F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 20 Sep 2015, 17:13
by spazsinbad
Because this F-35 Forum Sub Section does state 'test flights' (not just 'milestone test flights') my thot is to continue but with a new thread about F-35C DT-II due to start next month. So here is the beginning.....
2015 STRIKE TEST NEWS
2015 VX-23 LCDR Daniel “Tonto” Kitts

"...F-35C Carrier Suitability (continued)
The Pax River ITF team is now in heavy preparation for F-35C DT-II. Shore-based catapults and arrested landings are prerequisites for DT-II and modification to the jet that incorporated the hardware for the GEN III helmet HMD is undergoing “Shake, Rattle, and Roll” tests. Additionally, the team is conducting a structural survey with [intentional] mis-serviced landing gear on the aircraft.

The goal of DT-II will be to complete the Aircraft Launch and Recovery Bulletins. Additional at-sea tests include afterburner catapult shots, DFP performance with a 4-degree glideslope, completion of catapult minimum energy shots, and night arrested landings. The completion of all of the DT-II objectives and the shore-based mis-serviced landing gear tests will clear the envelope for operational users to conduct day and night carrier qualifications.

The pace of testing will remain high as the F-35C Carrier Suit team prepares for the final developmental test at-sea period (DT-III) in 2016 and for USN IOC. In the meantime, various loadings of external stores will require a significant amount of shore-based catapults and arrested landings at Patuxent River and Lakehurst."

Source: http://issuu.com/nawcad_pao/docs/striketest2015_single (PDF 3.6Mb)

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 23 Sep 2015, 03:11
by spazsinbad
Gettin' in the mood 21 Jul 2015 ZOOMed
F-35C Arrest Test https://www.flickr.com/photos/lockheedm ... ateposted/
CF-5 during arrestment testing at NAS Patuxent River. July 21, 2015
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lockheedm ... 4/sizes/o/ Original 1.3Mb JPG

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 23 Sep 2015, 23:03
by spazsinbad
Part of the original post from here by 'tritonprime' repeated below: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=14115&p=303439&hilit=round#p303439
U.S. Navy's F-35 test to include new helmet, full weapons load
23 Sep 2015 Andrea Shalal

"The U.S. Navy's next round of carrier testing of the Lockheed Martin Corp F-35C stealth fighter jet will include new helmets and jets fully loaded with internal weapons, a company official told Reuters.

During the tests, scheduled for the first two weeks of October, two F-35s will also test the Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS), an all-weather, GPS-guided landing system being designed by Raytheon Co, Lockheed's F-35 program manager, Lorraine Martin, said in an interview....

...She said the U.S. government is providing information about the aircraft to other countries, identified by sources familiar with the program as Singapore, Belgium, Switzerland, Poland, Finland and Spain.... [Any F-35Bs?]

...The U.S. Navy, which carried out the first round of at-sea testing on the USS Nimitz last November, plans to have an initial squadron of jets ready for combat by late 2018 or early 2019.

Martin said the jets' performance during the first round of carrier testing had helped build confidence in the program.

This time, one Lockheed and three government pilots will be using the jet's improved Generation-3 helmet, which is already being used for testing on land. They will fly with a full store of internal weapons and full fuel tanks to test the jet's performance at higher weights. There are no plans to fire the weapons, officials said.

U.S. defense officials said the tests would also include catapult takeoffs with after-burner power,[I'm not sure if I heard correctly OR LM F-35C test pilot said during brief at TAILHOOK 2015 that the pilot lights the after burner after the first night catapult 'because he got scared' (or words to that effect). Perhaps he was just joking.] more night approaches and landings, engine runs for maintainers and other parameters aimed at creating conditions that are more similar to combat.

They said the tests would not include a portable version of the F-35's complex, computer-based logistics system, with the data required to be relayed via communications links instead."

Source: http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/09/ ... 7F20150923


Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 25 Sep 2015, 01:56
by spazsinbad
For the LOLs - Arsey F-35Bs on CVeNs VIDEO - remember clench when Laffing....


Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 25 Sep 2015, 03:11
by popcorn
HAHAHA.. made my morning..n

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 25 Sep 2015, 03:18
by spazsinbad
This is how difficult it used to be - back in early 1950s - aboard HMAS Sydney for example (remember these just baduns). Then along came all the 'amazing' (even today) tech that enabled 124 traps out of 124 attempts hook down for F-35C test.


Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 25 Sep 2015, 05:49
by jessmo111
Spaz regarding the scared comment. Is it natural to err on the side of caution, in a unfamiliar jet, in a night enviorment?
Do most guys, just kick in AV to be safe either way? Im sure the plane can cat launch without it.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 25 Sep 2015, 06:09
by spazsinbad
I think I have said what I think earlier. However to elaborate and bear in mind we can only guess on the extremely limited one liner tossed aside probably as a joke but with some truth in it nevertheless. Keep in mind AS THE LM TEST PILOT SAYs:
"...No Moon, Overcast, Rain, 1,100 foot ceiling..."

It is likely that all the test pilots involved in CVN F-35C testing have carried out NIGHT catapults ashore - however again I can only guess. Seems to me to be prudent to have at least that one chap having done so for the likelihood - as demoed. And he did it twice. Given any misgivings for whatever reason: W/X; HMDS & 1st Time these chaps went ahead confidently.

There is nothing blacker than a low cloud base without any apparent moonlight below with the CVN most likely not providing any glow once ahead of said ship during catapulting. These circumstances - ALONG WITH THE KNOWN ISSUES WITH HMDS II - make DISORIENTATION - no matter how slight - a real possibility. And again I stress - I'm ONLY GUESSing.

IF the burner was not briefed for the first night catapult test then the test pilot took initiative to light it for whatever reason. You can read in the other thread where I thought perhaps this was the delayed full burner during/after catapult function kicking in (again that can only have ever been a guess).

Reporters or someone with the knowledge about that particular first night F-35C catapult shot will have to make the facts known. Personally I see it neither here nor there. A first of anything on a black night catapult will likely 'feel' a lot better and 'look' a lot better with the full burner lighting up. On a thread or two I have outlined my own severe disorientation one black night during catapulting an A4G with even more G force for extra disorientation effect than that of the F-35C longer catapult stroke. But again that is really neither here nor there in the great scheme of things. It is a known issue - disorientation - and one does what is necessary to alleviate same safely and get on with it. Seems like that happened and it is just a jokey comment. Navy Pilots are prone to jokes. Did you hear him say at the beginning "I'm from LM and I'm here to help"?

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 25 Sep 2015, 06:20
by jessmo111
Here is to hoping the final version of the helmet does alot to alleviate, disorientation. Seeing as how the thing is SUPPOSED to turn night into day, and allow you to do the wiz bang, Star trek see through the plane thing.
When there is an Class-A mishap ( and god forbid knock on wood) I feel sorry for the poor guy watching the ocean get closer through the airframe.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 25 Sep 2015, 06:39
by spazsinbad
As I predict one can doom and gloom all one wishes however we know already that HMDS III is going to the CVN for the next round of testing next month October 2015. This would not be happening if there was an HMDS problem. And ANY PILOT can become disorientation for a zillion reasons - even in daytime. This has been mentioned on the other threads about this topic (search on 'disorientation' for example). And as has been made clear by 'quicksilver' the pilots are NOT looking through the floor during flat deck ops (although they may catch a glimpse for a VL at the beginning height). And we know that the F-35B/C test pilots are looking at these issues from their latest newsletter VX-23 Strike Test News 2015.

Here is the link: viewtopic.php?f=62&t=16223&p=302954&hilit=Strike#p302954
2015 STRIKE TEST NEWS
2015 VX-23 Maj John “Ike” Dirk

"...Mission Systems
The F-35 ITF tests four SDD aircraft fully equipped with production-representative mission systems. Aircraft modifications are ongoing to continue testing on Block 3i and 3F capabilities including the GEN III HMD.

The GEN III HMD features improved stability, more accurate bore sighting, and improved night performance. In place of traditional Night Vision Goggles, the helmet-mounted night vision camera aids night operations for the F-35. The GEN III HMD also features a higher resolution camera than previous HMDs. This new system enables the electronic removal of the aircraft canopy bow from the scene by using a new fixed camera installed within the aircraft. Aided aerial refueling, simulated expeditionary airfield operations, and shipboard operations with the GEN III HMD are ongoing and are demonstrating promising results for acuity, clarity, and stability...."

Source: http://issuu.com/nawcad_pao/docs/striketest2015_single (PDF 3.6Mb)


Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 25 Sep 2015, 09:22
by spazsinbad
F-35C Completes First Night Flight Aboard Aircraft Carrier viewtopic.php?f=57&t=26634&p=281607&hilit=Dyckman#p281607
14 Nov 2014 Commander Naval Air Forces, Public Affairs

"...Navy test pilot Lt. Cmdr. Ted "Dutch" Dyckman piloted F-35C test aircraft CF-03 for the inaugural night flight, taking off from USS Nimitz (CVN 68). At 6:01 p.m. Dyckman conducted a series of planned touch and goes before making an arrested landing at 6:40 pm...."

Source: http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84456

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 25 Sep 2015, 21:02
by XanderCrews
jessmo111 wrote:Here is to hoping the final version of the helmet does alot to alleviate, disorientation. Seeing as how the thing is SUPPOSED to turn night into day, and allow you to do the wiz bang, Star trek see through the plane thing.
When there is an Class-A mishap ( and god forbid knock on wood) I feel sorry for the poor guy watching the ocean get closer through the airframe.



Disorientation happens with current NVG and of course the naked eye, but we don't mention that because only the F-35 has issues

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 26 Sep 2015, 01:10
by spazsinbad
Here are the 40 pages of the PDF of Strike Test News Sep 2015 attached: http://issuu.com/nawcad_pao/docs/striketest2015_single

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 29 Sep 2015, 09:10
by spazsinbad
Navy to test F-35C Lighting II aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower
28 Sep 2015 Todd Corillo

"...The second developmental test phase of the F-35C Lightning II aircraft will begin aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower on Monday, October 5, 2015.

Two F-35Cs are scheduled to conduct the training on the Eisenhower through October 15.

According to Naval Air Force Atlantic, the testing will include day and night carrier qualifications, night operations with the Generation III Helmet Mounted Display, Delta Flight Path testing as well as F-35 Joint Precision Approach and Landing System testing...."

Source: http://wtkr.com/2015/09/28/navy-to-test ... isenhower/

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 03 Oct 2015, 18:56
by KamenRiderBlade

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 03 Oct 2015, 19:02
by KamenRiderBlade
Landing on a wet deck amongst a cloudy overcast day. You can't ask for a more beautiful shot to film.

The very wet deck also proves the F-35C's deck landing capability in not ideal conditions

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 03 Oct 2015, 19:06
by spazsinbad
8) :drool: :devil: FARK! Thanks for that 'KRB' I did not realise the F-35C could do an SRVL to a wet deck! Thank goodness for slow landings for that first sequence. :mrgreen: :doh: :roll: [Rewatched video to see they catch No.2 - target - wire, as per post below]
F-35C Lightning II Flexes Sea Legs, Boards USS Eisenhower for Second Phase of Developmental Test
03 Oct 2015 U.S. Navy PR

"Two F-35C Lightning II carrier variants conducted their first arrested landings aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) off the coast of the eastern United States on Oct. 2.

U.S. Navy test pilots Cmdr. Tony "Brick" Wilson and LT Chris "TJ" Karapostoles landed F-35C test aircraft CF-03 and CF-05, respectively, aboard USS Eisenhower's flight deck. The arrested landing is part of the F-35's two week at-sea Developmental Testing (DT-II) phase.

DT-II is the second of three at-sea test phases planned for the F-35C. Naval aircraft undergo DT-I, -II and -III test phases in order to ensure the development of aircraft that meet specifications and to identify mission critical issues sufficiently early in the test phase to deliver fully capable aircraft in time for their scheduled initial operating capability (IOC).

During DT-I in 2014, the F-35 Lightning II made aviation history when it conducted its inaugural arrested landings and catapult launches aboard an aircraft carrier. The first-ever carrier-based flight operations of the F-35C occurred Nov. 3 aboard USS Nimitz (CVN 68). F-35C test pilots and engineers from the F-35 Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force (ITF) based at Naval Air Station Patuxent River in Patuxent River, Maryland, tested the suitability and integration of the aircraft with carrier air and deck operations in an at-sea environment Nov. 3-14. The F-35C demonstrated exceptional performance both in the air and on the flight deck, accelerating the team's progress through the DT-I schedule, achieving 100 percent of the threshold test points three days early and conducting night ops during DT-I - an unheard of feat since the Navy's F-4 era. Test pilots and engineers credited the F-35C's Delta Flight Path (DFP) technology with significantly reducing pilot workload during the approach to the carrier, increasing safety margins during carrier approaches and reducing touchdown dispersion.

"The follow-on sea trials of the F-35C are possible through the cooperation and teamwork of the USS Eisenhower," said Andrew Maack, Chief Test Engineer and Government Site Director of the Naval Variants ITF. "The men and women of the Eisenhower have partnered with the Pax River ITF test team in pursuit of a common goal - testing the F-35C in the at-sea environment. Together, their expertise and full measure of hard work and dedication will equip us with the data necessary to determine the path ahead for the F-35C."

The F-35C will perform a variety of operational maneuvers during DT-II - including catapult takeoffs and arrested landings - while simulating maintenance operations and conducting general maintenance and fit tests for the aircraft and support equipment. Following the analysis of DT-II test data, the team will conduct a thorough assessment of the F-35C's performance in the shipboard environment before advising the Navy on any adjustments necessary to ensure that the fifth-generation fighter is ready to meet its scheduled IOC in 2018...."

PHOTO: https://www.f35.com/assets/uploads/imag ... __main.jpg

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/f-35c-l ... nd-phase-o

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 03 Oct 2015, 21:15
by spazsinbad
F-35C Lightning Boards Ike for Developmental Testing
03 Oct 2015 Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Hillary Browning, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Public Affairs

"...The purpose of DT-II is to test the suitability and integration of the F-35C in an at-sea environment. The F-35 Patuxent River Integrated Test Force (ITF) will run through a series of tests designed to increase the aircraft's operability at sea. The Ike crew partnered with the Patuxent River ITF test team to ensure the ship was prepared to receive the aircraft.

"We brought a team from the Eisenhower to Patuxent River about two months ago," said Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 Navy test pilot Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Kitts. "We have a steam catapult built into our runway. We took some steps with the crew here to bring them up to speed by training them on the F-35 to get them a little bit more familiar with our aircraft."

The F-35C will perform a variety of operational maneuvers during DT-II while simulating maintenance operations and conducting general maintenance and fit tests for the aircraft and support equipment.

Following the analysis of DT-II test data, the team will conduct a thorough assessment of the F-35C's performance in the shipboard environment before advising the Navy on any adjustments necessary to ensure the fifth-generation fighter is ready to meet its scheduled IOC in 2018.

"The goal of this test phase is to find out how we can expand the envelope in which this aircraft works in an effective and safe fashion," Kitts said. "We have a huge team working on this, and I know that each time I get in this aircraft it's the culmination of a lot of people's hard work."

The F-35C - the Navy's and Marine Corps' carrier-suitable variant (CV) - combines unprecedented at-sea stealth with fighter speed and agility, fused targeting, cutting-edge avionics, advanced jamming, network-enabled operations and advanced sustainment. With a broad wingspan, reinforced landing gear, ruggedized structures and durable coatings, the F-35C will stand up to harsh shipboard conditions. The avionics also equip the pilot with real-time, spherical access to battlespace information and commanders at sea-in the air and on the ground-with an instantaneous, high-fidelity single picture view of ongoing operations.

"The Ike crew is very interested," Kitts said. "The Sailors are really curious about the F-35C and a lot of them have really great questions and we encourage them to ask. These Sailors are who we're working for to get this aircraft ready to be in the fleet so they can use it."..."

PHOTO: http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 75-027.JPG [UFO at the ramp for barricade] :mrgreen:

Source: http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=91357

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 03 Oct 2015, 21:28
by spazsinbad
Not all 'cross deck pendants' (arrestor wires/wires) set for arrival - confident buggas. NIMITZ class graphic from:

[ADDITION: According to the 'snag 2 wire report' below http://www.dodbuzz.com/2015/10/03/video ... r-testing/ ) we can see in the pitcha that No.4 wire is the last one with the barricade sheave and then No.3 wire not connected with the F-35C pulling out No.2 wire.]

http://www.military.tomsk.ru/forum/down ... hp?id=7976 [no longer exists]

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/705/2191 ... 1e_o_d.jpg (Lockheed Martin photo by Andrew McMurtrie)

Photo Album: F-35C Sea Trials 2015 The purpose of CVN DT-II is to test F-35C in the at-sea environment

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lockheedm ... 7081973804 &
"F-35C Sea Trials Aboard USS Eisenhower- Day 1
An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 makes an arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), as part of the second C-variant at-sea ship trials. The purpose of CVN DT-II is to test F-35C carrier suitability and integration in the at-sea environment. Learn more: bit.ly/1Oe953l (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Utah Kledzik/Released)"

Photo: https://farm1.staticflickr.com/776/2172 ... 54_o_d.jpg (CROPPED)

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 03 Oct 2015, 23:15
by spazsinbad
:devil: At least someone is fretting for the rest of us about the safety of the USN F-35C test pilots. BZ. :doh:

http://snafu-solomon.blogspot.com.au/20 ... icane.html

Little does SNAFUboybli realise that a CVN - FAST - can go places - FAST - where weather is much much more betta. :roll:

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 04 Oct 2015, 01:23
by KamenRiderBlade
spazsinbad wrote::devil: At least someone is fretting for the rest of us about the safety of the USN F-35C test pilots. BZ. :doh:

http://snafu-solomon.blogspot.com.au/20 ... icane.html

Little does SNAFUboybli realise that a CVN - FAST - can go places - FAST - where weather is much much more betta. :roll:


The idiots on that forum.

So many face palms -_-

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 04 Oct 2015, 03:51
by spazsinbad
Looks as though 'maus92' was successful - storm veers away from land - difficult to tell from dunnunder. As always sturm und drang has own mind - mind. Kinda takes the wind outta dem sails of wolof BLOWhardsBloggers. :mrgreen: ChickenLittle - always pissin' into dat wind. :mrgreen: Snafoot Doubles down here: http://snafu-solomon.blogspot.com.au/20 ... rials.html
Navy: Fleet to remain ready to set sail for storm, but will likely not need to
02 Oct 2015 Dianna Cahn

"The Navy is keeping its Atlantic fleet on the ready in case ships need to set sail to ride out the hurricane at sea.

But with new storm projections showing Hurricane Joaquin veering away from land as it makes its way up the Atlantic Coast this weekend, it’s unlikely the ships will be called on to get underway.

“It looks like they are going to stay in port,” Fleet Forces spokeswoman Lt. Stephanie Turo said.

This can change, Turo said, as the storm nears and projections are updated. But right now, she said, the commander of Fleet Forces, Adm. Phil Davidson, wanted the ships ready just in case.

On Thursday, the Navy set sortie conditions to "B" meaning ships should be ready to set sail within 24 hours. That condition remains."

Source: http://hamptonroads.com/2015/10/navy-fl ... y-not-need

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 04 Oct 2015, 04:39
by spazsinbad
F-35C is At Sea for its 2nd Developmental Test (DT-II)
03 Oct 2015 DefUp

"...Naval aircraft undergo DT-I, -II and -III test phases in order to ensure the development of aircraft that meet specifications and to identify mission critical issues sufficiently early in the test phase to deliver fully capable aircraft in time for their scheduled initial operating capability (IOC)....
Photo & Caption: "Two F-35Cs from the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 are conducting follow-on developmental test (DT-II) sea trials aboard the Eisenhower. Cmdr. Tony “Brick” Wilson flew aircraft 73/CF-03 (pictured above) and Lt. Chris “TJ” Karapostoles flew aircraft 75/CF-05. Photo: Andrew McMurtrie, Lockheed Martin" http://defense-update.com/wp-content/up ... son450.jpg


Source: http://defense-update.com/20151003_f35dt_2.html

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 04 Oct 2015, 04:49
by spazsinbad
Navy F-35Cs Return To The Carrier For More Development Flights
03 Oct 2015 TiredRogerAway

"The Navy and Joint Strike Fighter team have gone back to the carrier for further test, integration and development flights with the F-35C. Two of the jets landed aboard the USS Eisenhower yesterday for what will be two weeks of at-sea trials. Their arrival was a wet one, a rare occasion for the F-35 which is usually seen flying in fair weather conditions...."

[Addition: According to this report below ( http://www.dodbuzz.com/2015/10/03/video ... r-testing/ ) in the pitcha below we look at the F-35C between No.1 wire on the right and No.2 wire on the left - about to 'snag No.2 wire'.]

Photo: http://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/ima ... 626004.jpg

Source: http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/navy-f ... 1734493443

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 04 Oct 2015, 05:14
by spazsinbad
Video: F-35Cs Land Aboard USS Eisenhower for Carrier Testing
03 Oct 2015 Brendan McGarry

"Two of the U.S. Navy’s F-35C variants of the Joint Strike Fighter jet on Friday landed aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower for another round of tests at sea, the program office announced.

The fifth-generation fighters made by Lockheed Martin Corp. snagged the ship’s two-wire, the intended target, amid stormy weather from Hurricane Joaquin off the East Coast in the Atlantic Ocean, according to a statement from Joe DellaVedova, a spokesman for the program office.

“Despite a hurricane churning at sea and some of the worst weather experienced on the east coast of the U.S. in years, two F-35Cs landed aboard the USS Eisenhower yesterday to begin the F-35C DT-2 sea trial,” he said in the email...."

Photo: http://www.dodbuzz.com/wp-content/uploa ... 00x400.jpg

Source: http://www.dodbuzz.com/2015/10/03/video ... r-testing/

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 04 Oct 2015, 16:39
by spazsinbad
What a diff a day makes - WX fine & beaut: (somebody oughtta tell sollylollysnafusifu)
Atlantic Ocean 03 Oct 2015
"An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 prepares to make an arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is currently conducting follow-on sea trials aboard the Eisenhower. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jameson E. Lynch (Released) 151003-N-QD363-164"

PHOTO: http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 63-164.jpg

Atlantic Ocean 03 Oct 2015
"An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 makes and arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is currently conducting follow-on sea trials aboard the Eisenhower. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jameson E. Lynch (Released) 151003-N-QD363-165"

PHOTO: http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 63-165.jpg

Atlantic Ocean 03 Oct 2015
"An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 prepares to take-off from the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is currently conducting follow-on sea trials aboard the Eisenhower. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Anderson W. Branch (Released) 151003-N-KK394-458"

PHOTO: http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 94-458.jpg

Atlantic Ocean 03 Oct 2015
"An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 launches off the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is currently conducting follow-on sea trials aboard the Eisenhower. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Anderson W. Branch (Released) 151003-N-KK394-373"

PHOTO: http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 94-373.jpg

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 04 Oct 2015, 17:22
by spazsinbad



Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 04 Oct 2015, 21:02
by SnakeHandler
With IDLC and DFP doing all the work them Naval Aviators won't have any abilities to brag about. Maybe now they can focus on tactics instead of just getting home?

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 04 Oct 2015, 21:21
by spazsinbad
That is exactly the stated aim - although I would be more polite stating it. :mrgreen: Example - the LSO giving the 'Magic Carpet' brief at TAILHOOK 2015. OneSuch Quote (for Georgians [LSO]) at 5min 28sec into the video with others following....


Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 05 Oct 2015, 09:56
by spazsinbad
Navy F-35C pilot gears up for testing on carrier Ike
04 Oct 2015 Lance M. Bacon

"Do you want to know what it is like to fly the Navy's F-35C Joint Strike Fighter?

Well, that’s too bad, because “there are no words to describe it,” Lt. Cmdr. “Anoya” Hess said. He has been a JSF driver for two years and is still at a loss for words.

“It is an amazing piece of machinery,” he said.

The Navy’s next big JSF test is set for mid-October, if weather permits. Two F-35Cs, the Navy's carrier-landing variant, are set to spend 10 days training with carrier Dwight D. Eisenhower off the Virginia coast. The pair will conduct day and night carrier qualifications, night operations with the Generation III Helmet Mounted Display, Delta Flight Path testing, and F-35 Joint Precision Approach and Landing System testing.

Hess, who served as a landing signal officer when JSF made its first carrier landing aboard the carrier Nimitz in November 2014, will pilot one of the two test birds. Countless simulator landings and practice at the JSF’s home base of Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, has given Hess confidence as the date draws near. Still, he admits that he is “really excited to see what it can do behind the boat.”

The former F-14 Tomcat pilot, who went on to fly F/A-18 Super Hornets, described the JSF as a combination of current technologies and lessons learned from previous fighters.

“It takes that entire operational picture and gives you complete [situational awareness] as to what is going on in the battle space at all times and enables you to share with other assets in the fight with you,” said the 14-year vet, who asked Navy Times to withhold his first name out of concern for his security.

Despite the jet’s leap-ahead technology, the learning curve is not as steep as one might expect, he said.

Much of that is due to the $600,000 helmet, which Hess identified as the hardest thing to leave behind if he were to return to flying Super Hornets. Its visor replaces the traditional Heads-up Display. Every detail the pilot needs, from flight data to targeting information, is displayed in the helmet.

Then you add in the Distributed Aperture System, which streams real-time imagery from six infrared cameras. This allows pilots to “look through” the airframe.

Second only to the helmet on Hess’ list is the ease of flight controls. It is “very simple to handle whenever tasks are going on from a mission standpoint,” he said...."

Source: http://www.navytimes.com/story/military ... /73106716/

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 05 Oct 2015, 11:08
by spazsinbad
http://www.navy.mil/viewGallery.asp?id=0&page=9088&r=4 IKE GALLERY Oct 2015
Caption: "151003-N-UY653-021 ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 3, 2015) Two F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighters assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 taxi across the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is currently conducting follow-on sea trials aboard the Eisenhower. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Utah Kledzik/Released)"

Photo: http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 53-021.JPG

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 05 Oct 2015, 12:42
by popcorn
From that angle the C is all wing and control surfaces.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 05 Oct 2015, 12:46
by spazsinbad
Do the new curved upwards wing tips help with range/fuel burn? Oops... :crazypilot: :pint: :whistle: :nono: :lol: :roll:

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 05 Oct 2015, 17:28
by sferrin
spazsinbad wrote:Do the new curved upwards wing tips help with range/fuel burn? Oops... :crazypilot: :pint: :whistle: :nono: :lol: :roll:


Those are winglets you heathen. :wink:

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 05 Oct 2015, 19:01
by spazsinbad

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 05 Oct 2015, 23:29
by spazsinbad
The first video of F-35Cs IKE arrival 02 Oct 2015 (on Yutub earlier) is available here as a 6.6Mb .WMV of low quality:

http://www.jsf.mil/video/f35test/Arrival_Eisenhower.wmv

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 00:29
by archeman
spazsinbad wrote::devil: At least someone is fretting for the rest of us about the safety of the USN F-35C test pilots. BZ. :doh:

http://snafu-solomon.blogspot.com.au/20 ... icane.html

Little does SNAFUboybli realise that a CVN - FAST - can go places - FAST - where weather is much much more betta. :roll:

Solomon was going to "win" in his personal echo-chamber/blog no matter what in this case.
* If the F-35C flys out then "They Are SO Desperate"
* If they keep them home then "F-35C Afraid of Stormy Weather"

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 00:38
by Dragon029
The Navy's also released a heap of videos:


















Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 01:18
by checksixx
archeman wrote:Solomon was going to "win" in his personal echo-chamber/blog no matter what in this case.
* If the F-35C flys out then "They Are SO Desperate"
* If they keep them home then "F-35C Afraid of Stormy Weather"


LoL...he banned me after I told him he was a douche (after destroying his article).

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 01:25
by bring_it_on
Well if your post is still there do post the content it in the basement thread :)

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 01:39
by spazsinbad
Thanks 'Dragon029' good pilot interviews in that lot of videos with answers about the HMDS and vHUD.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 04:01
by maus92
In the 3rd video of Dragon's set, watch the rolling moment to the left on the longitudinal axis just after the aircraft touches down. I noticed that on the 02OCT vids, and these 03OCT vids. Happens on both the touch and go, and the arrested landing. Not sure what's causing that.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 04:15
by stereospace
I like the flight videos but I like the interviews even more. Thanks.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 04:23
by stereospace
maus92 wrote:In the 3rd video of Dragon's set, watch the rolling moment to the left on the longitudinal axis just after the aircraft touches down. I noticed that on the 02OCT vids, and these 03OCT vids. Happens on both the touch and go, and the arrested landing. Not sure what's causing that.


I didn't notice that on the previous videos but I did on these. I assumed it was a pitching deck.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 04:32
by Dragon029
I noticed it as well; the deck isn't pitching at the time, but if you pay close attention to his attitude (reference the nosetip vs the vertical stabilisers) at touchdown though, he's crabbing a fair bit; landing in such a state, even with a simultaneous main landing gear touchdown (as in the video) will cause the jet to want to roll towards the side you were yawing away from. If it had been a mechanical failure (blown piston or something) it's likely you would have seen the jet sagging to its left after it comes to a rest, whereas we don't see that in the video.

Spaz, what would be a normal vs a dangerous crabbing angle (I know it varies by jet, but in your experience)? I did a little image analysis on a top-down image of the Eisenhower and assuming he caught the 2 or 3 wire, he would have landed with about 6 degrees yaw.

Either way though, the jet's built to handle these kinds of stresses, and in various other videos (eg, from DT-1) there isn't that much bouncing around.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 05:36
by spazsinbad
First to ensure we refer to the same events below is a video clip that I think is referenced earlier? IF not then let me know. Otherwise the screenshot from the end of the video also below illustrates the camber of the deck (so that water runs off it quickly). I have not modified the angle to show a horizontal horizon (by rotating left by 1.25 degrees) because it is likely the camera is level with the horizon - with the camera lens distorting it - as shown.

The angle of the angle deck of IKE is 9 degrees AFAIK but I could be wrong so I'll check [see the LSO reference line drawing on left for the angle on page 2 of this thread]. As for the 'rolling' to port then that could be exacerbated by the camber to port and this item 'mis-serviced landing gear' on the test menu from the first post on this thread here: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=28046&p=302953&hilit=intentional#p302953 . However of course that is just a WAG. Also the test pilots and reports state that load asymmetry is being tested so we might see this also exacerbating the effect, another WAG. And it just might be a pilot test technique - for test purposes - yet another WAG. I would like to see SHornet touchdowns from the same vantage point - these will be on Ubend.

Approaches may be conducted at the start with some crab due to the SHornet HUD showing the velocity vector, which can be put on the crotch (the intersection of angle and axial deck area) however that technique to get close to line up and stay on it cannot last because the aircraft must be aligned with the angle deck centreline (explained elsewhere in detail) to ensure a safe arrest/bolter/touch and go. IF the aircraft is not within limits the LSO will wave off the aircraft so there is a good deal of incentive to be on centreline, aligned with it - on glideslope - at Optimum Angle of Attack - otherwise recalcitrant pilot will be sent back to the beach toot sweet. End of story.

My experience was on a 5.5 degree angle deck so the line up problem was less to a certain extent with the A4G quick aileron effects very noticeable even at landing airspeeds. Without any HUD technology our approach method was to be lined up / aligned at the start and to 'nibble to the right' a few times to stay in that situation during the approach (because the angled runway is moving from left to right during the approach as the carrier moves forward down the axial centreline [and any crosswind effects though these are usually minimal]).


Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 06:02
by Dragon029
It is that video; here's an image of what I mean:

Image

At the moment of touchdown, the jet appears to still be pointed towards the bow of Ike, by what looks to me as around 6 degrees; the tire friction causes the jet to lurch sideways and then the pilot and arrestor cable point the nose down the centerline, with the jet's wings becoming level again.

(The red circle in both parts of the image are just referencing one of the bow jet blast deflectors in order to provide an idea of where the camera is positioned).

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 06:23
by spazsinbad
That may be the situation however you must admit these approaches are 'test' approaches. IF you have viewed/listened to the Magic Carpet brief from TAILHOOK 2015 it is clear that test pilots will do all kinds of 'unhinged' approaches to firstly simulate nugget approaches, or fatigued after a long mission pilot approaches in order to find the limits (published as recovery bulletins AFAIK) for a particular aircraft (this one) carrier approach to guide all the sundries. To eviscerate one approach from a camera angle not aligned with the angle deck centreline is a bit much IMHO. I think perhaps some viewers have not seen enough carrier approaches from that particular angle - most often in my experience amateur videoers go to better positions for their clips. Being such a long way from the action without a big ZOOM lens kind of takes the shine off the viewer experience - as mentioned I would have to see a bunch of approaches by the current USN jet aircraft from that angle/position to form an opinion. YMMV.

For example the camera position can make a big difference - especially when down at or near deck level - and where it is in relation to the touchdown. There is a good example in the recent posting of the A4G deck contretemps showing a bone jarring t/d arrest. OMG. However it does not look all that remarkable if one has seen many arrests from a similar angle; yet seeing one example, juxtaposed inbetween other camera angles, makes that landing stand out. ARRESTING on a carrier deck is a VIOLENT experience for pilot and aircraft donchaknow. Hence the LSO insistence that the approach is within limits for a safe t/d arrest - aircraft runout on the arrestor gear/wire within the ladder lines painted on deck (or other variations of bolter/touch and goes).

For example in this video at 5min 10sec we see the start of a 'TAXI ONE' approach by A4G Side Number (on nose) 872. Immediately afterwards the camera angle view changes to an arrest seen at deck level - 5min 30 sec approx. Having seen most approaches from the more usual 'above' view (from 'goofers' position) the change of view is dramatic indeed. I'll make a clip so that viewers do not need to suffer through a long old video.... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAv0MnhNfKc

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 06:43
by Dragon029
That's precisely what I'm thinking / suggesting - hence potentially why the same behaviour is experienced in both the touch & go and arrested landing.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 06:54
by spazsinbad
Please explain - meanwhile here is a low quality clip showing what I mean about the abrupt change of view. First we see the end of a good approach arrest I'll assume then we see the 'TAXI ONE' arrest (wheels touch down before No.1 wire so that the aircraft 'taxis' to the arrest) then we see the abrupt view change from the many many approaches viewed from the more usual 'goofers' / 'LollyGaggers' viewpoint; where the RAN PHOTS positioned this particular camera however they did have other usual spots on deck for taking photos and film as well at the same time. I may attempt to put this video attached on youbend but it may not have the music (being disallowed - not sure 'till it is uploaded).

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 07:36
by Dragon029
What I'm saying is that, like you, I believe that this is just simply a deliberate 'unhinged' approach / landing for testing the aircraft's handling and future forgivingness towards nuggets. I was just saying in my last comment that this is even more likely to be the answer (vs a mechanical failure) because that roll to the left upon impact occurs on both the touch & go and the follow-up arrested landing in the video.

As for the camera angle, I agree that camera angles can make a massive difference to what the viewer thinks occurs; but I've also gone and looked at some other F-35C landing videos from the same or similar angle, and they didn't have the same rotation.

In this video for example (from DT-1), the camera isn't in the same location or using the same zoom, etc, but we are down on the deck where you can see the wings roll and move relative to the deck and horizon. However, in that video, the touchdowns appear quite stable, with little / no roll. Also, although it's obviously hard to say, I get the impression that the jets are touching down more inline with the runway centerline / not having to crab anywhere near as much.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 07:56
by spazsinbad
Thanks for explanation. My thought goes to the deliberate testing of the ''mis-serviced landing gear' but I do not claim to know. Perhaps these and other anomalies will be explained later.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 08:15
by spazsinbad
Lockheed F-35C begins second round of sea trials as bombs drop
05 Oct 2015 James Drew

"...“These sea trials will further expand the F-35C's flight envelope,” F-35 program executive officer Lt. Gen. Chris Bogdan says in statement. “The testing we're doing today will prepare us for next year's final at-sea developmental test and keep us on track to support the Navy's 2018 initial operational capability date.”

The Eisenhower, a Nimitz-class carrier, underwent modification prior to accepting the two F-35Cs, including rebuilt jet blast deflectors for aircraft launch catapults one and two.

According to the navy, the deflectors were redesigned to better withstand the F-35’s powerful engine exhaust. The devices protect the crews and equipment on the flight deck during aircraft takeoffs.

Improvements were also made to the carrier’s arresting or “trapping” unit, with the installation of an “advance recovery control” system.

“When an aircraft lands, no matter what cable it catches, the ARC system will only allow that aircraft to travel a total of 183ft [55.8m] down the landing area,” says one navy official in a 5 October statement
. [ARC will be given a work out also - perhaps explaining some arrest anomalies? ARC will have been tested ashore beforehand also]....

...During “DT-II,” the F-35Cs will perform many take-offs and arrested landings, but the navy is also assessing the aircraft’s maintainability at sea by conducting live and simulating maintenance operations as well as fit checks of the aircraft and maintenance gear."

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... as-417412/

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 08:29
by spazsinbad
ABMA Newsletter [ARC] [Aviation Boatswain's Mates Association]
01 Apr 2009 Volume 39 Issue 1 (Article submitted by Program Executive Office for Tactical Aircraft)

"...The Advanced Recovery Control (ARC) is a digital arresting-gear control system modification for the Mark 7 arresting gear found on Fleet carriers.

ARC replaces the older, mechanical system which utilized levers and mechanical actuators to control landing aircraft. The upgrade to a digitally controlled system allows for easier maintenance and use. Because of its ability to digitally monitor and automate the control system, ARC removes the “human error” factor, making it a more accurate and reliable system, lessening the damage to aircraft and potential injuries to Sailors.

The Mark 7 Arresting Gear remains the same, “said Wayne Kovacs, ARC team lead. “However, instead of being controlled by levers and [mechanical] actuators to set the engine and to stop the aircraft as was the case previously, all of that work is done by an electronic system. These electronic upgrades feature less moving parts to replace or repair and offer better reliability.”

ARC is installed at the Naval Air Systems Command Lakehurst, N.J., test sites. Before it was sent to the Fleet, ARC underwent simulated arrestment testing at the Lakehurst Jet Car Track, assuring system’s function during deployment.

ARCs initial installation was on the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) Nov. 24, 2007. Since its installation, the ship has accomplished more than 10,000 arrested landings. ARC was recently installed on the USS John C Stennis (CVN 74) and will be begin use on a 3 month deployment in winter 2009.

This electronic upgrade is garnering positive feedback from those who use ARC on daily basis.

The system has performed with “absolutely superb results during three in-flight engagements resulting in no damage to aircraft or arresting gear. Our fleet and engineering support has been outstanding and responsive since installation. The ARC should be considered a huge success and giant step forward for carrier aviation,” said Capt. John Breast, Air Boss on the USS Reagan.

Another benefit of the ARC is its ability to electronically collect the data from the aircraft arrestment log, a data repository which collects information from the aircraft’s carrier landing and store it on the system. Carriers which do not have ARC installed require Sailors to manually record the data.

“What it’s doing now is collecting parameters from the arrestment, so if there are issues, we can pinpoint the problems,” said Kovacs. “One of the benefits is that ARC can read that data and recognize system fault, such as low pressure or overheating oil.”

With the addition of advanced technology such as ARC to the fleet, the Navy can reap the benefits of its use with today’s increasingly tech-savvy Sailors.

“In the hands of the modern Sailor, who has grown up with digital technologies, advanced systems such as ARC give us an incomparable advantage in the battlefield,” said Capt. Randy Mahr, NAVAIR’s Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment (PMA 251) Program Manager. “I think it goes without saying that ARC is one of those systems that automatically improves our Fleet and will collect invaluable data for Fleet maintenance and safety professionals.”

The system is scheduled to be installed on all commissioned Fleet carriers, except for USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), which will receive the Advanced Arresting Gear [AAG], the next-generation replacement of the Mark 7 arresting gear. ARC’s next installation is slated for spring 2009 on board the George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). The PMA 251 ALRE program is committed to managing the development, demonstration and acquisition of operational advances in aviation data management and control systems, expeditionary air fields and all launch and recovery related products. PMA 251’s mission is to consistently deliver adaptable and reliable technology to the Fleet.

Source: http://www.abma-usn.org/acrobat/Newslet ... ing_09.pdf (0.65Mb)

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 09:24
by spazsinbad
Manned Advanced Arresting Gear Testing To Begin In February, Wrap Up After Carrier Ford Delivers
01 Oct 2015 Megan Eckstein

"The Navy will begin testing manned airplanes on its Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) at a New Jersey test site in February and will complete testing on all type/model/series in the months after the new carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) is delivered, Navy officials said on Thursday.

A 2013 hardware redesign on the General Atomics AAG has proven successful after more than 1,000 traps with dead load weights, Rear Adm. Donald Gaddis, Program Executive Officer for Tactical Aircraft, told reporters after a Senate hearing Thursday.

“We feel confident we can deliver hardware to the ship without having to go back and redesign or remove and replace anything we’ve delivered to the ship,” he said, noting that the ship is moving on with its test schedule as AAG continues land-based testing.

The remaining concerns with AAG all deal with software – particularly, whether the system can detect and help correct planes that land off-center on the carrier flight deck. The “divergent trajectory” issue is important because if a plane veers more than 20 feet off the centerline on the flight deck it would risk hitting people or equipment.

The software work currently taking place is “making sure that if the airplane doesn’t land on centerline – in other words, it’s off center 10 feet, 15 feet or as much as 20 feet – that the airplane stays inside that foul line. And that requires the software that the AAG system that’s on the right hand of the ship and the left-hand side of the ship know what’s happening to the wire as its paying out on the flight deck. So that requires a lot of software, requires a lot of test-analyze-fix on the software as well,” Gaddis said.

“At this point in the program, that is a very very low risk of anything happening in terms of concurrency to the hardware that we’ve already delivered to the ship,” he said, adding he was confident that software-only testing and fixing would address the divergent trajectory issue.

Once that software work is complete, Gaddis must then test each type of aircraft on AAG at the land-based Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division – Lakehurst, N.J. before the planes can go to the ship for at-sea AAG tests.

Gaddis said he would begin with the Super Hornets in February and will issue an Aircraft Recovery Bulletin in the summer once testing is complete.

“The plan right now is to do these recovery bulletins in incremental steps,” he said.

“We’ll start with the Super Hornet E/F, then we’ll go to the F-18C and then we’ll go to the E2 [Hawkeye] and C-2 [Greyhound]. And our plan is to do all those type/model/series and get all those recovery bulletins done before we hand it over to [the director of operational test and evaluation.”

Though all the bulletins will be issued by the time Ford reaches operational test, only the Super Hornet will be allowed on the flight deck when the ship delivers. Rear Adm. Tom Moore, Program Executive Officer for Aircraft Carriers, said after the hearing that that wouldn’t cause any delays, as he just needs any planes to train the ship’s crew and certify the flight deck.

“Even though I only have one aircraft once I deliver the ship, the ship doesn’t care – the catapults and arresting gear are agnostic to what type of planes land on them,” he said.

“What I need from the shipbuilding side of the house is, I need to be able to take the ship out and exercise the flight deck, exercise [Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System] and AAG and have a crew start training to move aircraft on the flight deck. It’s a brand new flight deck, brand new pit stop refueling. So it doesn’t matter to me how many different type/model/series, I just need planes for launching and recovering during the six-month period between delivery and before I take it in for the post-shakedown availability.”..."

Source: http://news.usni.org/2015/10/01/manned- ... d-delivers

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 09:31
by spazsinbad
The LSO NATOPS Manual says a heap of stuff as one would imagine about all things crarrierlandin' here is a tidbit 'bout camber: PDF attached.
NATOPS LANDING SIGNAL OFFICER MANUAL
15 DECEMBER 2001 USN LSOs

"...Deck centerline camber (i.e., the centerline is higher than the deck edge) is for water drainage. On most decks it is approximately 4 inches. All lens settings in the Recovery Bulletins compensate for deck camber...."

Source: http://www.navyair.com/LSO_NATOPS_Manual.pdf (1Mb)


AND JUST FOR FUN: https://www.scribd.com/doc/268197224/LS ... -01jun2015

AND... a more up to date LSO NATOP May 2009 from http://www.wings-of-gold.com/cnatra/LSONATOPSMAY09.pdf

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 10:11
by spazsinbad
Current USN F-35C/IKE Videos List: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... MJXJTbLPkK

SAME LIST AS THE EARLIER NINE ON PREVIOUS PAGE PROVIDED BY 'Dragon029' HOWEVER I GUESS MORE VIDEOS WILL BE ADDED AT URL ABOVE AT SOME POINT?

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 10:38
by spazsinbad
A recent example of the Super Hornet VV Velocity Vector starting at the top right corner 'CROTCH' of the landing area on CVN (at night) drifting to the centreline as the pilot adjusts for correct fore n aft alignment with centreline when in close to arrest. Screenshot gif shows this aspect at beginning and watch da fillum. Unlike us lollygaggers this pilot will not be looking at the VV at this time (only when much further out lining up when meatball more difficult to see) but at the Meatball - Lineup & Opt AoA to arrest. The VV will always lag the aircraft and not always truly show info in the same way the F-35C or Magic Carpet SuperHorneto will use the SRVV Ship Referenced Velocity Vector.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 15:12
by spazsinbad
Ike Receives Face Lift for F35C
05 Oct 2015 Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Hillary Browning, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Public Affairs

"ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS) -- With a next generation aircraft, the F-35C, going through its developmental test phase, Nimitz-class aircraft carriers are making modifications to keep up with the latest technology.

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike), who is currently hosting the Navy's newest warplane, began these upgrades months ago while still in the shipyard.

In order to optimize carrier operations, Ike modified its jet blast deflectors (JBD) & catapults to better support the F-35C.

A jet blast deflector does just what its name suggests. It is a safety device that redirects the high energy exhaust from a jet engine away from equipment and people on the flight deck to prevent damage and injury.

"We completely rebuilt catapult one's JBD on the ship," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 1st Class Shamon Smith, Air Department's V-2 division maintenance leading petty officer aboard Ike. "We replaced some of the salt-water piping which allows for a rapid flow of pressure throughout the JBDs so it can cool down a lot faster under strenuous conditions which make them perfect for the F-35C."

Catapult two also received a complete overhaul,
but it was built off-ship by the Carrier and Field Service Unit (CAFSU) and the Voyage Repair Team (VRT). The CAFSU and VRT engineers ensure carriers are operating under the latest instructions in order to maintain and update equipment for catapult flight operations.

"The CAFSU and VRT guys were a huge help," Smith said. "They came in and did the modifications that we received from AIRLANT and they added those specifications into our JBDs so we were ready for the F-35C's to land aboard Ike."

Changes were also made to the arresting system that is responsible for "trapping," or stopping, an aircraft during an arrested landing. The Advance Recovery Control (ARC), also installed while in the shipyard, aides in ensuring a safe recovery with every trap.

"The magic number is 183," Smith said. "When an aircraft lands, no matter what cable it catches, the ARC system will only allow that aircraft to travel a total of 183 feet down the landing area. It's an excellent safety precaution that they have for the F-35C, and safety is paramount to every recovery aboard Ike."


Besides making physical modifications to Ike, select Sailors were given the chance to visit the test site in Maryland so they could get a jump start on learning what it takes to launch and recover an F-35C.

"We brought a team from the Eisenhower to Patuxent River about two months ago," said Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 Navy test pilot Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Kitts. "At Pax River, we have a steam catapult built into our runway. We took some steps with the crew here to bring them up to speed by training them on the F-35 to get them a little bit more familiar with our aircraft."

Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) Jose Correa attended the training and says the information they received helped prepare them for this testing phase.

"The purpose of the trip was to receive information on launch and recovery and how we can accommodate the F-35C," he said. "We learned the taxiing, and chock and chain processes, the Crash and Salvage team was able to access rescue procedures, and V-4 Sailors learned the fueling process."...

... "We are going to see exactly what it does to the new water-brake system that we put in and how our JBDs are going to stand up," Smith said. "The F-35 guys out here listen to what we think, because we are the operators in the fleet. It's great being able to have some kind of input on tomorrow's Navy."..."

Photo & Caption: ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 4, 2015)
An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 prepares to launch from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is aboard Dwight D. Eisenhower conducting follow-on sea trials. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jameson E. Lynch (Released) 151004-N-QD363-254 " http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 63-254.jpg


Source: http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=91359

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 15:23
by sferrin
Oh ma gerd carrier needed new deflectors, F-35 suckz etc. etc.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 15:49
by spazsinbad
These info PDFs are only just on me radar so here is some old news: via: https://www.f35.com/resources/general-m ... kly-update
A Message from Lorraine Martin
20 Aug 2015 Lorraine Martin LM PR

"...Back in the states, CF-3 at Pax River completed the first Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS) approaches with an F-35. This mission is an important part of the shore-based workups the Pax ITF team is required to accomplish in preparation for the upcoming F-35C ship trials this fall. JPALS will primarily be used by pilots during night time and poor weather ship board landing operations...."

Source: https://www.f35.com/assets/uploads/docu ... -20-15.pdf (0.345Mb)

&
A Message from Lorraine Martin
17 Sep 2015 Lorraine Martin LM PR

"...In October [2015], the USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69) will host CF-3 and CF-5, as well as the Pax River test team for F-35C DT-II. The team is ready to get back out to sea and continue to expand the envelope for the carrier variant. The focus of the testing is on arrested landing, catapult performance and handling qualities, including max catapult shots up to 60,000 pounds with full internal weapons load. Other planned testing includes crosswind catapults, Gen III helmet testing and assessment, and a wide range of maintenance activities, including engine runs. Upon completion of testing, the Carrier Suitability team from the ITF will be in a position to develop and release the first fleet-ready launch and recovery bulletins allowing future fleet F-35C pilots to safely train and operate from NIMITZ-Class Aircraft Carriers. We look forward to completing this important testing and I will report on the progress of the detachment once the ship is underway.

Source: https://www.f35.com/assets/uploads/docu ... _17_15.pdf (0.3Mb)

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 16:25
by spazsinbad
F-35C Sea Trials Aboard USS Eisenhower
02 Oct 2015 LM Flickr

"The F-35 Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force (ITF) is conducting the second phase of F-35C carrier suitability and integration developmental testing (DT-II) aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). (U.S. Navy Photo Courtesy Lockheed Martin photographer Andrew McMurtrie)" https://farm1.staticflickr.com/580/2198 ... 3a_o_d.jpg

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lockheedm ... ateposted/
via:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lockheedm ... 7081973804

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 17:48
by archeman
maus92 wrote:In the 3rd video of Dragon's set, watch the rolling moment to the left on the longitudinal axis just after the aircraft touches down. I noticed that on the 02OCT vids, and these 03OCT vids. Happens on both the touch and go, and the arrested landing. Not sure what's causing that.


Asymmetric Internal Loads?

I believe the pilot interviews noted those tests as an important part of this phase.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 17:56
by sferrin
maus92 wrote:In the 3rd video of Dragon's set, watch the rolling moment to the left on the longitudinal axis just after the aircraft touches down. I noticed that on the 02OCT vids, and these 03OCT vids. Happens on both the touch and go, and the arrested landing. Not sure what's causing that.


Not unusual at all. Youtube is full of videos of every other USN aircraft doing the same thing at one time or another.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 18:10
by spazsinbad
VX-23 CMDR Wilson tells of the future DT-III aims for asymmetric store loads during IKE interview 05 Oct 2015 (audio only).

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 19:24
by johnwill
In the LM flickr post, this shot shows a missing tail hook cover during launch.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lockheedm ... 081973804/

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 20:02
by spazsinbad

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 20:16
by spazsinbad
Aaahhh the AvWEAKwags (the proper kind) are at it again... http://aviationweek.com/defense/watch-f ... eisenhower
"...The trials, expected to take two weeks, build upon work done in November 2004 on USS Nimitz off the coast of San Diego...."

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 20:40
by sferrin
spazsinbad wrote:https://www.flickr.com/photos/lockheedmartin/21980228011/sizes/o/


"Oh ma gawd the cover fell off. Cancel the Just So Farsical already."

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 21:25
by SpudmanWP
sferrin wrote:
spazsinbad wrote:https://www.flickr.com/photos/lockheedmartin/21980228011/sizes/o/


"Oh ma gawd the cover fell off. Cancel the Just So Farsical already."


Nah.. it's just the next gen of stealth.

Here is the whole plane:

Image

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 22:10
by lookieloo
checksixx wrote:
archeman wrote:Solomon was going to "win" in his personal echo-chamber/blog no matter what in this case.
* If the F-35C flys out then "They Are SO Desperate"
* If they keep them home then "F-35C Afraid of Stormy Weather"


LoL...he banned me after I told him he was a douche (after destroying his article).
I simply reminded him about his ebola-doom predictions and told him to kill himself.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 06 Oct 2015, 23:29
by oldiaf
http://www.popularmechanics.com/flight/ ... hurricane/
F-35C lands on CVN in middle of crappy weather because of hurricane

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 07 Oct 2015, 00:55
by archeman
SpudmanWP wrote:
sferrin wrote:
spazsinbad wrote:https://www.flickr.com/photos/lockheedmartin/21980228011/sizes/o/


"Oh ma gawd the cover fell off. Cancel the Just So Farsical already."


Nah.. it's just the next gen of stealth.

Here is the whole plane:

Image


Linda Carter beat you to it:

3680991-jla+.jpg

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 07 Oct 2015, 15:16
by spazsinbad
Back to the visible world - a great arresting moment indeed. https://www.flickr.com/photos/lockheedm ... 7081973804
"F-35C Sea Trials Aboard USS Eisenhower 02 Oct 2015 https://www.flickr.com/photos/lockheedm ... ateposted/ “Cmdr. Tony "Brick" Wilson makes an arrested landing with an F-35C Lightning II aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) during the second developmental test (DT-II) phase of the next-generation strike fighter. Wilson made naval aviation history Nov. 3, 2014 when he made the inaugural F-35C arrested landing aboard the flight deck of a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier. Wilson and a team from the F-35 Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force from Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 are conducting carrier suitability and integration testing of the F-35C. (U.S. Navy Photo Courtesy Lockheed Martin photographer Andrew McMurtrie)” https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5655/219 ... 3f_o_d.jpg

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 08 Oct 2015, 13:57
by spazsinbad
Light this candle (small JPG version): http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 94-141.jpg (2.6Mb) 06 Oct 2015

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 08 Oct 2015, 14:09
by ChippyHo
LOOK at he size of that front landing gear!!!! You could swap it out with a C-5 (exaggerating - only slightly!!!)

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 08 Oct 2015, 14:59
by spazsinbad
Further to the discussion about the wobbly T&G & Arrest earlier: Testing is done with cross winds during the approach, so perhaps we see an effect of that during landing. The arrest in question is on centreline and seems to be aligned fore & aft with the angle deck (or close enough for LSO) with the ARC gear keeping things within safe limits. A bunch of stuff there.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 08 Oct 2015, 16:16
by spazsinbad
Relevant to the testing is a compilation of the OUIJA BOARD aboard USS Eisenhower as seen during that first day (I guess).


Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 08 Oct 2015, 17:03
by spazsinbad
The C at Sea: The F-35 Aboard the USS Eisenhower
07 Oct 2015 LM PR - USS DWIGHT D EISENHOWER

“After a successful initial ship trial (Development Test-I (DT-I)) at the end of last year, the joint team of U.S. Navy, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems personnel who make up the F-35 Integrated Test Force (ITF) is back at sea to continue testing the capabilities of the F-35C.

For DT-II, the ITF based out of NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, will continue to expand the flight envelope, launching and recovering aircraft loaded with internal weapons while evaluating their flying and handling qualities under various wind conditions and catapult settings. To find out more about the F-35C testing at sea, we sat down with Jim Gigliotti, a Navy Veteran whose 28-year Naval Aviation career included aircraft operations and test tours of duty as well as Command of the Aircraft Carrier USS Harry S Truman. He gave us a few more details about DT-II.

Tough Enough
A standard airframe for a fighter jet is made out of the lightest but strongest materials possible. But for the F-35C, those standard materials won’t cut it. Carrier-based operations are very unforgiving to an aircraft because of the roughness of arrested landings and catapult takeoffs. Aircraft not specifically designed for ship operations would be unable to cope with the harsh carrier environment and would not survive the loads and stresses put on the vehicle. So the airframe, or the “skeleton,” of the F-35C contains a significant amount of titanium, one of the strongest metals available.

As a result, the F-35C weighs 5,500 pounds more than an A variant, which is designed to perform conventional takeoff and landings – on land. The B-variant (which is also capable of ship operations) contains titanium as well, but because the short takeoffs and vertical landings it performs aren’t as stressing as arrested landings and catapult takeoffs, not as much titanium is necessary.

In addition to needing a sturdier airframe, the F-35’s stealth coatings must be capable of standing up to the harsh and sometimes unpredictable weather conditions in an at-sea environment. So how does the F-35’s stealth coating hold up?

“For almost the last decade, we’ve been putting panels that are made the same way F-35 panels are made on legacy aircraft that are deployed at-sea,” explains Gigliotti. “This was meant to check just that – how well do the coatings wear on this aircraft?” In addition, climactic tests have been conducted on the aircraft to ensure it can withstand extreme heat, cold and moisture.

Day to Day: B vs. C
Besides the obvious difference between the way the B and C variants land and takeoff from the ship, there are some key differences in deck operations. First of all, the way the jets are parked is different. “On the big-deck amphibious war ships that the B-variant will operate from, there’s a set routine on where they park all the aircraft and helicopters. There’s not a lot of room, so you have to be very precise,” explains Gigliotti. On an aircraft carrier, it’s the same basic premise, but the folded wings give a little more flexibility. “Folding the wings are critical to being able to put as many airplanes you can in a very small space. They literally park inches away from each other.”

The Devil is in the Details
Some of the various maintenance and operations testing being conducted are things you might not even think of when you see the jet land on the carrier. For example: every aircraft on the deck needs to be chained down due to the motion of the ship. When your airfield tends to roll and pitch with the waves, you can’t have 29 ton aircraft rolling around free on a flightdeck. So the team will perform various exercises to ensure they can chain the aircraft in certain spots, and that the chains don’t cause any trip hazards or encumber weapons loading or other maintenance operations.

Also during DT-II, the team will perform fit-checks with a Pratt & Whitney F-135 engine to confirm it can fit in the jet shop, an area in the aft part of the carrier’s hangar deck where maintenance occurs.

“You can have all the measurements figured out in advance and in theory it should fit, but this is a check to make 100% certain that the engine can be moved around and manipulated within the jet shop,” explains Gigliotti. In addition, the team will perform a simulated power module swap to ensure that the power module within the engine can be replaced onboard if necessary.

JPALS
During DT-II, the Joint Precision Approach Landing System (JPALS) will be initially tested to verify that the displays and inertial alignment function are working. This system, which is on both the B and C variants of the F-35, is the next generation precision approach system that provides the pilot with the ability to fly a very precise flight path when landing on an aircraft carrier. Gigliotti explains this advancement:

“With JPALS, the ship and the aircraft will ‘talk’ to each other. JPALS allows the aircraft’s system to register where it is and which direction it’s going in relation to the ship via a radio frequency (RF) signal so the aircraft can correctly align itself with the ship for landing,” explains Gigliotti. “It also adds a ‘Wi-Fi-like’ capability for inertial alignment before flight.”

Eventually, he explains, JPALS will provide the capability for a hands-off approach, meaning the pilot will be able to completely let go of control of the aircraft – literally and figuratively – and allow the jet to land itself on the carrier.”

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/the-c-a ... eisenhower

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 08 Oct 2015, 18:15
by spazsinbad

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 09 Oct 2015, 02:39
by tritonprime
DELETED

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 09 Oct 2015, 03:06
by spazsinbad
:devil: 'tritonprime' are you the same poster 'triton' (or is it really just 'trite on') of stuff over at 'secretprojects'? :mrgreen:

HERE we are on the ball - me for good reason in that I research 'how to deck land' in the past - present and future. Thus you will see lots of NavAv material on the F-35 forum because why? Because there are three variants - TWO are flat deck capable. On an otherwise previously F-16 and other USAF jets (forget about the rest) forum there was little organic knowledge of carrier aviation. I found that out from my first post here on what became a very long thread (you can find it with your search skills). Use those search skills to look for material that has been posted before. For example your post above is just a lazy repeat - by the 'reporter' - of a PR blurb from the USN - go here on this thread for the original - word for word the same. Sheesh.

The RAN FAA, USN, USMC and LM and all the RN FAA hangers on :mrgreen: don't pay me enough. Why do I do it? Because it is a hobby that interests me. I can see you are interested so work on it. Thanks. :mrgreen: Investigate the links at the bottom of each of my posts here. Yes they are barnacle encrusted but no one is forced to walk the plank to download the material - mostly about NavAv in all its glory - so go for it. TootSweet.

viewtopic.php?f=57&t=28046&p=304419&hilit=Karapostoles#p304419

NOT Forgetting the bunch of NavAv related Videos here - for the use of: https://www.youtube.com/user/SpazSinbad ... =0&sort=dd

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 09 Oct 2015, 03:13
by tritonprime
My apologies.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 09 Oct 2015, 05:48
by spazsinbad
No worries. If you care to look at my first posts here - first on a 'hostile' forum - hostile in the sense that a lot of former members of this forum (note how I revert to airfarcespeak) thought I knew bugga all about NavAv and had no actual sperience. Well I neva. Also the ability to post edits at a reasonable leisure was on innovation wot only came later. So always look on the bright side of life & look at wot came in the e-mail just now - doan know if it is authentic (sea earlier).

Left mouse click ont to get your reading ability back.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 09 Oct 2015, 22:44
by bring_it_on
F-35C Wraps Up Flight Tests During Second Round Of Sea Trials - Posted: October 09, 2015 INSIDEDEFENSE


ABOARD THE AIRCRAFT CARRIER EISENHOWER -- The carrier variant of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter has completed the flight-test portion of the second round of sea trials, with officials testing among other things the aircraft’s ability to launch and recover with an internal weapons load.
The trials, termed Developmental Test-2, are nearly complete, with a few logistics tests remaining before the session wraps up over the next seven days, according to Cmdr. Christian Sewell, government flight test director at Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 23.
The recent flight tests involved launching the F-35C from the Eisenhower (CVN-69) at weights of between 55,000 and 60,000 pounds, as the aircraft for the first time held simulated internal weapons, Sewell told reporters. He said the aircraft was tested with internal-load weights simulating a GBU-31 Joint Direct Attack Munition and two AIM-120 Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missiles. The first round of developmental testing, held last year on the aircraft carrier Nimitz (CVN-68), did not include internal weapon stores.
"We're kind of expanding that envelope," Sewell said. "We're expanding the aircraft launch bulletins and the aircraft recovery bulletins."
The F-35C also did multiple "afterburner launches" from the Eisenhower, as the ship had the necessary modifications made to allow the catapults to conduct full-power take-offs, Sewell said.
Capt. Stephen Koehler, commanding officer of the Eisenhower, said the ship had two of its catapults' jet-blast deflectors modified to allow full-power launches. Otherwise, Sewell said the aircraft has integrated well within the ship's operations.
Sewell said the latest round of testing also focused on how high wind affected the F-35C on the flight deck, as well as the aircraft's movements on the deck and below in the hangar bay.
The third and final round of developmental testing is scheduled for late next summer. Sewell said those trials would involve loading external weapons onto the F-35C for flight test for the first time, as well as the full implementation of the Joint Precision Approach Landing System, which helps guide aircraft onto carriers. The Navy expects to declare initial operational capability on the F-35C sometime in 2018. -- Justin Doubleday

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 10 Oct 2015, 10:54
by oldiaf

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 10 Oct 2015, 13:47
by spazsinbad
The story above is a bit NAF however a goodly series of photos are available in a slideshow - here is onesuch with 'waist not want not' catapult testing... & TOW chocks & chocks & a slow dirty turn then fast under:

The fillum at top of the page has the CO IKE saying that cats 1 & 3 were modified for the F-35C tests so the waist cat is No.3 we see in the photie?

http://www.trbimg.com/img-5617c0a9/turb ... 0/1550x872
&
http://www.trbimg.com/img-5617c0b4/turb ... 0/1550x872
&
http://www.trbimg.com/img-5617ce5a/turb ... 0/1550x872
&
http://www.trbimg.com/img-56183d50/turb ... 00/506x900
&
http://www.trbimg.com/img-56183d4d/turb ... 0/1000x563

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 10 Oct 2015, 14:50
by spazsinbad
F-35C Lightning II, the Navy’s next-generation fighter plane
10 Oct 2015 Bill Bartel; The Virginian-Pilot

"ON BOARD THE EISENHOWER
By mid-afternoon Friday, the teeth-rattling thunder from repeated catapult launches of the Navy’s next-generation fighter plane had stopped.

The test pilots and crews for the F-35C Lightning II, the Navy’s version of the new Joint Striker Fighter, were wrapping up a short stint on the aircraft carrier Dwight D. Eisenhower that began last week under “suboptimal conditions” as Hurricane Joaquin threatened and ended Friday under sunny skies....

...The most high-risk exercises on the Eisenhower came Thursday and Friday as the pilots tested the aircraft’s limits for a safe launch.

Although there were considerable advance calculations and research, they’re not the same as conducting the test on a carrier at sea, said Rear Adm. J.R. Haley, the commander of Naval Air Force Atlantic in Norfolk.

“This is a physics problem,” Haley said, noting that depending on the plane’s weight, it needs a certain level of air speed to lift off.

“We got all that stuff in theory,” he said. “And now the pilots are going to go out here and… see if their walk matches the talk.”

It meant testing the bottom air speed limit for a safe launch – and then going just a little bit slower.

“We were shooting the aircraft slower and slower off the front of the boat until we found that level that said ‘too much,’ ” said Tom Briggs, a civilian Navy engineer.

On the Eisenhower, the test crew figured out that low limit and added 15 knots to it, Briggs said, adding that it will become the standard for carrier launches in the future.

The Navy’s F-35 test pilots had nothing but praise for the plane. One acknowledged that while stoically testing the plane’s limits comes with the job, there can be moments when emotions step in.

Cmdr. Tony Wilson remembered a year ago on the Nimitz when he was the first pilot to ever land an F-35 on a carrier.

“When I was coming aboard the Nimitz, yeah there is the ‘Holy crap, I’m actually doing this,’ ” when flying toward the carrier, Wilson said. “But to be completely honest, as soon as I came in – hit the brake ['speedbrake' maybe BUT "break" in reality] to enter the pattern – it was, ‘All right. Time to put on the test pilot hat.’ ”

This month’s trip aboard the Eisenhower didn’t have any drama.

“It was very comfortable,” Wilson said. “I didn’t have any moment of doubt.”

Source: http://hrana.org/news/2015/10/f-35c-lig ... ter-plane/


Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 10 Oct 2015, 16:06
by bring_it_on

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 10 Oct 2015, 16:20
by spazsinbad
F-35C Lightning Aboard Ike for Developmental Testing
Published on Oct 9, 2015 U.S. Navy

"ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 7, 2015) U.S. Navy Sailors conduct flight operations and tests with two F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighters assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is conducting follow-on sea trials. (U.S. Navy video by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class J. Alexander Delgado/Released)"


Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 10 Oct 2015, 16:50
by spazsinbad

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 10 Oct 2015, 22:43
by oldiaf

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 10 Oct 2015, 22:51
by spazsinbad
Probably that video has been posted on the NIMITZ THREAD last year - the CVN is NIMITZ the date is Nov 2014.

Milestone PLANK Owner First F-35C Arrest NIMITZ 03 Nov 2014

viewtopic.php?f=57&t=26634

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 10 Oct 2015, 22:52
by oldiaf
spazsinbad wrote:Probably that video has been posted on the NIMITZ THREAD last year - the CVN is NIMITZ the date is Nov 2014.

Milestone PLANK Owner First F-35C Arrest NIMITZ 03 Nov 2014

viewtopic.php?f=57&t=26634

I know .. But nice to remember

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 10 Oct 2015, 22:54
by spazsinbad
IF YOU KNOW - SAY SO. However as usual you post just an URL and we all have to click on that URL to find out - how about putting the TITLE - DATE - AUTHOR at least - of these anon.URLs to save us all the hassle - is that too much to ask?

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 10 Oct 2015, 23:05
by oldiaf
spazsinbad wrote:IF YOU KNOW - SAY SO. However as usual you post just an URL and we all have to click on that URL to find out - how about putting the TITLE - DATE - AUTHOR at least - of these anon.URLs to save us all the hassle - is that too much to ask?

Ok ... Next time I'll do what you say ..

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 10 Oct 2015, 23:21
by stereospace
Nice ones:

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 11 Oct 2015, 00:42
by spazsinbad
CatBird probably MADLing away amongst other things? https://www.dvidshub.net/image/2224839/ ... operations
151008-N-QS750-218 ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 8, 2015) - The Cooperative Avionics Test Bed (CATBird), a testing platform for the F-35 Lightning II, flies overhead the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is currently conducting follow-on sea trials aboard the Eisenhower. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Anderson W. Branch/Released) https://www.dvidshub.net/download/image/2224839

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 11 Oct 2015, 00:50
by spazsinbad
https://www.dvidshub.net/image/2224838/ ... operations
"151009-N-QS750-202 ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 9, 2015) - Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 2nd Class Mark Delmasio unwraps a catapult on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Dwight D. Eisenhower is underway conducting carrier qualifications . (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Corey Dill/Released) https://www.dvidshub.net/download/image/2224838

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 11 Oct 2015, 00:58
by spazsinbad
https://www.dvidshub.net/image/2224829/ ... operations
"151008-N-KK394-393 ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 8, 2015) - Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 1st Class Manuel Ariasraig signals to an F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is currently conducting follow-on sea trials aboard the Eisenhower. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Anderson W. Branch/Released) https://www.dvidshub.net/download/image/2224829

"151008-N-KK394-433 ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 8, 2015) - Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 1st Class Manuel Ariasraig signals to an F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is currently conducting follow-on sea trials aboard the Eisenhower. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Anderson W. Branch/Released) https://www.dvidshub.net/download/image/2224831

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 11 Oct 2015, 02:52
by neptune
deleted :D

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 11 Oct 2015, 04:18
by popcorn
Navy feeling all warm and fuzzy ...

http://news.yahoo.com/lockheed-f-35s-fi ... nance.html

Lockheed F-35s finish at-sea test flights as U.S. Navy warms to new jet

U.S. Navy Rear Admiral John Haley, commander of Naval Air Force Atlantic, said developmental testing of the F-35C, the carrier variant of the new stealthy fighter jet, had been "pretty doggone good" compared with earlier aircraft.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 11 Oct 2015, 05:40
by spazsinbad
'neptune' over the on previous page is the same article that you have posted again above and over page is the video also. Please read/search the forum before you post the same articles again - thanks. viewtopic.php?f=57&t=28046&p=305415&hilit=Bartel#p305415

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 11 Oct 2015, 17:36
by spazsinbad
The camera filming the initial slow motion FIRST ARREST aboard USS Eisenhower remains steady so that allows ZOOMing.

A bunch of goodly photos by AP 09 Oct 2015 : http://www.readingeagle.com/ap/article/ ... nias-coast

NOTE the checklists:
"The Associated Press | F-35C Lightning II test aircraft pilot Lt. Chris Karapostoles give a thumbs up to the flight crew as he prepares to taxi aboard the nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower of the coast of Norfolk, Va., Friday, Oct. 9, 2015. The aircraft is due to be deployed in 2018. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)" http://www.readingeagle.com/storyimage/ ... 099335.jpg



Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 11 Oct 2015, 18:49
by spazsinbad
The previous odd landing / arrest does not look so bad when zoomed at three quarter speed but YOUSE BE THE JUDGE!

Also a wide variation of file size/video quality F-35C downloads for free here: https://www.dvidshub.net/tags/video/f35c


Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 12 Oct 2015, 19:12
by spazsinbad
Sammy does SloMo - Groan - Geddit?: http://news.usni.org/2015/10/12/video-s ... eisenhower 09 Oct 2015



This next one is real time motion ???????????????

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 12 Oct 2015, 19:48
by sferrin
spazsinbad wrote:The previous odd landing / arrest does not look so bad when zoomed at three quarter speed but YOUSE BE THE JUDGE!

Also a wide variation of file size/video quality F-35C downloads for free here: https://www.dvidshub.net/tags/video/f35c



Anybody know the cause? I've seen vids of Hornets doing the same thing. :?:

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 12 Oct 2015, 20:55
by spazsinbad
Potential causes have been canvassed earlier in this thread on page four for example. viewtopic.php?f=57&t=28046&p=304700&hilit=ensure#p304700 The deck is moving whilst rolling can have an effect although perhaps only a smidge of roll in that landing. The new ARC system may cause some hiccups in various landing situations although there is the touch and go earlier with that hiccup. I repeat: arrested landings are violent. Usually they are seen from vantage points that do not highlight what we see in that video clip. IF there are similar Hornet videos online then please point to them. Otherwise I'm not going to search for them myself.

As I recall the 'entire' original video shows a waveoff then the touch and go then the arrest. This is a test event. The pilot PERHAPS is approaching at NOT optimal wind/sea/deck conditions as a test so he gets his 'eye in' for the not optimal approach and waves off (is waved off by LSO) then the touch and go - as a test - which goes well enough for the arrest to follow. However I can only guess - and it is a test event all round - with the pilots becoming deck qualified first thing.

These test pilots are finding the limits for operating the aircraft for the RECOVERY BULLETIN which will guide all concerned: aircrew - LSOs and uncle tomcobbley and all about how the aircraft can be recovered to an arrested landing in non optimal conditions (which have been ascertained during DT-1 aboard NIMITZ). Now the pilots go for the limits - perhaps we see a 'limit' approach/landing/arrest.

Meanwhile here is a problematic A4G DECK ROLLING LANDING ARREST viddy:


Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 12 Oct 2015, 21:50
by johnwill
Couple of things come to mind, off-center engagement, cable dynamics, gear strut servicing, and pilot induced. The first three are not the likely cause, but there is evidence the roll may be pilot induced. Take a close look at the right, excuse me starboard, flap and aileron at the time of the roll. Seems to me they are driving the roll rather than opposing it. A close look at the test data could verify that, and i'm sure someone has already done that. Note also the horizontal tails go TE up at the same time. Here's what may be happening. At cable engagement, the pilot pulls back on the stick and inadvertently puts left roll command in at the same time. He has relatively little experience with a side stick, so he may be experiencing the same learning curve as early F-16 pilots with a side stick. Here is a link to a discussion of the F-16 case.

viewtopic.php?f=23&t=27219&start=15


Another remote possibility just occurred to me. The flight control system sensors, especially roll axis (roll angle, roll rate, etc.) may be adversely affected by the impact shock of the landing and put out false roll indications. The system may think the airplane has a right roll and input left roll command to the flap and aileron. Here again, someone has already checked that out.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 12 Oct 2015, 22:05
by spazsinbad
Thanks 'JW' I forgot about the side stick. However these test pilots have been test arresting ashore and just plain landing navy style ashore - remember there is 'shake rattle and roll' among all the other carrier testing done ashore - so these guys would know about the side stick I'll imagine. It has been stated clearly they will find the limits for landings on the carrier. This test event could have found a limit. And yet in the grand scheme of things I do not see it as a big deal. Coming to a dead stop or even just touching down hard on a moving deck does all kinds of weird 'n wonderful things with all the variables involved with those six degrees of freedom - "it is only rock and roll but I like it". :mrgreen:

Graphic from: http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?Lo ... =ADA469901 (PDF 2.5Mb)

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 12 Oct 2015, 23:01
by spazsinbad
'JW' to follow on from your post about the F-16 sidestick - perhaps these test pilots are doing 'nugget' unhinged approaches with inappropriate sidestick input on touchdown/arrest. Perhaps they factor in this bit that otherwise more experienced pilots will not fumble. Conjecture about it can never end I guess without a specific detailed explanation.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 12 Oct 2015, 23:36
by johnwill
Spaz, of course you are right about the pilots having FCLP experience, but just human nature, he may have had the gain turned up just a bit with these early real carrier landings. Also possible the roll was intentional, certainly nothing hazardous about it. i really hope they let us know what it was, but doubt they will. Respects to all who land airplanes on boats.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2015, 00:11
by spazsinbad
'JW' I would be hazardous with that side stick. I'm going to look for info about it in my PDFs however I think perhaps the Avionics sub forum in the HMDS thread near the beginning has info about the side stick - whether it is relevant I do not recall. Here is a quote from this post: viewtopic.php?f=62&t=16223&p=263842&hilit=stick#p263842
"...On the right hand side of the cockpit is the side stick controller, which has a fair bit of movement and in the case of the F-35B STOVL variant so that the pilot can hover the aeroplane.

The throttle is on the left hand side and has a long linear throw rather than a rotary arc. This allows pilots of all physical sizes (from really small 104lb all the way up to 245lb) to fit and reach the controls, and sit comfortably in the aeroplane...."

This next quote will be somewhere in this forum however I'll only quote the stick bits.
Blue Sky OPS
26 April 2012 Mark Ayton spoke with Peter Wilson, a former Royal Navy Sea Harrier pilot and now STOVL lead test pilot at NAS Patuxent River - AIR International F-35 Lightning II

"...One very notable system on the F-35 is the side stick located on the right side of the cockpit. The mechanics of the side stick are well balanced with just the right amount of movement (about 1½ inches or 38mm) according to Peter Wilson who said: “You first notice this when using the stick to rotate and bring the nose up to establish an attitude at which the aeroplane’s going to climb away. The aeroplane feels absolutely rock solid, the handling feels precise.”

A very distinct feature of the F-35 is noise both inside the cockpit and out. “From the cockpit it’s not especially loud but it doesn’t sound like any other aeroplane that I’ve flown,” said the lead STOVL pilot.

The ride quality of the F-35 is also different, especially the precision with which the pilot can manoeuvre the aircraft using the side stick to put it exactly where he or she wants. “It’s most noticeable when you’re trying to do a tightly controlled formation task, like air refuelling. I’ve plugged into a tanker many times with a remarkably high success rate, higher than I would have had on the Harrier, and with a different technique. The pilot formates the air refuelling probe directly onto the basket of the tanker, sits behind it, and just plugs it when it’s steady and level.

Coming in to land is also precise. “Even in a cross wind it’s easy, the aeroplane points its nose into wind very nicely and reduces side slip,” said Peter Wilson.

Symbology in the helmet-mounted display allows the pilot to see the aircraft track, confirming that he or she is aligned with the runway even if the nose is not because of crosswind. The side stick is extremely precise for both flaring (the technique used to gradually reduce the descent rate) the aircraft and adjusting any drift, but even if he or she does not make any correction the aircraft will land and straighten itself up “beautifully” according to Peter Wilson. “It’s the easiest aeroplane I’ve ever landed and really does look after you. When I tell you how easy it is to land, in the back of my mind, I am thinking ‘isn’t that going to be great for the young pilot who has worked hard throughout the mission and needs to get home when he is tired’,” he added....

...The throttle commands thrust and not the rpm of the engine, so at idle the engine is providing 10% of the thrust available and when pushed forward to the mil stop it provides 100% of the available thrust or full mil power. The throttle gives a linear variation of the percentage of thrust available with its position, which makes it subtly different to use. One hundred percent thrust means just that, with no variation (which can be the case with a legacy aircraft), so the pilot knows when the engine is providing all of the power that it can...."

Source: militaryrussia.ru/forum/download/file.php?id=28256 (PDF 12.5Mb)

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2015, 00:43
by spazsinbad
ACTIVE STICK & THROTTLE FOR F-35
16 Oct 2008 Joseph Krumenacker; NAVAIR Flight Controls/JSF Vehicle Systems

Source: http://www.csdy.umn.edu/acgsc/mtg102/SubcommitteD/F35 AIS Krumenacker SAE 081016.ppt (13.8Mb)

"Delivery of first fleet F-35C starts countdown to debut
(NAVY TIMES 08 JUL 13) Mark D. Faram

"...Flies Beautifully’
Tabert, a test pilot, is one of the Navy’s most experienced pilots in the JSF, with more than 130 hours of stick time to date. He was the first military pilot to fly all three F-35 variants— Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy — and was involved in the initial tests of the Navy and Marine versions at Patuxent River, Md., before reporting to VFA-101 in February. As the Navy’s most experienced F-35 pilot, it’s his job to get the squadron’s other pilots — nearly all with 3,000-plus hours flying F/A-18s off carrier decks — up to speed as instructor pilots.

“It’s not a difficult airplane to fly,” Tabert said. “The systems and the sensors are very new and state of the art.” One main difference between the Lightning II & previous Navy fighters is the placement of the control stick, used to steer the aircraft. “This is the first ‘side stick’ control [carrier-based] aircraft the Navy has,” he said. “That’s a little bit different than the center-stick Hornet we came from. They did a great job aligning it & the aircraft flies beautifully.”..."

Source: http://hrana.org/news/2013/07/navy-jsf-arriving/

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2015, 00:48
by johnwill
That (38 mm) is considerably more motion than the YF-16 stick (zero) or F-16 stick (+/- 0.25 in.).

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2015, 00:57
by spazsinbad
'JW' the bit in 'a' quote about side stick movement needed for the hover in the F-35B was left out/not quoted above.

Lots of mumbo jumbo about the stick/throttle and computers and wires and such like in this excellent artickle. And included is an explanation about the 'criteria' for a safe carrier landing at beginning. Rereading it again this article is highly recommended to read at source to get all the good bits. Only some parts excerpted here.... (for comp geeks).
Tailored to Trap
01 Dec 2012 Frank Colucci

"...Safe carrier approaches require the airplane be stabilized in the correct glideslope and attitude to touch down with the proper geometry [aligned for and aft with the angle deck centreline and on centreline of the angle deck] and rate of descent. Carrier pilots maintain that glideslope with visual reference to an optical landing aid on the ship, or “meatball.” They make continuous power changes while holding the aircraft at a near-constant angle of attack (alpha). According to Canin, “If we’re going to hold alpha constant, then the only way to change lift is by accelerating or decelerating the airplane. We do this with power, but because of engine lag and aircraft inertia, there’s a lot of anticipation required, and a lot of corrections and counter-corrections. Doing that well requires skill, seat-of-the-pants [flying], and a lot of practice.”

He offered, “A much better approach would be to control the coefficient of lift itself, by changing the camber of the wing.”... [the IDLC/Delta Flight Path (magic carpet) wizardry]

......IDLC is commanded by an Approach Mode Control button on the F-35 active inceptor stick. “You really could have done this with any other airplane,” acknowledged Canin, “but the implementation would have been more complicated.” He added, “It’s easier and cleaner to do this with a flight control system that’s naturally a pitch-rate-command system.”

Flying With Feeling
The triplex-redundant flight control system of the F-35 has flight control laws embedded in three identical, independent Vehicle Management Computers (VMC) made by BAE Systems in Endicott, N.Y. Corin Beck, BAE product director for fixed-wing control systems, said typical quad-redundant legacy flight control systems route all interfaces back to a central Flight Control Computer. The F-35 VMCs are separated for survivability and work as network controllers. They interface with aircraft sensors, active inceptor controls, actuators, and utilities and subsystems, and they provide a bridge to the F-35 mission system network. The distributed network replaces big, dedicated wire bundles with high-speed serial buses to save weight.

The VMC was also designed for affordability and meant to control life-cycle sustainment costs with managed obsolescence. The baseline configuration supports two Freescale PowerPC 7410 processing elements and can expand to support up to four such processors and three SAE AS5643 1394b high-speed serial buses. Based on BAE experience with F-22A, F-16, F-15 and F/A-18 flight control systems, Beck stated the expandable VMC design is more than sufficient to manage any likely growth or added functionality over the life of the F-35 program.

BAE Systems Electronic Systems in Rochester, U.K., also makes the F-35 active inceptor system including the active throttle quadrant assembly, active side-stick control assembly, and an interface control unit. The motorized inceptors transmit pilot inputs to the F-35 fly-by-wire flight control system and give the pilot tactile cues with resistance ramps, gates and stops to provide aircraft “feel” and warnings. Unlike traditional springs, stick shakers and other mechanical force-feedback mechanisms, the motorized sidestick varies feedback forces with aircraft condition.

The throttle is likewise back-driven to give the pilot situational awareness about the energy state of the airplane and the corrections being made. If or when the pilot breaks out of Approach Mode, the throttle position is synchronized to the engine thrust request (ETR). “If the throttle is physically jammed, the approach mode will still work. One of the redundancy features of the airplane is that the physical throttle linkage is no longer required,” Canin said.

Engine thrust request is the driver for IDLC surface deflection. The Moog electro-hydrostatic actuators that move the F-35 control surfaces promise survivability and maintainability advantages over more conventional hydraulic actuators. They also provide slightly greater bandwidth than hydraulic actuators for IDLC. However, Canin observes, “We could have done this with hydraulic actuators. The magic is in the control laws.”..."

Source: http://www.aviationtoday.com/av/militar ... 77964.html

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2015, 01:23
by spazsinbad
IN FOCUS: Why the UK’s carriers will not be ‘airfields at sea’
11 April 2012 Peter Collins

"...LANDING SPACE
But for all its total size, the carrier’s angled deck, with four arrestor wires, only measures 786ft (240m) in length and 114ft in width between the painted side “foul lines”. From the stern “round down” to the first arrestor wire is 170ft. The arrestor wires are spaced about 40ft apart, with the number three wire being the target that any pilot will aim to catch. A typical approach speed for a mid-weight F/A-18E/F is 140kt (259km/h) indicated air speed, flown at an 8.1˚ angle of attack (AoA)...."

Source: http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... ea-370186/

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2015, 01:41
by spazsinbad
And the wizewoids of Art Tommassetti:
The Making of a Joint Strike Fighter Pilot Welcome to the fifth generation.
November 2013 Art Tomassetti Air & Space magazine

"...Why would anyone start training with an airplane that was only partially capable? Because we are building uderstanding, familiarity, and compatibility. Center stick pilots need to become side stick pilots.Push button and analog pilots need to become touch screen and digital pilots. Head-up-display pilots need to become helmet-mounted-display pilots. Fourth generation pilots need to become fifth generation pilots. We’re still learning what the F-35 can do, and we need people who know the airplane and can continue to drive it to its ultimate performance...."

Source: http://www.airspacemag.com/military-avi ... 70321.html

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2015, 03:04
by XanderCrews
spazsinbad wrote:And the wizewoids of Art Tommassetti:
The Making of a Joint Strike Fighter Pilot Welcome to the fifth generation.
November 2013 Art Tomassetti Air & Space magazine

"...Why would anyone start training with an airplane that was only partially capable? Because we are building uderstanding, familiarity, and compatibility. Center stick pilots need to become side stick pilots.Push button and analog pilots need to become touch screen and digital pilots. Head-up-display pilots need to become helmet-mounted-display pilots. Fourth generation pilots need to become fifth generation pilots. We’re still learning what the F-35 can do, and we need people who know the airplane and can continue to drive it to its ultimate performance...."

Source: http://www.airspacemag.com/military-avi ... 70321.html


Turbo has spoken

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2015, 04:46
by spazsinbad
And apologies to TURBO for msmelling his surnam. :mrgreen: No wonder the Greekish Surnamed Chappie [ download/file.php?id=21863&t=1 ] was looking concerned waiting to be catadepulted (see earlier photo) - youse'll find the quote below.
Navy Winds Up F-35Cs Development Tests On USS Eisenhower
12 Oct 2015 Colin Clark

"...The pilots were using the third generation helmets, a little over a month since the first one was delivered by Rockwell Collins. The verdict from three different pilots: it improved their ability to fly and land on the carrier at night, perhaps the most difficult feat for any pilot. They also got the chance to push the plane and the carrier to their limits. The carrier was operating in crosswinds of up to 40 knots, [this seems to be a mangled quote by either hearer or sayer - the limit for any crosswind is 20knots with an intention for 25knot limit eventually after testing and this is ashore on runways. What is meant to be said most likely is that the ship was generating WOD of forty knots with a crosswind component that was within limits (that we do not know yet)] and the planes were taking off with nearly full fuel loads of 50,000 pounds [we have to bear with retorter that he means the combined fuel/sim. weapon load was that] at the lowest speeds possible to establish the baseline for F-35C operations from here on out.

As the planes cleared the bow after being catapulted forward, they were falling up to 17 feet, testing :devil: the pilots’ abilities to control the plane, as well as pushing the planes avionics and control surfaces. Joe DellaVedova, the F-35 program spokesman, called the effort “once in a lifetime” testing. :devil:

One of the more intriguing comments on the interaction between ship and planes came from the Mighty Ike’s captain, Stephen Koehler, a former F-14 pilot who now commands one very big ship. He noted that the ship drivers use each of the four huge propellers to best position the ship as she’s underway to give pilots the best combination of wind and takeoff [CATAPULT] speeds.... [Good Oh]

...One thing that separated this from the first flights aboard the USS Nimitz was that the three-wire, the one pilots like to hit the most and for which they garner the most praise, was out of commission through the voyage. So we couldn’t report on how the F-35 pilots were besting their F-18 Super Hornet colleagues on catching the three-wire every time as happened aboard the Nimitz. However, several pilots I spoke with said they had been targeting the same area and hit the target each time...."

Source: http://breakingdefense.com/2015/10/navy ... isenhower/

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 13 Oct 2015, 15:11
by spazsinbad
NITE
“151008-N-KK394-580 https://www.dvidshub.net/image/2225716/ ... sea-trials
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 8, 2015) - An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 takes off aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is currently conducting follow-on sea trials aboard the Eisenhower. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Anderson W. Branch/Released) https://www.dvidshub.net/download/image/2225716
'N DAY:
“151010-N-QD363-343 https://www.dvidshub.net/image/2225730/ ... sea-trials
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 10, 2015) – An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 flies by the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is currently conducting follow-on sea trials aboard the Eisenhower. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jameson E. Lynch/Released) https://www.dvidshub.net/download/image/2225730

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 14 Oct 2015, 07:31
by spazsinbad
Okeydokey here is a great post about NavAv stuff - congrats and BZ SweepOfManyFiters. Best RED at the secret Sauce. :devil: In other words 'go to the URL link below to read the entire artickle from whoa to go. :mrgreen:
Feet Wet: F-35C DT-II aboard the Mighty Ike!
13 Oct 2015 Jonathan Derden

"...Commander Christian “Wilson” Sewell, F-35C test pilot and government flight test director for the Patuxent River-based ITF, elaborates:

“The whole point of this developmental testing is we need to get a jet to the fleet that can take off and land reliably on the boat, with an easy workload and good handling qualities. The way we do that is through our developmental test I, II, and III periods… We’re expanding the envelope a little bit to include the aircraft launch and recovery bulletins. We’re testing multiple wind-over-deck scenarios, and during this period we’re focusing on high-wind (around 40 knots) coming across the landing area on the carrier. [NOT all crosswind - only acceptable Xwind with most WOD down angle deck.] What we’ve seen is the handling qualities are all Level 1 – what we call low workload – even in a high-wind scenario. We’ve also seen minimal touchdown dispersion, so we’re reliable about putting the jet right where we want to on deck.”

Some of the last test points being tested during DT-II were also some of the most hazardous to plane and pilot. For example, the aircraft was subjected to several minimum energy catapult shots utilizing both afterburner and mil power.

“Today is a key test for us, because we’re doing what test pilots go to school for,” explains Rear Admiral John Haley, Commander Naval Air Force Atlantic. “Theoretically we know what the airplane is supposed to do because of all the work the flight test engineers have done. While it sounds pretty simple, it’s probably one of the things that creates the most pucker factor for a pilot because you’re exploring the bottom edge of the envelope – ‘speed is life, more is better’ – and now we’re purposely reducing the speed to validate the reality with the theoretical engineering data.”

Tom Briggs, F-35 Air Vehicle Lead Engineering Department Head for the Pax River ITF, explains the process:

“We were shooting the aircraft off the front of the boat until we found a level of sink that was deemed unacceptable. We then add 15 knots worth and we give that data to the fleet. We anchor that test point, so that even with inevitable wind and weight variations, the fleet guys are good to go.”

By establishing the bottom of the flight envelope, “we were going where a fleet jet should theoretically never go,” adds Sewell. “Barring a failure or other event, a fleet jet should never get to where we were the past few days.”

Though not visible thanks to the jet’s internal weapons carriage capability, the F-35s carried inert stores during DT-II, in contrast to the first DT-I test period where the aircraft flew with empty weapons bays. Each aircraft carried a 2,000lb GBU-31 JDAM and two AIM-120 AMRAAMs, adding almost 2,700 pounds to the aircraft’s gross weight, resulting in some 55,000 and 60,000 pound catapult launches....

...Despite the threat of a major hurricane churning in the western Atlantic, and other foul weather delaying the arrival of the jets onboard the Mighty Ike the F-35C DT-II phase was successfully completed ahead of schedule. “We’re done with flight testing sooner than expected,” says Murphy. “It’s a testament to the aircraft, and to the entire team that works on it.”

The F-35 program continues to make huge strides with its respective services, with the USMC recently declaring IOC and the USAF anticipated to follow suit in 2016. Though the Navy is slated to be the last of the services to reach IOC, the fleet aviators will know that their jet will be fully capable of operating off the carrier thanks to the intense testing done by VX-23 and the F-35 ITF." [GO TEAM]

Source: http://fightersweep.com/3158/feet-wet-f ... ighty-ike/

AND here are the lads doing the thing with the thing... Go here for the 'catapult buttons' info and scroll down etc:

viewtopic.php?f=57&t=26634&p=291539&hilit=buttons#p291539

PHOTO CROPPed: http://fightersweep.com/wp-content/uplo ... EW-8FS.jpg (1.1Mb)

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 15 Oct 2015, 10:38
by spazsinbad
AvWeak has a series of not very inspiring photos however this one has some interest with the JBD seen UP/BEHIND etc.
F35C Carrier Trials On USS Eisenhower
14 Oct 2015 Michael Fabey | Aviation Week & Space Technology

U.S. Navy test pilots put F-35Cs through their paces for military- and maximum-level launches with simulated missiles in early October aboard CVN 68 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, off the Virginia Coast. The aircraft were laden with gross weights equaling internal weapons to prove out the Joint Strike Fighter’s (JSF) carrier-speed needs during the lowest and highest “energy” catapult shots.

The tests are meant to show F-35C carrier suitability and integration during at-sea operations. The Navy wants to gradually expand that aircraft operating envelope while the service prepares for initial operating capability (IOC) in 2018. The simulated internal missiles included guided bomb units and Joint Direct Attack Munitions, says Cmdr. Christian Sewell, one of the test pilots.

“This is a really big test for us,” says Rear Adm. John Haley, commander of the Naval Air Force Atlantic. "You have to determine what the envelope is. How fast do you need to go? It’s one of the tests that creates the most 'pucker' factor.”

The carrier crew and F-35C team tested the aircraft’s Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS) for approach handling qualities at higher gross weights; the tests also garnered data for the system’s wind-over-deck survey.

Crews aboard the ship have seen little difference between handling F-35Cs and F-18 Hornets or Super Hornets, says Capt. Stephen Koehler, Eisenhower commanding officer. “It taxis well,” [OMG!] he says. “It doesn’t do anything we’re not used to.”

The F-35C will add a fast, lethal and survivable set of sensors to provide to the satellites, ships and other aircraft connected to a strike group the kind of situational awareness needed to operate in some of the more heavily defended areas, Navy officials say. “Data management is where it is these days,” says Capt. Stephen Koehler, commanding officer of the CVN 69 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower.

While many F-35 supporters boast about its stealthy features, the aircraft’s sensor and communications systems are of greater importance for naval officials.

“It’s not about stealth,” says Rear Adm. John Haley, commander of the Naval Air Force Atlantic. “It’s about the entire aircraft. It will change dramatically our tactics for the ship and the battlegroup.”

Some military analysts have questioned the aircraft’s ability to conduct close-contact aerial dogfights, but Haley says the F-35C’s sensors will make it possible to shoot an enemy aircraft before it can get that close. “You’ll be able to detect him. He’s not going to be able to detect you. With the sensors, I will have the capability to shoot at a longer distance. We’re going to change our tactics. Instead of just doing ISR [intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance] or strike, we’ll be doing those at the same time."

But, Haley says, “It’s not going to be a wall of F-35s. There will be a mix of aircraft. That’s one of the lessons we learned in World War II—if you go alone, you’re going to die. if you were going to tell me we’re doing away with [Super Hornets], or that we are doing away with Growlers and the only thing we’ll have are the F-35s, then I become lukewarm. Anyone who says that [it] is the master of all trades, well, I would say they are smoking dope.”

Still, Haley points out, the ability of the aircraft to do so many things will be unique to a naval aircraft, and only after younger pilots—who have grown up operating game controllers and related equipment—get a chance to test and fly the aircraft will the service learn the full extent of new possible operational concepts.

“We don’t know now half the tactics we are going to develop with this aircraft," Haley says." [OldGeezersHUH? :mrgreen: ]

PHOTO: http://aviationweek.com/site-files/avia ... s/F354.jpg

Source: http://aviationweek.com/defense/f35c-ca ... isenhower#

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 15 Oct 2015, 15:15
by neptune
spazsinbad wrote:AvWeak has a series of not very inspiring photos however this one has some interest with the JBD seen UP/BEHIND ..]


...any idea what the JBD upgrade was..maybe a couple of buckets of Thermion???... :?:

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 15 Oct 2015, 15:29
by spazsinbad
Back in old threads the modifications were mentioned. In this thread they are mentioned in the post here: [this thread post says cats no.1 & no.3 modified: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=28046&p=305407&hilit=catapult#p305407 ]

viewtopic.php?f=57&t=28046&p=304752&hilit=JBD%2A#p304752
"In order to optimize carrier operations, Ike modified its jet blast deflectors (JBD) & catapults to better support the F-35C.

A jet blast deflector does just what its name suggests. It is a safety device that redirects the high energy exhaust from a jet engine away from equipment and people on the flight deck to prevent damage and injury.

"We completely rebuilt catapult one's JBD on the ship," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 1st Class Shamon Smith, Air Department's V-2 division maintenance leading petty officer aboard Ike. "We replaced some of the salt-water piping which allows for a rapid flow of pressure throughout the JBDs so it can cool down a lot faster under strenuous conditions which make them perfect for the F-35C."...

..."The CAFSU and VRT guys were a huge help," Smith said. "They came in and did the modifications that we received from AIRLANT and they added those specifications into our JBDs so we were ready for the F-35C's to land aboard Ike."...

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 15 Oct 2015, 17:34
by neptune
spazsinbad wrote:Back in old threads the modifications were mentioned. ....."We replaced some of the salt-water piping which allows for a rapid flow of pressure throughout the JBDs so it can cool down a lot faster under strenuous conditions which make them perfect for the F-35C...

...looked and missed it....more water....of course..... :D
....turn up the heat....turn up the coolling...... :doh:

thanks....

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 15 Oct 2015, 18:00
by spazsinbad
You can search the F-35 forum using this four letter string: 'JBD*' without the single quote marks of course and also select the maximum number of words in the search criteria and you should find some useful information. There are only two pages of results: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=26634&p=284230&hilit=JBD%2A#p284230
DOTE Jan 2015 - Due to the higher temperature of F-35 engine exhaust compared to legacy aircraft, carrier JBDs need at least two modifications. A cooling water orifice modification enables basic operations, but additional side panel cooling must be added for higher afterburner thrust catapult launches. The Navy is accomplishing these full modifications on at least some JBDs on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) in preparation for IOT&E and on USS George Bush (CVN-77) for developmental testing, and performed the basic orifice modification on USS Nimitz (CVN-68) for the November DT-1....

And another bobrodgersshow: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=26708&p=282536&hilit=JBD%2A#p282536
""...“Aboard the aircraft carrier, the F-35C exhaust impingement on the jet blast deflector has also been studied,” he said. “The aircraft obviously has a common engine, the F135, and so we took an airplane out at Eglin and did tests against just a flat plate. We’ve taken the data off of that and we’ve delivered it to Lakehurst.

“Lakehurst is going to take fleet representative JBDs [jet blast deflectors] and the cooling structure that’s associated with that,” he continued. “They’ll install it at Lakehurst, and we’re going to do tests against that jet blast deflector and those units will be able to be installed on a ship at a future date.”

Manazir said the problem is not the heat pattern on the JBD, but the fact that the F-35 and the F/A-18E/F Super Hornets launch less than a minute apart and place a heat load on different places on the JBD.

“It means we have to have a slightly different cooling structure, which probably will involve extra piping in the JBD, but not that much of a change,” he said...."

Lotsa yaddayaddayadda from the amiable butler: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=15767&p=200694&hilit=JBD%2A#p200694
&
viewtopic.php?f=22&t=15852&p=200491&hilit=JBD%2A#p200491

NAVAIR: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=15767&p=200137&hilit=JBD%2A#p200137

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 16 Oct 2015, 12:45
by spazsinbad
Some stats for DT-II.
A Message from Lorraine Martin
15 Oct 2015 Lorraine Martin LM PR https://www.f35.com/resources/general-m ... kly-update

"...From Oct. 2-10, the F-35C stretched its wings over the Atlantic Ocean conducting a second round of development testing, aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The sea trials went very well, and flight testing concluded four days early despite inclement weather from Hurricane Joaquin. Let me repeat that: Four days early! As a key objective for this test event, the Integrated Test Force (ITF) from Pax River completed energy testing. This included taking off heavy, at low speeds, and into crosswinds up to 40 knots. The ITF also flew with internal weapons and conducted day and night flights with the Gen III helmet.

During the 17 flights and 26.5 flight hours, the team accomplished 66 catapults and arrestments and 280 flight test points to meet all the test objectives. These are simply phenomenal results, and it was a great job by the ITF, Eisenhower crew and everyone who supported this critical test event on the path to the U.S. Navy declaring IOC in 2018. The knowledge learned from this event serves as the baseline for the third and final F-35C development testing event next year.

Remarking on what the F-35C brings to naval aviation, Rear Adm. John Haley said, “The F-35C brings sensors and an ability to guide the fight, whether it's an air-to-ground fight or an air-to-air fight. We’re going to have an ability that’s going to change how we think about getting to the target, delivering weapons and getting out of the target.”...

Source: https://www.f35.com/assets/uploads/docu ... _15_15.pdf (350Kb)

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 16 Oct 2015, 17:08
by madrat
Can F-35B be used to double the takeoff sorties versus strictly F-35C's catapults? Can there ever be too many sorties in an emergency?

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 16 Oct 2015, 17:20
by spazsinbad
I'll guess you refer to F-35Bs on CVNs? Why would they be there? In an emergency lots of things will be possible - for ordinary operations the Bs are on LHAs/CVFs whilst the Cs are on CVNs. That is the end of it - best spell out your scenario.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 16 Oct 2015, 17:28
by blindpilot
madrat wrote:Can F-35B be used to double the takeoff sorties versus strictly F-35C's catapults? Can there ever be too many sorties in an emergency?


I'll answer seriously assuming a serious question.
For the forseeable future F-35Bs will not operate from CATOBAR CVNs. So that's out. But we might imagine an LHD or Brit Carrier nearby offering additional air power, so we can look at that.

Following WWII there was a time when the new "designed for jets" super carriers were still carrying smaller piston fighters. They loaded up 130 fighters on the ship. That was the first time that the capability of the command, control, and sortie management was stressed beyond its capability. So they would only manage some number less than that complement while the extras sat around playing cards. I don't know what the manageable number was but it was less than 130 per combat theatre area.

So yes there can be too many sorties. In large scale operations, like those seen in Vietnam and the Persian Gulf, different groups are given separate sectors to avoid C&C conflicts.

So actually, while no ,,, there won't be any "Bs" joining the Cs on CVNs it is still a pretty good question to ponder. Normally it will be either or. either the US CVN, or the Brit Carrier/USMC Fighter loaded LHD or multiple carriers assigned sectors in a large operation.

Anyway, a trivia number to remember - 130 aircraft on a carrier is too big. Carriers do have a known "too big" size. It's close to a land base's "two wings" (144 max) complement.

BP

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 16 Oct 2015, 19:26
by madrat
In war time you have deck space that can be spared for contingent planning. A pair of F-35B's on standby for point defense would not be futile when carrier air wings and task force participants are shrinking.

Perhaps the JBD can't retract down and clear a run past Hornets and C's stacked up for launching, but what about keeping some on standby for VTOL? I would think you could get F-35B's in the air faster than C's in a pinch, especially during sustained round the clock bombardment of an inshore action when the bulk of aircraft are loaded down with bombs. If you can get a pair of B's loaded with AMRAAM's out to a threat a hundred miles out in five minutes, it beats dropping all your bombs to divert C's going the other direction.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 16 Oct 2015, 19:38
by spazsinbad
First one must do the math to find out how much fuel with intended weapon load the F-35B will be able to 'VTOL'? with? Please get the terminology correct. VTOL is a great fudge because it can mean anything except what the F-35B is designed to do and that is STOVL. Yes the F-35B can also take off vertically but with a minimal load - ordinarily it will STO and then VL (and on CVFs it may SRVL). These are the terms to use whilst VTOL is NOT one of them. OK?

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 17 Oct 2015, 00:45
by popcorn
madrat wrote:In war time you have deck space that can be spared for contingent planning. A pair of F-35B's on standby for point defense would not be futile when carrier air wings and task force participants are shrinking.

Perhaps the JBD can't retract down and clear a run past Hornets and C's stacked up for launching, but what about keeping some on standby for VTOL? I would think you could get F-35B's in the air faster than C's in a pinch, especially during sustained round the clock bombardment of an inshore action when the bulk of aircraft are loaded down with bombs. If you can get a pair of B's loaded with AMRAAM's out to a threat a hundred miles out in five minutes, it beats dropping all your bombs to divert C's going the other direction.

I think the US Navy are familiar with lessons from the Battle of Midway and would have sufficient CAP coverage.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 17 Oct 2015, 01:04
by madrat
The F-35B has demonstrated a 41,100 pound vertical takeoff. At under 30,000 pound empty weight and AMRAAM's only, that leaves a pretty good fuel fraction for an emergency intercept.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 17 Oct 2015, 01:11
by spazsinbad
Next I'm wondering at the potential thread derailment on what has become a thread about a very successful F-35C DT-II period aboard IKE these last few weeks. Why is this so? Why are F-35Bs on CVNs? Why are not F-35Cs ready to catapult from same CVNs with plenty of gas and weapons to deal with incoming that are not already being dealt with by already airborne CVN fixed wing jet assets? What early warning systems on ships and aircraft have failed to get F-35Bs on CVNs?

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 17 Oct 2015, 01:17
by KamenRiderBlade

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 17 Oct 2015, 01:27
by spazsinbad
Do we see the variable A/B starting up after the first milliseconds into the cat shot at 1min 48-49secs? Wanna see a slomo?

Various quality versions of the same Youtube video are available here: Best quality is 125 Mb .MP4

https://www.dvidshub.net/video/428539/f ... eisenhower

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 17 Oct 2015, 03:42
by spazsinbad

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 17 Oct 2015, 09:02
by sdkf251
Nice Videos Guys! Not bad music, makes the video feel like a movie trailer. Expecting an added text scroll in the end like "Coming to an operational theater near you" :mrgreen:

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 18 Oct 2015, 00:18
by bring_it_on
F-35C completes carrier tests aboard the Ike

Long article best read at source..


Test pilots found the jet’s slowest airspeed cat shot. Officials were not ready to reveal that number, but there were launches in which the F-35C dipped well below the flight deck. The Navy typically sets the standard launch speed at 15 knots above the minimum.

While the ship’s crew and JSF’s pilots put a future jet fighter to the test, one two-star pilot was engaged in a different kind of battle. Many media outlets reported earlier this year that the stealth fighter had lost in a dogfight with the Air Force's F-16 Falcon earlier this summer. Is the JSF inferior? Is it a waste of money? Did the designers fail to build a better plane?

Such assertions “makes me cringe," said Rear Adm. John Haley, the head of Naval Air Force Atlantic. "It makes me think the people that are looking at this don't understand what the future holds for us.”

“If you wanted us to design an airplane that optimized going out and beating an F-16 or F-15, we could do that. It wouldn't be this airplane. If you tell me to optimize an airplane that's going to do the mission we need to do, which is power projection and force protection, in a modern cyber and threat environment, this airplane does that without sacrificing your capabilities to do a close-in fight.”

Haley reiterated the JSF’s stand-off capabilities, unmatched situational awareness, and the fact that it won’t travel into the battlespace alone.

“With this airplane and how were going to fight with it, [a close-in dogfight] will not be typical,” he said. “I'm pretty confident I'm not going to have that happen. However, if it happens, we're not just going to stop training guys on [air combat maneuvering].

“I'm not saying that there aren't airplanes out there that can beat this thing if you put it in a bad position. I'm saying that the airplane had such great situational awareness, the chances of getting in that position are slim. An adversary coming off aspect would be identified long before he could recognize you.”

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 18 Oct 2015, 00:36
by spazsinbad
Thanks 'backITbrung' - some more quotes I like... :mrgreen: OH NOES - heating the ceiling - where's me THERMION.... :devil:
F-35C completes carrier tests aboard the Ike
17 Oct 2015 Lance Bacon

"...The multifaceted two-week flight test was used to develop launch and recovery bulletins. The former focused on 55,000 and 60,000-pound catapult shots at military, the catapult shot with standard jet thrust, and maximum power....

...Development of recovery bulletins saw multiple wind scenarios — some as high as 40 knots over deck [with a crosswind component within limits sometimes as reported by others]. Cmdr. Christian “Wilson” Sewell, the flight test director, lauded "Delta flight path," in which flight controls capture the glide slope once the pilot has a center ball on their flight deck approach. The pilot then adjusts with minor tweaks via the stick.

“Easy,” Sewell said. “We put it on the deck exactly where we want just about every time.”

Sewell, who started off in F/A-18 Hornets, has been flying 16 years. He has roughly 40 shots and traps in the JSF, and another 230 in the Hornet....

...Yellow shirts said the JSF taxis and maneuvers well on the flight deck. Sailors found it to be similar to the F/A-18 Super Hornet — it uses the same repeatable release holdback bar, the Catapult Capacity Selector Valve is set the same, and suspend procedures are the same. The one difference is location of the intakes.

"Our hold back operators and topside safety petty officers have to approach the aircraft similar to the way they would approach a EA-6B Prowler or A-6 Intruder,” said Lt. Cmdr. Karl Murray, V-2 division officer and senior catapult and arresting gear officer, a.k.a. "Top Cat." "The intakes are closer to the nose launch bar, and some of these sailors aren’t used to seeing that."...

...“We are a single engine, but we are a single huge engine,” Sewell said. “A 10,000-pound engine presents some unique logistical considerations: how to get it aboard the ship, how to unpack it and move it around, where can maintenance be done, etc.”

The team did not do an engine swap, but simulated a swap of the power module, which is the largest component. The team also tested the integrated power package that provides electrical power to start the engine. While such gear is nothing new, the exhaust in this IPP points upward. The team ran the IPP for 20 minutes to ensure the hangar bay ceiling didn’t get too hot ....

...Final carrier tests are scheduled for late summer of 2016. This will include external weapons and the full joint precision aircraft landing system."

Source: http://www.navytimes.com/story/military ... /74015774/

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 18 Oct 2015, 10:27
by spazsinbad
ChippyHo wrote:LOOK at he size of that front landing gear!!!! You could swap it out with a C-5 (exaggerating - only slightly!!!)

An explanation about the F-35C nose gear and main gear and the F-35 landing gear in general in this PDF attached from:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/174844675/F-3 ... I#download

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 21 Oct 2015, 05:53
by spazsinbad



Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 23 Oct 2015, 04:43
by spazsinbad
I do not think these details were known before? Anyway here they are again....
Cats and Traps on the Ike
November 2015 UNK

"...The Pax River-based ITF has flown nearly 500 flights, logged more than 700 flight hours, and achieved almost 3,400 test points since January 2015, many in preparation for DT II....

...Aircraft CF-03 was expected to perform asymmetric flying qualities testing loaded with [internal] weapons....

...According to a Lockheed Martin press release, during DT I test pilots and engineers credited the F-35C’s Delta Flight Path (DFP) technology with significantly reducing pilot workload during the approach to the carrier, increasing safety margins during carrier approaches and reducing touchdown dispersion. The DFP was developed by BAE Systems at its facilities at Salmesbury and Warton in Lancashire, UK...." [CVF simulator at Warton can change roles from suitable for F-35Bs to suitable for F-35Cs for test purposes]

Source: Air International Magazine November 2015

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 24 Oct 2015, 01:11
by Dragon029
Great new video from the Navy on DT-II:


Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 24 Oct 2015, 01:30
by spazsinbad
Thanks - great video. Check the first lady launcher - what a grin. And I'm pleased that details were given about 'crosswind' catapult launches up to fifteen knots (nothing about landing but certainly not 40k oft quoted). But youse knew that. :mrgreen: Shirley the BATwing Duo break near the end has got to inform what the nickname might be? BAT baby.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 24 Oct 2015, 02:36
by spazsinbad
I would call this a FAN BREAK but YMMV - the BAT wing rools.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 24 Oct 2015, 11:17
by spazsinbad
F-35C VX-23 ITF EISENHOWER DT-II TEST USN OCTOBER 2015


Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 29 Oct 2015, 22:06
by KamenRiderBlade

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 01 Nov 2015, 11:02
by spazsinbad
The F-35B bits will be replicated on the SRVL thread elsewhere also. 5 page PDF attached.
ALL AT SEA F-35B/F-35C test update
SHOWCASE 2016 SYLVIA PIERSON AEROSPACE TESTING INTERNATIONAL

"2015 has proved to be a busy and record-breaking year for the team responsible for testing naval variants of the F-35 Lightning II...

“SINCE 2010 THE PAX ITF HAS FLOWN MORE THAN 1,800 TEST FLIGHTS, LOGGED 2,544 TEST HOURS AND COMPLETED 12,800 F-35B TEST POINTS, DIRECTLY RESULTING IN THE USMC IOC FLIGHT CLEARANCE”


...The PAX ITF is now 100% complete with its second phase of F-35C testing, conducted aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) from October 2-10, 2015 – the team conducted 66 catapults and 66 arrestments across 17 flights, logging 26.5 flight hours and achieving a total of 280 flight test points and 17 logistics test and evaluation (LT&E) test points....

...WET RUNWAY, BRAKING VALIDATION AND HIGH CROSSWIND TESTING
ITF testers proved the aircraft can stop safely in extreme weather conditions and validated the aircraft envelope out to a 25-knot crosswind with high asymmetric air-to-ground loadings. Even in a maximum asymmetry configuration (up to 26,000 lb·ft) with weapons stores on one wing, the aircraft performed well – in fact, the high asymmetry and crosswind
required little additional attention from the pilot....

...F-35 STOVL MODE TESTING
The PAX ITF continued to expand the STOVL envelope last year in the clean wing configuration and with symmetric and asymmetric external stores. Flying qualities testing featured semi-jet, short take-off and jetborne modes to clear the aircraft for take-off and landings and airspeeds as low as 70kts with 24,000 lb of asymmetry and jet borne with 10,000 lb of asymmetry. The team performed rolling vertical landings (RVL), creeping vertical landings (CVL), vertical landings (VL), high altitude CVLs and VLs, slow landings (SL), and short take-off (STO) tests with nominal winds and crosswinds of up to 25kts. Test pilots reported that flying qualities during asymmetric testing were nearly identical to those in symmetric testing...."

Source: SHOWCASE 2016 AEROSPACE TESTING INTERNATIONAL

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 04 Nov 2015, 02:51
by spazsinbad
Cannot get enough of that Optimum Angle of Attack - Front & Side Views.
https://www.dvidshub.net/image/2212421/ ... eisenhower “ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 2, 2015) The F-35 Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force (ITF) is conducting the second phase of F-35C carrier suitability and integration developmental testing (DT-II) aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Based at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, the highly diverse cadre of PAX ITF technicians, maintainers, engineers, logisticians, support staff and test pilots have flown nearly 500 flights, logged more than 700 flight hours, and achieved almost 3,400 test points since January 2015. (U.S. Navy Photo Courtesy Lockheed Martin Photo by Andrew McMurtrie/Released)” https://www.dvidshub.net/download/image/2212421

151004-N-UY653-012 https://www.dvidshub.net/image/2212060/ ... operations “ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 4, 2015) - An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 prepares to make an arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is currently conducting follow-on sea trials aboard the Eisenhower. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ryan U. Kledzik/Released)” https://www.dvidshub.net/download/image/2212060

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 10 Dec 2015, 04:37
by spazsinbad
Semper Lightning: F-35 Flight Control System
09 Dec 2015 Dan “Dog” Canin

"...Generally, the F-35 tries to keep sideslip near zero, but in some cases it intentionally creates adverse or proverse yaw as necessary to control roll and yaw rates. We’ll talk about the use of pedals at high AOA in a later article, but, for general flying around, the best coordination we’ll get is with our feet on the floor....

...the CV airplane has three different approach modes, easily selected using buttons on the stick and throttle. Two of these modes – APC and DFP[3] – are auto-throttle modes, indicated by a three-letter label on the left side of the HUD. The third mode – manual throttle – is indicated by the absence of a label…arguably not the most compelling indication that you’re responsible for the throttle. This interface will probably evolve; in the meantime, we need to be disciplined and to make doubly sure we’ve got APC engaged before we turn throttle control over to George.

Another area is STOVL landing. The difference between what the power lever (a.k.a. throttle) does on the ground and what it does in the air is profound. On the ground, it acts like a normal throttle: pulling it full aft commands idle thrust. In air, it commands accel/decel rate: pulling it full aft commands a maximum decel. There’s plenty of redundancy in the weight-on-wheels sensors, but if the airplane ever thought it was still airborne after a vertical landing, and you pulled the throttle full aft, the airplane would go charging backward. This would be “untidy” (as our British friends say), especially on the ship. So we take every STOVL landing to a firm touchdown, and let the airplane itself set the throttle to idle when it determines it’s on the ground....

...APC is “approach power compensation” mode, in which the throttle is automatically controlled to maintain the desired AOA during approach. In the C-model, engagement of APC also increases the gain on IDLC (integrated direct lift control), which schedules the flaps in response to stick movements to give very high-gain glideslope response. Another approach mode, DFP (delta flight path), currently in the C-model only, changes the pitch axis CLAW from a pitch-rate system to a glideslope-command system. DFP improves glideslope tracking performance and significantly reduces workload during carrier approaches...."

Source: http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=187

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 11 Dec 2015, 11:48
by spazsinbad

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 08 Jan 2016, 12:19
by spazsinbad
LM has a B Roll Vimeo 11Mb .MP4 Video of IKE testing: https://vimeo.com/lmaeronautics/review/ ... 2452e848dd

I'll put it on youtube....


Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 08 Jan 2016, 19:33
by sferrin
Love the big wings there starting at 0:07. :drool:

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 08 Jan 2016, 22:55
by KamenRiderBlade
F-35C, still my favorite variant.

Also during the night launch, what is up with the purple batons that the deck crew were using?

What does the purple color mean?

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 08 Jan 2016, 23:28
by spazsinbad
I think you see the colour change due to the film used for night time. I see momentary brief purple wash at the start of the first cat launch and the left wing light as it goes down the catapult. The wands look to be white with the purple wash on top. Otherwise I do not think they are purple wands. Over the page there is an LM Official Video which shows the white wands and then colour change with other lights (from film):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=p ... ziAE#t=106

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 08 Jan 2016, 23:36
by SpudmanWP
I'd love to see the min speed takeoff tests and how far it sank below the deck.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 09 Jan 2016, 01:26
by spazsinbad
Airwaves: 2015 Year in Review [F-35B/C flat deck testing, EMALS and other good stuff highlighted]

"2015 marked another milestone year for Naval Air Systems Command. In this year-in-review edition of Airwaves, see the fleet's newest aircraft launch and recovery system; plus, learn about the new tool helping Sailors and Marines get broken aircraft off the flight line faster; and see the F-35C Lightning II make history landing on a carrier at sea."

Source: http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... 58D392AAF1

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 09 Jan 2016, 03:39
by spazsinbad

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 09 Jan 2016, 14:49
by spazsinbad
oops - wrong thread

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 30 Jan 2016, 08:43
by spazsinbad
F-35C Developmental Test Phase 2
29 Jan 2016 Andy Wolfe

"...The team completed sixty-six catapults and traps to expand the gross weight and crosswind operating limits established on USS Nimitz (CVN-68) during DT-I. These tests included catapult launches up to the maximum aircraft gross weight with full internal stores as well as the expanding crosswind limits for launch and recovery. This testing supported the official US Navy aircraft launch and recovery bulletin that is required for fleet F-35C pilots to conduct carrier qualifications in 2016.

Additional testing completed on board the Ike included a variety of Logistics Test and Evaluation, or LT&E, tasks required to prove the F-35C can be maintained and supported above and below deck in the shipboard environment of a Nimitz class carrier. This testing included an engine run and Integrated Power Pack, or IPP, run in the hangar deck, deck spotting, chaining, weapons loading, as well as F135 engine compatibility testing in the ship’s engine shop...."

Caption: "Lt. Karapostoles guides CF-3 as it crosses the fantail of Ike for one of the last arrestment test points completed during DT-II. Photo by Andrew McMurtrie http://www.codeonemagazine.com/images/m ... 7_9029.jpg
&
"
After completing all 280 flight test points, Dyckman and Sewell launched and then joined up for a formation flyby of Ike before returning home to NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. Photo by Andy Wolfe" http://www.codeonemagazine.com/images/m ... 7_4133.jpg


Source: http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=188

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 01 Feb 2016, 19:17
by spazsinbad
Mystery solved about the missing three wire as seen in the many videos [causing bolters but I guess depends on subsequent target wire - if no.4 wire targeted then NOTHING BEYOND except BOLTER BOLTER BOLTER ....
F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) 2015
Jan 2016 DOT&E

"...F-35C
• The second phase of ship suitability testing —DT-2— was conducted from October 2–10, 2015. Ship availability delayed the start of DT-2 from the planned date in August 2015. The principal goal of DT-2 was to perform launch and recovery of the F-35C with internal stores loaded.

- The F-35C sea trials are a series of developmental tests conducted by the program with the principal goal of supporting development of the aircraft launch and recovery bulletins, and the general goal of characterizing ship suitability for operating and maintaining F-35C on a CVN-class ship. During DT-2, only developmental test aircraft CF-3 and CF-5, transient aircraft needed for logistical support, and search and rescue helicopters deployed to the carrier. No air wing was present. The major contractor was responsible for maintenance. ALIS was not installed on the carrier; it was accessed via satellite link to a location ashore.

- Testers accomplished 100 percent of threshold and objective test points (280 total test points) over the course of 17 flights totaling 26.5 flight hours. The results of the test are still in analysis. In addition to the principal goal, the test points addressed:

▪ Minimum end airspeed for limited afterburner and military power catapult launches. For catapult launches that use afterburner, engine power is initially limited to less than full afterburner power while the aircraft is static in the catapult, but then automatically goes to full afterburner power once released. This power limitation was in place to reduce thermal loads on the Jet Blast Deflectors (JBDs) behind the aircraft. [Variable A/B is by DESIGN similar to that of the Super Hornet and experience of same - see here:

▪ Crosswinds catapults

▪ Recovery in high headwinds

▪ Initial Joint Precision Approach and Landing System testing

▪ Qualities of the Gen III HMDS at night

▪ Running the Integrated Power Package (IPP) and engine in the hangar bay

▪ Engine and power module logistics in the hangar bay

- There were 7 bolters (failure to catch an arresting wire) in 66 arrestments during DT-2. During DT-1 (Developmental Test – One), there were no unplanned bolters in 122 arrestments. The higher rate was expected since the carrier arresting gear was not fully operational during DT-2. The third arresting wire (i.e., the wire typically targeted in carrier landings), was removed from service during the test because of a malfunction.

- Testers ran the aircraft’s IPP, a miniature gas turbine engine that can provide ground power, in the hangar bay. They then performed a low-thrust engine run as well. This process simulated maintenance checkout procedures that frequently occur in the hangar bay with legacy aircraft. During these evolutions, crew position the aircraft with its tail pointing out of one of the set of hangar bay doors to the aircraft elevators to direct heat and exhaust away from the inside of the ship. For the F-35C, the unique concern is that the IPP exhaust vents up towards the hangar bay ceiling. The test team monitored the IPP exhaust gas temperature to ensure it would not damage the ceiling of the hangar bay. During both the IPP run and the engine-turn, this temperature remained within safe limits. Testers also collected noise data; analysis is ongoing. The team did not collect data on the potential build-up of IPP exhaust gases within the hangar bay atmosphere, but plans to collect these data during DT-3.

• DT-3, the third and final set of sea trials, will expand the carrier operating envelope further, including external stores, and is scheduled to occur in August 2016.

• The Navy is working on the following air-ship integration issues, primarily for carriers. Some of the following issues also apply to F-35B operations on L-class ships:

- Flight deck JBDs may require additional side panel cooling in order to withstand regular, cyclic limited afterburner launches from an F-35C. JBDs are retractable panels that re-direct hot engine exhaust up and away from the rest of the flight deck when an aircraft is at high thrust for take-off. Even with this additional cooling, however, JBDs may be restricted in how many consecutive F-35C limited afterburner launches they can withstand before they will require a cool down period, which could affect the launch of large “alpha strikes” that involve every aircraft in the air wing, a combat tactic the Navy has used frequently in past conflicts. F-35C limited-afterburner launches are required when the F-35C is loaded with external weaponry and in a heavy, high-drag configuration. The Navy estimates that an F-35C will have 3,000 catapult launches over a 35 year expected lifespan, but that no more than 10 percent of these launches will be limited-afterburner. [General idea of V A/B: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=27772&p=299447&hilit=variable+afterburner#p299447 ] [More on the V A/B for both aircraft: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=26634&p=281244&hilit=variable+afterburner#p281244 ] & [ a goodly explanation here: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=15953&p=201921&hilit=variable+afterburner#p201921 ]
JBD Testing A Key Step For Joint Strike Fighter
18 Jul 2011 Amy Butler, Aviation Week & Space Technology | Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J.

"...Even with<script id="gpt-impl-0.4477642670327495" src="http://partner.googleadservices.com/gpt/pubads_impl_79.js"></script>out the more extensive data provided by today’s sensor array, Super Hornet engineers gained valuable experience during JBD trials that led to a change in how the aircraft is launched. During testing, hot air was inadvertently recirculated into the air intake of the Super Hornet, prompting a “pop stall,” or hiccup in the airflow for the propulsion system. The result was a dangerous fireball coughing from the back of the Super Hornet, says Briggs.

The design fix was the creation of a limited afterburner setting for launch. Engineers crafted software such that the engine is at 122% of military power when a pilot sets it to afterburner. By the time the jet reaches the edge of the deck, the system automatically opens the throttle to full afterburner at 150% of power without intervention by the pilot, says Briggs...

...Because of this lesson, the limited afterburner setting was designed into the F-35 in its infancy...."

Source: http://www.navair.navy.mil/lakehurst/nl ... esting.pdf (125Kb)


- The Navy continues to investigate the replacement of a mobile Material Handling Equipment crane for several purposes onboard carriers, including, and perhaps most importantly, facilitating F-35 engine module maintenance. In order to transfer spare F-35 engine modules from their containers onto a transportation trailer, so they can later be installed in an aircraft, or to take broken modules from a trailer and put them into a shipping container to send back to an ashore repair site, a heavy lift capable crane is required. Onboard L-class ships, the Navy will use an overhead bridge crane built into the hangar bay ceiling, but CVNs do not have any similar ship’s facility and the Navy intends to use a mobile crane. However, efforts to acquire a suitable crane have gone more slowly than originally expected. Given procurement timelines, the Navy must proceed without any further delays in order to have an appropriate crane onboard ship in time for the projected first deployment of an F-35C.
[Portable Crane Info Elsewhere on this forum: Aviogei Delivers F-35 Lightning II Equipment [CRANE] viewtopic.php?f=60&t=28804&p=313404&hilit=crane#p313404 ]

- Work continues on developing triple hearing protection for flight deck crews, but with little update since the FY14 DOT&E Annual Report. Both the F-35C and F/A-18E/F produce around 149 decibels of noise where personnel are normally located when at maximum thrust [both on lower power variable afterburner one would guess] during launch evolutions. The Navy has determined that 53 decibels of attenuation will be required from a triple hearing protection system to allow these personnel to be on deck for 38 minutes, or the equivalent of 60 launch and recovery cycles. Current designs only achieve in the mid-40s decibel range of attenuation, which allows less than 10 minutes of exposure before certain flight deck personnel reach their maximum daily limit of noise.

- Two methods of shipboard aircraft firefighting for the F-35 with ordnance in the weapons bay are being developed, one for doors open and one for doors closed. Each will consist of an adapter that can fit to the nozzle of a standard hose. The open door adapter will also attach to a 24-foot aircraft tow bar so firefighters can slide it underneath the aircraft and spray cooling water up into the bay.

▪ The Navy has produced four articles of the open bay firefighting device. This adapter performed well in preliminary tests conducted in 2014. Three of the production articles have been sent to Naval Air Station China Lake for further evaluation, and the fourth has been sent to a training command at Naval Air Station Norfolk to begin training flight deck personnel in its use and ship’s company personnel how to maintain it.

▪ Developmental work continues on the closed bay adapter. The Navy is currently pursuing two different designs that would cut through the aircraft skin to flood the weapons bay with water as well as lock into place to allow firefighting crews to back away from the fire after the hose is securely attached to the aircraft. One design will require two sailors to use, and the other design is more aggressive, but would potentially only require a single sailor...."

Source: http://aviationweek.com/site-files/avia ... Report.pdf (361Kb)

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 01 Mar 2016, 20:05
by spazsinbad
This account of a carrier circuit in the FMS by a novice F-35C (civilian now; but otherwise well experienced in USN aircraft such as the Phantom/Tomcat) pilot so please keep that in mind. Useful nevertheless even though back in 2010 before IDLC/Delta Flight Path (aka Magic Carpet for the F-35C) and upgrades to everything, including the hook. :mrgreen:
Flying the F-35 [carrier circuit in FMS]
28 Dec 2010 'wabpilot' [former USN Phantom & TomCat pilot]

"Christmas day was very good to me. My son and his girlfriend were the only family in town, so instead of making a big meal, we decided to dine at the O-club aboard JRB Ft. Worth. (It's not a naval air station, but in the BRAC era that's what we've got.) After dinner, I ran into an old student of mine who is also retired, and now working for Lockheed-Martin. Specifically he is working on their F-35 flight simulator. We got to talking shop and he found out that I am still very involved in simulator training with my airline. He invited me to come to L-M on Sunday to fly the F-35 sim. No way I could turn that invitation down.

The sim at Lock-Mart is not the full motion variety I'm accustomed to, it's really a cockpit procedures trainer, a very sophisticated one with 360 degree horizontal and 270 degree vertical views that carefully mimics the F-35. With the change of software, the sim can mimic the F-35A, B or C. As I was a naval aviator, he set it up as the C. (Longer wings, longer range 7.5g limits much better high altitude performance.) We set up with me on the catapult, helmet on and engine running. It's not difficult to start the engine, one button hold it on until 10 percent N1 and then throttle from idle cut-off to ground idle. It's only got one "throttle" on the left side and a side-stick on the right. Both bristle with buttons and mice, but they don't get used much to start the engine. Engine starts are almost automatic thanks to the full authority digital engine control system. Once running, I throttle up to gate five after burn, but the FADEC limits power on the cat to METO power. The cat officer signals he is ready (I guess the Avatar on the screen is a he.) I salute and zip we launch. At the end of the track, the FADEC commands afterburner just when I need it. By pressing my hand on the throttle I override the FADEC's bias toward climbing at full power. But, too soon, I'm climbing too fast. This is supposed to be a quick trip around the pattern, so I bring power back to flight idle and level off. If the sim is true to life, and my host says it is, there is no sink off the boat. Just like the Phantom and Tomcat, the F-35 climbs smartly away from the boat. I turn to enter the pattern at Vref of 145 knots indicated. Given our weight, the Vref is fairly high. The F-35 can bring back 10,000 pounds of weapons and fuel. That means we won't have to dump a lot of fuel or some of Uncle Sam's expensive weapons to get back aboard. Maximum landing weight is programmed into the sim for this flight. Plenty of fuel for a missed approach, my host says.

Abeam the island, I select gear down, one of only two real switches used in flight. The gear handle looks like it was borrowed from a Beech King Air. (Hawker-Beechcraft is the sub-contractor for landing gear controls.) Pilots demanded a real gear handle otherwise Lock-Mart would have either automated that function or put it on a menu somewhere. The pre-landing check list is agreeably simple: 1. Gear Down; 2. Hook Down; and 3. Weapons Safe. In the navy we fly approaches by AOA, not speed, so I just watch the AOA indexer on the helmet mounted sight. It's amazing, even though the boat is under my left wing, I can turn my head and "see" through the wing to the boat and the AOA indexer continues to compute my landing aim point. With the same clarity as if I was using my Mark One eyeballs.

Turning final, the lineup looks good. But, I'm slewing around too much. My host politely reminds me to "KEEP YOUR FEET ON THE DECK, ... SIR." Apparently, it's not much of a rudder airplane. Feet on the deck and the plane settles down. Flying AOA keeps the speed acceptably around 143 knots. Then I drift low. Correct up, too much. Finally after a couple of pilot induced oscillations I get the ball. It's moving nicely down. Right on the bar now. Over the fantail. Power up - Whang, I grab a wire. The four wire, the sim is forgiving today. Do I ever wish I was 22 again and starting my naval flight training!"

Source: http://warships1discussionboards.yuku.c ... tXhoXlun3w

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 18 Oct 2017, 03:58
by neptune
deleted
:oops:

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 28 Oct 2019, 00:56
by spazsinbad
Searching the F-35 forum using *JBDs* OR JBD* (without asterisks in first instance) one may glean three hit pages.

Anyone have any idea which CVN has these ginormous JBDs? I'll guess the yellow steel is a safety measure for chaps under.

My fav JBD pic other side: http://tailhookdaily.typepad.com/tailho ... ge_173.png

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 28 Oct 2019, 01:14
by 35_aoa
Looks like a normal Nimitz class JBD to me. The yellow bar is like you said, a safety measure they use when doing work on the thing. Never knew for sure if it actually holds the weight, or is just installed to prevent someone from lowering the JBD while people are working.

Re: F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Unread postPosted: 28 Oct 2019, 01:46
by spazsinbad
Thanks. I've never been near a CVN to gauge these things. For sure the JBD is de-activated with the safety pole an extra.