted: 20 May 2012, 16:39
by hobo
On the flight sciences side, the US Marine Corps short take-off vertical landing (STOVL) F-35B test programme is further along than that of the F-35C. The previously troubled B-model is now running 20% ahead of this year's planned test schedule, O'Bryan says.

The F-35B has flown at altitudes over 49,000ft and has hits speeds of Mach 1.4. That's just shy of the F-35's required 50, 000 ft ceiling and Mach 1.6 design speed limit, he says. The B-model has also flown at its maximum airspeed of 630 knots and has achieved its maximum 7G limit.

"It's about over 50% complete with its clean-wing full-envelop test points," O'Byan says.

The F-35C is also about 20% ahead of this year's flight test plan, O'Bryan says. Like the F-35B, the C-model has flown out to 630 knots, but the naval variant is required to hit 700 knots. The C-model has also flown at 45, 000 ft and at speeds of Mach 1.4. It has also hit its maximum 7.5G limit.

That means the USN version has completed about 40% of its clean configuration flight envelope test points, O'Bryan says.

Out at Edwards AFB, California, F-35A will have completed 45% of the totality of its flight test points by the end of the year. By the fourth quarter, the F-35A should have competed its first full lifetime of durability testing, O'Bryan says. There have thus far been no new issues that have arisen as a result of the tests.



It is interesting to see how quiet the various self-appointed "expert" critics have become as these sorts of reports become common.

F-35s are rolling off the production line, testing is proceeding steadily, real training will start soon... and yet where are the people who were calling for the program to be cancelled just a year or two ago? Even over at Ares BS seems to have run a little short on material for his hit pieces.

Unread postPosted: 23 May 2012, 19:59
by neptune
neptune wrote:
tally wrote:May 17 brought first flights. Yes, flightS. AF-17 as 09-5004/OT "31 TES" and AF-18 as 09-5005/OT.


It would be nice to see the 53rd Wing get a couple of F-35s for EW testing and tactics; but it is not likely until the pilot/ maintenance training squadron (359th Training Squadron) has a full complement of a/c. :)


Wow! :shock: They did get AF-17&18, OT tail codes. My apologies for doubting! :oops:

I'll change the tailcodes in my spreadsheet! :D

Unread postPosted: 24 May 2012, 01:27
by codeonemagazine
How about a credit to the source and photographer?

Unread postPosted: 24 May 2012, 01:47
by neptune
codeonemagazine wrote:How about a credit to the source and photographer?


"Of course", my apologies are getting the best of me. But, I was shocked over the tailcode change. Yes, this info was provided from several sources including;

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/index.html

and photos by "Carl Richards"

and thanks again for your excellent web site, that we all visit regularly! Kudos to you! :D

Unread postPosted: 24 May 2012, 17:51
by neptune
tally wrote:May 17 brought first flights. Yes, flightS. AF-17 as 09-5004/OT "31 TES" and AF-18 as 09-5005/OT.


The 31st Test and Evaluation Squadron is located at Edwards AFB, California.

...provides, maintenance and engineering experts to work alongside AFMC and Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center personnel.
...provides early war-fighter insight and influence during developmental testing.

Unread postPosted: 07 Jun 2012, 03:34
by Ztex
I saw BF-05 running up and down the runway at LM Fort Worth today...curious?

Unread postPosted: 07 Jun 2012, 21:45
by spazsinbad
How well is F-35 testing going? 07 June 2012

http://whythef35.blogspot.com.au/2012/0 ... going.html

"...All numbers and events are as of May 31st.

Monthly flight and Test Point actuals again exceeded plan...."

...CF-3 performed a total of 18 successful roll-in arrestments [MK-7 (6 with risers and 4 with no risers) and E-28 (8 arrestments)] at Lakehurst from 80 to 100 knots ground speed...." :beer: :notworthy:

BEST to go to the blog post to see the rest. I'll search for same info elsewhere online and post the successful arrest info in appropriate 'other' thread.

Unread postPosted: 08 Jun 2012, 00:10
by neptune
[quote="spazsinbad"][b]How well is F-35 testing going......[b]CF-3 performed a total of 18 successful roll-in arrestments [MK-7 (6 with risers and 4 with no risers) and E-28 (8 arrestments)] at Lakehurst from 80 to 100 knots ground speed.[/b.....

Oh joy! :D The hook mod is working, perhaps even the damper mod. Yeah! Another hook problem bites the dust! :applause:

The Mk-7 is the same as the a/c carrier system, but with runways.

The E-28 is the portable field arresting system.

While they are on a roll, perhaps they will try the AAG at Lakehurst. :idea:

Unread postPosted: 13 Jun 2012, 14:06
by neptune
Ztex wrote:I saw BF-05 running up and down the runway at LM Fort Worth today...curious?


Have any of these SDD had the bulkheads replaced. BF-05 first flew in Jan. 11 and no report of obtaining 50 flights......curious???????? :?:

Unread postPosted: 13 Jun 2012, 14:08
by neptune
F-35A AF-19 First Flight 9 June 2012

Martin test pilot Al Norman was at the controls for the first flight of F-35A AF-19 on 9 June 2012 at NAS Fort Worth JRB.

:)

This is the third (of 24 LRIP 1,2,3) OT tailcode to the EW test squadron in the first 37 inflight a/c.

Unread postPosted: 27 Jun 2012, 04:21
by Ztex
BF-05 left Fort Worth for Pax River (I think) today....just FYI.

Unread postPosted: 27 Jun 2012, 05:40
by johnwill
neptune wrote:
Ztex wrote:I saw BF-05 running up and down the runway at LM Fort Worth today...curious?


Have any of these SDD had the bulkheads replaced. BF-05 first flew in Jan. 11 and no report of obtaining 50 flights......curious???????? :?:


Normally an SDD airplane would not have the bulkheads replaced, but would have them inspected more frequently. It all depends on where (flight hours) in the design lifetime the durability test airframe first began cracking.

Let's say the durability test began cracking at 3000 flight hours. Depending on the safety factor, that might clear an SDD airplane for 750 or 1500 flight hours, if the usage were similar to design. More severe usage would reduce the cleared flight hours of the SDD airplane. The SDD airplanes are nowhere near that flight hour level now, so I doubt they would require anything but inspection.

If future inspections find cracks, then more than likely the cracked bulkheads would be repaired rather replaced, for obvious reasons. It's possible the SDD airplanes will never have to have the bulkheads repaired, since their flight time will likely be much less than the design life. If I remember right, my structural test F-16A No. 2 had about 750 hours on it when it was retired.

It is also entirely possible the early LRIP airplanes would be repaired in a similar way. Replacing a bulkhead is about equivalent to building a new airplane.

However, these are Navair airplanes, and there is no telling how they will handle the problem.

Unread postPosted: 27 Jun 2012, 21:32
by spazsinbad
F-35 Lightning II Program Status and Fast Facts June 12, 2012

https://ex.democracydata.com/243F8CB0E1 ... cc798e.pdf (140Kb)

"Program Status
? Cumulative flight test activity totals for 2012 as of May 31, are provided below:
o F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) jets have flown 211 times.
o F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft have completed 161 flights, 128 of which began with a short takeoff. Additionally, F-35B STOVL aircraft have conducted 52 vertical landings.
o F-35C carrier variant (CV) jets have flown 109 times.
? Since December 2006, F-35s have flown 2,242 times and accrued more than 3,500 cumulative flight hours. This total includes 91 flights from the original test aircraft, AA-1; 1,945 SDD test flights; and 206 production-model flights.
? During May, the program achieved the highest number of F-35 flights in a single day, 11, three different times: May 10, May 17 and May 22.
? During May, AF-7, an F-35A CTOL, flew 14 times accumulating 35.6 flight hours to set an individual jet record for the most flight hours in a single month.
? On May 10, AF-6, an F-35A CTOL, flew the highest altitude to date for a Mission Systems test jet, 39,000 feet.
? On May 15, AF-7, an F-35A CTOL, became the first production F-35 to fly supersonic.
? On May 17, the Cooperative Aircraft Test Bed (CATB), highly modified 737-300 aircraft designed to integrate, develop, and test the F-35 Lightning II sensor suite and associated mission systems software, demonstrated the F-35’s Electronic Attack (EA) capabilities against Eglin Air Force Base (AFB) range emitters.
? On May 22, CATB achieved integrated Multiple Advanced Datalinks (MADL) communications with the Open Air System Integration System (OASIS) laboratory.
? On May 31, the System Development and Demonstration (SDD) fleet, including the original test aircraft AA-1, achieved 2,000 total flights.

F-35 Fleet Status
System Development and Demonstration (SDD) Fleet
? 14 F-35s comprise the SDD test fleet. There are six F-35As assigned to Edwards AFB, Calif., and five F-35Bs along with three F-35Cs stationed at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.
Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) Aircraft
? Currently there are 24 active LRIP aircraft, 12 of which are assigned to the 33d Fighter Wing at Eglin AFB, Fla., two of which are engaged in flight testing at Edwards AFB, Calif., and ten of which are undergoing checkout flights at the F-35 production facility in Fort Worth, Texas."...

Unread postPosted: 28 Jun 2012, 20:35
by spazsinbad
LM Fast Facts from 12 June 2012 PDF (140Kb):
https://ex.democracydata.com/243F8CB0E1 ... cc798e.pdf

Unread postPosted: 28 Jun 2012, 21:08
by megasun
hmmm, in here, CV varient has no further range than A version.

Unread postPosted: 28 Jun 2012, 21:11
by spazsinbad
Has been that way for a long time. Only recently was the F-35A reduced to 590 nm rather than 600 nm [KPP change].

Unread postPosted: 05 Jul 2012, 07:20
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Martin officially opens Canberra office 05 July 2012

http://www.asiapacificdefencereporter.c ... rra-office

"...[Mr. Kubasik] looking at it from a high level, the development of the F-35 is going very well. One of the key metrics he uses is the flight test program and in particular the number of test points that have been achieved – with up to eight significant criteria looked at to validate performance. According to Mr Kubasik, Lockheed Martin will try and undertake around 1,000 flights during the course of this year and use these to retire another several thousand test points.

He added that the company exceeded its target of flight tests in 2010 and did the same thing last year. He and other senior executives receive nightly updates about aircraft test performance – an indicator of how closely progress is being monitored. As of the morning of the briefing – July 3 – the Joint Strike Fighter was about 50 flights ahead of its 2012 schedule and also about 1,000 test points ahead of plan...."

This article has no formatting. WTF? :D

Unread postPosted: 05 Jul 2012, 18:39
by neptune
spazsinbad wrote:[b]...This article has no formatting. WTF? :D


Looking at some of the other articles, formatting is up to the author. Apparently they have no editor. Looks more like a blog site.

Sorry, IMHO.

Unread postPosted: 09 Jul 2012, 00:53
by spazsinbad
FARNBOROUGH: Lockheed ready to deliver UK's first F-35 By: Craig Hoyle Farnborough 08 July 2012

http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... 35-373942/

"...O'Bryan says testing of the F-35 remain ahead of Lockheed's planned schedule for 2012. By 30 June, aircraft in all three variants had made a combined 595 flights and achieved 4,800 programme test points: 34% and 14% ahead of target, respectively...."

Unread postPosted: 10 Jul 2012, 21:27
by spazsinbad
Lockheed Martin F-35 Flight Test Progress Report 10 July 2012

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/p ... eport.html

"FORT WORTH, Texas, July 10, 2012 -- Lockheed Martin’s [NYSE: LMT] F-35 program accrued the highest number of test points in a single month during June, an accomplishment indicative of the program’s ongoing maturation. Additionally, for the 18th consecutive month the F-35 test program remained ahead of plan.

As of June 30, the F-35 Lightning II 5th Generation multirole fighter had conducted 595 test flights in 2012 versus a plan of 445 and accrued 4,830 test points against a plan of 3,901.

In June, the F-35 program accomplished several flight test and production milestones:
During June, the F-35 test program accrued the most test points in a single month, 1,118, in program history.

On June 5, BF-5 became the first F-35B short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) jet to fly with Block 2A software.

On June 13, the first F-35C carrier variant (CV) night flight was completed at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.

On June 13, F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) weapons pit drop testing was conducted for the first time at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif.

On June 14 at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., BF-2 completed the first test flight for the F-35B STOVL variant with an asymmetric weapons load.

On June 25, AF-1, an F-35A CTOL test jet, accomplished the first F-35 weapon pit drop from an external station, a GBU-12 from station 2.

On June 27, the program achieved the highest number of F-35 flights in a single day, 12.

Cumulative flight test activity totals for 2012 through June 30 are provided below:
F-35A CTOL jets have flown 260 times.
F-35B STOVL jets have completed 202 flights, 134 of which began with a short takeoff. Additionally, F-35B STOVL aircraft have conducted 55 vertical landings.
F-35C CV jets have flown 133 times.

Cumulative flight test activity totals for the duration of the program through May 31 are provided below:
F-35A CTOL jets have flown 907 times.
F-35B STOVL jets have completed 791 flights, 553 of which began with a short takeoff. Additionally, F-35B STOVL aircraft have conducted 334 vertical landings.
F-35C CV jets have flown 325 times.

Since December 2006, F-35s have flown 2,355 times and accrued more than 3,700 cumulative flight hours. This total includes 91 flights from the original test aircraft, AA-1; 2,023 SDD test flights; and 241 production-model flights...."

That's it.

Unread postPosted: 10 Jul 2012, 22:46
by neptune
spazsinbad wrote:[...On June 5, BF-5 became the first F-35B short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) jet to fly with Block 2A software.... F-35A CTOL jets have flown 260 times.... F-35C CV jets have flown 133 times.

Cumulative flight test activity totals.. F-35A CTOL jets have flown 907 times.... F-35C CV jets have flown 325 times.
...
That's it.


That's a lot!

It's great to see the "Bees" with Block 2A inflight, now we know why BF-5 was hanging around FW.

It'll be great to see CF-5 next year in LRIP 4, added to the SDD flight regime. Perhaps the "Sea" can catch-up on some of the flights, hours and test points. It'll also be grand to see the first "3" wire and carrier launch. Anchors Aweigh! :)

Unread postPosted: 11 Jul 2012, 15:40
by alloycowboy
Awsome that is some great news, they are ahead of plan by 929 test points. They are achieving just slightly over 8.1 test points per flights. I think the flight staff of the F-35 program deserves some "major kudos" for being extremely productive in achieving a high number of test points per flight.

The plan called for an extremely ambitious plan of 8.76 test points per flight and the flight test group beat that.

Unread postPosted: 11 Jul 2012, 22:19
by pants3204
Any report on test flights in the Phoenix area yesterday, July 10th?

Unread postPosted: 12 Jul 2012, 02:19
by spazsinbad
to Release: Fifth F-35B test aircraft returns to Patuxent River 11 July 2012

http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=5056

"NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND, PATUXENT RIVER, Md. – The F-35B test aircraft BF-5 returned to Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., on June 26 after a planned modification period in Fort Worth, Texas. BF-5 fills the complement of five F-35B test aircraft at NAS Patuxent River...."

Unread postPosted: 02 Aug 2012, 04:22
by Ztex
For the first time I saw two F-35's in the air at the same time in Fort Worth...they departed to the south with an F-18 in tow.

Don't know which airframes they were...saw them from a distance.

I'm assuming this was a delivery flight.

Just FYI

Unread postPosted: 04 Aug 2012, 05:16
by neptune
F-35B To Edwards

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/news_ite ... tem_id=786

USMC Lt. Col. Matt Kelly flew F-35B BF-2 to its new but temporary home at the F-35 Integrated Test Force at Edwards AFB, California, on 23 July 2012. The aircraft is at Edwards for a series of flights involving airstart testing. :crazypilot:

Air restart testing worked on the "A", now time to try the "B" :)

Unread postPosted: 04 Aug 2012, 14:42
by quicksilver
Ztex wrote:For the first time I saw two F-35's in the air at the same time in Fort Worth...they departed to the south with an F-18 in tow.

Don't know which airframes they were...saw them from a distance.

I'm assuming this was a delivery flight.

Just FYI


BF-13 and -14 going to Eglin.

Unread postPosted: 08 Aug 2012, 02:25
by spazsinbad
F-35 Flight Test Update 8 By Sydney Carrol 7 August 2012

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=105

"The F-35 Flight Test Update in the Volume 27, Number 1 issue of Code One closed with Royal Air Force Sqdn. Ldr. Jim Schofield’s first flight, which, as it turned out, was also the program’s 1,500th flight. Since then, nine new F-35 pilots have qualified, bringing the total to forty-two pilots who have now flown the Lightning II. The growing pilot population has made significant progress testing external weapons on all three F-35 variants, accomplishing first flights with external stores, refueling inflight with external stores, and flying with asymmetric weapons loads. The team has also begun night aerial refueling of F-35 at Edwards AFB, California, and night flight testing of F-35B and F-35C variants at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

In the months since the last issue, the System Development and Demonstration, or SDD, test pilots have set new records for most flights in a month – 123 flights in March 2012 – and most test points in a month – 1,118 in June 2012. Through 30 June 2012, the F-35 test program had conducted 595 test flights in 2012 and accrued 4,830 test points...."

"...3 May 2012: First Carrier Variant Approach Handling Qualities Test
The F-35 Integrated Test Force continued preparations for F-35C carrier variant ship trials with the first handling approach qualities test at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. US Marine Corps Lt. Col. Matt Taylor executed sixteen touch and goes, one wave off, and two full stop landings during the 1.4-hour mission. The test marked F-35C CF-3 Flight 53...."
___________

I guess the FCLP is part of this...

New Flight Control Mode Improves F-35C Handling on Landing Approach 25 July 2012
by Tamir Eshel

http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-20155.html
_________________________________

A lot of information in the Update 8 article is not new but all consolidated. The above excerpt is something new to me anyway. Best to go to de URL.

Unread postPosted: 19 Sep 2012, 03:10
by spazsinbad
Air Force chief cites concern about F-35 operating costs Reuters 18 Sep 2012 By Andrea Shalal-Esa

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/us-air-fo ... 12244.html

"...Lockheed officials told reporters the program was making progress in flight testing and software development. They said the Air Force model of the plane had flow 365 times this year [2012], while the B-model being developed for the Marine Corps had flown 300 times, including 184 short takeoffs, 133 short landings, and 66 vertical landings...."

Unread postPosted: 19 Sep 2012, 04:47
by neptune
spazsinbad wrote:Air Force chief cites concern about F-35 operating costs Reuters 18 Sep 2012 By Andrea Shalal-Esa

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/us-air-fo ... 12244.html

"...Lockheed officials told reporters the program was making progress in flight testing and software development. They said the Air Force model of the plane had flow 365 times this year [2012], while the B-model being developed for the Marine Corps had flown 300 times, including 184 short takeoffs, 133 short landings, and 66 vertical landings...."


....but no VL at Eglin...yet! :lol:

Unread postPosted: 11 Oct 2012, 21:15
by fang
According to Code One BF-17 in PAX to assist the SDD planes there.
And after a while it will go to Edwards, why to Edwards and mot to Eglin?
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/f35_news ... tem_id=853

Unread postPosted: 12 Oct 2012, 19:36
by neptune
fang wrote:According to Code One BF-17 in PAX to assist the SDD planes there.
And after a while it will go to Edwards, why to Edwards and mot to Eglin?
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/f35_news ... tem_id=853


1- This a/c is #6 of 9 F-35B from LRIP3, it is not a test plane.

2- Any testing to be done at Edwards would have to be Operationally or from attached systems/ weapons. Perhaps the telemetry at Edwards is better than PAX but the AF weapons testing is usually done at Eglin (where the F-35B training command is co-located)??

3- Taking BF-17 out of the training command, may allow the USMC to expedite efforts toward IOC, with Mission Systems v. 2.B.

4- Environmentally, Yuma is more similar (250 miles) to Edwards than PAX or Eglin. :idea: :)

5- BF-3, a SDD plane, was recently at Edwards for in-flight restart testing. The precedent of F-35B flights at Edwards has been set. :)

6- AF-6 (LRIP1) at Edwards was upgraded to Mission Systems v. 2.A at Edwards and recertified by LO/ RCS. All LRIP 2 and 3 a/c will soon be upgraded to MS v. 2.A for required flight training. BF-17 could be the first one to prove the upgraded program? Also, BF-17 is ending movement at Eglin AFB. This would add to the progress of #3. :idea:

Unread postPosted: 17 Oct 2012, 14:26
by neptune
LRIP; LM No.; Branch No.; Pilot; First Flight;
4; AF-22; 10-5010; Hattendorf, Paul; 14-Oct-12
3; BF-18; 168314; Norman, Al; 8-Aug-12
4; BF-19; 168717; Flynn, Billie; 15-Oct-12
4; BF-20; 168718; Gigliotti, William J. (Bill); 14-Oct-12

LRIP4 first 3 jets from LRIP4 with Mission System ver. 2.A

Unread postPosted: 19 Oct 2012, 22:27
by fang
LRIP; LM No.; Branch No.; Pilot; Delivery date; Destination
------------------------------------------------------------------
3; BF-16; 168312; USMC Maj. Adam Levine; oct-19-12; Eglin AFB
3; BK-2; ZM136; RAF Sqn. Ldr. Jim Schofield; oct-19-12; Eglin AFB

Unread postPosted: 03 Nov 2012, 21:15
by neptune
F-35 Flight Test Update 9

By Sydney Carroll
Posted 30 October 2012

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/f35_arti ... tem_id=111

typical;

22 August 2012: 20,000th Test Point Complete
The SDD team accomplished 20,000 test points since the beginning of the test program with two F-35A test flights at Edwards AFB, California, and three F-35B test flights at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. The overall F-35 SDD flight test program plan calls for 59,585 test points to be verified through developmental test flights by 31 December 2016.

Thanks Code One :)

Unread postPosted: 06 Nov 2012, 14:37
by Asif
Lockheed Martin wrote:
Eglin Completes 500TH F-35 Sortie

EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla., Nov. 5, 2012 – The Integrated Training Center (ITC) here completed its 500th combined sortie for both the F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) and F-35B short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft Friday. Flight operations for the F-35 began on the Emerald Coast March 6. There are currently 22 F-35s at Eglin as the fleet continues to grow supporting the team as it trains instructor pilots and maintainers. The team accomplished the 500 sorties in 238 days cutting the time between each milestone sortie:

100th sortie – July 12 - accomplished in 123 days
200th sortie – Aug. 24 - accomplished in 44 days
300th sortie – Sept. 21 - accomplished in 28 days
400th sortie – Oct. 16 - accomplished in 25 days
500th sortie – Nov. 2 - accomplished in 16 days


Also can be found under this thread F-35 program updates

Unread postPosted: 07 Nov 2012, 16:46
by Asif

F-35B BF-18 stops by at Lockheed's Marietta facility on its ferry flight from Fort Worth to NAS Patuxent River on November 5th, 2012. Chief Test Pilot Alan Norman talks to the local Marietta media as F-35 Operations Director Steve Blake looks on. [Lockheed Martin photo by John Rossino]

Unread postPosted: 07 Nov 2012, 17:52
by spazsinbad
Photo above here earlier with story: http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-20560.html Stroll down.

Unread postPosted: 13 Nov 2012, 10:32
by spazsinbad
Fast Facts by LM for F-35 now out with some bits below:

http://f-35.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/ ... 1-2012.pdf (140Kb)

"AF-4 completed the first F-35 Spin Recovery Chute taxi deployment on October 20, the first F-35 flight with the SRC on October 24, and the first High AoA mission at 26 and 30 degrees AoA on October 29."

PDF will be attached to the DOC thread here: http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... 135#235135

Unread postPosted: 13 Nov 2012, 15:27
by Conan
spazsinbad wrote:Fast Facts by LM for F-35 now out with some bits below:

http://f-35.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/ ... 1-2012.pdf (140Kb)

"AF-4 completed the first F-35 Spin Recovery Chute taxi deployment on October 20, the first F-35 flight with the SRC on October 24, and the first High AoA mission at 26 and 30 degrees AoA on October 29."

PDF will be attached to the DOC thread here: http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... 135#235135


Hopefully our old mate JeffB will be crying into his beer now that his precious "can't go beyond 20 degree AoA" mantra is out the window...

:D

Unread postPosted: 13 Nov 2012, 20:30
by spazsinbad
Just on that point about 'limited AoA' here is an insight into whys and wherefores:

Extreme Angle of Attack: What is It Good for? Not as much as you might think. 12 Nov 2012

http://elementsofpower.blogspot.com.au/ ... -good.html

"In looking at AoA papers related to the series I just concluded, I ran across a paper that was able to express what good Aeros everywhere already know. Higher maximum AoA does not translate into more "vector" change if it sucks down your "smash"....

...4) The quantification of these metrics showed that the angle of attack load factor limiter in the F-16A provided that aircraft with a definite advantage over the F-18A, F-5A, and X-29A. The limiter, although reducing the maximum turn rate, prevented the aircraft from reaching high energy bleed rate conditions. This limiting essentially relieves the pilot of the responsibility of having to set up an optimum maneuver. However, the metrics quantified here do not provide an ability to assess the benefits of performing high angle of attack maneuvering - a capability which could potentially offset the associated energy losses."

Best to read entire post at SOURCE.

Unread postPosted: 13 Nov 2012, 21:59
by hobo
Conan wrote:
spazsinbad wrote:Fast Facts by LM for F-35 now out with some bits below:

http://f-35.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/ ... 1-2012.pdf (140Kb)

"AF-4 completed the first F-35 Spin Recovery Chute taxi deployment on October 20, the first F-35 flight with the SRC on October 24, and the first High AoA mission at 26 and 30 degrees AoA on October 29."

PDF will be attached to the DOC thread here: http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... 135#235135


Hopefully our old mate JeffB will be crying into his beer now that his precious "can't go beyond 20 degree AoA" mantra is out the window...

:D



Did he get banned or did he just realize the time for his sort of act had about run out?

Unread postPosted: 13 Nov 2012, 22:37
by SpudmanWP

Unread postPosted: 04 Dec 2012, 01:08
by spazsinbad
Possibly 'old' news but in any event these people think it is newsworthy....

Lockheed Martin Corporation : F-35 Lightning II Program Surpasses 5,000 Flight Hours Dec/03/2012

http://www.4-traders.com/LOCKHEED-MARTI ... -15572449/

"FORT WORTH, Texas, Dec. 3, 2012 - The Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] F-35 Lightning II program surpassed 5,000 flight hours last month. This milestone was reached by the combined F-35 System Development and Demonstration (SDD) aircraft flying at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., and Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., and the training aircraft flying at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. All three variants, the F-35A Conventional Takeoff and Landing (CTOL), the Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing (STOVL) and Carrier Variant (CV), participated in achievement of this goal. Since the program's first flight in December 2006, F-35s have flown 3,464 times. This total includes 91 flights from the original test aircraft, AA-1; 2,510 SDD test flights; and 863 production-model flights...."

Unread postPosted: 07 Dec 2012, 00:02
by arrow-nautics
I have a question I'd like to throw out for discussion. I don't wish to start a new thread so I figure this would be the best place to pose the question. Actually there's 2 questions. First, when can we estimate the F-35 will do external fuel tank testing & jettison tests on tanks? Number 2, when can we estimate the F-35 (all variants) will be declared fully operational?

Unread postPosted: 07 Dec 2012, 00:20
by SpudmanWP
1. The earliest that tanks will be integrated in Blk4 or maybe Blk5

2. FOC is 2020 at the earliest

Unread postPosted: 12 Dec 2012, 18:54
by spazsinbad
UhOh, another 'millstone' flight! :D Good on 'em I say...

Photo: F-35B achieves milestone flight 12 Dec 2012

http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=5216

"NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND, PATUXENT RIVER, Md. – Marine Corps test pilot Maj. C. R. Clift flies BF-1 on a short take off and vertical landing mode mission, Dec. 7. The flight marked the 1000th developmental test flight for the F-35B Lightning II in the program’s system development and demonstration phase...."

That is it: BIG PIC: http://www.navair.navy.mil/img/uploads/ ... lights.jpg

Unread postPosted: 12 Dec 2012, 21:49
by f-22lm
spazsinbad wrote:UhOh, another 'millstone' flight! :D Good on 'em I say...

Photo: F-35B achieves milestone flight 12 Dec 2012

http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=5216

"NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND, PATUXENT RIVER, Md. – Marine Corps test pilot Maj. C. R. Clift flies BF-1 on a short take off and vertical landing mode mission, Dec. 7. The flight marked the 1000th developmental test flight for the F-35B Lightning II in the program’s system development and demonstration phase...."

That is it: BIG PIC: http://www.navair.navy.mil/img/uploads/ ... lights.jpg
That's proof that the f-35 will do its ship trial again ;)

Unread postPosted: 13 Dec 2012, 20:13
by orkss
F-35 Lightning II Program Status and Fast Facts December 11, 2012

http://f-35.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/F-35-Fast-Facts-December-11-2012.pdf

Unread postPosted: 13 Dec 2012, 22:45
by spazsinbad
Thanks 'orkss'. Some items not otherwise noted elsewhere wot caught me eye:

"On November 3, CF-2 flew an HMD Jitter FTR mission completing first pilot evaluation.

On November 14, during setup for a 45,000 ft test point, AF-4 flew to 50,000 ft, the design altitude limit. This is the first time F-35 has flown to 50K.

On November 30, BF-1 accomplished the longest duration F-35 hover at 10 minutes. [OMG] :D

On December 3, BF-1 accomplished its 200th vertical landing at PAX and completed maximum weight hover, vertical landing and 90 degree translation on December 6.

On December 6, BF-4 flew the first STOVL mode night ops, including night hover." Brilliant! OOPs I see some of this is repeated on the 'Program Dox' thread with the PDF at: http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopi ... t-135.html stroll down.

Unread postPosted: 19 Dec 2012, 00:28
by munny
Can someone tell me what a 90 degree translation would be?

Unread postPosted: 19 Dec 2012, 03:03
by neptune
munny wrote:Can someone tell me what a 90 degree translation would be?


I have never flown a Harrier but would anticipate that the 90 degree translation would be a 90 degree turn "in hover" while landing or positioning the a/c. Any other 90 degree maneuver would be a bit much for my "unbraced" stomach. :wink: :lol:

Unread postPosted: 19 Dec 2012, 03:20
by spazsinbad
Early F-35B hover videos show the aircraft turning in the hover. Perhaps the term is a helo one where it refers to a vertical takeoff and transition to normal flight going forward. Just my guess though. Vertical takeoffs were going to be tested but they are not part of the F-35B operational requirements.

Unread postPosted: 19 Dec 2012, 04:07
by Raptor_claw
munny wrote:Can someone tell me what a 90 degree translation would be?
Translation generally means to move or change direction without turning. In this case it would mean a direct "sideways" movement of the air vehicle.
A 90 degree translation would imply direct movement 90 degrees off the axis in which the nose is pointing. In other words, he's sitting there in a hover with the nose pointing due north. He then "moves" the a/c due east (or west), while the nose continues to point north. In this case, you can assume that there was no accompanying forward (northerly) motion...

Unread postPosted: 19 Dec 2012, 04:19
by spazsinbad
'Raptor_claw' if you watch the F-35Bs landing aboard USS Wasp you will see them doing exactly what you describe, with the nose probably pointing into the wind, which is likely straight down the deck. From pilot comments the F-35B can do amazing flying feats when in STOVL mode - it can fly backwards remember?

Just to clarify in words: the F-35B comes to a hover adjacent to the landing spot but over the water. Then the aircraft hovers sideways with nose still pointing into the wind to be over the vertical landing spot. Then the F-35B will slowly descend onto the landing spot.

If you watch a helicopter take off vertically it may well then point the nose down slightly gathering forward speed, but not descending, to then fly away at speed. This is how I envisage what the F-35B has done in a recent test - perhaps.
____________________________

F-35B 1st Landing on USS WASP

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7cAmCCmObw

"Uploaded on Oct 3, 2011
F-35B test aircraft completes its first landing aboard USS Wasp."

Unread postPosted: 19 Dec 2012, 07:17
by munny
This is why I asked. I've seen plenty of videos of it turning more than 90 degrees in hover and sliding sideways to land, so you would have to exclude those if this is something new and noteworthy. I know one of the test pilots mentioned they will be performing transitions from hover to forward flight as test points and was wondering if this was it.

Unread postPosted: 19 Dec 2012, 07:33
by spazsinbad
'munny' said: "...I know one of the test pilots mentioned they will be performing transitions from hover to forward flight as test points and was wondering if this was it." IF you can point to where this comment was made that would be very helpful. IF your recollection is accurate then I think you have the answer.

Unread postPosted: 19 Dec 2012, 13:23
by munny
Will see how I go on a pc. It was a YouTube flick of a pilot interview from mud last year. He said while VTOL isn't a requirement, testing it is. He said its low priority and they'll be going out to the ship (wasp) layer in the year

Unread postPosted: 19 Dec 2012, 13:42
by quicksilver
Raptor_claw wrote:
munny wrote:Can someone tell me what a 90 degree translation would be?
Translation generally means to move or change direction without turning. In this case it would mean a direct "sideways" movement of the air vehicle.
A 90 degree translation would imply direct movement 90 degrees off the axis in which the nose is pointing. In other words, he's sitting there in a hover with the nose pointing due north. He then "moves" the a/c due east (or west), while the nose continues to point north. In this case, you can assume that there was no accompanying forward (northerly) motion...


Raptor is correct. And, as others have pointed out, it wouldn't be the first time it has done so given it's trip to the ship over a year ago. Given that it was connected to a performance hover (ie max weight), it was likely demonstrating the control margins that are part of the analytic VLBB calculation.

Unread postPosted: 19 Dec 2012, 15:13
by munny
Some of my details were wrong (lots of beers since May last year), but the gist of it was right....

http://bit.ly/V6C0t8

"Pilots at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md have flown about 125 sorties with many of those dedicated to getting the aircraft ready for shipboard tests. Kelly notes that they are in good position to begin those ship tests this fall. The F-35B will also eventually be required to perform vertical takeoffs, but for now, the STOVL trials have been deemed more important. The Marine Corps Leaders are optimistic about the performance of the aircraft as well. The F-35B is said to offer performance very much like that of the F/A-18."

Unread postPosted: 19 Dec 2012, 16:49
by spazsinbad
So a '90 degree vertical translation' is no big deal and just part of the 200th such maneuver for that aircraft (amongst other things such as a max. weight hover). And thanks 'munny' for finding the vertical takeoff quote. I wonder what weight is a max. weight hover? How long is a piece of string?

BTW similar 'vertical takeoff testing' & 'FnA-18 like performance' quote here:

F-35 Tests Proceed, Revealing F/A-18-Like Performance 16 May 2011 Dave Majumdar

http://www.defensenews.com/article/2011 ... erformance

"...Eventually, the F-35B will perform vertical takeoffs, but that testing has yet to be performed because other STOVL trials are of more immediate import, Kelly said.

"There is a requirement for that and we do plan on performing vertical takeoffs," he said...."

Unread postPosted: 20 Dec 2012, 12:16
by spazsinbad
Avcorp Industries touts first successful flights of F-35 'carrier variant' Dec 20, 2012 (AIRLINE INDUSTRY INFORMATION via COMTEX)

http://www.individual.com/storyrss.php? ... a20f96c646

"...This programme has already seen all three aircraft variants complete over 2,000 flights and over 16,000 test points, the company said."

Unread postPosted: 21 Dec 2012, 02:05
by f-22lm
Cool image :D

Image

Unread postPosted: 21 Dec 2012, 02:43
by spazsinbad
I wonder if the HMDS II had the jitters hovering at night? :D Oh the horror.

Unread postPosted: 21 Dec 2012, 15:22
by quicksilver
spazsinbad wrote:So a '90 degree vertical translation' is no big deal and just part of the 200th such maneuver for that aircraft (amongst other things such as a max. weight hover). And thanks 'munny' for finding the vertical takeoff quote. I wonder what weight is a max. weight hover? How long is a piece of string?

BTW similar 'vertical takeoff testing' & 'FnA-18 like performance' quote here:

F-35 Tests Proceed, Revealing F/A-18-Like Performance 16 May 2011 Dave Majumdar

http://www.defensenews.com/article/2011 ... erformance

"...Eventually, the F-35B will perform vertical takeoffs, but that testing has yet to be performed because other STOVL trials are of more immediate import, Kelly said.

"There is a requirement for that and we do plan on performing vertical takeoffs," he said...."


It's a big enough deal that they mentioned it, but they didn't put its significance in context since translations -- purely as an aircraft movement -- have been done many times before. The significance of a successful translation at max hover weight is that the jet is using part of the thrust that it uses for lift to move the jet sideways (through the roll post nozzles). There has to be sufficient thrust margin in the system for the jet to do this without losing altitude. Analytically, and as suggested by previous flight test data, they expected to be able to do this. The tests confirmed it.

Next test point please... 8)

Unread postPosted: 21 Dec 2012, 18:09
by spazsinbad
So in context of the three items mentioned together the test is significant: "...completed maximum weight hover, vertical landing and 90 degree translation...". Thanks.

Unread postPosted: 21 Dec 2012, 19:56
by quicksilver

Unread postPosted: 21 Dec 2012, 20:10
by spazsinbad
Good stuff - thanks 'quicksilver':

"...Prior to these milestones, developmental test with the F-35A was restricted to a flight envelope between -10 and 20 degrees AoA. Now, test maneuvers are being executed up to 50 AoA and intentional departures are being conducted to explore the aircraft behavior even beyond this boundary. Results will be used to clear F-35 operational aircraft to 50 AOA, directly supporting the air superiority needs of the warfighter by allowing them to aggressively maneuver the F-35A.

Throughout the High AoA testing, the F-35A's performance has closely matched piloted simulator results and modeled predictions, giving the team the confidence in the jet to continue moving forward in the test plan.

"We are significantly matching models and it gives us good confidence in the aircraft and how to polish the flight control systems so it's even better than what we started with. Going into this unknown area of High AoA, we really like when things match. It makes you feel very safe, although we will remain cautious all the way though," said David Nelson, F-35 chief test pilot from Lockheed Martin.

"We don't want a first lieutenant going through F-35 school to be the first person to see something. We, as a flight test community, feel this is a protection and a promise we must deliver to the warfighter," he continued.

As a result of the success, the F-35 ITF has also gained momentum in delivering an envelope in 2014 to the program office to the design limit of 50 degrees AoA, along with the ability to pull 7gs throughout the envelope, and also ensuring that the jet can fly out to 700 knots and 1.6 mach....

..."The testing is going very well; I'm extremely pleased with the progress. But, it's important to note that we are finding areas for improvement. We are feeding that information back for follow-on software versions that will make the aircraft safer and effective in maneuvering at high angles of attack. By the time we get done, the aircraft will fly up to 50 degrees angle of attack with care-free handling qualities" said Schwartz."

As always best to read ALL at the jump INCLUDING info about the Test Pilot NELSON.
__________________

CAPTION: "The F-35A, AF-4, can be seen outfitted with a spin recovery chute (SRC) during High Angle of Attack testing accomplished by the F-35 Integrated Test Force team at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. (Photo by Darin Russell/Lockheed Martin)"

BIGPIC: http://www.edwards.af.mil/shared/media/ ... 99-010.jpg

Unread postPosted: 22 Dec 2012, 20:07
by f-22lm
Image

Image

Unread postPosted: 24 Jan 2013, 06:23
by spazsinbad
Second F-35A Reaches 500 Flight Hour Milestone 23 Jan 2013

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/p ... s-500.html

"EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif., Jan. 23, 2013 – The second Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] F-35 Lightning II stealth fighter, known as AF-1, joined the 500 flight hour club recently during its 272nd flight. It joins AF-2 which passed the milestone June 26, 2012. The conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) fighter began flight operations when it made its inaugural flight Nov. 14, 2009. The F-35A flight test program has completed more than 43 percent of its overall test plan. Overall, the program’s three variants have achieved nearly 5,900 flight hours by 55 aircraft in the System Development and Demonstration (SDD) and Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) programs...."

Big Pic: http://www.lockheedmartin.com/content/d ... 35_AF1.jpg

Unread postPosted: 03 Feb 2013, 21:09
by lonewolf121188
Watched an F-35 do three touch and goes here at Sheppard AFB on Friday. There was an F-16 following it all the way around. Pretty cool, first time I've seen one flying. Wasn't close enough to see the markings...think it was straight from the factory in Ft Worth?

Unread postPosted: 03 Feb 2013, 21:27
by neptune
lonewolf121188 wrote:Watched an F-35 do three touch and goes here at Sheppard AFB on Friday. There was an F-16 following it all the way around. Pretty cool, first time I've seen one flying. Wasn't close enough to see the markings...think it was straight from the factory in Ft Worth?


I'm jealous, I've traveled to FW and Eglin and weather allowed me to only hear the F-135 in the distance. Soon......I'll see one in the air. :lol:

Unread postPosted: 05 Mar 2013, 06:28
by Ztex
09-5005 (AF-18 ) and 09-5006 (AF-19) left Fort Worth for Edwards today...fyi

Unread postPosted: 05 Mar 2013, 09:29
by fang
Ztex wrote:09-5005 (AF-18 ) and 09-5006 (AF-19) left Fort Worth for Edwards today...fyi

TNX for the info.
Any idea what about AF-17 & AF-20 to Edwards?
And what about AF-21/22/23/24 to Nellis?

Unread postPosted: 05 Mar 2013, 18:17
by neptune
[quote="fang"][...Any idea what about AF-17 & AF-20 to Edwards?...

AF-17 to Eglin 10-Jul-12.

OT tailcode ?

:)

So....did it go to 359th TS or ....?

Unread postPosted: 05 Mar 2013, 21:02
by joost
neptune wrote:
fang wrote:[...Any idea what about AF-17 & AF-20 to Edwards?...

AF-17 to Eglin 10-Jul-12.

OT tailcode ?

:)

So....did it go to 359th TS or ....?


AFAIK AF-17 is still at Fort Worth and was certainly not delivered to Eglin, this was an unconfirmed message which turned out to be wrong. AF-17 has OT tail code and 31 TES on tail. So probably that one will go to Edwards together with AF-20 later this week or next week.

Unread postPosted: 05 Mar 2013, 22:11
by neptune
joost wrote:[..AFAIK AF-17 is still at Fort Worth and was certainly not delivered to Eglin, this was an unconfirmed message which turned out to be wrong. AF-17 has OT tail code and 31 TES on tail. So probably that one will go to Edwards together with AF-20 later this week or next week.


Thanks, OT tailcode to Eglin wasn't jivin".

Updated the 31TES, and the 422TES

I guess;

AF-17,18,19 and 20 are going to Edwards with the 31TES
and
AF-21,22,23 and 24 are going to Nellis with the 422 TES.

:wink: :)

Unread postPosted: 14 Mar 2013, 07:30
by fang
Some cool pic of 31TES birds
AF-18 (09-5005) and AF-19 (09-5006) on the way to Edwards
http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisk48/8 ... otostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisk48/8 ... otostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisk48/8 ... otostream/
and more...

The photographer says it was during a short final at Luke AFB during delivery

More news from 31TES
EDWARDS BEGINS F-35 OPERATIONAL TESTING (March 14, 2013)
http://www.avionics-intelligence.com/ne ... sting.html

F-35 Flight Testing At Edwards

Unread postPosted: 22 Jun 2013, 17:56
by neptune
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/f35_arti ... tem_id=117

F-35 Flight Testing At Edwards

By Eric Hehs Posted 17 May 2013


The F-35 ITF at Edwards AFB, California, consists of more than 900 military, contractors, and civilian personnel from a variety of services, countries, and industries.

In 2012, the ITF operated six F-35As assigned to Edwards—three for flight sciences testing and three for mission systems testing—as well as one F-35B temporarily deployed to Edwards from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, for air start testing. By the end of 2013, Edwards F-35 ITF will be operating three additional F-35s—two F-35Bs and one F-35C, for a total of nine F-35s. The test pilot population will expand from nine pilots to twelve pilots as well. The additional aircraft and pilots will be involved primarily with mission system testing.

We spent the first two years turning the F-35 into a flying machine, but the focus has quietly shifted to weaponizing the aircraft in both flight sciences and mission systems. — Lt. Col. George Schwartz

Aerial refueling assets are one of many examples of the support the F-35 ITF receives from other organizations at Edwards.

The airplane does quite well at high AOA, and the tests have been proceeding smoothly. We went from twenty degrees angle of attack to fifty degrees in only four days of testing. — David Nelson, Lockheed Martin test pilot

Mission system testing deals with how the aircraft detects what is going on around it and how well it conveys that information to the pilot. Mission system tests are used to evaluate the functionality of the various electronic systems and sensors on the aircraft, including communications (datalinks and satellite communications), radar, countermeasures, distributed apertures, and electro-optical targeting.

Since receiving their first two F-35As (called AF-1 and AF-2) in May 2010, Edwards F-35 ITF personnel have been busy expanding the flight envelope.

The majority of the envelope expansion at Edwards has been accomplished on AF-1, AF-2, and AF-4—the three F-35As devoted to flight sciences testing.

Aerial refueling extends the duration of flight test missions.

Operational pilots will never execute some of the maneuvers we’re performing in the airplane. But the maneuvers are part of building a flight envelope. We are verifying that the airframe will be fine structurally if it stays within the limits we are testing here. — Lt. Col. Brent Reinhardt

The F-35 ITF at Edwards will be doing more flight sciences tests with external stores in 2013.

F-35A AF-2 has been used for the majority of loads testing.

The F-35 was flown on its first night refueling mission on a flight from Edwards AFB in March 2012.

F-35A AF-4 is recognizable by its spin recovery system. The system was first flown on the aircraft in October 2012.

F-35 test pilots at Edwards are evaluating the aircraft's flying qualities at angles of attack from a negative ten degrees AOA to a positive fifty-plus. High AOA testing for 2013 will involve a variety of loadings mounted externally.

AF-6 takes off in afterburner for its first night mission in January 2012.

In terms of mission profiles, we had single F-35 operations early on. That is, one F-35 would go out with a chase aircraft. Now we are adding another F-35 as wingman, and the two F-35s are flying against multiple, maneuvering targets. In the next year or so, we will have our first four-ship F-35 mission with multiple maneuvering targets. — Capt. Nathan Yerrick

Because mission systems are common for the most part across all F-35 variants, the mission system testing done on an F-35A applies to the F-35B and F-35C. Similarly, the software that underlies the evolution is shared.

Most of the mission system testing performed with the F-35 prior to 2013 involved single aircraft and even single sensors with limited sensor fusion, that is, the process for taking inputs from two or more sensors, combining them, distilling them, and then conveying them in an intuitive form to the pilot.

Multi-ship missions represent the increasing complexity and continuing evolution of mission system testing.

The mission systems fleet at Edwards originally consisted of F-35A AF-3, AF-6, and AF-7. Unlike the flight sciences test aircraft, these three F-35s fly with a full complement of electronic systems and sensors found on operational F-35s. This current fleet will be increased with the three additional F-35s scheduled for delivery in 2013, which will also be used for mission system testing. F-35B BF-17 (shown here) arrived in March. It was joined by BF-18 in April. CF-8 will arrive later in the year.

We start with benign releases at higher altitudes, at one g, and at Mach 0.8. Then we come down in altitude and release at increased pressures. After that, we do releases at g forces above and below one g. Some of these test profiles are to establish an envelope so they are conducted at the edge of the operational envelope. — Bobby Rocha, weapons integration engineer

Weapons are pit drop tested before they are released from an F-35 in flight.

Early weapon tests fall into the flight sciences regime. The initial separation tests are used to verify that the weapon separation characteristics conform to predictions. These initial tests are done on flight sciences aircraft—mostly on AF-1.

Weapons are pit drop tested before they are released from an F-35 in flight.

Whenever we have a maintenance task on the airplane that can be used to verify the technical data, representatives from the US government and Lockheed Martin are right behind the maintenance technicians asking if the techs have the information and the right tools they need. We are making sure that the maintenance task instructions can be performed in the field. — Mary Parker, deputy for logistics at the F-35 ITF

Maintenance at the ITF is performed by personnel from Lockheed Martin as well as by civilians and military personnel working for the US Government. Four technicians come from international air forces—two from the Netherlands, one from Norway, and one from Canada.

In many ways, the F-35 is easier to maintain than the F-16. The F-35 has fewer LRUs and is more software driven. Normal scheduled maintenance is reduced. And the computer interface replaces a lot of test equipment. The aircraft also has more built-in test capability. Overall, fewer people are required to maintain the F-35. — Capt. Terje Vik, a maintenance lead from the Royal Norwegian Air Force

In many ways, the F-35 is easier to maintain than the F-16. The F-35 has fewer LRUs and is more software driven. Normal scheduled maintenance is reduced. And the computer interface replaces a lot of test equipment. The aircraft also has more built-in test capability. Overall, fewer people are required to maintain the F-35. — Capt. Terje Vik, a maintenance lead from the Royal Norwegian Air Force


The F-35 ITF at Edwards AFB, California, consists of more than 900 military, contractors, and civilian personnel from a variety of services, countries, and industries.

Photo by Matthew Short

The first thing members of the F-35 Integrated Test Force see when they walk through the main entrance to the hangar at Edwards AFB, California, is a large flat screen display with a list of flight test priorities. The items on that list can change from one day to the next.

“Stability is crucial to successful test execution, but we can turn on a dime if priorities shift,” noted Lt. Col. George Schwartz, US government director for the F-35 ITF at Edwards. “The helmet mounted display test we are flying tonight is an example. The program asked us two days ago to fly an additional night flight for HMD testing. We are conducting that mission tonight.”

Edwards normally operates a daylight flying schedule, so a short-notice night mission requires a significant adjustment in schedules and resources across Edwards. “The night mission exemplifies the incredible support the F-35 ITF gets from the base,” Schwartz added.

The F-35 ITF at Edwards consists of more than 900 military, contractors, and civilian personnel from a variety of services, countries, and industries. In 2012, the ITF operated six F-35As assigned to Edwards—three for flight sciences testing and three for mission systems testing—as well as one F-35B temporarily deployed to Edwards from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, for air start testing.

By the end of 2013, Edwards F-35 ITF will be operating three additional F-35s—two F-35Bs and one F-35C, for a total of nine F-35s. The test pilot population will expand from nine pilots to twelve pilots as well. The additional aircraft and pilots will be involved primarily with mission system testing.

Expanding The Envelope
Since receiving their first two F-35As (called AF-1 and AF-2) in May 2010, Edwards F-35 ITF personnel have been busy expanding the flight envelope.

“We spent the first two years turning the F-35 into a flying machine, but the focus has quietly shifted to weaponizing the aircraft in both flight sciences and mission systems,” Schwartz said. “Flight sciences work began with a small envelope. Today we’re flying at the edge of the envelope—at 100 percent loads—out to 1.6 Mach. Thanks to all the incredible work on envelope expansion done by this team, we are flying at seven g’s with no loads monitoring on our mission systems aircraft, and we have proven the aircraft can operate anywhere throughout the full envelope.”

The majority of the envelope expansion has been accomplished on AF-1, AF-2, and AF-4—the three F-35As devoted to flight sciences testing. F-35A AF-1 is flown in flutter tests. AF-2 is flown for most of the loads testing. And AF-4, recognizable by its spin recovery chute, is flown in high angle of attack test missions. These three aircraft alone accumulated about 600 hours of flying time in about 300 flights in 2012—approximately one-fourth of the total 1,167 System Design and Development missions for the entire fleet, which includes the test aircraft at Pax River.

Mike Glass, F-35 ITF site director at Edwards for Lockheed Martin, doesn’t see that level of activity diminishing for the flight sciences aircraft. “Envelope expansion testing remains significant in 2013,” Glass said. “We’ve completed the clean wing flutter flight sciences testing. Now we are installing pylons on the aircraft and doing the same type of flutter and loads testing we did with the clean wing. We will be conducting these tests for the next couple of years but with different load configurations on the aircraft.”

High angle of attack testing with the F-35 began in late October 2012. This testing involves taking the aircraft to its production angle of attack limit, which is fifty degrees. It also involves taking the aircraft beyond this limit to evaluate its characteristics in recovering from out-of-control conditions.

“High AOA testing produces some of the most challenging environments for the engine because the intake gets bad air,” explained David Nelson, lead F-35 test pilot for Lockheed Martin at Edwards. “The bad air creates a potential for producing a flameout, which is basically an engine shutdown. For that reason, air start testing preceded high AOA testing.”

Air start testing involves shutting down the engine and restarting it in flight. All four test pilots involved in high-AOA flight tests have flown air start missions. “The graduation exercise involved turning off the engine at 45,000 feet and then restarting it,” Nelson said. “Everything worked as planned.”

Besides producing conditions that can cause the engine to flame out, flying at high angles of attack can also lead to out-of-control flight. The spin recovery chute mounted at the apex of a four-legged structure on the back of AF-4 is designed to deal with that possibility. The test pilot can deploy this twenty-eight foot diameter parachute in case the airplane gets into an out-of-control condition from which the pilot cannot recover with the standard flight control inputs. The chute has not been needed to date.

“The airplane does quite well at high AOA,” Nelson added, “and the tests have been proceeding smoothly. We went from twenty degrees angle of attack to fifty degrees in only four days of testing.” Nelson and other pilots have also evaluated flying qualities at minus ten degrees AOA, which is the maximum design limit for negative AOA for the airplane. High AOA testing for 2013 will involve a variety of loadings mounted externally.

Loads Testing
Loads testing involves putting the aircraft in highly dynamic conditions to measure the stresses on the airframe and on other components. The tests verify the structural integrity of the F-35 in all flight regimes. Most of the loads testing has been flown on AF-2. US Air Force test pilot Lt. Col. Brent Reinhardt, who has been at the ITF since June 2012, has flown many of these missions.

“Loads missions can be physically demanding,” he said. “Some test points are hard to hit. I am diving at the ground at sixty degrees, doing Mach-one-point-whatever, and pulling 5.6 g’s while doing a roll—all this maneuvering just so we can hit a loads point at given speed and altitude conditions. Depending on the point, a lot of the runs start at Mach 1.3 and at altitudes nearing 50,000 feet. During the rolls, I increase the g’s so the flight test engineers on the ground can determine if we are overstressing any part of the airplane.”

Jennifer Schleifer is one of the flight test engineers who monitors and measures the loads on the aircraft during these test missions. Assigned to AF-2, she arrived at Edwards with the aircraft in May 2010. “We are flying on the edges of the structural envelope,” she explained, “and we have to make sure the airplane does not cross an edge. We spend a lot of time in the control room making sure that we won’t exceed structural limits.”

“We’re flying at Mach 1.6 and at more than seven g’s,” added Reinhardt. In a lot of the loads tests, pilots perform rolling maneuvers at a particular g. “Once we clear out a portion of the envelope at that g, we move to a higher g and repeat the testing process. We are shooting for a continuous g roll for 360 degrees through a certain block of altitude.”

In these maneuvers, the F-35 is often pushed to a very high roll rate, which is around 200 degrees per second.

“Operational pilots will never execute some of the maneuvers we’re performing in the airplane,” said Reinhardt. “But the maneuvers are part of building a flight envelope. We are verifying that the airframe will be fine structurally if it stays within the limits we are testing here.”

When not flying or conducting an actual mission, test pilots and flight test engineers practice the missions in a simulator. “We go to the simulator with a pilot to see if the more challenging loads points are achievable,” added Schleifer. “In the simulator, we can determine what Mach and what altitude the pilot needs to set up a particular run. We easily spend four hours in the simulator for every flight. We often return to the simulator to rehearse the points the morning of the flight. More practice in the simulator translates to greater mission efficiency in the air.”

Mission System Testing
“Flight sciences testing is fun,” Nelson said, “but it has its limits. Once an aircraft is good to nine g’s, it’s good to nine g’s. There’s no updating the flight envelope thereafter. Mission systems, on the other hand, will evolve for the life of the F-35, just as capabilities continue to evolve for the F-22 and F-16.”

Mission system testing deals with how the aircraft detects what is going on around it and how well it conveys that information to the pilot. Mission system tests are used to evaluate the functionality of the various electronic systems and sensors on the aircraft, including communications (datalinks and satellite communications), radar, countermeasures, distributed apertures, and electro-optical targeting.

Mission systems, combined with stealth, define the F-35. They separate fifth generation fighters from previous generation fighters.

“The F-35 was designed as a stealthy sensor platform,” added Reinhardt. “The aircraft can carry two 2,000-pound bombs and two AIM-120s internally. A similarly configured F-16 must carry those bombs and missiles externally, in the wind stream. Plus the F-16 has to add external fuel tanks as well as external targeting and countermeasure pods. These external loads reduce performance. And they increase radar cross section. We have to look at the whole picture when comparing fighters.”

Before mission systems are tested in the F-35s at Edwards, they are checked out on the ground in the mission systems integration laboratory in Fort Worth, Texas, and in the air in the Cooperative Avionics Test Bed (referred to as CATB, or CATbird), which is also based in Fort Worth.

The mission systems fleet at Edwards originally consisted of F-35A AF-3, AF-6, and AF-7. Unlike the flight sciences test aircraft, these three F-35s fly with a full complement of electronic systems and sensors found on operational F-35s. This current fleet will be increased with the three additional F-35s scheduled for delivery in 2013, which will also be used for mission system testing. F-35B BF-17 arrived in March. It was joined by BF-18 in April. CF-8 is expected to arrive later in the year.

“The additional aircraft coming in will help with multi-ship missions,” explained Glass. “As you can imagine, launching four aircraft for a mission at one time with only four aircraft available can be a real challenge even for an operational unit. Having six aircraft should improve our success.”

These multi-ship missions represent the increasing complexity and continuing evolution of mission system testing. Most of the mission system testing performed with the F-35 prior to 2013 involved single aircraft and even single sensors with limited sensor fusion, that is, the process for taking inputs from two or more sensors, combining them, distilling them, and then conveying them in an intuitive form to the pilot.

“At the system level, we are moving from testing individual systems or testing small federated groups of systems to testing fusion, where all of the sensors work together,” explained Capt. Nathan Yerrick, a US Air Force flight test engineer at the Edwards F-35 ITF.

“Eventually we will have all systems on,” Yerrick continued. “In terms of mission profiles, we had single F-35 operations early on. That is, one F-35 would go out with a chase aircraft. Now we are adding another F-35 as wingman, and the two F-35s are flying against multiple, maneuvering targets. In the next year or so, we will have our first four-ship F-35 mission with multiple maneuvering targets.”

Software
Because mission systems are common for the most part across all F-35 variants, the mission system testing done on an F-35A applies to the F-35B and F-35C. Similarly, the software that underlies the evolution is shared.

Capabilities associated with mission systems are being developed in a series of software blocks. Block 1 covers basic functions of the navigation system, the communication systems, and the sensors. With Block 1, the aircraft is limited to subsonic airspeeds, 40,000-foot altitude, 4.5 maximum g force, and eighteen degrees maximum angle of attack. Block 2A covers the Multifunction Advanced Data Link, the current Link-16, the maintenance data link, and a mission debriefing system.

Block 2B, which is the initial warfighting version of the software, adds capabilities associated with air-to-air and air-to-ground missions. It also has the complete set of maintenance functions. With Block 2B, the aircraft can be flown at supersonic speeds (up to Mach 1.2 for B- and C-models); at maximum g force of 5.5 and 7.5 for B- and C-models, respectively; and at maximum angle of attack of fifty degrees. The software also covers various loadings of the AIM-120 air-to-air missile, 2,000-pound JDAM GPS-guided bombs, and 500-pound GBU-12 laser-guided bombs.

Block 3, the full warfighting version of the software, is scheduled to be installed on production F-35s beginning with the ninth production lot, called Low-Rate Initial Production 9, or LRIP 9.

“We will wrap up the last of the mission system testing for Block 2A in summer 2013 and have already started testing 2B in the spring,” explained Eric Schutte, US government mission systems lead engineer at Edwards. “We corrected a lot of issues during our tests with 2A. The electro optical targeting system, for example, is working a lot better now. Link 16 is working well, too. We performed some interoperability tests with Link 16 last December. We will be doing a lot more interoperability testing with Block 2B.

“The software has come a long way,” Schutte added. “This is an incredibly complex airplane. Getting all the systems talking to each other can be a real challenge.”

Weapon Testing
Software updates are also delivering more weapon capability to the F-35. The test aircraft at Edwards began flying with weapons in 2012. The first bomb separation test occurred from F-35A AF-1 on 16 October 2012. The first AMRAAM separation test came three days later. The Edwards F-35 ITF is gearing up for about another twenty weapon drops in a series of weapon delivery accuracy tests for the spring and summer of 2013.

“We’ve done separation tests with the AMRAAM and a GBU-31,” said Bobby Rocha, a weapons integration engineer at the F-35 ITF. “These are the first steps toward actual weapon launch.”

Early weapon tests fall into the flight sciences regime. The initial separation tests are used to verify that the weapon separation characteristics conform to predictions. These initial tests are done on flight sciences aircraft—mostly on AF-1.

“We have a defined envelope for weapon releases,” Rocha noted. “We start with benign releases at higher altitudes, at one g, and at Mach 0.8. Then we come down in altitude and release at increased pressures. After that, we do releases at g forces above and below one g. Some of these test profiles are to establish an envelope so they are conducted at the edge of the operational envelope.”

As the envelope is established, the tests transition to the mission systems aircraft. “The weapon delivery accuracy tests are flown on the mission systems aircraft,” Rocha continued. “The delivery tests will be fairly simple at first. They will determine that the aircraft can hit a target with the weapon. That involves making sure the weapon receives the updates it needs from the aircraft, guides properly, and hits its target. The releases from mission systems aircraft will become more operationally representative and more complex as the testing proceeds.”

Maintenance Evaluations
Besides flight testing, the F-35s operating from Edwards are also being tasked to verify technical data used to maintain the aircraft and to evaluate and test the overall system for maintaining the F-35.

“For technical data, we have a list by US Air Force specialty codes for maintenance actions we want to evaluate,” explained Mary Parker, deputy for logistics at the F-35 ITF. “Whenever we have a maintenance task on the airplane that can be used to verify the technical data, representatives from the US government and Lockheed Martin are right behind the maintenance technicians asking if the techs have the information and the right tools they need. We are making sure that the maintenance task instructions can be performed in the field.”

The Edwards ITF has recently completed evaluations for servicing and towing the aircraft in chemical protection gear as well as for maintaining the engine. The chemical protection gear consists of overgarments, boots, and gas masks. “We are also evaluating weapons loading, which covers loading AMRAAMs and JDAMS into the internal weapon bays while wearing chem gear,” Parker continued. “In an upcoming phase, we will evaluate maintenance items related to low observable restoration. The maintenance personnel will be wearing chem. gear in these evaluations as well.”

Maintenance at the ITF is performed by personnel from Lockheed Martin as well as by civilians and military personnel working for the US Government. Four technicians come from international air forces—two from the Netherlands, one from Norway, and one from Canada.

“In many ways, the F-35 is easier to maintain than the F-16,” said Capt. Terje Vik, a maintenance lead from the Royal Norwegian Air Force. Vik has been at the F-35 ITF since the aircraft first arrived May 2010. “The F-35 has fewer LRUs [line replaceable units] and is more software driven. Normal scheduled maintenance is reduced. And the computer interface replaces a lot of test equipment. The aircraft also has more built-in test capability. Overall, fewer people are required to maintain the F-35.”

Delivering Capability
While the priorities on those flat screen panels positioned at the main entrance may change from day to day, the overarching goal for the F-35 ITF at Edwards remains constant: To deliver a highly capable fighter that is safe and meets all of its requirements.

“The testing we are doing now is focused on delivering capability,” concluded Schwartz. “Ultimately, we are delivering that capability to future generations of fighter pilots who will be operating the F-35.”

RE: F-35 Flight Testing At Edwards

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2013, 09:31
by fang
Is LRIP-5 birds started to fly?
According to Scramble.nl AF-33 (part of LRIP-5) made FF in July 6th
http://forum.scramble.nl/viewtopic.php? ... &start=405

Re: RE: F-35 Flight Testing At Edwards

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2013, 18:56
by neptune
fang wrote:Is LRIP-5 birds started to fly?
According to Scramble.nl AF-33 (part of LRIP-5) made FF in July 6th
http://forum.scramble.nl/viewtopic.php? ... &start=405


I don't have FF, first flight dates on AF-26 and AF-30 in LRIP4. Projecting AF-26&30 to the Eglin squadron.

Typically todate, LM has flown the earlier LRIPs before moving to the next, perhaps that might change??

AN-002 LRIP4 flew FF, first flight on 27 Jun 13 and AF-28 flew FF, first flight on 19 Jun 13.

Any additional updates with photos would be appreciated. :)

RE: Re: RE: F-35 Flight Testing At Edwards

Unread postPosted: 09 Jul 2013, 04:57
by F16VIPER
Does anyone know what are the names of the current test pilots?
Regards

RE: Re: RE: F-35 Flight Testing At Edwards

Unread postPosted: 09 Jul 2013, 06:47
by spazsinbad
F-35 Pilot Roster Then you would have to know who is where when - some retired now etc.

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/gallery_ ... ry_style=3

Re: RE: Re: RE: F-35 Flight Testing At Edwards

Unread postPosted: 10 Jul 2013, 17:46
by neptune
F16VIPER wrote:Does anyone know what are the names of the current test pilots?
Regards


43 Past and Present T.P.s as of 10Jul13. :)

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: F-35 Flight Testing At Edwards

Unread postPosted: 11 Jul 2013, 20:39
by orkss

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: F-35 Flight Testing At Edwards

Unread postPosted: 11 Jul 2013, 21:36
by F16VIPER
That is exactly what I needed thank you very much.