F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN

Production milestones, roll-outs, test flights, service introduction and other milestones.
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ChippyHo

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Unread post08 Oct 2015, 14:09

LOOK at he size of that front landing gear!!!! You could swap it out with a C-5 (exaggerating - only slightly!!!)
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Unread post08 Oct 2015, 14:59

Further to the discussion about the wobbly T&G & Arrest earlier: Testing is done with cross winds during the approach, so perhaps we see an effect of that during landing. The arrest in question is on centreline and seems to be aligned fore & aft with the angle deck (or close enough for LSO) with the ARC gear keeping things within safe limits. A bunch of stuff there.
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Unread post08 Oct 2015, 16:16

Relevant to the testing is a compilation of the OUIJA BOARD aboard USS Eisenhower as seen during that first day (I guess).

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Unread post08 Oct 2015, 17:03

The C at Sea: The F-35 Aboard the USS Eisenhower
07 Oct 2015 LM PR - USS DWIGHT D EISENHOWER

“After a successful initial ship trial (Development Test-I (DT-I)) at the end of last year, the joint team of U.S. Navy, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems personnel who make up the F-35 Integrated Test Force (ITF) is back at sea to continue testing the capabilities of the F-35C.

For DT-II, the ITF based out of NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, will continue to expand the flight envelope, launching and recovering aircraft loaded with internal weapons while evaluating their flying and handling qualities under various wind conditions and catapult settings. To find out more about the F-35C testing at sea, we sat down with Jim Gigliotti, a Navy Veteran whose 28-year Naval Aviation career included aircraft operations and test tours of duty as well as Command of the Aircraft Carrier USS Harry S Truman. He gave us a few more details about DT-II.

Tough Enough
A standard airframe for a fighter jet is made out of the lightest but strongest materials possible. But for the F-35C, those standard materials won’t cut it. Carrier-based operations are very unforgiving to an aircraft because of the roughness of arrested landings and catapult takeoffs. Aircraft not specifically designed for ship operations would be unable to cope with the harsh carrier environment and would not survive the loads and stresses put on the vehicle. So the airframe, or the “skeleton,” of the F-35C contains a significant amount of titanium, one of the strongest metals available.

As a result, the F-35C weighs 5,500 pounds more than an A variant, which is designed to perform conventional takeoff and landings – on land. The B-variant (which is also capable of ship operations) contains titanium as well, but because the short takeoffs and vertical landings it performs aren’t as stressing as arrested landings and catapult takeoffs, not as much titanium is necessary.

In addition to needing a sturdier airframe, the F-35’s stealth coatings must be capable of standing up to the harsh and sometimes unpredictable weather conditions in an at-sea environment. So how does the F-35’s stealth coating hold up?

“For almost the last decade, we’ve been putting panels that are made the same way F-35 panels are made on legacy aircraft that are deployed at-sea,” explains Gigliotti. “This was meant to check just that – how well do the coatings wear on this aircraft?” In addition, climactic tests have been conducted on the aircraft to ensure it can withstand extreme heat, cold and moisture.

Day to Day: B vs. C
Besides the obvious difference between the way the B and C variants land and takeoff from the ship, there are some key differences in deck operations. First of all, the way the jets are parked is different. “On the big-deck amphibious war ships that the B-variant will operate from, there’s a set routine on where they park all the aircraft and helicopters. There’s not a lot of room, so you have to be very precise,” explains Gigliotti. On an aircraft carrier, it’s the same basic premise, but the folded wings give a little more flexibility. “Folding the wings are critical to being able to put as many airplanes you can in a very small space. They literally park inches away from each other.”

The Devil is in the Details
Some of the various maintenance and operations testing being conducted are things you might not even think of when you see the jet land on the carrier. For example: every aircraft on the deck needs to be chained down due to the motion of the ship. When your airfield tends to roll and pitch with the waves, you can’t have 29 ton aircraft rolling around free on a flightdeck. So the team will perform various exercises to ensure they can chain the aircraft in certain spots, and that the chains don’t cause any trip hazards or encumber weapons loading or other maintenance operations.

Also during DT-II, the team will perform fit-checks with a Pratt & Whitney F-135 engine to confirm it can fit in the jet shop, an area in the aft part of the carrier’s hangar deck where maintenance occurs.

“You can have all the measurements figured out in advance and in theory it should fit, but this is a check to make 100% certain that the engine can be moved around and manipulated within the jet shop,” explains Gigliotti. In addition, the team will perform a simulated power module swap to ensure that the power module within the engine can be replaced onboard if necessary.

JPALS
During DT-II, the Joint Precision Approach Landing System (JPALS) will be initially tested to verify that the displays and inertial alignment function are working. This system, which is on both the B and C variants of the F-35, is the next generation precision approach system that provides the pilot with the ability to fly a very precise flight path when landing on an aircraft carrier. Gigliotti explains this advancement:

“With JPALS, the ship and the aircraft will ‘talk’ to each other. JPALS allows the aircraft’s system to register where it is and which direction it’s going in relation to the ship via a radio frequency (RF) signal so the aircraft can correctly align itself with the ship for landing,” explains Gigliotti. “It also adds a ‘Wi-Fi-like’ capability for inertial alignment before flight.”

Eventually, he explains, JPALS will provide the capability for a hands-off approach, meaning the pilot will be able to completely let go of control of the aircraft – literally and figuratively – and allow the jet to land itself on the carrier.”

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/the-c-a ... eisenhower
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Unread post08 Oct 2015, 18:15

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Unread post09 Oct 2015, 02:39

DELETED
Last edited by tritonprime on 09 Oct 2015, 03:16, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread post09 Oct 2015, 03:06

:devil: 'tritonprime' are you the same poster 'triton' (or is it really just 'trite on') of stuff over at 'secretprojects'? :mrgreen:

HERE we are on the ball - me for good reason in that I research 'how to deck land' in the past - present and future. Thus you will see lots of NavAv material on the F-35 forum because why? Because there are three variants - TWO are flat deck capable. On an otherwise previously F-16 and other USAF jets (forget about the rest) forum there was little organic knowledge of carrier aviation. I found that out from my first post here on what became a very long thread (you can find it with your search skills). Use those search skills to look for material that has been posted before. For example your post above is just a lazy repeat - by the 'reporter' - of a PR blurb from the USN - go here on this thread for the original - word for word the same. Sheesh.

The RAN FAA, USN, USMC and LM and all the RN FAA hangers on :mrgreen: don't pay me enough. Why do I do it? Because it is a hobby that interests me. I can see you are interested so work on it. Thanks. :mrgreen: Investigate the links at the bottom of each of my posts here. Yes they are barnacle encrusted but no one is forced to walk the plank to download the material - mostly about NavAv in all its glory - so go for it. TootSweet.

viewtopic.php?f=57&t=28046&p=304419&hilit=Karapostoles#p304419

NOT Forgetting the bunch of NavAv related Videos here - for the use of: https://www.youtube.com/user/SpazSinbad ... =0&sort=dd
Last edited by spazsinbad on 09 Oct 2015, 03:17, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread post09 Oct 2015, 03:13

My apologies.
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Unread post09 Oct 2015, 05:48

No worries. If you care to look at my first posts here - first on a 'hostile' forum - hostile in the sense that a lot of former members of this forum (note how I revert to airfarcespeak) thought I knew bugga all about NavAv and had no actual sperience. Well I neva. Also the ability to post edits at a reasonable leisure was on innovation wot only came later. So always look on the bright side of life & look at wot came in the e-mail just now - doan know if it is authentic (sea earlier).

Left mouse click ont to get your reading ability back.
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Unread post09 Oct 2015, 22:44

F-35C Wraps Up Flight Tests During Second Round Of Sea Trials - Posted: October 09, 2015 INSIDEDEFENSE


ABOARD THE AIRCRAFT CARRIER EISENHOWER -- The carrier variant of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter has completed the flight-test portion of the second round of sea trials, with officials testing among other things the aircraft’s ability to launch and recover with an internal weapons load.
The trials, termed Developmental Test-2, are nearly complete, with a few logistics tests remaining before the session wraps up over the next seven days, according to Cmdr. Christian Sewell, government flight test director at Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 23.
The recent flight tests involved launching the F-35C from the Eisenhower (CVN-69) at weights of between 55,000 and 60,000 pounds, as the aircraft for the first time held simulated internal weapons, Sewell told reporters. He said the aircraft was tested with internal-load weights simulating a GBU-31 Joint Direct Attack Munition and two AIM-120 Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missiles. The first round of developmental testing, held last year on the aircraft carrier Nimitz (CVN-68), did not include internal weapon stores.
"We're kind of expanding that envelope," Sewell said. "We're expanding the aircraft launch bulletins and the aircraft recovery bulletins."
The F-35C also did multiple "afterburner launches" from the Eisenhower, as the ship had the necessary modifications made to allow the catapults to conduct full-power take-offs, Sewell said.
Capt. Stephen Koehler, commanding officer of the Eisenhower, said the ship had two of its catapults' jet-blast deflectors modified to allow full-power launches. Otherwise, Sewell said the aircraft has integrated well within the ship's operations.
Sewell said the latest round of testing also focused on how high wind affected the F-35C on the flight deck, as well as the aircraft's movements on the deck and below in the hangar bay.
The third and final round of developmental testing is scheduled for late next summer. Sewell said those trials would involve loading external weapons onto the F-35C for flight test for the first time, as well as the full implementation of the Joint Precision Approach Landing System, which helps guide aircraft onto carriers. The Navy expects to declare initial operational capability on the F-35C sometime in 2018. -- Justin Doubleday
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Unread post10 Oct 2015, 10:54

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Unread post10 Oct 2015, 13:47

The story above is a bit NAF however a goodly series of photos are available in a slideshow - here is onesuch with 'waist not want not' catapult testing... & TOW chocks & chocks & a slow dirty turn then fast under:

The fillum at top of the page has the CO IKE saying that cats 1 & 3 were modified for the F-35C tests so the waist cat is No.3 we see in the photie?

http://www.trbimg.com/img-5617c0a9/turb ... 0/1550x872
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http://www.trbimg.com/img-5617c0b4/turb ... 0/1550x872
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http://www.trbimg.com/img-5617ce5a/turb ... 0/1550x872
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http://www.trbimg.com/img-56183d50/turb ... 00/506x900
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http://www.trbimg.com/img-56183d4d/turb ... 0/1000x563
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F-35CsideViewOverDeckIKEoct2015.jpg
dp-f-35c-testing-aboard-the-uss-eisenhower-201-002.jpg
TOWchocks dp-f-35c-testing-aboard-the-uss-eisenhower-201-011.jpg
F-35CslowTurnDirtyIKEoct2015.jpg
F-35CfastUnderDirtyIKEoct2015.jpg
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Unread post10 Oct 2015, 14:50

F-35C Lightning II, the Navy’s next-generation fighter plane
10 Oct 2015 Bill Bartel; The Virginian-Pilot

"ON BOARD THE EISENHOWER
By mid-afternoon Friday, the teeth-rattling thunder from repeated catapult launches of the Navy’s next-generation fighter plane had stopped.

The test pilots and crews for the F-35C Lightning II, the Navy’s version of the new Joint Striker Fighter, were wrapping up a short stint on the aircraft carrier Dwight D. Eisenhower that began last week under “suboptimal conditions” as Hurricane Joaquin threatened and ended Friday under sunny skies....

...The most high-risk exercises on the Eisenhower came Thursday and Friday as the pilots tested the aircraft’s limits for a safe launch.

Although there were considerable advance calculations and research, they’re not the same as conducting the test on a carrier at sea, said Rear Adm. J.R. Haley, the commander of Naval Air Force Atlantic in Norfolk.

“This is a physics problem,” Haley said, noting that depending on the plane’s weight, it needs a certain level of air speed to lift off.

“We got all that stuff in theory,” he said. “And now the pilots are going to go out here and… see if their walk matches the talk.”

It meant testing the bottom air speed limit for a safe launch – and then going just a little bit slower.

“We were shooting the aircraft slower and slower off the front of the boat until we found that level that said ‘too much,’ ” said Tom Briggs, a civilian Navy engineer.

On the Eisenhower, the test crew figured out that low limit and added 15 knots to it, Briggs said, adding that it will become the standard for carrier launches in the future.

The Navy’s F-35 test pilots had nothing but praise for the plane. One acknowledged that while stoically testing the plane’s limits comes with the job, there can be moments when emotions step in.

Cmdr. Tony Wilson remembered a year ago on the Nimitz when he was the first pilot to ever land an F-35 on a carrier.

“When I was coming aboard the Nimitz, yeah there is the ‘Holy crap, I’m actually doing this,’ ” when flying toward the carrier, Wilson said. “But to be completely honest, as soon as I came in – hit the brake ['speedbrake' maybe BUT "break" in reality] to enter the pattern – it was, ‘All right. Time to put on the test pilot hat.’ ”

This month’s trip aboard the Eisenhower didn’t have any drama.

“It was very comfortable,” Wilson said. “I didn’t have any moment of doubt.”

Source: http://hrana.org/news/2015/10/f-35c-lig ... ter-plane/

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Unread post10 Oct 2015, 16:06

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Unread post10 Oct 2015, 16:20

F-35C Lightning Aboard Ike for Developmental Testing
Published on Oct 9, 2015 U.S. Navy

"ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 7, 2015) U.S. Navy Sailors conduct flight operations and tests with two F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighters assigned to the Salty Dogs of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The F-35C Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force is conducting follow-on sea trials. (U.S. Navy video by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class J. Alexander Delgado/Released)"

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