F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln

Unread postPosted: 07 Sep 2017, 22:21
by spazsinbad
BeGeez BeGollee I wonder wot is being tested? Nose Gear Catapulting Arrangements effect on HMDS III anyone? Beuller?
F-35C Lighting II aircraft being tested aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)
04 Sep 2017 DVIDS

PHOTO: "ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 4, 2017) Sailors prepare two F-35C Lightning II aircraft assigned to the Grim Reapers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA 101) to launch on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Abraham Lincoln is underway conducting training after successful completion of carrier incremental availability. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Josue Escobosa/Released) https://www.dvidshub.net/download/image/3744286 (1Mb)
&
https://www.dvidshub.net/download/image/3744297 (1.1Mb)


Source: https://www.dvidshub.net/image/3744297/ ... oln-cvn-72

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 07 Sep 2017, 23:52
by zerion
JPO Fixing F-35 Oxygen, Carrier Landing, Software Glitches: VADM Winter
By SYDNEY J. FREEDBERG JR.
on September 07, 2017 at 2:02 PM

...
The program’s adjusted the helmet display, Winter said. It’s also retrained pilots and made minor adjustments to fix the intense vibration during catapult take-offs (“cat stroke”). There’s no need for a costly and time-consuming redesign of the aircraft’s nose landing gear, as some had thought...

http://breakingdefense.com/2017/09/jpo- ... dm-winter/

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 08 Sep 2017, 00:44
by alloycowboy
zerion wrote:JPO Fixing F-35 Oxygen, Carrier Landing, Software Glitches: VADM Winter
By SYDNEY J. FREEDBERG JR.
on September 07, 2017 at 2:02 PM

...
The program’s adjusted the helmet display, Winter said. It’s also retrained pilots and made minor adjustments to fix the intense vibration during catapult take-offs (“cat stroke”). There’s no need for a costly and time-consuming redesign of the aircraft’s nose landing gear, as some had thought...

http://breakingdefense.com/2017/09/jpo- ... dm-winter/


Zerion..... I think you failed todays reading test. LOL :doh:

From the article:

"Two Navy F-35C squadrons (VFA-101 and VFA-125) now have both sets of fixes and are going through carrier qualifications with them aboard the USS Abraham Lincoln, Winter said. This isn’t a test specially arranged for the F-35 program, he emphasized. It’s pilots going through their routine training, using the improved gear and providing feedback on it.

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 08 Sep 2017, 00:51
by SpudmanWP
"using the improved gear " is talking about the helmet and NOT the nosegear.

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 08 Sep 2017, 01:05
by blindpilot
alloycowboy wrote:From the article:
"Two Navy F-35C squadrons (VFA-101 and VFA-125) ... .. Winter said. This isn’t a test specially arranged for the F-35 program, he emphasized. It’s pilots going through their routine training, using the improved gear and providing feedback on it.


That's actually more encouraging, than any fixes, since it reflects the USN starting to cycle up for operations ... IE. getting pilots qual'ed.

MHO
BP

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 08 Sep 2017, 01:33
by spazsinbad
The imprecision of spokespeople about the F-35 (now the F-35C) and the INABILITY of reporters to clarify potential misunderstandings by either reporting in plain English so that everyone understands or ask spokespersons questions. DUH!?

I reckon conglomerating reporters/spokespeople we have both HMDS & nose gear fixes (if any - which may have been so slight as to not merit detailing by said spokies peeps - I dunno - it gets too difficult very quickly - but sh*t happens eh.).

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 08 Sep 2017, 01:44
by blindpilot
One nugget of info that hopefully is true.
... "Operational testing – run by the Pentagon’s notoriously tough and independent Director of Operational Test & Evaluation – will start in February. Winter doesn’t expect DOT&E to find new software problems, but the program stands ready to fix 3F if necessary."


This is a change from Gilmore's "June at the earliest," and would seem to be ahead of critical "final dots on "I"s and crosses to "T"s," (ie, MDF, available 3F test airframes etc.)

MHO
BP

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 08 Sep 2017, 04:32
by Dragon029
https://insidedefense.com/insider/navy- ... icane-irma

They achieved 1 (apparently very productive) day of testing before having to head back to Norfolk for safety. Very interestingly though:

"They had a very productive day," he said. "We had the test pilots wearing the new helmet with the new organic LED configuration to assess the green-glow fix." Green-glow typically occurs at night and makes it difficult for pilots to see certain objects.

The Navy deems the O-LED helmet "acceptable," but Winter said the new configuration needs to be tested in darker conditions at sea.

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 12 Sep 2017, 22:25
by spazsinbad

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 12 Sep 2017, 22:43
by SpudmanWP
Will someone with better eyes than I see if the launch oscillation looks better?

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 12 Sep 2017, 22:57
by spazsinbad
I was just commenting via e-mail on that aspect however we must remember all current USN catapult jet aircraft do the 'bobble'. What has been minimized as we have been told via TAILHOOK 2017 videos is that reducing the 'holdback' force has reduced the initial up and down which was the problem. No one expects a NObobble catapult methinks. Whether the 'bobble' is better compared to previous 'catapult bobbling' would require some comparison from the same camera angle at the same known aircraft weight at the same known launch conditions otherwise - WOD & endspeed if not a test - but say the problematic CarQual catapult conditions. Believe the pilots (test & otherwise) in the HOOK '17 videos I suggest.

Thanks to 'Dragon029' for the HOOK'17 video excerpts first posted on another thread viewtopic.php?f=22&t=53438&p=376137&hilit=compressed#p376137 this one below explains some cat stuff.

Catapult Ride Quality comments start from minute 2 & 50 seconds....


Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 13 Sep 2017, 10:50
by spazsinbad
LINCOLN olde schoole 4 arrestor wires with barricade sheave empty (just aft of no.4 wire) with F-35C in the 'spaghetti':
"170904-N-UX312-0057 ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 4, 2017) An F-35C Lightning II assigned to the Grim Reapers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101 lands on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Abraham Lincoln is underway conducting training after successful completion of carrier incremental availability. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Herbst/Released) "
STORY: http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=102331
Photos:
http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 2-0057.JPG
&
http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 7-0103.JPG [looks like No.2 wire arrest]

Could be the arrest photos are a series of this one No.2 wire arrest - more photos at the STORY URL above

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 13 Sep 2017, 14:20
by lamoey
spazsinbad wrote:I was just commenting via e-mail on that aspect however we must remember all current USN catapult jet aircraft do the 'bobble'. What has been minimized as we have been told via TAILHOOK 2017 videos is that reducing the 'holdback' force has reduced the initial up and down which was the problem. No one expects a NObobble catapult methinks. Whether the 'bobble' is better compared to previous 'catapult bobbling' would require some comparison from the same camera angle at the same known aircraft weight at the same known launch conditions otherwise - WOD & endspeed if not a test - but say the problematic CarQual catapult conditions. Believe the pilots (test & otherwise) in the HOOK '17 videos I suggest.

Thanks to 'Dragon029' for the HOOK'17 video excerpts first posted on another thread viewtopic.php?f=22&t=53438&p=376137&hilit=compressed#p376137 this one below explains some cat stuff.

Catapult Ride Quality comments start from minute 2 & 50 seconds....



Since we are talking about human comfort, and not aircraft handling qualities, we just need to measure what happens to the pilot. A simple way to do it would be for each of the pilots to have a smartphone, which all have accelerometers these days, in a designated pocket in their flight suites, with an app that records the accelerations they are exposed to during launch. A simple csv file is stored on the phone that can be downloaded every so often. A rig to create a baseline for the accelerometers in each phone would also be needed. I can have that app made for less than $5K.

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 13 Sep 2017, 14:25
by spazsinbad
Can it measure the vertical acceleration? I'm not sure why it is needed though if the problem is solved according to users.

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 13 Sep 2017, 15:30
by krorvik
It sure can. One needs to take into account the precision of those devices though - and the calibration. Unsure how good the measurement would be.

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 13 Sep 2017, 19:38
by lamoey
spazsinbad wrote:Can it measure the vertical acceleration? I'm not sure why it is needed though if the problem is solved according to users.


Yes, I agree, but as you mentioned comparing to other aircraft and loads etc. This would be a cheap way of removing all other very expensive factors from the equation.

krovik wrote:It sure can. One needs to take into account the precision of those devices though - and the calibration. Unsure how good the measurement would be.


How accurate would it need to be? Human perception, or discomfort, which is what we are dealing with, is not an easy thing to clasify either.

On the other hand, if they somehow log the movement of the "smart" helmet, they already have the data available.

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 13 Sep 2017, 19:46
by krorvik
Perhaps humans are the best sensors here :D

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 13 Sep 2017, 21:42
by botsing
krorvik wrote:Perhaps humans are the best sensors here :D

Certain injury will not immediately pop up with human use. RSI for example will usually not show its ugly head within a few months.

So together with proudness and peer pressure I doubt humans are a good sensor for cases like this.

We also do not need super accuracy (like down to 0.01 G). Having used a smartphone to sense g-forces on a track-day I remember it got pretty near the pro rally g-sensors results when we compared.

The only thing I am not sure about is the peak G a smartphone can sense and if that would be accurate enough for measuring the forces of a deck launch.

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 13 Sep 2017, 22:45
by spazsinbad
This 'sensor' thingy has become a storm in a teacup. The 'hard bobble' was only experienced during lightweight catapults when (at moment) new F-35C pilots carrier qualify. Pilots so far have reported that the fix means there is not a problem.

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 14 Sep 2017, 02:54
by popcorn
Lending a hand...

https://www.dvidshub.net/news/248147/ai ... s-f-35-sea

The Air Force’s 33rd Maintenance Squadron provided training and support to F-35C Lightning II operations aboard the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) from Aug. 30 to Sept. 7, 2017.

Two Airmen and two Sailors from the aerospace ground equipment flight and the wheel and tire shop qualified Abraham Lincoln Sailors to operate F-35 support equipment, bringing the U.S. Navy one step closer to initial operations capability.

"We are the most qualified unit to (train these Sailors)," said Staff Sgt. Mark Gower, 33rd MXS wheel and tire technician. "We have been working with this jet the longest because the 33rd Fighter Wing was the first unit to receive the F-35 from the test community."

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 14 Sep 2017, 07:43
by spazsinbad
Bunch of pics here: http://www.sldinfo.com/grim-reapers-onb ... m-lincoln/

Right click on the SLDinfo pic to see properties and copy the URL then remove pixel restriction to get below JPG:

http://www.sldinfo.com/wp-content/uploa ... 746278.jpg
&
http://www.sldinfo.com/wp-content/uploa ... 745831.jpg
&
YEAH BABY! 3 wire: http://www.sldinfo.com/wp-content/uploa ... 746164.jpg

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 14 Sep 2017, 18:49
by spazsinbad
'popcorn' highlighted this article above however my replication of same article is to highlight the details bolded below.
Air Force supplements F-35 at sea
13 Sep 2017 Story by Staff Sgt. Peter Thompson 33rd Fighter Wing/Public Affairs

"The Air Force’s 33rd Maintenance Squadron provided training and support to F-35C Lightning II operations aboard the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) from Aug. 30 to Sept. 7, 2017.

Two Airmen and two Sailors from the aerospace ground equipment flight and the wheel and tire shop qualified Abraham Lincoln Sailors to operate F-35 support equipment, bringing the U.S. Navy one step closer to initial operations capability....

...The Airmen and Sailor’s role extended beyond training for this embark, they were also directly supporting carrier qualification for F-35C pilots.

Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101 and VFA-125 flew six aircraft aboard the Abraham Lincoln to execute initial carrier qualification for 13 pilots, training that cannot be replicated on-shore. This qualification requires pilots to take off and land the jet during day and night operations.

"We do this to learn the capabilities of the aircraft and hone our abilities in a carrier environment," said U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Coulter, VFA-101 instructor pilot. "The training we put in now will allow us to focus on implementing the aircraft as intended in the future."

This is the second time both fighter squadrons have deployed from an aircraft carrier at sea to gain experience using the arresting gears and working with the full complement of flight deck personnel on the ship.

"Every time the F-35 embarks on an aircraft carrier there are many lessons learned," Coulter said. "While we are at sea we are able to accomplish flight deck familiarization for pilots and maintainers alike, while attaining the carrier qualifications we need as pilots and landing signal officers."

The Navy currently has plans for several more underways with the F-35C, where the 33rd MXS will continue to train and qualify Abraham Lincoln maintainers on these systems.

"That’s the whole point of this aircraft being a joint program," Coulter said. "The 33rd MXS is a part of future integration of the F-35C and all of the U.S. Navy carriers. It comes down to being prepared at all times for whatever we are tasked with. Once the F-35C reaches Initial Operational Capability, it will be a tool at the Navy's disposal. We will be ready to sustain this aircraft's operations so we can carry out the mission sets we are directed to.""

Source: https://www.dvidshub.net/news/248147/ai ... s-f-35-sea

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 23 Oct 2017, 20:17
by mrbuno
Does anyone know the BuNos of the aircraft that were on board, especially the two VFA-125 aircraft?

VFA-101
169305 NJ-101
169161 NJ-122
169163 NJ-124
169304 NJ-127

VFA-125
NJ-406
NJ-411

(underlined BuNos are from http://forum.scramble.nl/viewtopic.php?p=878553, second post.)

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 24 Oct 2017, 21:09
by spazsinbad
I'm searching DVIDS and boy do they have a lot of misinformed comments for their photos. Anyhoo here is a zoom of NJ 411 but cannot read BuNo. https://www.dvidshub.net/image/3744287/ ... oln-cvn-72

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 25 Oct 2017, 01:00
by spazsinbad
Here is BuNo for NJ 412 is 169303 - so probably BuNo for NJ 411 is one less number 169302?

viewtopic.php?f=62&t=16223&p=379363&hilit=169303#p379363

download/file.php?id=25712

Image

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 25 Oct 2017, 13:22
by mrbuno
spazsinbad wrote:Here is BuNo for NJ 412 is 169303 - so probably BuNo for NJ 411 is one less number 169302?

Thanks spazsinbad, I was thinking the same, also because 169302 was previously NJ-125, but I haven't seen pictures of it since December 2016. It quite possible it is indeed NJ-411 now. A candidate for NJ-406 could be 169160. 169160 was flying as NJ-121, but I haven't seen it since August 2016.

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 16 Dec 2017, 02:26
by zerion
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Completes First F-35C Carrier Qualification


The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) successfully completed Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) Carrier Qualifications for the F-35C Lightning II program, carrier qualifying the first nine fleet aviators in the new aircraft, while underway Dec. 7-11.

Along with Abraham Lincoln, the "Rough Raiders" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 125, the "Grim Reapers" of VFA-101, and VX-9 accomplished many first steps including first-time use of Autonomic Logistic Information System (ALIS) aboard a carrier, and use of the Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS) in an operational setting.

"Thanks to the tireless work from the VFA-125, VFA-101, VX-9, CVN72, and the Lockheed Team this detachment was able to successfully complete numerous milestones that will set the foundation for the future 5th generation employment of the F-35C into the Carrier Air Wing," said Cmdr. Scott Hulett, VFA-125 executive officer.

One of those milestones achieved was with ALIS, an information infrastructure that allows operators to plan, maintain, and sustain systems over the F-35Cs. The system provides a secure way to transmit up-to-date operations, maintenance, prognostic, support, training and technical data to users and technicians worldwide. According to Lockheed Martin, the developer of the F-35C, ALIS is considered the IT backbone of current and future aircraft throughout the Department of Defense.

USS Abraham Lincoln CVN 72 Completes First F 35C Carrier Qualification 2ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dec. 10, 2017) An F-35C Lightning II assigned to the "Rough Raiders" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 125 approaches the flight deck for landing during flight operations aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Juan

Abraham Lincoln operated in inclement weather during portion of the qualification process, which gave the squadrons varying condition to test the new landing system, JPALS. The all-weather system works with the ship's navigation system to provide accurate and reliable guidance for the aircraft. Prior to this underway, F-35Cs only used JPALS for developmental testing.

While the pilots put new systems to the test in the air, Abraham Lincoln Sailors, both on and below deck achieved important milestones. The aircraft intermediate maintenance department performed their first unassisted F-35C tire change. This accomplishment provided proven capabilities that will help ensure full and successful integration of the air wing with Abraham Lincoln.

"We could not have achieved our lofty goals without the dedication and expertise from everyone involved. We look forward to working with the CVN72 team throughout 2018 as we continue to ensure 5th generation power projection from the sea," said Hulett.

By 2025, the Navy's aircraft carrier air wings are forecasted to consist of F-35C, F/A-18E/F Super Hornets, EA-18G Growlers electronic attach aircraft, E-2D Hawkeye battle management and control aircraft, MH-60R/S helicopters and Carrier Onboard Delivery logistics aircraft.

https://www.navyrecognition.com/index.p ... ation.html

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 18 Dec 2017, 20:17
by spazsinbad
Is it just me - the hilariously wrong captions on some USN photos are a joke SHIRLEY - no one seems to check or know sh*t.
F-35C Aviators Carrier Qualify Aboard USS Abraham Lincoln
18 Dec 2017 Ben Werner

"...while Abraham Lincoln was underway, nine F-35C aviators with the “Rough Raiders” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 125, the “Grim Reapers” of VFA-101, and VX-9 carrier qualified in the Navy’s first stealth fighter. In October, F-35C aviators qualified aboard USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70), according to a Navy spokesperson....

...Below deck on Abraham Lincoln, the aircraft intermediate maintenance department performed their first unassisted F-35C tire change, according to a statement released by the Navy. The tire change is considered significant, the Navy statement explained, because the accomplishment suggests the airwing will successfully integrate with Abraham Lincoln."

photo: "An F-35C Lightning II assigned to the Grim Reapers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101 lands on the flight deck of aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Abraham Lincoln is underway conducting training after successful completion of carrier incremental availability. US Navy Photo" https://news.usni.org/wp-content/upload ... 95-3-2.jpg


Source: https://news.usni.org/2017/12/18/f-35c- ... am-lincoln

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 03 Apr 2018, 22:53
by spazsinbad


When the head head bobbin' comes bob bobbin' along.... [apologies to 'Red Red Robin' song] :devil:


Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 03 Apr 2018, 23:21
by alloycowboy
Question, what does "FTCE" stand for? "FTCE Dustin Canada" is written on nose gear door and google doesn't know what FTCE stands for.

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 03 Apr 2018, 23:28
by spazsinbad
Screenshot from first video above. It is a VX-23 test aircraft so I guess FT=Flight Test CE=Chief Engineer? from ITF slang.

Gargle Flight Test Chief Engineer F-35C ITF or similar (+ words such as Patuxent River NAS etc.) for hits a plenty almost.

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 04 Apr 2018, 00:14
by quicksilver
Flight Test Control Engineer

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 04 Apr 2018, 02:44
by johnwill
quicksilver is right. At Edwards, the FTCE is the link between flight test engineering and the airplane hands-on maintenance crew. Flight test engineering supplies the FTCE all maintenance items to be worked, test instrumentation changes, store loadings, and any other configuration changes needed before the next test flight. The ground crews do all the work and the FTCE signs off on it before the airplane is released for flight. I am assuming the Navy has a similar or identical system.

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 04 Apr 2018, 17:59
by ricnunes
It would be quite comical if that name would be:

"FTCE Justin Canada" :mrgreen:

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 04 Apr 2018, 19:34
by sferrin
spazsinbad wrote:
When the head head bobbin' comes bob bobbin' along.... [apologies to 'Red Red Robin' song] :devil:



Jeez, they still haven't fixed that? :-?

Re: F-35C being test aboard aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lin

Unread postPosted: 04 Apr 2018, 19:47
by spazsinbad
That is an old video - probably there is a recent video that may show less bobbin' but who knows which aircraft have been altered to lessen this issue. Also I see some 'no head abobbin' catapults' because I guess the aircraft is HEAVY or has been altered but HOW CAN I KNOW? I don't.