Milestone PLANK Owner First F-35C Arrest NIMITZ 03 Nov 2014

Production milestones, roll-outs, test flights, service introduction and other milestones.
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spazsinbad

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Unread post14 Nov 2014, 04:55

First Arrestor for the record: http://media.utsandiego.com/img/photos/ ... b9b1684c1a
"...Cmdr. Tony “Brick” Wilson, who made the historic first landing Nov. 3. [2014]..."

Source: http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2014/nov ... all/?print


Another good photo gallery here (compare finish of CF-05 to CF-03 f'rinstance):

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2014/nov ... -results/#
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Jon

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Unread post14 Nov 2014, 05:31

spazsinbad wrote:'QS' any chance you can tell us the BuNos. of CF-03 and CF-05 please?


BuNos were never assigned. I don't like that but that's the way it is for the Low Rate Initial Production aircraft. First BuNo was CF-06 which has BuNo 168733. I've connected with two different F-35 production managers and confirmed this was the case.
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Unread post14 Nov 2014, 06:27

'Jon' OK - thanks a lot for that info. Much appreciated - tah. :mrgreen:
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Unread post14 Nov 2014, 09:50

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Unread post14 Nov 2014, 09:53

Jon wrote:
spazsinbad wrote:'QS' any chance you can tell us the BuNos. of CF-03 and CF-05 please?


BuNos were never assigned. I don't like that but that's the way it is for the Low Rate Initial Production aircraft. First BuNo was CF-06 which has BuNo 168733. I've connected with two different F-35 production managers and confirmed this was the case.


Perhaps they meant SDD jets because its not an LRIP practice.
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Unread post14 Nov 2014, 18:49

OK got the correction about SDD (not LRIP) but the missing BuNos remain. Real stealth. Meanwhile we await some nitefloggin' reports eh (also same URL mentioned overpage) but anyways....
Navy's F-35C Takes Historic Step Forward Following Budgetary Turmoil
14 Nov 2014 Kris Osborn

"..."Our job is to identify the issues and report on them. All the issues that we have been finding are very minor," said Navy Cmdr. Tony Wilson, an F-35C test pilot. "The main focus of the test has been catapult shots and landings. We did do shore-based testing to make sure we were ready to come out here. However, the big difference is you can't simulate rolling off the edge of an aircraft carrier when you are shore based."...

...A second round of developmental testing is slated for next summer to study the aircraft's ability to operate on a carrier while carrying weapons internally, Wilson said. A third period of testing with external weapons on board is also slated, all designed to bring the aircraft to operational status by 2018, Navy officials said.

"In this main round of testing, we're looking at the basic aircraft. We're looking at the approach and handling qualities. We're looking at high headwinds, low headwinds, crosswinds and a bunch of different wind variations as well," said Chris Karapostoles, an F-35C test pilot....

...Landing a Stealth Fighter at Sea
As part of the testing, pilots practice maintaining their glide slope by watching a yellow light on the flight deck called the Fresnel Lens. It includes a vertical row of yellow lights between two horizontal rows of green lights. Using a series of lights and mirrors, a pilot's approach is reflected by the position of the yellow light in relation to the green lights above and below, displaying whether the aircraft is on the right "center line" or "glide slope," Karapostoles said.

"If he [the pilot] is on glide slope, he will see a centered amber ball in between the horizontal green lights. If he goes high on glide slope, he will see the ball rise above the green lights. If he goes below glide slope, he will see the ball fall below the green lights," he explained.

The F-35C is also engineered with a technology referred to as Delta Flight Path, a system that uses software to help the flight control computer automatically correct course and adjust the aircraft's flight path as needed.

"Instead of manually controlling thrust and pitch attitude, our flight control engineers have cut out the middle work so the flight path is controlled directly. It gives us spare capacity to monitor the other systems on the jet. We are landing the jet almost exactly where we want almost every time," said Cmdr. Christian Sewell, a F-35C test pilot.

Pilots try to land the F-35C in between the second and third of four cables arranged on the landing deck, Sewell explained.

In order to properly align for an approach to the flight deck about three-quarters of a mile away, pilots make a sharp, descending 180-degree turn to slow the aircraft and begin descending from about 600 feet, Wilson said.

"Once we arrive on center line and on glide slope, that is where the precision comes in because your runway is essentially moving sideways on you," [from left to right - hence the 'nibbles' to the right to remain on centreline] he explained.

The testing is also assessing how the F-35C catapults off the deck. The steam catapult on board the Nimitz is thrusting the aircraft off the deck at a range of speeds in order to test the slowest and fastest potential takeoff speeds, said Lt. Eric Ryziu, catapult arresting gear officer.

Aircraft are able to reach speeds up to 160 knots in about 2.5 seconds as a result of being thrust forward by the steam catapult, which stretches about 300 feet. The steam catapult generates 520 PSI (pounds per square inch) of pressure pushing pistons forward. The pistons push cylinders connected to a shuttle attached to a launch bar, which pulls the aircraft forward, Ryziu explained."

Source: http://www.military.com/daily-news/2014 ... rmoil.html
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Unread post14 Nov 2014, 18:59

F-35C exceeds 100 catapults, arrestments during first week at sea
13 Nov 2014 Marina Malenic, USS Nimitz - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

"...Further, the F-35C has conducted its first night-flight, the Pentagon announced. "Lieutenant Commander Ted Dyckman piloted test aircraft CF-03 for the inaugural night-flight of the F-35C on 13 November," said F-35 programme office spokesman Joe Dellavedova...."

Source: http://www.janes.com/article/45765/f-35 ... eek-at-sea
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Unread post14 Nov 2014, 22:36

spazsinbad wrote:First Arrestor for the record: http://media.utsandiego.com/img/photos/ ... b9b1684c1a
"...Cmdr. Tony “Brick” Wilson, who made the historic first landing Nov. 3. [2014]..."

Source: http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2014/nov ... all/?print


Another good photo gallery here (compare finish of CF-05 to CF-03 f'rinstance):

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2014/nov ... -results/#


Someone oughta remind Einstein that it aint a bolter if there is no intent to land, particularly when the land-long was LSO-induced.
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Unread post14 Nov 2014, 23:15

Funny how the brain misses misspellins' and suchlike. I completely missed this 'deck officers' for LSOs in that report over page 'still learning how to work with the F-35' viewtopic.php?f=57&t=26634&p=281558&hilit=officers#p281558

:mrgreen: NOT OFTEN LSOs get BLAMED for ANYTHING - except when they say so themselves. :devil: Cartoon to follow.... :drool: AND what a GROTTY LOT of HALLOWeenie LSOs! :doh:
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Unread post15 Nov 2014, 00:32

How a NavalGazingSpokesPerson kept MUM on the LSOdeckOccifers.....
Amid a Year of Challenges, F-35C Sea Trials Progressing Well
14 Nov 2014 Valerie Insinna

"...During a media day aboard the Nimitz on Nov. 13, CF-05 test aircraft took off, flew in pattern around the carrier, and performed an arrested landing. Its tail hook caught the third wire on the ship, which the Navy considers optimal for safety.

Those third-wire engagements have been the norm during tests, Wilson said. So far there has been only one bolter — when a pilot touches down too late and fails to catch onto a wire. The pilot executed a planned touch-and-go, but touched down after the fourth and final wire, technically qualifying it as a bolter.

Navy officials could not comment on whether that was the result of pilot error or an issue with the F-35’s new “delta flight path” technology, which helps automate landing on the carrier.

Wilson said delta flight path had performed well in testing and would help to unburden pilots during normal operations, likening it to having cruise control in a car.

"This flight control scheme is revolutionary and is going to pay huge dividends for the Navy,” he said. “It's going to make landing on the boat a routine task, and right now landing on the boat is anything but a routine task. That's why the Navy invests so much money into training its pilots and continually training them.”

Another positive finding was the performance of the F-35C’s new tail hook. During the original hook’s initial tests at Naval Air Engineering Station Lakehurst in New Jersey, service officials found the hook did not engage with the cable, said Thomas Briggs, head of the air vehicle engineering department at Patuxent River.

Lockheed Martin then redesigned the tail hook with the input of Atlantic Test Range personnel [Anyone? Buehler?], he said.

It passed structural demonstrations earlier this year at Patuxent River, but critics like Michael Gilmore, the Pentagon’s director of test and evaluation, cautioned that the increased weight and sharpness of the new equipment could cause damage to the flight deck.

However, the gear has been catching the wires on the carrier deck without gouging or otherwise damaging the surface, Wilson said.

The F-35 is planned to return to the carrier for sea trials in summer 2015, when testers will gather data about how it performs with munitions inside its internal bomb bays, Briggs said. In the third set of trials, external payloads on its wings will be added.

Because most of the mission systems testing apply to all variants, they can be tested ashore, Kern said. Once they mature through testing at Patuxent River and Edwards Air Force Base, “we’ll bring that capability out to the ship and then look at specific issues involving ship integration out here.”

“What we have been looking at here is some of the electromagnetic effects to see if there is any interference issues between the ship’s equipment and the aircraft’s equipment,” he said. “We haven’t found any” during this round of sea trials, he added."

Source: http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/ ... a2&ID=1667
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Unread post15 Nov 2014, 01:18

They cant have it both ways. If the touchdown point on planned T&Gs is part of the count against bolter/no-bolter, then they've had one bolter in 315+ passes...one. Can you say, "most successful initial sea trials ever"?

35 years ago, F/A-18A initial sea trials took one jet to the ship for 3 days. I think it turned into 5 because of problems of one kind or another. I'll have to look up SH which occurred in 1997 IIRC.

I look forward to the stats upon completion.
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Unread post15 Nov 2014, 01:30

Yes it is a puzzlement - but only for the PRESS - looking for that ANGLE - hook fails and all that. And let us all hope we get to see the stats - even if they will be wilfully misinterpreted by many. We are here - never fear. :mrgreen:
"...touched down after the fourth and final wire, technically qualifying it as a bolter...."

For TEST PURPOSES it seems reasonable to call it a bolter - for the purpose of doing as many approaches HOOK UP to simulate a REAL hook down approach etc. But not my call.

I had few bolters and do not recall having any with hook up touch and goes. Apart from initial qualifying we had to often get back into gear after a long transit (over that VAST PACIFIC) usually going NORTH - to RIMPAC for example - not wanting to be LATE; then there would be little open ocean (blue water) flying during these long transits, so getting catted and arrested to be requalled was fairly commonplace, with the usual initial hook up approach. On the small deck of HMAS Melbourne a touch down LONG could be a worry indeed. For example the TA4G was never used on our deck because there was insufficient deck length to get the nose up again - particularly for night flying (and boltering one can surmise).

OFTEN a bolter was caused by the hook skipping - especially over No. Four (target wire) to then hit the aft lip of the aft lift (at the end of the landing area) to cause the hook to skip over the last No.5 wire and ON to the BOLTER BOLTER BOLTER (bugga). Or that was our story to the others. :mrgreen:
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Unread post15 Nov 2014, 03:05

On page 9 of this thread here: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=26634&p=281500&hilit=indication#p281500

There is an indication of the healthy 'hook to ramp' clearance available to the F-35C when on glideslope. With that in mind I thought this BreakaDaFence photo was good value from: http://breakingdefense.sites.breakingme ... 24x567.jpg
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Unread post15 Nov 2014, 04:05

F-35C Completes First Night Flight Aboard Aircraft Carrier
14 Nov 2014 Commander Naval Air Forces, Public Affairs

"SAN DIEGO (NNS) -- The F-35C Lightning II carrier variant Joint Strike Fighter conducted its first carrier-based night flight operations aboard an aircraft carrier off the coast of San Diego Nov. 13.

Navy test pilot Lt. Cmdr. Ted "Dutch" Dyckman piloted F-35C test aircraft CF-03 for the inaugural night flight, taking off from USS Nimitz (CVN 68). At 6:01 p.m. Dyckman conducted a series of planned touch and goes before making an arrested landing at 6:40 pm....

...Through Nov. 13, two test F-35C aircraft have completed 28 flights for a combined 34.5 flight hours and accomplished more than 75 percent of threshold test requirements. The aircraft also performed 108 catapult launches, 215 planned touch-and-go landings, two long touch and go landings, 110 arrested landings and zero bolters....

...The F-35C has proven its ability to operate in the carrier environment and has consistently caught the optimal three-wire during arrested landings. The test team successfully landed during every attempt, with zero hook-down bolters, or failures to catch an arresting cable on the flight deck...."

Photo Caption: "141113-O-ZZ999-001 PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 13, 2014) An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant Joint Strike Fighter conducts its first carrier-based night flight operations aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The aircraft launched at 6:01 p.m. (PST) and conducted a series of planned touch-and-go landings before making an arrested landing at 6:40 pm. Nimitz is hosting the F-35 Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force from Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 during the initial sea trials of the F-35C.(U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin by Andy Wolfe/Released) http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 99-001.JPG 4Mb


Source: http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84456
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Unread post15 Nov 2014, 10:24

AvWeak 17 Nov 2014 edition has a two page spread about these tests. WOW. Some quotes below....
Feet Wet
17 Nov 2014 Amy Butler Fort Worth and Guy Norris aboard the USS Nimitz

"....The apparent success of these carrier trials will also likely bring more visible support from the Navy, which
has historically been conservative in planning for the F-35 purchases while continuing to advocate for more buys of Boeing F/A-18E/Fs....

...Unlike conventional carrier aircraft, in which the pilot approaches the carrier with flaps set at a fixed position and adjusts power and pitch attitude to stay on the glideslope, the F-35 system controls power through an "auto-thrust" function and alters the position of the trailing edge flap in response to pilot inputs. "So the stick becomes my glideslope controller" says Dyckman, the second F-35C test pilot to make a carrier landing. "If I pull back, the flap adds lift; if I push forward, it commands a steeper approach." The nominal flap position for a carrier approach is 15 deg., or half-flap, providing ample margin for additional flap movement to add or reduce lift. Wilson says the effect is to "change the 'heave' of the aircraft, rather than the pitch."... [then the B/S CHIEF quote about seeing 'all green' from the AoA nosewheel indicator]

...This flight control system mode, called Delta Path, is unique to the F-35 though it is nearly identical in functionality to the Magic Carpet system recently flight tested by F/A-18E/F pilots, says Eric Van Camp, director of domestic F-35 business development for Lockheed Martin. "The way we used to do it was this choreography between your right and left hand. Delta Path and Magic Carpet eliminate that." Magic Carpet is due to be tested at sea on the Super Hornet in early 2015....

...The Navy objective is to declare initial operational capability (IOC) with a squadron of 10 aircraft in August 2018
or no later than February 2019...."

Source: Aviation Week and Space Technology 17 November 2014
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