Milestone PLANK Owner First F-35C Arrest NIMITZ 03 Nov 2014

Production milestones, roll-outs, test flights, service introduction and other milestones.
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Unread post12 Jan 2015, 19:06

XanderCrews wrote:
maus92 wrote:ALIS still a problem area...


The F-35 Has To Phone Texas Before Taking Off
Patrick Tucker – Defense One January 8, 2015
http://www.imra.org.il/story.php3?id=66007


"The U.S. military ran the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter through a series of
tests aboard the USS Nimitz super carrier in San Diego in early November. It
performed adequately, with one exception — it needed to send its diagnostic
data to Lockheed Martin in Fort Worth, Texas, before taking off. If the most
recent exercises are any indication, the F-35 may need to phone home every
time it sets out on a mission.

First, the good news. The plane flew through its aerial paces well enough
and passed a majority of its flight tests.

“The test team accomplished 100 percent of the threshold test points and 88
percent of the objective points during deployment, completing 33 test
flights (39.2 flight hours) and 124 arrested landings, of 124 attempts,
including one night flight with two catapult launches and two arrested
landings. The results of the test were still in analysis at this time,”
Pentagon spokesperson Air Force Maj. Eric Badger told Defense One...."

"The possible bad news to emerge from the recent tests is this: The Nimitz
didn’t have the plane’s Autonomic Logistics Information Systems, ALIS, on
board and so the team had to implement a “workaround.” ALIS is the F-35’s
notoriously buggy diagnostic system that can ground fully functional
aircraft. ...."

"ALIS has a rather strained relationship with Air Force Lt. Gen. Christopher
Bogdan, the man in charge of the F-35 Program, as Military.com’s Brendan
McGarry reported in February, Bogdan has few kind words for the system.

“ALIS doesn’t always work right and it is not the font of all knowledge
about the airplane because I got maintainers out there who fix the airplane,
I’ve got pilots who go out and pre-fly the airplane, and everyone in the
enterprise thinks the airplane is ready to go except ALIS,” Bogdan told a
defense budget conference. In terms of manual overrides, Bogden said “we
need to start doing that… We can’t do that wholesale, but we need to do that
in a measured way.”

The Nimitz testing team’s “workaround” streamed the plane’s diagnostic data
to technicians at Lockheed Martin in Fort Worth, Texas. That, in turn,
allowed them “to process the necessary maintenance actions” so the tests
could proceed. ...."

"The Pentagon has not yet said whether the issue that kept all the ALIS
equipment off the Nimitz was related to the difficulty of integrating a
shipping container worth of servers into the ship’s structure, the software
(up to 29 million lines of code and counting for the F-35) or something
else. ..."



clearly an unsolvable problem

This article has a bit part in wrapping up a post I am now prioritizing to have up late tonight. The guy who wrote the article is at least a 'Pawn' of the Faux Reform crowd, and may have been assigned to the story at the behest of a 'Loyal Babbler'. The post would have already been up, except that unlike these kind of 'articles' I did some research and analysis first.
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Unread post12 Jan 2015, 22:14

smsgtmac wrote:This article has a bit part in wrapping up a post I am now prioritizing to have up late tonight. The guy who wrote the article is at least a 'Pawn' of the Faux Reform crowd, and may have been assigned to the story at the behest of a 'Loyal Babbler'. The post would have already been up, except that unlike these kind of 'articles' I did some research and analysis first.


I'm now excited, always enjoy your posts, so much information and sources to read!
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Unread post13 Jan 2015, 03:21



No more F-35 gravy!
There's an old rule among many in the fighter procurement business: "Too Early to Tell, Too Late to Stop".
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Unread post13 Jan 2015, 03:49

:mrgreen: 'Now he nose'? That is just sick. :devil:
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Unread post15 Jan 2015, 22:08

A LONG DETAILED article at the JUMP where it is best read there. However the excerpts below are relevant to this thread especially the next CVN test period along with ALIS v.2.0 and stuff. HoKay?
Important Tests Loom for Navy and Marine Corps F-35
Feb 2015 Valerie Insinna

"The Navy and Marine Corps variants of the joint strike fighter have an eventful year ahead, and program officials are saddled with a long list of work to do before major milestones in the summer....

...Donnelly [a defense and security policy analyst at the American Enterprise Institute]. The Marine Corps and Navy have many ways of taking down a target. What they need is a platform capable of penetrating enemy air defenses.
“Who cares about the gun?” he said. “I think this is going to end up being employed much less as a strike platform and more as, basically, an armed scout that’s stealthy and very operationally flexible.”...

...[the Eglin AFB fire in June 2014] delayed flight testing by 45 days. “I thought I was going to be done on the 10th of December with all flight testing … I’m now projecting that date to be around 30 January,” Bogdan said. That puts pressure on certifying that the fighter is capable of flying its full flight envelope because those 45 days would have acted as a buffer in case more data needed to be collected.

Those tests also are vital for validating the 2B software to be installed on the 10 Marine Corps planes slated for fielding in July, Tomassetti said. Software installation was originally scheduled for November, but is now planned to begin in February.

The Marine Corps will need the 2B software to deploy the F-35 in combat. Without it, the joint strike fighter cannot release its internally-stored weapons, he said.

“More than giving you brand new capabilities, it gives you depth in some of the capability that already exists. It allows additional capabilities in the radar and some of the other sensors in the airplane,” as well as in its data links, he said.

But before the Marine Corps can install 2B and use some of the software’s new features, it must finish flight testing the newest version of the F-35’s logistics and maintenance program and deliver it to the operational fleet, Tomassetti said. Although operators and maintainers can run an old version of the autonomic logistics information system, or ALIS, with 2B software, ALIS 2.0 enables diagnostic capabilities not available with the earlier system. ALIS 2.0 began flight tests last year at Edwards Air Force Base in California.

“Some of the mission planning stuff, because you have new capabilities in 2B, you need a new ALIS version to really take advantage of that,” he said. “It allows us to really maximize what you really get with the 2B software loaded in the airplane.”

A smaller, 200-pound ALIS system capable of being carried by a deployed Marine squadron will also be made available to the service for IOC in July, he said.


The Marine Corps is not the only sea service with major F-35 milestones on the horizon. Although the Navy will be the last service to field the platform, officials are under pressure to ready the C-model for sea trials aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower in August, said Jim Gigliotti, Lockheed’s F-35C program manager. Last November, the fighter completed its first round of carrier-based testing aboard the USS Nimitz three days ahead of schedule, with test pilots executing 124 catapults, 222 touch-and-go landings and 124 arrested landings, according to Navy information.

“We have to do a significant amount of build up yet again for our next carrier evolution,” Gigliotti said. “That will involve expanded envelopes of the aircraft, as well as now we’re going to start carrying internal weapons.”

To expand the jet’s flight envelope, Lockheed and the joint program office will fly the aircraft in non-conformal conditions, such as high angles of attack, high gravity and with a wet runway. It also will test different weapons configurations, including externally stored munitions, and validate that the F-35 can release weapons safely in various conditions, he said.


Donnelly, an F-35 defender, said it will take four or five years after IOC for the services to understand what the F-35 can bring to the table and how to best use it.

“I predict that, in a few years, instead of a president asking where the carriers are or how many B-2s he can get up … the go to crisis response force will be Marine Corps [amphibious ships] with F-35s on them,” he said...."

Source: http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/ ... omfor.aspx
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Unread post16 Jan 2015, 05:20

On page 17 of this thread are some bits about the supposed 'lukewarmness of USN to F-35C being contradicted by Admirables' [ viewtopic.php?f=57&t=26634&p=281971&hilit=dispel#p281971 ] well here is anotherie:
UPDATE 2-F-35 jet is said to be on track to meet US combat use targets
15 Jan 2015 Andrea Shalal

"...Mabus [Navy Secretary] said the Navy still expected to declare the F-35 C-model, which is designed for use on aircraft carriers, ready for combat use by the end of the decade, as planned. The Navy tested the F-35C on board a ship for the first time in November.

"We're not lukewarm about the F-35 in terms of the need for it in the fleet, and the fact that it's going to form the backbone of our carrier air for a long time," he said.

Mabus said the Navy was also assessing whether it needed more EA-18G Growler electronic attack planes built by Boeing Co , since it was now the only military service providing that capability...."

Source: http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/01/ ... ZY20150115
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Unread post18 Jan 2015, 09:48

Elsewhere today there is a thread about the accomplishments recently - among them is this relevant item - worth repeating here:
F-35 Continues on Path Toward Full Weapons Certification
16 Jan 2015 F-35 News

"... · F-35C set a record for 17 sorties in a day for a single F-35 aircraft (Nov.5) and a record 22 sorties with F-35C aircraft CF-3 and CF-5 combined aboard USS Nimitz for F-35C Sea Trials off the coast of San Diego (Nov. 3-14)..."

Source: https://www.f35.com/news/detail/f-35-co ... tification
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Unread post19 Jan 2015, 05:37

From the latest DOTE report (I'll post more from it later) here is the news - NO ALIS on NIMITZ: :doh:
FY 14 DOD PROGRAMS F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
Jan 2015 UNK

"...No ALIS equipment was installed on the carrier. The test team created a network connection from the ship to the major contractor in Fort Worth to process necessary maintenance actions....

Air-Ship Integration and Ship Suitability Testing - F-35C
• The program began testing the redesigned arresting hook system on aircraft CF-3 at Patuxent River Naval Air Station in February 2014. This test aircraft is modified with unique instrumentation to monitor loads on the arresting hook system and the nose landing gear for catapult launches and arrested landings. The structural survey testing was a pre-requisite for initial carrier sea trials.

- Testing encountered significant delays, as numerous deficiencies were discovered, some requiring new engineering designs. Testing was planned to be completed in July, to support deployment to a CVN for the first set of sea trials. The following problems caused delays:

▪ In February, a hydraulic leak in the nose landing gear steering motor, caused by over-pressurization, required a redesigned valve and halted testing for 10 weeks.

▪ Excessive galling of the arresting hook pitch pivot pin, which required a redesigned pin made of titanium and additional inspections after each landing.

▪ Damage to the nose landing gear shock strut, which required down time for repair - The structural testing was partially completed in two phases, all on CF-3.

▪ Phase one completed September 10, 2014, and consisted of 24 test points needed to clear a monitored envelope for carrier landings. Completion of phase one was necessary for CF-3 to conduct landings on a CVN in November.

▪ Phase two consists of 20 additional test points to clear an unmonitored envelope for carrier landings. Completion of phase two testing would allow non-loads instrumented test aircraft to conduct landings on a CVN. Phase two work was ceased on September 25, with 17 of 20 phase two test points completed, but the program waived the remaining three test points to allow CF-5 to participate in DT-1.

• Carrier-based ship suitability testing is divided into three phases.

- The first phase, DT-1, consisted of initial sea trials to examine the compatibility of F-35C with a CVN class ship and to assess initial carrier take-off and landing envelopes with steady deck conditions. DT-1 was conducted November 3–15, 2014; it was initially scheduled to begin in July.

▪ Testers accomplished 100 percent of the threshold test points and 88 percent of the objective points during deployment, completing 33 test flights (39.2 flight hours) and 124 arrested landings, of 124 attempts, including one night flight with two catapult launches and two arrested landings. The results of the test were still in analysis at the time of this report.

▪ No other aircraft deployed to the carrier, except transient aircraft needed for logistical support. All landings were flown without the aid of the Joint Precision Approach Landing System, which is planned for integration on the F-35C in Block 3F. No ALIS equipment was installed on the carrier. The test team created a network connection from the ship to the major contractor in Fort Worth to process necessary maintenance actions.

- The second and third phases, DT-2 and DT-3, consist of ship-borne operations with an expanded envelope (e.g., nighttime approaches, higher sea states than observed in DT-1, if available, and asymmetrical external stores loading). DT-2, which is currently planned for August 2015, will expand the carrier operating envelope. The third set of sea trials is planned for CY16.

• The Navy is working on the following air-ship integration issues, primarily for carriers. Each of the following integration issues also applies to F-35B on L-class ships, with the exception of Jet Blast Deflectors (JBDs):

- Due to the higher temperature of F-35 engine exhaust compared to legacy aircraft, carrier JBDs need at least two modifications. A cooling water orifice modification enables basic operations, but additional side panel cooling must be added for higher afterburner thrust catapult launches. The Navy is accomplishing these full modifications on at least some JBDs on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) in preparation for IOT&E and on USS George Bush (CVN-77) for developmental testing, and performed the basic orifice modification on USS Nimitz (CVN-68) for the November DT-1.

- The Lockheed Martin-developed F-35 ejection seat dolly failed Critical Design Review. The F-35 ejection seat has a higher center of gravity than legacy seats due to supports for the helmet-mounted display, and in the shipboard environment needs to be securely tied down in case of rolling motion from high sea states. The Navy is investigating developing less expensive adapters to the current ejection seat dolly, and determining what seat shop modifications (if any) will be required to safely tie down the dolly when a seat is installed.

- Two separate methods for shipboard aircraft firefighting for the F-35 with ordnance in the weapon bays are being developed, one for doors open and one for doors closed. Each will consist of an adapter that can fit to the nozzle of a standard hose. The open door adapter will also attach to a 24-foot aircraft tow bar so firefighters can slide it underneath the aircraft and spray cooling water up into the bay.

▪ Testing of a prototype open bay adapter was conducted in October and included use on an AV-8B hulk, propane fires, and JP-8 pool fires, as well as assessing ordnance cooling effectiveness. Mobility tests of the rig were also performed on CVN and L-class non-skid, asphalt, grass, dirt, and rough terrain. All tests indicate that the adapter provides sufficient access to the bay for water spray, and featured sufficient ease of use to place the adapter where needed quickly in all environments.

▪ The closed door adapter will consist of a penetrating device to punch through the fuselage’s carbon fiber skin, secure in place, and hold when water pressure is applied so deck personnel can then back away from the fire. The Navy also plans to test closed bay door firefighting testing of on-aircraft lithium ion battery fires.

- Work on noise abatement during launch and recovery continues. The Navy is installing sound dampening material in the highest noise level areas for flight operations on the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during its nuclear refueling and overhaul, and the Office of Naval Research (ONR) will analyze effectiveness compared to untreated ships. This effort will not involve treatment of all work areas, however, and may not be sufficient to allow conversational-level speech in every mission planning space during flight operations.

- The need for improved flight deck hearing protection is not limited to the F-35, as the F-35 and F/A-18E/F Super Hornet produce similar maximum ground noise in afterburner (149 decibels for the F-35 and 150 decibels for the Super Hornet).

▪ Based on an assumed F-35 noise environment of 149 decibels when in maximum thrust where personnel are normally located, 53 decibels of attenuation is required to enable 38 minutes of exposure to this worst-case noise per day before long-term hearing loss ensues. This is estimated to be equivalent to 60 launches and 60 recoveries.

▪ Current expected performance for triple hearing protection only reaches into the mid 40’s decibels of attenuation though, which enables less than 10 minutes exposure to maximum noise before the daily limit is reached. Workarounds may include re-positioning launch crew personnel and tighter administrative controls for exposure times.

- The unique Integrated Power Package (IPP), and high-speed/low-thrust engine turn capability for maintenance on the F-35, may introduce new concerns for hangar bay maintenance. The Navy plans to investigate the impact of IPP exhaust emissions on hangar bay atmosphere, exhaust temperature, and the noise environment produced, to determine acceptable hangar bay maintenance practices. No IPP or engine turns were conducted during the DT-1 sea trials...."
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Unread post19 Jan 2015, 06:09

spazsinbad wrote:From the latest DOTE report (I'll post more from it later) here is the news - NO ALIS on NIMITZ: :doh:


We already knew that about the DT-1 for the F-35C
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Unread post19 Jan 2015, 06:30

Yep - just re-inforcing that point - perhaps unnecessarily I will agree.
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Unread post19 Jan 2015, 06:39

FY 14 DOD PROGRAMS F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
Jan 2015 UNK

"...F-35C Flight Sciences
Flight Test Activity with CF-1, CF-2, CF-3, and CF-5 Test Aircraft

• F-35C flight sciences focused on:

- Structural survey testing of the newly designed arrestingb hook system (This testing was a pre-requisite for the first developmental testing period aboard an aircraft carrier, referred to as DT-1, which was conducted in November 2014.)...

...• The program modified CF-3 and CF-5 with the new arresting hook system and modified nose landing gear, which was necessary to prepare for and accomplish the first set of ship trials, completed in November....

... • Weight management is important for meeting air vehicle performance requirements, including the KPP for recovery approach speed to the aircraft carrier, and structural life expectations. These estimates are based on measured weights of components and subassemblies, calculated weights from approved design drawings released for build, and estimated weights of remaining components. These estimates are used to project the weight of the first Lot 8 F-35C aircraft (CF-28), planned for delivery in April 2016, which will be the basis for evaluating contract specification compliance for aircraft weight.

- The weight reports show that the program has reduced weight by 62 pounds in CY14 (from January to October estimate). The current estimate of 34,519 pounds is 349 pounds (1 percent) below the planned not-to-exceed weight.

- The program has demonstrated positive weight management of the F-35C over the past 38 months, showing a net loss of 103 pounds in the estimates from August 2011 to October 2014. The program will need to ensure the actual aircraft weight meets predictions and continue rigorous management of the actual aircraft weight beyond the technical performance measurements of contract specification in CY16 through the balance of SDD to avoid performance degradation that would affect operational capability...."
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Unread post19 Jan 2015, 14:36

Just for the heck of it because I'm intrigued by it all - VIA SMSgt Mac blog [ http://elementsofpower.blogspot.com.au/ ... elers.html ] at the top of the previous page 20 there is a long post from Patrick Tucker via 'maus92' about 'the F-35C foning Texas from NIMITZ' - this article at original URL has been amended thusly:
The F-35 Has To Phone Texas Before Taking Off
08 Jan 2014 Patrick Tucker

"...Update:
Joe DellaVedova, Public Affairs Director F-35 Lightning II Joint Program Office contacted Defense One about this story. He says that while previous versions of ALIS did not allow for a human override, ”this has been corrected in the latest fielded release (ALIS 1.0.3).”

He adds: “ALIS continues to mature per its development roadmap and we currently have it installed aboard the USS Wasp today to support of an operational test and evaluation of the F-35B air system which will happen this spring. There is also a more portable, modularized version of the ALIS Standard Operating Unit server for shipboard and expeditionary operations that is currently in final integration and test. This version will support the U.S. Marine Corps initial operating capability later this year.”

Source: http://www.defenseone.com/technology/20 ... ng/102525/
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Unread post16 Feb 2015, 08:02

This thread has info about 'how well liked the F-35C is' so why not continue that tradition - you know you want to... :doh:
Ex-Navy air boss: F-35s 'essential' for carrier air wings
15 Feb 2015 Mark D. Faram

"Retiring Vice Adm. David H. Buss, who stepped down as the Navy's "air boss" Jan. 22, has guided the Navy's F-35C Lightning II through some difficult times.

But he insists the controversial next-generation fighter jet is now well on its way to becoming operational and, more than that, is essential to the future of carrier air wings.

"I'm very happy with where we are with the program now," Buss said during an interview at his office at Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego, shortly before stepping down.

"We still have some work to do with regard to the elements that must come into place for the Navy to reach initial operating capability with the F-35C in 2018," he said. "But I'm very happy with where we are after a very successful two-week at sea period [n November] We ended up with 124 traps and 124 cat shots and about 250 or so touch-and-go's as well."

The aircraft accomplished tasks that its predecessors, the F/A-18 Hornets and Super Hornets, did not, he said.

"We got to operate the two aircraft we had on board in a variety of envelopes and even got to night operations," Buss said. "The night catapults and traps — which we didn't do in the initial developmental test programs for either the F-18 or the Super Hornet — show you we've made very, very good progress."

And the re-designed tailhook — a primary factor contributing to the delay in getting the F-35 its first traps at sea — was a non-issue.

There were "absolutely no issues out on board," he said.

By the end of the testing, it was clear the aircraft is fit for carrier duty and is well-liked by pilots and deck crews.

The pilots, Buss said, called the F-35C "very, very easy, very user friendly or pilot friendly to fly on and off the ship."

The aircraft handlers said the aircraft was "just like any other aircraft" to maneuver around the flight and hanger decks, he said, "music to your ears, from an integration standpoint."...

..."The first fleet squadron will form in 2018 as we reach IOC, and then deploy at some point after that," Buss said. "We'll likely transition a squadron that's already existing at Lemoore — which specific squadron I'm not prepared to talk about today because, with aircraft delivery schedules and squadron operational schedules, that patch could change several times before it happens."...

Source: http://www.militarytimes.com/story/mili ... /23142875/
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Unread post19 Feb 2015, 03:10

Sea Trial for F-35B to Precede Initial Operational Capability
18 Feb 2015 RICHARD R. BURGESS

"...The Navy’s carrier-based F-35C version also will return to sea this year, with Developmental Test-2 scheduled for the third quarter, probably in August, onboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower. Developmental Test -3 will be conducted during the third quarter of 2016.

IOC for the F-35C is scheduled for the third quarter of 2018."

Source: http://www.seapowermagazine.org/stories ... 8-f35.html
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Unread post19 Feb 2015, 05:49

spazsinbad wrote:This thread has info about 'how well liked the F-35C is' ]


Has the navy gone from Turquoise to Magenta on its mood ring?
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