F-35 Makes First Transatlantic Crossing

Production milestones, roll-outs, test flights, service introduction and other milestones.
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neptune

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Unread post03 Jun 2016, 14:47

yeswepromise wrote:they're there


Thanks!, no news was good news.... :)
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Unread post23 Jun 2016, 19:57

Crossing the Pond [TWO PAGE PDF ATTACHED]
July 2016 Riccardo Niccoli & Kees van der Mark; Air International Magazine

INSERT: Parlare Italiano by Riccardo Niccoli

"Major Gianmarco Di Loreto, Chief Project Pilot for the Italian F-35 programme, speaks exclusively to AIR International....

...What is piloting the F-35 like?
The flight controls are exceptional, very well harmonised, and as a whole the aircraft is very intuitive to the pilot. In addition, the flight controls are designed to change their control laws when in landing configuration, when the aircraft automatically makes itself set [engine included] to follow the pilot’s input coming just from the side stick. This also happens during in-flight refuelling, when all the control surfaces are positioned in order to create more drag, and allow the pilot, with a higher engine setting, to use the power more quickly. The aircraft is speedy, keeps its energy well, and has low fuel consumption. At Luke, for example, we flew 90-minute long missions, and landed because it was necessary to allow other training missions to fly, not because we were low on gas. What can surprise is the fact that even with armament in the internal hold, the aircraft endurance changes very little.

In flight, the F-35 is optimised for high subsonic speeds and is always on the edge [of its flight envelope]. When it manoeuvres, even at low G, it buffets, which in my opinion helps the pilot to instinctively understand which zone of the flight envelope he or she is in....

...Can you tell us about the transatlantic flight, a remarkable first for Italy, that you had the honour and responsibility to plan and carry out?
The most difficult aspect of the transatlantic flight was the planning phase: to consider and evaluate all elements of the puzzle, and ensure nothing was forgotten that could pose a potential source of risk or danger. The biggest problem was to draw a route that, in the event of an emergency, made it possible to reach an alternate airport. It was also crucial to determine which cases would allow the flight to continue in the event of a small emergency, and when circumstances deemed it necessary turn back to the airport of departure. The aircraft flight manuals were a big help, but remember that no such flight had been accomplished before with an F-35. We also had to consider the characteristics of the various aircraft included in the mission [F-35, KC-767, Typhoon], their in-flight refuelling requirements, management of the two tankers in case of an emergency, the logistical needs and be prepared for any kind of scenario that could develop. For example, having a Typhoon as chase aircraft was necessary, so Captain Mangini, the other Italian F-35 pilot, was there to help me [also with the checklist] in case of an emergency, and also to have a radar-equipped aircraft alongside. My aircraft had not completed the necessary check tests on the radar because it was the first APG-81 radar system fitted in an F-35 outside the United States. The flight was divided into two legs, the first from Italy to Lajes [Azores Island], about a six-hour leg, with three in-flight refuellings. The second leg was from Lajes to Naval Air Station Patuxent River [Portsmouth, New Hampshire, for the Typhoon chase aircraft], about a seven-hour leg, with four in-flight refuellings. Near the end, we were getting tired and the last refuelling took place in the clouds, with bad weather, which wasn’t simple. We flew at FL270 [27,000ft], at Mach 0.75, lower than what’s possible for the F-35 and KC-767, in order to allow mixed refuelling, also with the hose and drogue system for the Typhoon.

Everything went well. The F-35 showed no problems at all."

Source: Air International Magazine July 2016 Vol.91 No.1
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Italian Pilot from F-35 Dutch & Italian Pond Cross Air International July 2016 2pp.pdf
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RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post23 Jun 2016, 20:11

[quote="spazsinbad.Crossing the Pond.[/quote]

Any hope of the finding the pilot's names of the transatlantic flights for Italian Air Force AL-2/3?? to Luke AFB.

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Unread post25 Jul 2016, 22:32

Now AL-1, AL-2 and AL-3 are at Luke AFB, does anyone know if they are assigned to 61/62 FS? Like how the Norwegian F-35's are assigned to 62 FS and Australian F-35's to 61 FS. Or perhaps 13º Gruppo, since they're flying with 32-xx codes?
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Unread post30 Sep 2016, 11:02

This video could go in several threads however early on it does show the F-35Bs en route to UK - there are other scenes....

RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post02 Oct 2016, 06:02

Eight Page PDF of article attached...
LIGHTNING STRIKES IN THE UK
Sep 2016 Jamie Hunter, Combat Aircraft Magazine

"...Three Lockheed Martin F-35B Lightning IIs — two US Marine Corps examples and a single British jet (BuNos 168726/VM-18 and 168727/VM-19 of Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 and ZM137, c/n BK-03) — arrived at RAF Fairford, England, at 19.10hrs on June 29, accompanied by a pair of US Air Force KC‑10A Extenders. The F-35 flight used the call sign ‘Tabor 01’ and came direct from Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, South Carolina. Three USAF F-35As from the 56th Fighter Wing (FW) at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, arrived two days later (serials 12‑5042, 12-5052 and 12-5058)....

...Marine Corps update
The Marine Corps is rapidly expanding its F-35B footprint. Speaking at RIAT, Lt Gen Jon ‘Dog’ Davis, the deputy commandant for Marine Aviation, said: ‘Getting the airplane here [means] we are able to test moving the F-35B across the Atlantic Ocean. It’s also the first time we put a [vertical landing] expeditionary pad out for F-35Bs, so getting ‘the tin’ laid down is important. We brought it over and then had to build it here. We are going to take it apart and take it home with us....

...Talking up the capabilities
The UK deployment saw both the F-35Bs flying a ‘role demonstration’, including vertical landings on the austere pad that was installed at Fairford....

...Little was made of the much-publicized air combat scenarios that have been flown against ‘legacy’ fighters, such as F-16s. The USAF F-35A Heritage Flight pilot, Maj Will Andreotta, stated simply: ‘We have made a point of flying with the F-16s at Luke’. He went on: ‘We’ve been flying BFM [basic fighter maneuvers] for some time, and it handles the way we want it to handle. I have complete confidence in this aircraft’.

Rusnok offered a little more information. ‘It’s more of a high-alpha fighter, and that tends to be where we go. It’s more like the F/A-18 in terms of flying qualities, and from what we’ve seen in development and operational test, 7g is going to be more than sufficient’. His latter point referred to the F-35B’s 7g limit as opposed to 7.5g for the Navy F-35C and 9g for the USAF F-35A.

‘We have a lot going on’, said Rusnok of his current tasking on VMX-1. Following the UK detachment, the unit was preparing to deploy to Eglin AFB, Florida, for an AIM-120 AMRAAM missile shot, and this fall it will join the development test team aboard the USS America for the third embarked period of testing during the DT-3 phase. ‘We are going to take deployable ALIS [the F-35’s Autonomic Logistics Information System] onto the ship for the first time, and generally build shipboard experience.’

The integrated test team will utilize a combined fleet of aircraft from both developmental and operational test sides of the program. ‘They [the DT team] will be going out after test points, flying in wacky winds, high sea states, or with asymmetric loads. It’s a good example of integrated test because we will then use the open-windows operational test-type things.

‘We are actually looking for bad weather in DT-3’, Rusnok revealed. ‘We had incredibly good weather for DT-1 and 2, so we are going after higher sea states. We are going to the West Coast out of San Diego and will intentionally find bad weather.’..."

Source: Combat Aircraft September 2016 Vol 17 No 9
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F-35s in UK Combat Aircraft Sep 2016 pp8.pdf
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RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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