F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Production milestones, roll-outs, test flights, service introduction and other milestones.
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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 05:36

First to ensure we refer to the same events below is a video clip that I think is referenced earlier? IF not then let me know. Otherwise the screenshot from the end of the video also below illustrates the camber of the deck (so that water runs off it quickly). I have not modified the angle to show a horizontal horizon (by rotating left by 1.25 degrees) because it is likely the camera is level with the horizon - with the camera lens distorting it - as shown.

The angle of the angle deck of IKE is 9 degrees AFAIK but I could be wrong so I'll check [see the LSO reference line drawing on left for the angle on page 2 of this thread]. As for the 'rolling' to port then that could be exacerbated by the camber to port and this item 'mis-serviced landing gear' on the test menu from the first post on this thread here: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=28046&p=302953&hilit=intentional#p302953 . However of course that is just a WAG. Also the test pilots and reports state that load asymmetry is being tested so we might see this also exacerbating the effect, another WAG. And it just might be a pilot test technique - for test purposes - yet another WAG. I would like to see SHornet touchdowns from the same vantage point - these will be on Ubend.

Approaches may be conducted at the start with some crab due to the SHornet HUD showing the velocity vector, which can be put on the crotch (the intersection of angle and axial deck area) however that technique to get close to line up and stay on it cannot last because the aircraft must be aligned with the angle deck centreline (explained elsewhere in detail) to ensure a safe arrest/bolter/touch and go. IF the aircraft is not within limits the LSO will wave off the aircraft so there is a good deal of incentive to be on centreline, aligned with it - on glideslope - at Optimum Angle of Attack - otherwise recalcitrant pilot will be sent back to the beach toot sweet. End of story.

My experience was on a 5.5 degree angle deck so the line up problem was less to a certain extent with the A4G quick aileron effects very noticeable even at landing airspeeds. Without any HUD technology our approach method was to be lined up / aligned at the start and to 'nibble to the right' a few times to stay in that situation during the approach (because the angled runway is moving from left to right during the approach as the carrier moves forward down the axial centreline [and any crosswind effects though these are usually minimal]).

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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 06:02

It is that video; here's an image of what I mean:

Image

At the moment of touchdown, the jet appears to still be pointed towards the bow of Ike, by what looks to me as around 6 degrees; the tire friction causes the jet to lurch sideways and then the pilot and arrestor cable point the nose down the centerline, with the jet's wings becoming level again.

(The red circle in both parts of the image are just referencing one of the bow jet blast deflectors in order to provide an idea of where the camera is positioned).
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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 06:23

That may be the situation however you must admit these approaches are 'test' approaches. IF you have viewed/listened to the Magic Carpet brief from TAILHOOK 2015 it is clear that test pilots will do all kinds of 'unhinged' approaches to firstly simulate nugget approaches, or fatigued after a long mission pilot approaches in order to find the limits (published as recovery bulletins AFAIK) for a particular aircraft (this one) carrier approach to guide all the sundries. To eviscerate one approach from a camera angle not aligned with the angle deck centreline is a bit much IMHO. I think perhaps some viewers have not seen enough carrier approaches from that particular angle - most often in my experience amateur videoers go to better positions for their clips. Being such a long way from the action without a big ZOOM lens kind of takes the shine off the viewer experience - as mentioned I would have to see a bunch of approaches by the current USN jet aircraft from that angle/position to form an opinion. YMMV.

For example the camera position can make a big difference - especially when down at or near deck level - and where it is in relation to the touchdown. There is a good example in the recent posting of the A4G deck contretemps showing a bone jarring t/d arrest. OMG. However it does not look all that remarkable if one has seen many arrests from a similar angle; yet seeing one example, juxtaposed inbetween other camera angles, makes that landing stand out. ARRESTING on a carrier deck is a VIOLENT experience for pilot and aircraft donchaknow. Hence the LSO insistence that the approach is within limits for a safe t/d arrest - aircraft runout on the arrestor gear/wire within the ladder lines painted on deck (or other variations of bolter/touch and goes).

For example in this video at 5min 10sec we see the start of a 'TAXI ONE' approach by A4G Side Number (on nose) 872. Immediately afterwards the camera angle view changes to an arrest seen at deck level - 5min 30 sec approx. Having seen most approaches from the more usual 'above' view (from 'goofers' position) the change of view is dramatic indeed. I'll make a clip so that viewers do not need to suffer through a long old video.... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAv0MnhNfKc
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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 06:43

That's precisely what I'm thinking / suggesting - hence potentially why the same behaviour is experienced in both the touch & go and arrested landing.
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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 06:54

Please explain - meanwhile here is a low quality clip showing what I mean about the abrupt change of view. First we see the end of a good approach arrest I'll assume then we see the 'TAXI ONE' arrest (wheels touch down before No.1 wire so that the aircraft 'taxis' to the arrest) then we see the abrupt view change from the many many approaches viewed from the more usual 'goofers' / 'LollyGaggers' viewpoint; where the RAN PHOTS positioned this particular camera however they did have other usual spots on deck for taking photos and film as well at the same time. I may attempt to put this video attached on youbend but it may not have the music (being disallowed - not sure 'till it is uploaded).
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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 07:36

What I'm saying is that, like you, I believe that this is just simply a deliberate 'unhinged' approach / landing for testing the aircraft's handling and future forgivingness towards nuggets. I was just saying in my last comment that this is even more likely to be the answer (vs a mechanical failure) because that roll to the left upon impact occurs on both the touch & go and the follow-up arrested landing in the video.

As for the camera angle, I agree that camera angles can make a massive difference to what the viewer thinks occurs; but I've also gone and looked at some other F-35C landing videos from the same or similar angle, and they didn't have the same rotation.

In this video for example (from DT-1), the camera isn't in the same location or using the same zoom, etc, but we are down on the deck where you can see the wings roll and move relative to the deck and horizon. However, in that video, the touchdowns appear quite stable, with little / no roll. Also, although it's obviously hard to say, I get the impression that the jets are touching down more inline with the runway centerline / not having to crab anywhere near as much.
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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 07:56

Thanks for explanation. My thought goes to the deliberate testing of the ''mis-serviced landing gear' but I do not claim to know. Perhaps these and other anomalies will be explained later.
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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 08:15

Lockheed F-35C begins second round of sea trials as bombs drop
05 Oct 2015 James Drew

"...“These sea trials will further expand the F-35C's flight envelope,” F-35 program executive officer Lt. Gen. Chris Bogdan says in statement. “The testing we're doing today will prepare us for next year's final at-sea developmental test and keep us on track to support the Navy's 2018 initial operational capability date.”

The Eisenhower, a Nimitz-class carrier, underwent modification prior to accepting the two F-35Cs, including rebuilt jet blast deflectors for aircraft launch catapults one and two.

According to the navy, the deflectors were redesigned to better withstand the F-35’s powerful engine exhaust. The devices protect the crews and equipment on the flight deck during aircraft takeoffs.

Improvements were also made to the carrier’s arresting or “trapping” unit, with the installation of an “advance recovery control” system.

“When an aircraft lands, no matter what cable it catches, the ARC system will only allow that aircraft to travel a total of 183ft [55.8m] down the landing area,” says one navy official in a 5 October statement
. [ARC will be given a work out also - perhaps explaining some arrest anomalies? ARC will have been tested ashore beforehand also]....

...During “DT-II,” the F-35Cs will perform many take-offs and arrested landings, but the navy is also assessing the aircraft’s maintainability at sea by conducting live and simulating maintenance operations as well as fit checks of the aircraft and maintenance gear."

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... as-417412/
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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 08:29

ABMA Newsletter [ARC] [Aviation Boatswain's Mates Association]
01 Apr 2009 Volume 39 Issue 1 (Article submitted by Program Executive Office for Tactical Aircraft)

"...The Advanced Recovery Control (ARC) is a digital arresting-gear control system modification for the Mark 7 arresting gear found on Fleet carriers.

ARC replaces the older, mechanical system which utilized levers and mechanical actuators to control landing aircraft. The upgrade to a digitally controlled system allows for easier maintenance and use. Because of its ability to digitally monitor and automate the control system, ARC removes the “human error” factor, making it a more accurate and reliable system, lessening the damage to aircraft and potential injuries to Sailors.

The Mark 7 Arresting Gear remains the same, “said Wayne Kovacs, ARC team lead. “However, instead of being controlled by levers and [mechanical] actuators to set the engine and to stop the aircraft as was the case previously, all of that work is done by an electronic system. These electronic upgrades feature less moving parts to replace or repair and offer better reliability.”

ARC is installed at the Naval Air Systems Command Lakehurst, N.J., test sites. Before it was sent to the Fleet, ARC underwent simulated arrestment testing at the Lakehurst Jet Car Track, assuring system’s function during deployment.

ARCs initial installation was on the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) Nov. 24, 2007. Since its installation, the ship has accomplished more than 10,000 arrested landings. ARC was recently installed on the USS John C Stennis (CVN 74) and will be begin use on a 3 month deployment in winter 2009.

This electronic upgrade is garnering positive feedback from those who use ARC on daily basis.

The system has performed with “absolutely superb results during three in-flight engagements resulting in no damage to aircraft or arresting gear. Our fleet and engineering support has been outstanding and responsive since installation. The ARC should be considered a huge success and giant step forward for carrier aviation,” said Capt. John Breast, Air Boss on the USS Reagan.

Another benefit of the ARC is its ability to electronically collect the data from the aircraft arrestment log, a data repository which collects information from the aircraft’s carrier landing and store it on the system. Carriers which do not have ARC installed require Sailors to manually record the data.

“What it’s doing now is collecting parameters from the arrestment, so if there are issues, we can pinpoint the problems,” said Kovacs. “One of the benefits is that ARC can read that data and recognize system fault, such as low pressure or overheating oil.”

With the addition of advanced technology such as ARC to the fleet, the Navy can reap the benefits of its use with today’s increasingly tech-savvy Sailors.

“In the hands of the modern Sailor, who has grown up with digital technologies, advanced systems such as ARC give us an incomparable advantage in the battlefield,” said Capt. Randy Mahr, NAVAIR’s Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment (PMA 251) Program Manager. “I think it goes without saying that ARC is one of those systems that automatically improves our Fleet and will collect invaluable data for Fleet maintenance and safety professionals.”

The system is scheduled to be installed on all commissioned Fleet carriers, except for USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), which will receive the Advanced Arresting Gear [AAG], the next-generation replacement of the Mark 7 arresting gear. ARC’s next installation is slated for spring 2009 on board the George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). The PMA 251 ALRE program is committed to managing the development, demonstration and acquisition of operational advances in aviation data management and control systems, expeditionary air fields and all launch and recovery related products. PMA 251’s mission is to consistently deliver adaptable and reliable technology to the Fleet.

Source: http://www.abma-usn.org/acrobat/Newslet ... ing_09.pdf (0.65Mb)
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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 09:24

Manned Advanced Arresting Gear Testing To Begin In February, Wrap Up After Carrier Ford Delivers
01 Oct 2015 Megan Eckstein

"The Navy will begin testing manned airplanes on its Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) at a New Jersey test site in February and will complete testing on all type/model/series in the months after the new carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) is delivered, Navy officials said on Thursday.

A 2013 hardware redesign on the General Atomics AAG has proven successful after more than 1,000 traps with dead load weights, Rear Adm. Donald Gaddis, Program Executive Officer for Tactical Aircraft, told reporters after a Senate hearing Thursday.

“We feel confident we can deliver hardware to the ship without having to go back and redesign or remove and replace anything we’ve delivered to the ship,” he said, noting that the ship is moving on with its test schedule as AAG continues land-based testing.

The remaining concerns with AAG all deal with software – particularly, whether the system can detect and help correct planes that land off-center on the carrier flight deck. The “divergent trajectory” issue is important because if a plane veers more than 20 feet off the centerline on the flight deck it would risk hitting people or equipment.

The software work currently taking place is “making sure that if the airplane doesn’t land on centerline – in other words, it’s off center 10 feet, 15 feet or as much as 20 feet – that the airplane stays inside that foul line. And that requires the software that the AAG system that’s on the right hand of the ship and the left-hand side of the ship know what’s happening to the wire as its paying out on the flight deck. So that requires a lot of software, requires a lot of test-analyze-fix on the software as well,” Gaddis said.

“At this point in the program, that is a very very low risk of anything happening in terms of concurrency to the hardware that we’ve already delivered to the ship,” he said, adding he was confident that software-only testing and fixing would address the divergent trajectory issue.

Once that software work is complete, Gaddis must then test each type of aircraft on AAG at the land-based Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division – Lakehurst, N.J. before the planes can go to the ship for at-sea AAG tests.

Gaddis said he would begin with the Super Hornets in February and will issue an Aircraft Recovery Bulletin in the summer once testing is complete.

“The plan right now is to do these recovery bulletins in incremental steps,” he said.

“We’ll start with the Super Hornet E/F, then we’ll go to the F-18C and then we’ll go to the E2 [Hawkeye] and C-2 [Greyhound]. And our plan is to do all those type/model/series and get all those recovery bulletins done before we hand it over to [the director of operational test and evaluation.”

Though all the bulletins will be issued by the time Ford reaches operational test, only the Super Hornet will be allowed on the flight deck when the ship delivers. Rear Adm. Tom Moore, Program Executive Officer for Aircraft Carriers, said after the hearing that that wouldn’t cause any delays, as he just needs any planes to train the ship’s crew and certify the flight deck.

“Even though I only have one aircraft once I deliver the ship, the ship doesn’t care – the catapults and arresting gear are agnostic to what type of planes land on them,” he said.

“What I need from the shipbuilding side of the house is, I need to be able to take the ship out and exercise the flight deck, exercise [Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System] and AAG and have a crew start training to move aircraft on the flight deck. It’s a brand new flight deck, brand new pit stop refueling. So it doesn’t matter to me how many different type/model/series, I just need planes for launching and recovering during the six-month period between delivery and before I take it in for the post-shakedown availability.”..."

Source: http://news.usni.org/2015/10/01/manned- ... d-delivers
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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 09:31

The LSO NATOPS Manual says a heap of stuff as one would imagine about all things crarrierlandin' here is a tidbit 'bout camber: PDF attached.
NATOPS LANDING SIGNAL OFFICER MANUAL
15 DECEMBER 2001 USN LSOs

"...Deck centerline camber (i.e., the centerline is higher than the deck edge) is for water drainage. On most decks it is approximately 4 inches. All lens settings in the Recovery Bulletins compensate for deck camber...."

Source: http://www.navyair.com/LSO_NATOPS_Manual.pdf (1Mb)


AND JUST FOR FUN: https://www.scribd.com/doc/268197224/LS ... -01jun2015

AND... a more up to date LSO NATOP May 2009 from http://www.wings-of-gold.com/cnatra/LSONATOPSMAY09.pdf
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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 10:11

Current USN F-35C/IKE Videos List: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... MJXJTbLPkK

SAME LIST AS THE EARLIER NINE ON PREVIOUS PAGE PROVIDED BY 'Dragon029' HOWEVER I GUESS MORE VIDEOS WILL BE ADDED AT URL ABOVE AT SOME POINT?
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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 10:38

A recent example of the Super Hornet VV Velocity Vector starting at the top right corner 'CROTCH' of the landing area on CVN (at night) drifting to the centreline as the pilot adjusts for correct fore n aft alignment with centreline when in close to arrest. Screenshot gif shows this aspect at beginning and watch da fillum. Unlike us lollygaggers this pilot will not be looking at the VV at this time (only when much further out lining up when meatball more difficult to see) but at the Meatball - Lineup & Opt AoA to arrest. The VV will always lag the aircraft and not always truly show info in the same way the F-35C or Magic Carpet SuperHorneto will use the SRVV Ship Referenced Velocity Vector.
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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 15:12

Ike Receives Face Lift for F35C
05 Oct 2015 Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Hillary Browning, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Public Affairs

"ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS) -- With a next generation aircraft, the F-35C, going through its developmental test phase, Nimitz-class aircraft carriers are making modifications to keep up with the latest technology.

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike), who is currently hosting the Navy's newest warplane, began these upgrades months ago while still in the shipyard.

In order to optimize carrier operations, Ike modified its jet blast deflectors (JBD) & catapults to better support the F-35C.

A jet blast deflector does just what its name suggests. It is a safety device that redirects the high energy exhaust from a jet engine away from equipment and people on the flight deck to prevent damage and injury.

"We completely rebuilt catapult one's JBD on the ship," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 1st Class Shamon Smith, Air Department's V-2 division maintenance leading petty officer aboard Ike. "We replaced some of the salt-water piping which allows for a rapid flow of pressure throughout the JBDs so it can cool down a lot faster under strenuous conditions which make them perfect for the F-35C."

Catapult two also received a complete overhaul,
but it was built off-ship by the Carrier and Field Service Unit (CAFSU) and the Voyage Repair Team (VRT). The CAFSU and VRT engineers ensure carriers are operating under the latest instructions in order to maintain and update equipment for catapult flight operations.

"The CAFSU and VRT guys were a huge help," Smith said. "They came in and did the modifications that we received from AIRLANT and they added those specifications into our JBDs so we were ready for the F-35C's to land aboard Ike."

Changes were also made to the arresting system that is responsible for "trapping," or stopping, an aircraft during an arrested landing. The Advance Recovery Control (ARC), also installed while in the shipyard, aides in ensuring a safe recovery with every trap.

"The magic number is 183," Smith said. "When an aircraft lands, no matter what cable it catches, the ARC system will only allow that aircraft to travel a total of 183 feet down the landing area. It's an excellent safety precaution that they have for the F-35C, and safety is paramount to every recovery aboard Ike."


Besides making physical modifications to Ike, select Sailors were given the chance to visit the test site in Maryland so they could get a jump start on learning what it takes to launch and recover an F-35C.

"We brought a team from the Eisenhower to Patuxent River about two months ago," said Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 Navy test pilot Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Kitts. "At Pax River, we have a steam catapult built into our runway. We took some steps with the crew here to bring them up to speed by training them on the F-35 to get them a little bit more familiar with our aircraft."

Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) Jose Correa attended the training and says the information they received helped prepare them for this testing phase.

"The purpose of the trip was to receive information on launch and recovery and how we can accommodate the F-35C," he said. "We learned the taxiing, and chock and chain processes, the Crash and Salvage team was able to access rescue procedures, and V-4 Sailors learned the fueling process."...

... "We are going to see exactly what it does to the new water-brake system that we put in and how our JBDs are going to stand up," Smith said. "The F-35 guys out here listen to what we think, because we are the operators in the fleet. It's great being able to have some kind of input on tomorrow's Navy."..."

Photo & Caption: ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 4, 2015)
An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 prepares to launch from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is aboard Dwight D. Eisenhower conducting follow-on sea trials. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jameson E. Lynch (Released) 151004-N-QD363-254 " http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 63-254.jpg


Source: http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=91359
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Unread post06 Oct 2015, 15:23

Oh ma gerd carrier needed new deflectors, F-35 suckz etc. etc.
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