F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Production milestones, roll-outs, test flights, service introduction and other milestones.
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Unread post13 Oct 2015, 15:11

NITE
“151008-N-KK394-580 https://www.dvidshub.net/image/2225716/ ... sea-trials
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 8, 2015) - An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 takes off aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is currently conducting follow-on sea trials aboard the Eisenhower. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Anderson W. Branch/Released) https://www.dvidshub.net/download/image/2225716
'N DAY:
“151010-N-QD363-343 https://www.dvidshub.net/image/2225730/ ... sea-trials
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 10, 2015) – An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 flies by the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is currently conducting follow-on sea trials aboard the Eisenhower. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jameson E. Lynch/Released) https://www.dvidshub.net/download/image/2225730
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Unread post14 Oct 2015, 07:31

Okeydokey here is a great post about NavAv stuff - congrats and BZ SweepOfManyFiters. Best RED at the secret Sauce. :devil: In other words 'go to the URL link below to read the entire artickle from whoa to go. :mrgreen:
Feet Wet: F-35C DT-II aboard the Mighty Ike!
13 Oct 2015 Jonathan Derden

"...Commander Christian “Wilson” Sewell, F-35C test pilot and government flight test director for the Patuxent River-based ITF, elaborates:

“The whole point of this developmental testing is we need to get a jet to the fleet that can take off and land reliably on the boat, with an easy workload and good handling qualities. The way we do that is through our developmental test I, II, and III periods… We’re expanding the envelope a little bit to include the aircraft launch and recovery bulletins. We’re testing multiple wind-over-deck scenarios, and during this period we’re focusing on high-wind (around 40 knots) coming across the landing area on the carrier. [NOT all crosswind - only acceptable Xwind with most WOD down angle deck.] What we’ve seen is the handling qualities are all Level 1 – what we call low workload – even in a high-wind scenario. We’ve also seen minimal touchdown dispersion, so we’re reliable about putting the jet right where we want to on deck.”

Some of the last test points being tested during DT-II were also some of the most hazardous to plane and pilot. For example, the aircraft was subjected to several minimum energy catapult shots utilizing both afterburner and mil power.

“Today is a key test for us, because we’re doing what test pilots go to school for,” explains Rear Admiral John Haley, Commander Naval Air Force Atlantic. “Theoretically we know what the airplane is supposed to do because of all the work the flight test engineers have done. While it sounds pretty simple, it’s probably one of the things that creates the most pucker factor for a pilot because you’re exploring the bottom edge of the envelope – ‘speed is life, more is better’ – and now we’re purposely reducing the speed to validate the reality with the theoretical engineering data.”

Tom Briggs, F-35 Air Vehicle Lead Engineering Department Head for the Pax River ITF, explains the process:

“We were shooting the aircraft off the front of the boat until we found a level of sink that was deemed unacceptable. We then add 15 knots worth and we give that data to the fleet. We anchor that test point, so that even with inevitable wind and weight variations, the fleet guys are good to go.”

By establishing the bottom of the flight envelope, “we were going where a fleet jet should theoretically never go,” adds Sewell. “Barring a failure or other event, a fleet jet should never get to where we were the past few days.”

Though not visible thanks to the jet’s internal weapons carriage capability, the F-35s carried inert stores during DT-II, in contrast to the first DT-I test period where the aircraft flew with empty weapons bays. Each aircraft carried a 2,000lb GBU-31 JDAM and two AIM-120 AMRAAMs, adding almost 2,700 pounds to the aircraft’s gross weight, resulting in some 55,000 and 60,000 pound catapult launches....

...Despite the threat of a major hurricane churning in the western Atlantic, and other foul weather delaying the arrival of the jets onboard the Mighty Ike the F-35C DT-II phase was successfully completed ahead of schedule. “We’re done with flight testing sooner than expected,” says Murphy. “It’s a testament to the aircraft, and to the entire team that works on it.”

The F-35 program continues to make huge strides with its respective services, with the USMC recently declaring IOC and the USAF anticipated to follow suit in 2016. Though the Navy is slated to be the last of the services to reach IOC, the fleet aviators will know that their jet will be fully capable of operating off the carrier thanks to the intense testing done by VX-23 and the F-35 ITF." [GO TEAM]

Source: http://fightersweep.com/3158/feet-wet-f ... ighty-ike/

AND here are the lads doing the thing with the thing... Go here for the 'catapult buttons' info and scroll down etc:

viewtopic.php?f=57&t=26634&p=291539&hilit=buttons#p291539

PHOTO CROPPed: http://fightersweep.com/wp-content/uplo ... EW-8FS.jpg (1.1Mb)
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Unread post15 Oct 2015, 10:38

AvWeak has a series of not very inspiring photos however this one has some interest with the JBD seen UP/BEHIND etc.
F35C Carrier Trials On USS Eisenhower
14 Oct 2015 Michael Fabey | Aviation Week & Space Technology

U.S. Navy test pilots put F-35Cs through their paces for military- and maximum-level launches with simulated missiles in early October aboard CVN 68 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, off the Virginia Coast. The aircraft were laden with gross weights equaling internal weapons to prove out the Joint Strike Fighter’s (JSF) carrier-speed needs during the lowest and highest “energy” catapult shots.

The tests are meant to show F-35C carrier suitability and integration during at-sea operations. The Navy wants to gradually expand that aircraft operating envelope while the service prepares for initial operating capability (IOC) in 2018. The simulated internal missiles included guided bomb units and Joint Direct Attack Munitions, says Cmdr. Christian Sewell, one of the test pilots.

“This is a really big test for us,” says Rear Adm. John Haley, commander of the Naval Air Force Atlantic. "You have to determine what the envelope is. How fast do you need to go? It’s one of the tests that creates the most 'pucker' factor.”

The carrier crew and F-35C team tested the aircraft’s Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS) for approach handling qualities at higher gross weights; the tests also garnered data for the system’s wind-over-deck survey.

Crews aboard the ship have seen little difference between handling F-35Cs and F-18 Hornets or Super Hornets, says Capt. Stephen Koehler, Eisenhower commanding officer. “It taxis well,” [OMG!] he says. “It doesn’t do anything we’re not used to.”

The F-35C will add a fast, lethal and survivable set of sensors to provide to the satellites, ships and other aircraft connected to a strike group the kind of situational awareness needed to operate in some of the more heavily defended areas, Navy officials say. “Data management is where it is these days,” says Capt. Stephen Koehler, commanding officer of the CVN 69 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower.

While many F-35 supporters boast about its stealthy features, the aircraft’s sensor and communications systems are of greater importance for naval officials.

“It’s not about stealth,” says Rear Adm. John Haley, commander of the Naval Air Force Atlantic. “It’s about the entire aircraft. It will change dramatically our tactics for the ship and the battlegroup.”

Some military analysts have questioned the aircraft’s ability to conduct close-contact aerial dogfights, but Haley says the F-35C’s sensors will make it possible to shoot an enemy aircraft before it can get that close. “You’ll be able to detect him. He’s not going to be able to detect you. With the sensors, I will have the capability to shoot at a longer distance. We’re going to change our tactics. Instead of just doing ISR [intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance] or strike, we’ll be doing those at the same time."

But, Haley says, “It’s not going to be a wall of F-35s. There will be a mix of aircraft. That’s one of the lessons we learned in World War II—if you go alone, you’re going to die. if you were going to tell me we’re doing away with [Super Hornets], or that we are doing away with Growlers and the only thing we’ll have are the F-35s, then I become lukewarm. Anyone who says that [it] is the master of all trades, well, I would say they are smoking dope.”

Still, Haley points out, the ability of the aircraft to do so many things will be unique to a naval aircraft, and only after younger pilots—who have grown up operating game controllers and related equipment—get a chance to test and fly the aircraft will the service learn the full extent of new possible operational concepts.

“We don’t know now half the tactics we are going to develop with this aircraft," Haley says." [OldGeezersHUH? :mrgreen: ]

PHOTO: http://aviationweek.com/site-files/avia ... s/F354.jpg

Source: http://aviationweek.com/defense/f35c-ca ... isenhower#
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Unread post15 Oct 2015, 15:15

spazsinbad wrote:AvWeak has a series of not very inspiring photos however this one has some interest with the JBD seen UP/BEHIND ..]


...any idea what the JBD upgrade was..maybe a couple of buckets of Thermion???... :?:
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Unread post15 Oct 2015, 15:29

Back in old threads the modifications were mentioned. In this thread they are mentioned in the post here: [this thread post says cats no.1 & no.3 modified: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=28046&p=305407&hilit=catapult#p305407 ]

viewtopic.php?f=57&t=28046&p=304752&hilit=JBD%2A#p304752
"In order to optimize carrier operations, Ike modified its jet blast deflectors (JBD) & catapults to better support the F-35C.

A jet blast deflector does just what its name suggests. It is a safety device that redirects the high energy exhaust from a jet engine away from equipment and people on the flight deck to prevent damage and injury.

"We completely rebuilt catapult one's JBD on the ship," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 1st Class Shamon Smith, Air Department's V-2 division maintenance leading petty officer aboard Ike. "We replaced some of the salt-water piping which allows for a rapid flow of pressure throughout the JBDs so it can cool down a lot faster under strenuous conditions which make them perfect for the F-35C."...

..."The CAFSU and VRT guys were a huge help," Smith said. "They came in and did the modifications that we received from AIRLANT and they added those specifications into our JBDs so we were ready for the F-35C's to land aboard Ike."...
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Unread post15 Oct 2015, 17:34

spazsinbad wrote:Back in old threads the modifications were mentioned. ....."We replaced some of the salt-water piping which allows for a rapid flow of pressure throughout the JBDs so it can cool down a lot faster under strenuous conditions which make them perfect for the F-35C...

...looked and missed it....more water....of course..... :D
....turn up the heat....turn up the coolling...... :doh:

thanks....
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Unread post15 Oct 2015, 18:00

You can search the F-35 forum using this four letter string: 'JBD*' without the single quote marks of course and also select the maximum number of words in the search criteria and you should find some useful information. There are only two pages of results: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=26634&p=284230&hilit=JBD%2A#p284230
DOTE Jan 2015 - Due to the higher temperature of F-35 engine exhaust compared to legacy aircraft, carrier JBDs need at least two modifications. A cooling water orifice modification enables basic operations, but additional side panel cooling must be added for higher afterburner thrust catapult launches. The Navy is accomplishing these full modifications on at least some JBDs on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) in preparation for IOT&E and on USS George Bush (CVN-77) for developmental testing, and performed the basic orifice modification on USS Nimitz (CVN-68) for the November DT-1....

And another bobrodgersshow: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=26708&p=282536&hilit=JBD%2A#p282536
""...“Aboard the aircraft carrier, the F-35C exhaust impingement on the jet blast deflector has also been studied,” he said. “The aircraft obviously has a common engine, the F135, and so we took an airplane out at Eglin and did tests against just a flat plate. We’ve taken the data off of that and we’ve delivered it to Lakehurst.

“Lakehurst is going to take fleet representative JBDs [jet blast deflectors] and the cooling structure that’s associated with that,” he continued. “They’ll install it at Lakehurst, and we’re going to do tests against that jet blast deflector and those units will be able to be installed on a ship at a future date.”

Manazir said the problem is not the heat pattern on the JBD, but the fact that the F-35 and the F/A-18E/F Super Hornets launch less than a minute apart and place a heat load on different places on the JBD.

“It means we have to have a slightly different cooling structure, which probably will involve extra piping in the JBD, but not that much of a change,” he said...."

Lotsa yaddayaddayadda from the amiable butler: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=15767&p=200694&hilit=JBD%2A#p200694
&
viewtopic.php?f=22&t=15852&p=200491&hilit=JBD%2A#p200491

NAVAIR: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=15767&p=200137&hilit=JBD%2A#p200137
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Unread post16 Oct 2015, 12:45

Some stats for DT-II.
A Message from Lorraine Martin
15 Oct 2015 Lorraine Martin LM PR https://www.f35.com/resources/general-m ... kly-update

"...From Oct. 2-10, the F-35C stretched its wings over the Atlantic Ocean conducting a second round of development testing, aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The sea trials went very well, and flight testing concluded four days early despite inclement weather from Hurricane Joaquin. Let me repeat that: Four days early! As a key objective for this test event, the Integrated Test Force (ITF) from Pax River completed energy testing. This included taking off heavy, at low speeds, and into crosswinds up to 40 knots. The ITF also flew with internal weapons and conducted day and night flights with the Gen III helmet.

During the 17 flights and 26.5 flight hours, the team accomplished 66 catapults and arrestments and 280 flight test points to meet all the test objectives. These are simply phenomenal results, and it was a great job by the ITF, Eisenhower crew and everyone who supported this critical test event on the path to the U.S. Navy declaring IOC in 2018. The knowledge learned from this event serves as the baseline for the third and final F-35C development testing event next year.

Remarking on what the F-35C brings to naval aviation, Rear Adm. John Haley said, “The F-35C brings sensors and an ability to guide the fight, whether it's an air-to-ground fight or an air-to-air fight. We’re going to have an ability that’s going to change how we think about getting to the target, delivering weapons and getting out of the target.”...

Source: https://www.f35.com/assets/uploads/docu ... _15_15.pdf (350Kb)
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Unread post16 Oct 2015, 17:08

Can F-35B be used to double the takeoff sorties versus strictly F-35C's catapults? Can there ever be too many sorties in an emergency?
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Unread post16 Oct 2015, 17:20

I'll guess you refer to F-35Bs on CVNs? Why would they be there? In an emergency lots of things will be possible - for ordinary operations the Bs are on LHAs/CVFs whilst the Cs are on CVNs. That is the end of it - best spell out your scenario.
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Unread post16 Oct 2015, 17:28

madrat wrote:Can F-35B be used to double the takeoff sorties versus strictly F-35C's catapults? Can there ever be too many sorties in an emergency?


I'll answer seriously assuming a serious question.
For the forseeable future F-35Bs will not operate from CATOBAR CVNs. So that's out. But we might imagine an LHD or Brit Carrier nearby offering additional air power, so we can look at that.

Following WWII there was a time when the new "designed for jets" super carriers were still carrying smaller piston fighters. They loaded up 130 fighters on the ship. That was the first time that the capability of the command, control, and sortie management was stressed beyond its capability. So they would only manage some number less than that complement while the extras sat around playing cards. I don't know what the manageable number was but it was less than 130 per combat theatre area.

So yes there can be too many sorties. In large scale operations, like those seen in Vietnam and the Persian Gulf, different groups are given separate sectors to avoid C&C conflicts.

So actually, while no ,,, there won't be any "Bs" joining the Cs on CVNs it is still a pretty good question to ponder. Normally it will be either or. either the US CVN, or the Brit Carrier/USMC Fighter loaded LHD or multiple carriers assigned sectors in a large operation.

Anyway, a trivia number to remember - 130 aircraft on a carrier is too big. Carriers do have a known "too big" size. It's close to a land base's "two wings" (144 max) complement.

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Unread post16 Oct 2015, 19:26

In war time you have deck space that can be spared for contingent planning. A pair of F-35B's on standby for point defense would not be futile when carrier air wings and task force participants are shrinking.

Perhaps the JBD can't retract down and clear a run past Hornets and C's stacked up for launching, but what about keeping some on standby for VTOL? I would think you could get F-35B's in the air faster than C's in a pinch, especially during sustained round the clock bombardment of an inshore action when the bulk of aircraft are loaded down with bombs. If you can get a pair of B's loaded with AMRAAM's out to a threat a hundred miles out in five minutes, it beats dropping all your bombs to divert C's going the other direction.
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Unread post16 Oct 2015, 19:38

First one must do the math to find out how much fuel with intended weapon load the F-35B will be able to 'VTOL'? with? Please get the terminology correct. VTOL is a great fudge because it can mean anything except what the F-35B is designed to do and that is STOVL. Yes the F-35B can also take off vertically but with a minimal load - ordinarily it will STO and then VL (and on CVFs it may SRVL). These are the terms to use whilst VTOL is NOT one of them. OK?
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Unread post17 Oct 2015, 00:45

madrat wrote:In war time you have deck space that can be spared for contingent planning. A pair of F-35B's on standby for point defense would not be futile when carrier air wings and task force participants are shrinking.

Perhaps the JBD can't retract down and clear a run past Hornets and C's stacked up for launching, but what about keeping some on standby for VTOL? I would think you could get F-35B's in the air faster than C's in a pinch, especially during sustained round the clock bombardment of an inshore action when the bulk of aircraft are loaded down with bombs. If you can get a pair of B's loaded with AMRAAM's out to a threat a hundred miles out in five minutes, it beats dropping all your bombs to divert C's going the other direction.

I think the US Navy are familiar with lessons from the Battle of Midway and would have sufficient CAP coverage.
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
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Unread post17 Oct 2015, 01:04

The F-35B has demonstrated a 41,100 pound vertical takeoff. At under 30,000 pound empty weight and AMRAAM's only, that leaves a pretty good fuel fraction for an emergency intercept.
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