Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 15 Aug 2013, 21:22
by spazsinbad
Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea 15 Aug 2013 By F-35 Joint Program Office Public Affairs | Headquarters Marine Corps
"USS WASP, At Sea -- A key milestone on the path to declaring F-35B initial operating capability for the U.S. Marine Corps is underway.

The F-35 Integrated Test Force from NAS Patuxent River, Md. embarked USS Wasp, Aug. 12, for the second at-sea test of the F-35B Lightning II, the short takeoff and vertical landing variant of the Joint Strike Fighter.

Developmental Test Phase Two is the second of three planned tests aimed at expanding the F-35B’s shipboard operating envelope for the U.S. Marine Corps. The first shipboard testing phase was successfully completed in October 2011. A milestone many point to as a turning point in F-35B development.

During the 18-day long ship trials, two F-35Bs will conduct a series of tests to determine the aircraft’s suitability for sea-based operations. Pilots will expand the F-35Bs allowable wind envelope for launch and recovery, conduct first-ever night operations at sea, conduct initial mission systems evaluations at sea, evaluate the dynamic interface associated with aircraft operations on a moving flight deck, and further evaluate shipboard sustainment of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

On Aug. 14, the first DT-II night vertical landing was accomplished by F-35 Marine Corps test pilot, Lt. Col. C.R. “Jimi” Clift. Clift, a Harrier pilot by training was pleased to be part of the milestone event.

“It all went extremely well,” said Clift. “Eight successful landings in one night, so we’re tracking favorably along the learning curve.”

Preparing for DT- II was no small task. Extensive Field Carrier Landing Practice training and qualifications wrapped up last week for the ITF at Patuxent River. Engineers completed electromagnetic environmental effects testing on the pair of F-35Bs being used in the ship trials. During the past month, F-35 maintainers have completed several actions to ensure the aircraft and support equipment were ready for shipboard operations.

Meanwhile, USS Wasp underwent a series of shipyard modifications to accommodate the F-35B, to include application of a new composite deck coating that offers additional heat protection, movement of some lights and sensors to better support F-35 landings, and installation of equipment to monitor environmental effects and collect data during F-35 operations. major actions taken included an on-site engine removal,which was performed in record time to ensure the aircraft were ready to deploy.

At the conclusion of DT-II, the Navy and Marine Corps team should have sufficient data to support certification for future F-35B Lighting II shipboard operations in anticipation of 2015 deployment."

http://www.hqmc.marines.mil/News/NewsAr ... t-sea.aspx

CAPTION: "CAPTION: "Lt. Col. C.R. “Jimi” Clift makes the first F-35B Lightning II night landing on USS Wasp during the second at-sea F-35 developmental test event, Aug. 14. The F-35 Integrated Test Force is embarked on the Wasp for three weeks to expand the F-35B operational envelope in preparation for Marine Corps initial operational capability test in 2015. (Photo by MCSN Michael T. Forbes II, U.S. Navy) (Photo by MCSN Michael T. Forbes II)"

PHOTO: http://media.dma.mil/2013/Aug/15/200070 ... 72-136.JPG

RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 15 Aug 2013, 22:02
by orkss
OMG!
AMAZING!

RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 15 Aug 2013, 22:08
by SpudmanWP
Keep in mind that this was done without the new HMDS...

RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 15 Aug 2013, 22:32
by spazsinbad
Do you mean HMDS II (and not HMDS III - future version in some years time)? Landing Aids other than HMDS would have been used also (that are used in daytime - Harrier Landing Aids - that have been modified for F-35Bs I do not know, being used at night also). Will be nice to have more details about the landings. I guess that will come along with a video.

RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 15 Aug 2013, 22:46
by SpudmanWP
Yes, HMDS Gen2, the one they have been using for a long time (3 years at least).

HMDS Gern3 is to be the one that goes IOC but is not out yet.

RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 16 Aug 2013, 00:53
by quicksilver
The flight was conducted unaided -- iow without use of the DAS or the NVC. The other HMDS features were fully operative.

RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 16 Aug 2013, 00:54
by quicksilver
Delete

RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 16 Aug 2013, 01:26
by spazsinbad
Thanks I heard/read a rumour to that effect. I guess you mean 'NVG' rather than 'NVC'? OR is 'NVC' Night Vision Capability?

RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 16 Aug 2013, 02:10
by quicksilver
The F-35 HMDS has a digital night vision camera, referred to as the NVC. This camera does not feature 'traditional' image intensifiers like NVGs. More technically it is the ISIE-10, the performance of which has created all the hoopla.

See munny's post at -- http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopi ... t-315.html

RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 16 Aug 2013, 03:33
by sprstdlyscottsmn
the Bee is back at sea? Love it!

RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 16 Aug 2013, 03:58
by spazsinbad
'quicksilver' thanks for clarification. I tend to use 'non-standard' terms I guess - so I should use 'NVC as viewed in HMDS'?

NOT using NVC in my head the forum was searched to find very few uses of "NVC" - except recently of course.

RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 16 Aug 2013, 22:31
by spazsinbad
No Night Moves here but some new daytime VLs aboard USS Wasp Video:

F-35B Lightning ll

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pThT6DIG ... r_embedded

RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 17 Aug 2013, 00:41
by f-22lm
Image

Image


Image

Why are these pics on Chinese websites first? :?

RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 17 Aug 2013, 01:36
by spazsinbad
The internet is faster than most of us can keep up - those who sleep anyway - in different time zones no less. Perhaps those Chinese Hackers are in the Twilight Zone? :D

Faster than my speed of thot here is a cropped version of the original 5.5Mb JPG:
"130814-O-ZZ999-390 ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 14, 2013) An F-35B Lightning II aircraft lands aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) during the second at-sea F-35 developmental test event. The F-35B is the Marine Corps variant of the Joint Strike Fighter and is undergoing testing aboard Wasp. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin by Andy Wolfe/Released)/Released)"

http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 99-390.jpg

Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at

Unread postPosted: 17 Aug 2013, 12:50
by quicksilver
spazsinbad wrote:'quicksilver' thanks for clarification. I tend to use 'non-standard' terms I guess - so I should use 'NVC as viewed in HMDS'?

NOT using NVC in my head the forum was searched to find very few uses of "NVC" - except recently of course.


The NVC is an integral part of the helmet -- it is always there. There are a few pics around where one can see it above the edge-roll just above the pilot's brow (top of his forehead).

Conversely, traditional NVGs are temporary attachments that are affixed to one's helmet just for night flying, and removed after the flight is over. For the most part, the only thing retained on the helmet is some kind of attachment device or bracket. Not so with the NVC -- it is always on the helmet -- but because it is so small, it does not encumber the helmet for day flying like a set of NVGs would (do).

RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landin

Unread postPosted: 17 Aug 2013, 13:16
by spazsinbad
'quicksilver' I'm pleased you want to explain however my original question was about your use of the term 'NVC' which was unfamiliar to me. And as I point out it was not in wide use on any of the articles posted on this forum. Must by a USN thing. The 'night vision camera' has been well documented in the HMDS threads on this forum.

Being unfamiliar with the term 'NVC' I had asked the question. Thanks.

Squirt Kelly seen here: http://www.sldinfo.com/fly-testing-the- ... -approach/

Over page 'quicksilver' said:
"The NVC is an integral part of the helmet -- it is always there. There are a few pics around where one can see it above the edge-roll just above the pilot's brow (top of his forehead)...."

RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landin

Unread postPosted: 17 Aug 2013, 14:00
by spazsinbad
OLD INFO NOW - look at the new info on HMDS / Avionics threads: The FULL FRONTAL graphic below is on the cover of this magazine. Somewhere probably on this forum there is a higher quality photo but it is 2300 here and I have had it for now....

‘Such A Capable Helmet’ Avionics Magazine July 2010 pp20-23
...Big Picture
The HMDS night imaging capability comes from sensors on the helmet and on the aircraft. On the helmet, an Electron Bombarded Active Pixel Sensor (EBAPS) from Intevac, Santa Clara, Calif., sends imagery directly to the visor. The camera works in the same wavelength as night vision goggles (NVG). “The sensitivity range is in the same range as image intensifier tubes,” said Foote.

Though the 1280-by-1024 pixel camera does not have the acuity of the latest NVGs, it does provide the 700-line video required for F-35 pilots to land at night. According to Foote, “It’s not really meant to be the main night sensor.”"


Read backwards from this last page of this thread for more up to date HMDS info:

Helmet-mounted displays
http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... +ii#254900

Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night la

Unread postPosted: 17 Aug 2013, 18:21
by quicksilver
spazsinbad wrote:OLD INFO NOW - look at the new info on HMDS / Avionics threads: The FULL FRONTAL graphic below is on the cover of this magazine. Somewhere probably on this forum there is a higher quality photo but it is 2300 here and I have had it for now....

‘Such A Capable Helmet’ Avionics Magazine July 2010 pp20-23
...Big Picture
The HMDS night imaging capability comes from sensors on the helmet and on the aircraft. On the helmet, an Electron Bombarded Active Pixel Sensor (EBAPS) from Intevac, Santa Clara, Calif., sends imagery directly to the visor. The camera works in the same wavelength as night vision goggles (NVG). “The sensitivity range is in the same range as image intensifier tubes,” said Foote.

Though the 1280-by-1024 pixel camera does not have the acuity of the latest NVGs, it does provide the 700-line video required for F-35 pilots to land at night. According to Foote, “It’s not really meant to be the main night sensor.”"


Read backwards from this last page of this thread for more up to date HMDS info:

Helmet-mounted displays
http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... +ii#254900


This picture (Bill Gigliotti) is better -- the Kelly picture largely obscures the camera. The two prominent lenses (my descriptive) you see in each pic are the vHUD projectors. Smaller circles you see above them in the middle of the helmet are the NVC and a 'day' equivalent. IIRC, the system will switch back and forth btwn 'day' and 'night' without pilot actuation based on detected ambient light levels.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 17 Aug 2013, 20:56
by quicksilver
And finally, NVC is a common reference for the night vision camera anywhere F-35s are flown or discussed amongst those who are familiar.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 17 Aug 2013, 21:07
by spazsinbad
Yep I get that. Tell journalists that also because we get our information here mostly from them. However I will endeavour to always use NVC for Night Vision Camera from this day forward in any communications on this forum. I guess I'll have to explain elsewhere also.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 17 Aug 2013, 22:36
by spazsinbad
Feast of Fixes
Pentagon to weigh readiness of tailhook, helmet improvements in advance of F-35 production review
Amy Butler Washington and Huntsville, Ala., and Graham Warwick Los Angeles
AVIATION WEEK & SPACE TECHNOLOGY/AUGUST 19, 2013 | p 28 & p 33
"...Two F-35Bs are on the USS Wasp amphibious assault ship for the second round of developmental testing (DT) trials associated with the aircraft's unique ability to conduct vertical landings and short takeoffs in support of the U.S. Marine Corps. The Wasp trials, slated for three weeks, began Aug. 12.

The objective of these trials is to focus on night flying around, on and off the ship. Night flying from the ship is one of the capabilities needed for the U.S. Marine Corps to declare initial operation al capability (IOC) as planned by the end of December 2015.

Also on the agenda is flying, landing and taking off in heavier and more taxing wind conditions and more severe sea states than was experienced during the October 2011 DT trials onboard the Wasp. During tests this month, the Pentagon will check refinements to the F-35B's integrated propulsion and flight control systems. The initial trials in 2011 were "a testament to how well it works on a real deck," says Steven Wurth, technical lead for F-35 propulsion at Lockheed Martin. "The next deployment, with its higher sea states, will stress the system," he said during the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' Aviation 2013 conference in Los Angeles last week. Lockheed refined the integrated propulsion and flight control system based on the results of the 2011 sea trials.

Pilots will also test for the first time the aircraft's behavior on ship approaches, landings and takeoffs while it is loaded with various weapons.

Four pilots have been selected for the DT trials: two are from the U.S. Marine Corps; one is from the United Kingdom, which - along with Italy - is buying the F-35B; and one works for BAE, which produces the aft fuselage and empennage for the aircraft. The U.K. pilot will be the first from that nation to land an F- 35B at sea.

During the 2011 DT trials for the F-35B on the Wasp in 2011, officials conducted the first-ever vertical landing of the aircraft on a ship at sea...."

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 18 Aug 2013, 06:21
by spazsinbad
Navy/Marine Corps Team: Testing F-35B Lightning II Aircraft Aboard USS Wasp
Story Number: NNS130816-07 Release Date: 8/16/2013
By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Michael T. Forbes, USS Wasp Public Affairs
"...DT-II is the second of three test phases encompassing numerous milestone events including the first night operation at sea as well as the first launch and recovery of the F-35B at sea by a U.K. test pilot. The goal of this testing is to further define F-35B operating parameters aboard amphibious ships such as Wasp....

...Launch and recoveries filled the first, second and third days at sea creating smooth, synchronized daytime operations. Wasp flight deck crew members were trained in advance of DT-II to prepare them for F-35B operations at sea, ensuring all those involved were ready to support DT-II.

"The crew itself has spent quite a bit of time up at Patuxent River working with the F-35B understanding how the aircraft operates," said Capt. Brian Teets, Wasp's commanding officer....

...U.K. Squadron Leader Jim Schofield, a Royal Air Force pilot became the first international pilot to conduct sea-based launch and landing in the F-35B.

"It's exciting to see the integration of this new plane with the amphibious assault ships," said Schofield. "After a year leading up to this evolution, it's awesome to get here and start. And the crew has been especially accommodating and efficient at running these tests smoothly."...

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=76012
&
Large Photo: http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 65-075.JPG (1Mb)

CAPTION: "130814-N-ML172-152 ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 14, 2013) An F-35B Lightning II aircraft takes off from the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) during the second at-sea F-35 developmental test event. The F-35B is the Marine Corps variant of the joint strike fighter and is undergoing testing aboard Wasp. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Michael T. Forbes II/Released)"

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 18 Aug 2013, 06:56
by spazsinbad
Search on 'F-35B' without quote marks here:

http://www.navy.mil/viewGallery.asp (NOW THE GOOD ONE)

For a bunch of goodly recent USS Wasp / F-35B DT II photos. For example (cropped):

130814-N-ML172-278 http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=157424
"ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 14, 2013) An F-35B Lightning II aircraft lands aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) during the second at-sea F-35 developmental test event. The F-35B is the Marine Corps variant of the joint strike fighter and is undergoing testing aboard Wasp. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Michael T. Forbes II/Released)"

http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 72-278.JPG

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 18 Aug 2013, 14:05
by spazsinbad

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 18 Aug 2013, 14:20
by spazsinbad
A bad URL was posted above so NOW the good URL is reposted here along with two pages (of the most recent) F-35Bs on WASP Aug 2013 photo thumbnails with live URLs to online photos:

http://www.navy.mil/viewGallery.asp (search using 'F-35B' without the quotes....)

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 18 Aug 2013, 21:52
by spazsinbad
To follow on the discussion about day/night cameras NVCs here is a good photo:

http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... &start=225

Day/Night Cameras seen: http://www.f-16.net/attachments/hmds_iipilot_310.jpg

Image

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 19 Aug 2013, 21:21
by SpudmanWP
Video with night landing and night takeoff.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jJglPPDm-w

Another View of the night landing and takeoff:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AW72dBp5DBM

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 19 Aug 2013, 22:31
by spazsinbad
Thanks 'SWP'. Here is a screenshot of the HMDS II in use from that same video above.
+
I had note seen the canopy luv handles in use before (maybe I have - but not noticed - in other videos). Whatever.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 19 Aug 2013, 23:37
by spazsinbad
The HOLE BLOG article could go elsewhere but it is worthwhile at least to highlight some woids from the wizened one so cited here:

South Korea Stumble Threatens Lockheed's 'Super Jet' 19 Aug 2013 William Hartung
"...There are also serious questions as to whether the F-35 will ever work as planned. It has had problems taking off and landing vertically, as required for the Marine Corps version..."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/william-h ... 81321.html

:wtf:

Part of the disinformation campaign I would guess. But then again I'm a paranoid F-35B yoda? Right? :D :devil:

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2013, 10:09
by spazsinbad
F-35B Accomplishes First Night Vertical Landing Aboard USS Wasp 20 Aug 2013
"...As of August 18, the two F-35Bs participating in DT-II, known as BF-1and BF-5, had completed a total of 40 short takeoffs and 41 vertical landings...."

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/p ... -wasp.html

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2013, 19:39
by SpudmanWP

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2013, 21:14
by spazsinbad
Another ZOOM view of the cameras HMDS II...

http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 59-003.jpg
“PATUXENT RIVER, Md. (Feb. 21, 2012) Royal Air Force test pilot Squadron Leader Jim Schofield sits in the cockpit of an F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter test aircraft after his first flight in the carrier variant. Schofield is the first pilot from the United Kingdom to fly the F-35C. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin by Andy Wolfe/Released)”

http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=116057

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2013, 21:36
by f-22lm
Hey Spaz, I kept on seeing a laser pointer next to the F-35. What is for? Thanks for answering.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2013, 22:03
by SpudmanWP
Where are you seeing a laser pointer?

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2013, 22:05
by spazsinbad
This early frame screenshot from the video above shows light reflection in the camera lens - which is repeated later by the 'green laser light like pointer' of another light bloom in the camera lens under port wing tip of F-35B VLing at end of video.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 24 Aug 2013, 04:25
by F16VIPER
Has anyone found any photos of the pilot or pilots flying out of the WASP. One of them is Lt. Col. C.R. “Jimi” Clift.
Also any good shots of the taped HMD helmet? It seems to have the F-35 logo at the back.

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B

Unread postPosted: 24 Aug 2013, 17:00
by quicksilver
spazsinbad wrote:This early frame screenshot from the video above shows light reflection in the camera lens - which is repeated later by the 'green laser light like pointer' of another light bloom in the camera lens under port wing tip of F-35B VLing at end of video.


If the video is being filmed from Pri-fly (Primary Flight Control or, for you Brits -- Flyco) then the refections are likely from the inside of the glass in those spaces.

Ain't no 'laser pointing' going on...

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 24 Aug 2013, 22:08
by spazsinbad
On previous page of this very same thread this is the best screenshot of taped helmet:

Image

All the pilots are listed here AFAIK:
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/gallery_ ... ry_style=3
http://www.codeonemagazine.com/images/m ... 7_7379.jpg

Image
"USMC Maj. C.R. Clift became the thirty-first pilot to fly the F-35 when he took off from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, in F-35B BF-4 for a 1.2-hour test mission on 2 November 2011. Clift is the sixth USMC pilot to fly the F-35."

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 26 Aug 2013, 19:29
by spazsinbad
Some good edited unusual video cuts of DAY STO & VLs....

Marines test F-35B vertical landing on ship
"Published on Aug 26, 2013
The F-35B variant of the Joint Strike Fighter demonstrates its capabilities on the USS Wasp while being tested by Marine Corps and Lockheed Martin pilots and engineers off the coast of North Carolina, Aug. 19, 2013. This is the second repetition of three planned sea trials designed to test the capabilities of the Department of Defense's newest multi-role jet aircraft candidate. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photos and video by Sgt. Tyler L. Main)"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IG-Uzc7mbNI

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 27 Aug 2013, 22:35
by spazsinbad
Had to laugh about some anti-F-35B websites complaining about the 'shooter' cringing during STO. Note in the video he does not even clench the deck tiedown fitting (I'll guess he could have done so if required?). Anyhoo I'll post a slowmo video of that action at one-eighth speed - meanwhile here is THE screenshot and another pic relating to 'tieing down the F-35B onboard USS Wasp'. I recall that this 'no need to grab on to anything' was noted for the first ever shooter subsequently from previous testing in Oct 2011. [My recall is not quite correct but youse get the picture from this old quote 2011.]

Vertical landings hit the mark in F-35B’s tests By Kate Wiltrout The Virginian-Pilot 20 Oct 2011
“...Engineers initially thought the jet would create far more turbulence on the flight deck because it's much more powerful than the Harrier. Cordell said for the first few flights off the Wasp, the shooter – the flight deck crewmember who taps the flight deck, signaling final permission for pilots to takeoff – was told to tuck his head down, run to the ship's island (superstructure) & hold on for the actual launch. After a number of takeoffs, Cordell said, the shooter said that precaution seemed unnecessary. Couldn't he just hold onto one of the metal rings set into the flight deck, like he did when Harriers launched? The engineers assented.

Engineers were also concerned about the forward-most flight deck crewmember – the bow-waver, who signals to the shooter that there's no interference before takeoff. "He is right at the point where the wing is demanding the most lift possible, where you'd expect outwash and potential problems. He stands there as if he has very few cares in the world," Cordell said. Adm. Kevin Scott, the commander of Expeditionary Strike Group Two, seconded that point. "I didn't believe it at first. So I walked up there and stood next to him. It was really impressive," Scott told reporters....”

http://hamptonroads.com/2011/10/vertica ... 35bs-tests

NOW on Utubby: http://youtu.be/QeJ-X1Z0saM

"ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 24, 2013) - The flight deck crew secures an F-35B Lighting II aircraft aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) following testing. Wasp is underway in support of F-35B Lightning II Developmental Testing phase II (DT-II). DT-II is a collaborative effort among the Navy, Marine Corps, and coalition partners to validate operational capabilities of the F-35B for amphibious platforms (LHD, LHA). U.S. Navy photo"

http://bymnews.com/photos/displayimage. ... fullsize=1

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 28 Aug 2013, 22:59
by spazsinbad
F-35B Lightning II Week 1 Testing
"Published on Aug 26, 2013
Video of the F-35B Lightning II conducting Development Testing II testing aboard USS Wasp (LHD 1) during week 1 of testing."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5TC1Bbr ... e=youtu.be

First shooter in this video grabs the aircraft tiedown deck fitting. Don't forget to ZOOM full screen.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 28 Aug 2013, 23:17
by spazsinbad
F-35B Lightning II: From The Deckplate Of USS Wasp 28 Aug 2013
by Capt. Brian Teets is USS Wasp (LHD 1) commanding officer
"USS Wasp (LHD 1) Sailors are supporting testing and validation of the F-35B Lightning II until Aug. 30.The ship’s commanding officer explains how Wasp has prepared for the testing.

(NAVY LIVE BLOG 26 AUG 13) Capt. Brian Teets...

...Since Wasp’s designation as the F-35B LHD test platform, she has undergone a series of alterations and training evolutions to support hosting both the first and second underway phases of developmental testing; Development Testing I in October 2011 and now, Development Testing II in August 2013.

During Development Testing II, the F-35B Integrated Test Force is focused on expanding integration of the F-35B with large deck amphibious ships. This testing provides the baseline for the aircraft’s operational test in 2015. In preparation for Development Testing II, Wasp has been modified with special and unique infrastructure to accommodate test equipment, some deck-edge equipment has been moved, and accommodations for monitoring performance and environmental factors were added.

For example, we modified deck markings and lights to include the tramline and short take-off cue, we installed new materials to support thermal loading, and brought aboard temporary facilities to handle charging and storage of Lithium-Ion batteries. In some cases, the modifications not only accommodated F-35B but solved legacy ship-aircraft integration issues associated with the MV-22. For example, the new non-skid solution used for the F-35B is now an option for addressing MV-22 deck heating in operations and maintenance areas. That could be a big win for reducing maintenance time and keeping ships at sea...."

http://hrana.org/news/2013/08/f-35b-lig ... -uss-wasp/

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 29 Aug 2013, 00:14
by count_to_10
I don't know about anyone else, but I ran the section where the shooter is bracing against the jet blast several times. Seriously, that looked cool.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 29 Aug 2013, 04:56
by spazsinbad
Interesting orientation of VLs in these photos: + ZOOM to Vertical Landing Visual Aids

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3798/9614 ... 6b1e_o.jpg (0.85Mb)
&
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3712/9614 ... 0722_o.jpg (2.9Mb)

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 29 Aug 2013, 09:38
by spazsinbad
Marine Corps F-35B Finishing Sea Trials 29 Aug 2013 Kris Osborn
"USS WASP — The Marine Corps and Navy are close to wrapping up 19 days of Sea Trials for the Corps’ F-35B...

...The ongoing Sea Trials have resulted in at least 90 successful short take-offs and 92 vertical landings aboard the USS Wasp, said Joe DellaVedova, spokesman for the Joint Strike Fighter’s Joint Program Office....

...“Harriers are all manual controls. With the F-35 we have computers. A ton of engineering goes into making it a low work load. The plane is literally sampling winds, sampling conditions and the parameters,” said Marine Corps Capt. Michael Kingen, an F-35 developmental test pilot....

...The next Sea Trials for the F-35B are slated for sometime in 2016, DellaVedova said...."

http://defensetech.org/2013/08/29/marin ... ea-trials/

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B

Unread postPosted: 29 Aug 2013, 21:06
by XanderCrews
spazsinbad wrote:Had to laugh about some anti-F-35B websites complaining about the 'shooter' cringing during STO. Note in the video he does not even clench the deck tiedown fitting (I'll guess he could have done so if required?).


People were actually trying to make that an issue? Wow.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-

Unread postPosted: 29 Aug 2013, 21:14
by sprstdlyscottsmn
the B is becoming such a success that they grasp and anything they can.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-

Unread postPosted: 29 Aug 2013, 23:08
by spazsinbad
Marines Put F-35B STOVL Jet Through Paces At Sea 29 Aug 2013 Colin Clark
"More than 1,200 Marine test pilots, engineers, experts from the Joint Program Office running the program and Navy and industry civilians are collecting enormous amounts of data from the two aircraft, BF-1 and BF-5, and the ship itself to ensure the planes are performing as they should....

...both JSF planes had glitches while we were out on the ship, though BF-1 began flying again soon after we left. The second plane appeared to have a “pretty significant problem,” a crew member told me. Its Integrated Power Package, a sort of super generator that powers many of the plane’s sophisticated electronics would not start. I’ve emailed the Joint Program Office for an update and will update this as soon as we hear from them.

One of the biggest concerns about the F-35B, which directs most of the engine’s power directly down to the ship’s deck as it lands, was that it would damage the ship’s deck so much at each landing that the Wasp and other ships — or the F-35B — would have to be redesigned to mitigate that problem. I spoke with several deck crew, the men and women who wear yellow shirts on the carrier deck and execute the dangerous ballet of launching and retrieving aircraft from the Wasp. They say that, after taking off and landing several times almost every day since Aug. 12, they are seeing less damage to the deck than it sustains from some other aircraft that routinely fly from the Wasp and other LHD class ships.

The Navy and Marines have added a new coating to the deck where F-35Bs land, called Thermion. From all accounts, it’s a remarkable product composed of aluminum and ceramic bonded together by heat at application to form a very smooth and tough heat-resistant coating.

There is one part of the ship that is sustaining unanticipated — if not critical — damage, namely the edge of the bow. Nets to catch crew members who might lose their footing in rough seas or be blown down by a passing aircraft are being severely rattled by the enormous downwash from the F-35B’s jet engine as it passes low over the end of the ship. The wire netting is snapping and some of the structure that supports the nets is being bent. And lights just under the deck’s lip are being shattered.

Chief Steven Vlasich, who is responsible for maintaining the deck, took me up to check the damage. I saw a few snapped wires. It didn’t look too bad, but then Vlasich and his crew had been fixing everything they could. The chief and three other yellow shirts told me the Thermion appeared to be working well. But Vlasich said he’d like to keep much of the deck covered with its current aluminum product, which is much rougher than Thermion. He thinks it gives crew members better traction, especially when the deck is wet and covered in leaking hydraulic fluid and oil.

Joe Spitz, a systems engineer with Naval Sea Systems Command, told me they’ve got several solutions they’re considering for the nets. One would be pretty simple: drop them down as the jets take off.

He doesn’t agree with Vlasich about Thermion. He says it is safer than the older surface and grips better. Perhaps most important, you can clean oil and other fluid from it more effectively, Spitz says. The Wasp is reportedly going to have its entire deck coated in Thermion.

But these are secondary, if important issues. What really matters to those on the Wasp is that they are getting the F-35B into the air consistently and safely...."

http://breakingdefense.com/2013/08/29/7646/

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-

Unread postPosted: 29 Aug 2013, 23:25
by spazsinbad
Turn up the volume to ELEVEN!

F-35B Day Landing USS Wasp

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMl1hgZlHHI

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-

Unread postPosted: 30 Aug 2013, 06:04
by spazsinbad
F-35B DT 2 Update: A few hours on the USS Wasp 30 Aug 2013 Amy Butler
"...Peter Wilson, a BAE test pilot, was able to test the F-35B landing at four headings, each 90-deg. apart. He says the testing validates the aircraft can conduct VLs at any heading on the ship.

The VLs were conducted on spots in the aft portion of the ship that have been treated with Thermion, a new heat resistant coating the includes ceramic and steel; it is a vast improvement over the current anti-skid coating used on the deck and might be applied to other F-35 ships in the future, says Joe Spitz, lead tester on deck for Naval Sea Systems Command.

During one of the tests, Wilson landed an F-35B with its nose off toward the port side of the deck and its engine and hot nozzle exhaust on the port side. During this test, the engine nozzle was just at the demarcation on the deck between the Thermion and baseline anti-skid coatings on the deck. The effects are obvious. The anti-skid coating is brown as a result of the intense heat, while the Thermion appears unaffected.

Spitz says that while the anti-skid coating typical on can handle F-35 operations, its service life could be compromised over time. So, the Navy is assessing whether it will outline decks – or at least portions to be used by the F-35B – with this Thermion material in the future. The performance tradeoff is cost; Thermion is more expensive, he says.

However, heat output is an issue also with the MV-22s landing on the decks of carriers and small-deck ships, so it is possible the Navy will take into account the operational use of these tiltrotor aircraft as it plots a way forward for the use of Thermion.

Below, the dark section on the right is the Thermion coating. You can see on the left where Wilson landed with the engine nozzle just over the divider between the Thermion and standard anti-skid -- the the latter a bit toasted...."

http://www.aviationweek.com/Blogs.aspx? ... 344c382ecb

Image

BIG PIC:
http://sitelife.aviationweek.com/ver1.0 ... b.Full.jpg

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-

Unread postPosted: 30 Aug 2013, 13:29
by spazsinbad

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-

Unread postPosted: 30 Aug 2013, 21:43
by spazsinbad
LONG nightime VIDEO STOs & VLs USS Wasp F-35B DT-II

F-35B Lightning II Testing Night Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxaNt98yVE4

DayTime FlyCo Big Pic: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7406/9602 ... f9d3_o.jpg (6Mb)

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-

Unread postPosted: 30 Aug 2013, 22:18
by spazsinbad

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-

Unread postPosted: 30 Aug 2013, 22:29
by quicksilver
Thank you Amy for the pics ref the Thermion (and Spaz for posting). This will silence all but the lunatic fringe about deck melting etc.

It should be noted however, that Harrier exhaust discolors traditional non-skid in the same fashion.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Elf2AgKi510

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-

Unread postPosted: 30 Aug 2013, 23:43
by spazsinbad
What is with the 'IPP' patch? Is that a joke or just a way to place the IPP over that exact spot when aircraft chained or secured before start or something. Is there more than one IPP patch or just this one 'joke'? Sailors - you cannot take them anywhere except to apologise. :D

http://sitelife.aviationweek.com/ver1.0 ... 4.Full.jpg

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes firs

Unread postPosted: 31 Aug 2013, 00:14
by quicksilver
spazsinbad wrote:What is with the 'IPP' patch? Is that a joke or just a way to place the IPP over that exact spot when aircraft chained or secured before start or something. Is there more than one IPP patch or just this one 'joke'? Sailors - you cannot take them anywhere except to apologise. :D


No joke. The F135 wasn't the only thing that the Henny Pennys said was going to melt the flight deck -- it was the IPP also.

Thus, there have been all sorts of test points (engineering science projects) set up to assess the effect of IPP exhaust on the flight deck.

Problem with the test is that the exhaust geometry of the IPPs on the SDD jets does not match that of production jets. IOW, the production jets are more benign than the SDD jets because the exhaust has more time to cool off before it impinges on a given horizontal surface.

Since this is flight test, they've been parking the jets in specific locations where they can assess the effects of IPP exhaust. Never mind that they did a lot of instrumented work a couple years ago on this stuff... :roll:

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes

Unread postPosted: 31 Aug 2013, 01:44
by spazsinbad
Here is one reference to the new 'oval' shape of the IPP: http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... val#201318

JSF Heat Woes Getting Fixed Naval Open Source INTelligence July 19, 2010
“Changes are being made to the integrated power package (IPP) on the Marine’s F-35(B) that should limit heat damage to carrier decks and other surfaces, Lt. Gen. George Trautman, deputy commandant for aviation, told DoD Buzz in an exclusive interview one day before the start of the Farnborough Air Show.

In addition, the heat buildup from the STOVL drive shaft will be addressed in LRIP 4, although negotiations on that are still underway so costs for that are not set yet.

“We have made the decision to adjust the IPP,” he said Sun-day, reshaping the nozzle so that the enormous [?] thrust comes out in an oval shape instead of the more highly focused circle now used. It takes a “slight adjustment” to the IPP. The oval “will resolve that problem for almost all surfaces,” he said.”

http://nosint.blogspot.com/2010/07/jsf- ... fixed.html

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot ma

Unread postPosted: 31 Aug 2013, 03:39
by quicksilver
spazsinbad wrote:Here is one reference to the new 'oval' shape of the IPP: http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... val#201318

JSF Heat Woes Getting Fixed Naval Open Source INTelligence July 19, 2010
“Changes are being made to the integrated power package (IPP) on the Marine’s F-35(B) that should limit heat damage to carrier decks and other surfaces, Lt. Gen. George Trautman, deputy commandant for aviation, told DoD Buzz in an exclusive interview one day before the start of the Farnborough Air Show.

In addition, the heat buildup from the STOVL drive shaft will be addressed in LRIP 4, although negotiations on that are still underway so costs for that are not set yet.

“We have made the decision to adjust the IPP,” he said Sun-day, reshaping the nozzle so that the enormous [?] thrust comes out in an oval shape instead of the more highly focused circle now used. It takes a “slight adjustment” to the IPP. The oval “will resolve that problem for almost all surfaces,” he said.”

http://nosint.blogspot.com/2010/07/jsf- ... fixed.html


The writer didn't have a clue, and the quote above puts the evidence in-writing. The IPP is essentially an APU. It does not produce 'enormous thrust' in any operating mode -- period. The adjustment they made simply shifted the exhaust angle so it doesn't impinge directly on any surface beneath it.

Notice the effect of the IPP was anticipated to be "so extreme" that they simply painted a spot on the flight deck where they anticipated the exhaust would impinge.

YGBSM :roll:

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 31 Aug 2013, 05:56
by spazsinbad
Looks pristine - that spot. :D

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 31 Aug 2013, 06:15
by lookieloo
They should paint the entire deck with "WHERE'S THE HOLE SWEETMAN?"

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 31 Aug 2013, 06:24
by spazsinbad
F-35B finds its sea legs 30 Aug 2013 Dominic Perry
"The much-maligned short take-off and landing variant of the Lockheed Martin Joint Strike Fighter was all at sea earlier this week, literally, as two examples of the stealthy type were embarked on the USS Wasp for sea trials. It’s the second round of embarked testing for the jet. And although it may be late and over budget, it sure makes a pretty picture. Millions of dollars well-spent, then."

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/aircr ... -sea-legs/

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/aircr ... 5tests.jpg

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 31 Aug 2013, 10:06
by spazsinbad
Zoomed from original: http://breakingdefense.com/wp-content/u ... aspbow.jpg

Looks like a port crosswind blows deck water (in tiedown fittings) spray to starboard onto bowmen.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 31 Aug 2013, 23:12
by spazsinbad
As mentioned on previous page of this thread 'make the nets droppable to avoid damage': http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7371/9632 ... 0832_o.jpg

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 31 Aug 2013, 23:37
by count_to_10
That's not a lot of clearance.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 01 Sep 2013, 01:37
by spazsinbad
That aspect of adequate clearance was OKed in the first trials (we should call them DT-I now). The ZOOM lens makes the situation look worse than actuality. Anyway it is adequate and has been for every launch AFAIK. Probably the issue with the safety netting could have been foreseen but it seems lowering them is an easy fix along with more robust light fittings as required.

The F-35B is airborne - not rotating to become airborne - at the end of the deck. Remember it is partly engine borne as well as wing lift borne in STOVL mode - at speed. Whilst apparently as I recall there are three modes/methods for takeoff in STOVL mode I'll have to look them up.

Marine Corps demonstrates F-35B at sea 18 Oct 2011 Dave Majumdar
"...For getting off the ship, Cordell said that there are three short take-off modes that the team tested: manual, semi-automatic and fully automatic...."

http://www.marinecorpstimes.com/news/20 ... ea-101811/
______________________

Navy Sees Few Anomalies in F-35B Ship Trials 31 Oct 2011 Amy Butler | Onboard USS Wasp
"...the STO operations do vary for the F-35 owing to the different lift qualities of the F-35s’ stealthy, supersonic-capable design. For testing on the Wasp, the nozzles and control surfaces actuate with 225 ft. of runway remaining on deck, creating an angle of attack and allowing for the wings to produce enough lift for takeoff from the deck, Cordell says.

The Harrier’s rotation line is at the bow, owing to its wing design creating the required lift without the corresponding angle-of-attack change. Cordell says that the testing equipment at the ship’s bow has also not detected any problems with the F-35’s nozzle clearance as it takes off....

...There are three methods for takeoff: manual (pilot pulling back on the stick); using a button that actuates the nozzle at the rotation line; or auto STO, which places the aircraft at a known distance from the rotation line. In this auto setting the aircraft will actuate automatically when the pilot reaches that rotation line...."

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/ ... avy&next=0
_________________

Pic from DT-I:
http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6100/631 ... 51d7_b.jpg

VIDEO STO from DT-I

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 01 Sep 2013, 02:17
by spazsinbad
THE JSF STOVL [X-35B] PERFORMANCE PROCESS FROM SMALL-SCALE DATABASE TO FLIGHT TEST DEMONSTRATION Kevin M. McCarthy, JSF Program Office/Naval Air Systems Command Nov 2002
“...The STO deck run starts at brake release, which typically occurs at the maximum thrust that the brakes can hold. This is an input. The engine spool-up characteristics from this throttle setting to maximum power are considered during the acceleration portion of the deck run. Weight on main and nose gear is calculated, and must be monitored to maintain adequate deck handling characteristics....

...STO demonstrations were a critical aspect of the flight test program as well. The X-35B performed two different technique STOs; 1) fixed nozzle and 2) auto-STOs. The fixed nozzle STOs are self-explanatory, and were used for the initial flight test STO maneuvers. For these maneuvers, the demonstrated performance was very consistent with predicted levels. The flight test auto-STOs featured a deck run nozzle angle (34/28 fan/main) and flyaway nozzle angle between 40/40 and 60/60, depending on aircraft weight. The auto-rotation was pilot actuated at the desired rotation speed....”

http://pdf.aiaa.org/downloads/2002/CDRe ... 274d1857TR (1.7Mb PDF)

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2013, 20:12
by spazsinbad
Diagram shows where the F-35B starts to rotate on LHA-1

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2013, 22:29
by sprstdlyscottsmn
great stuff! Thanks Spaz!

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 04 Sep 2013, 01:20
by haavarla
How does Heavy sea affect such take-off from the B Version?
Assuming the super carriers ever face Heavy sea. Their huge size in mind..

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 04 Sep 2013, 01:45
by spazsinbad
There would be a limit to the pitching deck movement for both landing and taking off on any flat deck at sea. What these limits are for an LHA I'm not aware but could look around. Earlier I think I have posted what is a known limit for CVNs on this forum - I would have to find it again.

Having been catapulted from a small carrier down a 100 foot track I am well aware of the pitching deck phenomena. If stormy weather too bad then we did not fly but could be surprised by long Pacific Ocean swell that could move the carrier HMAS Melbourne quite a way sometimes. Movements can be regular or not. The skill of the FDO (in my case the officer responsible or his deputy) for catapulting would wait for the deck movement to be optimum (bow high) when the A4G reached the end of the catapult. Some days he might misjudge it slightly or the erratic movement over a long swell might make a dramatic change just for that instant OR the FDO or Asst. FDO might be still in their learning cycle. Nothing the pilot can do about it except fly the aircraft at optimum.

CVNs are seen in some dramatic photos with waves breaking over the bow with aircraft tied down securely parked there.

For carrier landings the LSO can be a great help to even out the 'apparent' movement depending on circumstances the pilot always follows the meatball perhaps with some assistance from the LSO. These issues have been canvassed a few times on this forum but mostly in conventional carrier landing context.

We read that the latest trials have tested heavy STOs to judge what kind of sink can be expected under differing wind / WOD conditions so that parameters can be acquired for such STOs in heavy weather with the bow moving. Once again the launch officer can judge best when to launch the F-35B because his experience will be greater than the pilot to judge such a launch himself. The ski jump is useful under these heavy weather conditions also.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 04 Sep 2013, 09:51
by spazsinbad
A search for more robust night deck lighting has been underway for some time according to this old report:

Navy Seeks Foreign Sources For JSF-Proof Lighting On Ship Decks InsideDefense.com: July 5, 2010
"The Navy is reaching out to potential sources in other countries to provide ship deck lighting that would be able to handle the hot exhaust heat from the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter's engine, according to a recent notice on Federal Business Opportunities.

The June 23 sources sought notice from the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division in Lakehurst, NJ, calls for information on "commercially available, non-developmental" heat-resistant flight deck material, specifically light fixtures.

"The FCT (Foreign Cooperative Test) program is an [Office of the Secretary of Defense]-funded effort to evaluate foreign vendors' equipment, hardware, etc. for a quick solution to the warfighter's needs in the field," according to June 30 responses to questions from Inside the Navy provided by Lakehurst spokesman Tom Worsdale. "This particular solicitation is a request to foreign vendors to see what 'in deck' lighting exists that will survive the JSF exhaust heat for shipboard flight ops."

Last month, InsideDefense.com reported that the Navy estimates it will cost at least $70 million to modify each large-deck amphibious ship to accommodate the Marine Corps F-35B short-take-off, vertical-landing variant of the JSF. Later this year, crews will modify the amphibious ship Wasp (LHD-1) with hundreds of sensors to measure the effects of the fierce downwash from the STOVL variant...."

http://insidedefense.com/Inside-the-Nav ... hip-decks/

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 06 Sep 2013, 07:09
by spazsinbad
Just so happened to have a request for a 100Mb PDF about catapulting (specifically for the A4G aboard HMAS Melbourne) which includes info of a general nature about past and future catapulting. The photo attached is from: http://www.eugeneleeslover.com/AMMUNITI ... 960-29.jpg

Otherwise.... 100Mb PDFs about catapulting and related maters will be in the 'Documents & Videos Various' folder on SkyDrive:
https://skydrive.live.com/?cid=CBCD63D6 ... 07E6%21119
OR
http://tinyurl.com/l7n6jyb

&
In the 'A4G_Skyhawk_RAN_FAA_PDFs' folder on GoogleDrive:
https://drive.google.com/?authuser=0#fo ... WNERFJLQ2s
OR
http://tinyurl.com/myzjmv7

File name is: "CHLOE&deCatapult+.pdf" (100Mbs)

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 06 Sep 2013, 07:57
by lookieloo
With their relatively low speeds and high freeboard, how often does water come over the bow of an LHD/LHA? I always thought roll was the main issue with such decks.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilo

Unread postPosted: 06 Sep 2013, 08:36
by spazsinbad
Do you have any photos? Links to photos of these events would be good. As for your question I guess GOOGLing would be the answer. I may get to that soon.

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test

Unread postPosted: 06 Sep 2013, 08:42
by lookieloo
spazsinbad wrote:Do you have any photos? Links to photos of these events would be good. As for your question I guess GOOGLing would be the answer. I may get to that soon.
Photos and videos wouldn't actually answer either of my questions.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine t

Unread postPosted: 06 Sep 2013, 08:47
by spazsinbad
Well you asked a question that needed a response in my view but as always it will be a work in progress. Otherwise I suspect you would get no response. Firstly have you been at sea in a relatively large ship? Here is an example of an RN CVS hitting some large swell somewhere (I do not know the details) from: http://i842.photobucket.com/albums/zz34 ... /jump2.jpg

My personal interest is in the history of the RAN/RN fixed wing aircraft carrier ops with the USN the only game in town these days. However not being in the STOVL world (although many former A4G pilots went there - mostly to the RN) I do have some connections to that history vicariously. As I say I will research the question - be patient.

There is an excellent documentary (often only available to those of the US persuasion sadly) on the internet called 'CARRIERS' I think - on the PBS network anyway - which has a segment about the long Pacific swells causing consternation on a CVN a few years ago. The sea is powerful. Any sized ship is always small by comparison.
__________________

An example of how a CVN is able to move:

"...10 Mar–21 Mar 1992: Hampered by high winds, heavy seas and poor flying conditions, Dwight D. Eisenhower [CVN-69] participated in Teamwork 92, a huge NATO exercise off southern Scotland.,... Appalling weather, including heavy snow squalls that reduced visibility to “near zero,” forced all hands topside to don cold weather gear but kept Russian ship interference to a minimum, though they did monitor operations.... Seven F/A-18C Hornets experienced hard landings, mostly due to the flight deck pitching as much as 35 feet during rolls...."

http://archive.is/YfSk
_______________________

Nothing found for USN / USMC LHAs but an inference is building about how ships move at sea.... [search forum for 'Collins' will find similar stories about such matters - onesuch: http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ins#224188 ]

Flying the Sea Harrier: a test pilot’s perspective By Peter Collins, Flight International 20/04/09
"...Recalling one experience, Collins says: "It was a perfect day, but Lusty was heaving in a massive swell and the flight deck was pitching through 6°. I manoeuvred into my launch position while Flyco [Flying Co-ordination] had a think about it. Through my forward canopy the entire world alternated from completely bright blue to completely bright green (the sea was alive with plankton) as the ship pitched through more angles than I had ever seen before. Refusing the launch is mutiny: it has to be done by the pilot slamming the throttle as the deck starts to pitch down. Thankfully Flyco scrubbed the launch!" Illustrious returned home after two months of duty, with Collins having logged a total of 66 deck landings. "I am immensely proud of my short time with the Fleet Air Arm," says Collins...."

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/20 ... ctive.html

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine t

Unread postPosted: 06 Sep 2013, 12:00
by spazsinbad
This same old VSTOL NATOPS will be attached also. Meanwhile here is there take on the Harrier Launch Procedure.... [I'll look at AV-8B NATOPS also - which says "Shipboard Procedures 8.1 GENERAL SHIPBOARD PROCEDURES Refer to NAVAIR 00-80T-111 (below).]

V/STOL SHIPBOARD AND LANDING SIGNAL OFFICER NATOPS MANUAL 01 July 2004 NAVAIR 00-80T-111
8.1.4 Day Short Takeoff Procedures. page 8-2
"...6. Pilot shall salute when ready.

7. The launch officer will touch the deck when cleared to launch.

8. Apply full power on the launch signal and hold the brakes until the tires skid.

9. Note maximum rpm and water flow if required.

10. Guard the stick in the preset stabilator trim position throughout the deck run and nozzle
rotation.

11. If the aircraft deviates from the tramline, do not attempt to correct back to the tramline
immediately or PIO may occur. Instead, a correction should be made so the aircraft arrives
at the nozzle rotation line with the nose tire on the tramline.

12. Rotate the nozzles briskly to the STO stop at the nozzle rotation line.

Note
There may be a slight pause depending on
excess end speed before the aircraft rotates.
This is because of the time delay from nozzle
rotation until the flaps fully program. This is
normal, and no pilot compensation is
required.

13. At bow exit, expect a noseup rotation that will tend to increase in rate slightly as the target attitude is achieved. The proper attitude is achieved when the depressed attitude symbol (witch’s hat) is maintained between the pitch carets and the 5_ pitch bar. With the proper trim set, the aircraft will seek the proper attitude. A small forward stick check will be required to stop the pitch rate and maintain the exit attitude. The pilot shall maintain the witch’s hat between the pitch carets and the 5_ pitch bar. Do not pull the nose off the deck.

WARNING
Checking the attitude at less optimum may
result in a sink off the bow.

14. After a positive rate of climb is established, commence an accelerating transition...."

http://www.robertheffley.com/docs/CV_en ... Manual.pdf (1Mb)

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Unread postPosted: 06 Sep 2013, 12:25
by spazsinbad
From the SAC Standard Aircraft Characteristics PDF here are the AV-8B T/O Statistics.

http://www.history.navy.mil/planes/av-8b.pdf (0.3Mb)

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Unread postPosted: 06 Sep 2013, 19:40
by neurotech
lookieloo wrote:With their relatively low speeds and high freeboard, how often does water come over the bow of an LHD/LHA? I always thought roll was the main issue with such decks.

Water over the bow happen on big-deck CVN carriers, Catapult Officers try and time the movement so they don't send a jet into the water. There is a few photos of Super Hornets being sprayed by water over the bow, but flight operations were put on hold.

Pitch is often the bigger issue landing on a carrier, rolling deck causes line-up deviations and a harder than typical landing. A pitching deck can cause a perfectly good approach to grab the 1-wire and have a near ramp strike. The USN LSOs use MOVLAS to manually guide a jet during heavy movement conditions. Hard landings in difficult deck conditions can occur even with experienced senior pilots.

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine t

Unread postPosted: 12 Sep 2013, 01:51
by spazsinbad
Another STO view I have not seen before. Original: http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3829/9602 ... 6149_o.jpg

15 Aug 2013 USS Wasp DT-II
&
19 Aug 2013 etc: http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3727/9614 ... 490a_o.jpg

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine t

Unread postPosted: 12 Sep 2013, 12:50
by spazsinbad
VIDEO: RAF Pilot performs first UK takeoff of F-35B Lightning at sea
"Published on Sep 12, 2013
Squadron Leader Jim Schofield performs the first short takeoff at sea in a F-35B aircraft onboard USS Wasp"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oYy0XR6E ... e=youtu.be

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine t

Unread postPosted: 13 Sep 2013, 01:24
by count_to_10
Has anyone posted these videos on the Falklands War?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYO5nfMLTKo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RaHBevZT23c
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A44HHf5f73M

also caught this smaller one on the harrier specifically:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFJ7wRbHRIo

But there seems to be a contradiction about what aircraft took out the runway:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTDYcuoOKkM

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine t

Unread postPosted: 17 Sep 2013, 21:29
by spazsinbad
These two videos are the ones I had in mind earlier (but I'm - along with others not of the US persuasion - not able to see them here) about illustrating how a CVN is affected by the sea...

PBS: Carrier - Landing on a Pitching Deck Pt. 1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gGMI8d3vLs

PBS: Carrier - Landing on a Pitching Deck Pt. 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0yj70QbBzg

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Mari

Unread postPosted: 17 Sep 2013, 23:38
by count_to_10
spazsinbad wrote:These two videos are the ones I had in mind earlier (but I'm - along with others not of the US persuasion - not able to see them here) about illustrating how a CVN is affected by the sea...

PBS: Carrier - Landing on a Pitching Deck Pt. 1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gGMI8d3vLs

PBS: Carrier - Landing on a Pitching Deck Pt. 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0yj70QbBzg

That part about having to send tankers up -- which increases the number of aircraft that need to trap in difficult conditions -- and the 15 straight bolters, may be something to consider in discussions about using V-22s for COD and tankers.

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Unread postPosted: 20 Sep 2013, 06:54
by spazsinbad
VIDEO: Crew Interviews from F-35B Ship Trials
"Published on Sep 19, 2013
Hear from the Marine and Navy aviators and maintainers that were aboard the USS Wasp for F-35B ship trials in August 2013."


___________________

Ship Trials Bring F-35B Capability, Operational Utility Into Focus
"FORT WORTH, Texas, September 19, 2013 - Recent ship trials for the Lockheed Martin [LMT] F-35B onboard the USS Wasp [LHD-1] underscored the fifth-generation fighter's unique capabilities and operational utility according to Marines and sailors alike.

In a video released today, U.S. Navy Capt. Erik Etz stated, "A fifth-generation aircraft, such as the F-35, will open up threat areas where previous legacy fighters that operate off L-class ships weren't even invited to play. So, an F-35B operating from this type of ship really gives a joint war-fighting commander different options to affect change in the world wherever it is necessary."

Marine Corps Capt. Mike Kingen, an F-35 test pilot, added, "Ship-borne capabilities are important for the F-35B because they are important for the Marine Corps. Having F-35B, having a stealth platform that's organic to that unit will allow us to support the Marines…. The F-35 is going to allow future pilots to worry less about stick and rudder skills and more about executing the mission."

"The fact that the Harrier was not fly by wire at all, there was nothing in between me and the flight controls," said Marine Corps Maj. Michael Rountree, an F-35 test pilot. "So, I could do things in the Harrier that would very specifically get me killed if I did them incorrectly. Whereas in this airplane there is a level of protection between me and those flight control surfaces. So in a mission - you know up and away from the ship - that's going to allow me more time to think about the tactical picture, thinking about how I'm going to support the Marines on the ground."

During the 18-day long ship trials, two F-35Bs conducted a series of tests to determine the aircraft's suitability for sea-based operations. The aircraft completed 95 vertical landings, 19 of which were conducted at night, and 94 short takeoffs. The ship trials, known as Developmental Test-II, were a key milestone on the Marine Corps' path to Initial Operating Capability which is scheduled for 2015...."

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/p ... ility.html

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 21 Sep 2013, 13:33
by spazsinbad
On page 3 of this thread 'F16VIPER' asked a question about back o helmet logo. "...Also any good shots of the taped HMD helmet? It seems to have the F-35 logo at the back." Here is another go:

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 23 Sep 2013, 13:59
by spazsinbad
A force of 174,000: Corps will cut Marines to save readiness 23 Sep 2013 James K. Sanborn
"...Aviation
Likewise, in the aviation community, the F-35B Joint Strike Fighter and CH-53K heavy lift helicopter remain priorities.

In August, the F-35 underwent sea trials, conducting 95 vertical landings. That was 40 percent more than expected, putting testing for the next-generation fighter ahead of schedule, said Brig. Gen. Matthew Glavy, the assistant deputy commandant for aviation.

Meanwhile, roll-out is on schedule with 16 F-35s to be stationed at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., by the end of September, he said. Elsewhere, construction projects to support the new aircraft are on schedule. Next year, Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron 501, which operates the F-35, will relocate from Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., to Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, S.C...."

http://www.marinecorpstimes.com/article ... /309230003

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 24 Sep 2013, 21:33
by spazsinbad

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 19 Oct 2013, 11:45
by spazsinbad
F-35 Lightning II Program Status and Fast Facts 17 Oct 2013
"...F-35B accomplishes first night vertical landing aboard the USS Wasp (Aug. 14)

Developmental Test II aboard the USS Wasp completed; 95 VLs, 94 STO, 19 Night VLs; 42 flights each by two aircraft in 17 available flying days (Aug. 30)..."

http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_download-id-18223.html (180Kb PDF)

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 03 Nov 2013, 19:37
by spazsinbad
F-35B Conducts Second Round of Sea Trials aboard USS Wasp 18 Oct 2013
"In August 2013, the F-35 Integrated Test Force at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md. Conducted the second set of sea trials for the short takeoff and vertical landing variant (F-35B) aboard USS Wasp (LHD 1). Test team members talk about the three-week period and what it means for the development of the F-35B for the U.S. Marine Corps and international partners. (Lockheed Martin video)"


RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B nigh

Unread postPosted: 08 Nov 2013, 23:00
by spazsinbad
Apologies if video seen before....

Operations of the F-35B at Twilight VIDEO SldInfo.com Oct 2013
"The Integrated Test Force operates F-35B test aircraft aboard the USS Wasp at twilight in August 2013. The tests were a part of Developmental Test Phase Two for the F-35B STOVL variant.

According to Lt. Col. Gillette, currently the X0 of the Squadron and in transition with the jet to Yuma as the CO of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121, the initial operating capability of his squadron is set for 2015.

The Commandant has set the target as a six-month window from mid 2015 to the end of 2015.

There are certain requirements that need to be met in order to successfully declare that milestone in the F-35 program.

Specifically, it will require a certain number of jets, a certain number of air group training, maintenance to support that. In addition, that the air vehicle still needs to make some more progress in terms of its developmental tests, specifically, you have aerodynamic limitations that will be lifted, you have software limitations that will be lifted that will support core competency missions.

And then lastly, weapon certification. So those three things, air vehicle, the weapon certification, and then the people piece of being trained all have to come together. Those are all projected to merge, if you will, and come to fruition mid to the end of 15.

http://www.sldinfo.com/declaring-ioc-fo ... -approach/

http://vimeo.com/77275046#at=0

Re: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 24 Nov 2013, 01:38
by spazsinbad
AFAIK this info/article not posted before. Up till today the 'Code One' website has been 'Code whatever it is for down' in my part of the world? :bang: MORE photos at the jump.

F-35B Shipboard Testing: Phase 2 18 Oct 2013 Andy Wolfe
"More than 200 members of the F-35 Integrated Test Force from the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, deployed to the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD-1) in August 2013 for the second phase of developmental test sea trials, called DT-II, for the short takeoff/vertical landing variant of the Lightning II, the F-35B. The team deployed with two test F-35Bs, BF-1 and BF-5, for almost three weeks off the East Coast of the United States. Test participants came from Naval Sea Systems Command, or NAVSEA; Naval Air Systems Command, or NAVAIR; Lockheed Martin; BAE Systems; Pratt & Whitney; and several other organizations. The ITF team worked with nearly 1,000 Sailors aboard the Wasp.

The flight tests at sea were critical to clearing the flight envelope to support the Initial Operational Capability trials for the US Marines scheduled for 2015. During the deployment, four F-35B test pilots combined to fly almost 100 short takeoffs and vertical landings between the two aircraft. The flights were made in a variety of conditions that included day and night operations as well as unique crosswind, tailwind, and other dynamic wind-over-deck conditions. The trials expanded the F-35B flight envelope to include internal weapons carriage in a variety of configurations at varying weights and centers of gravity, as well as asymmetric loadings of stores in the aircraft internal weapon bays.

The sea trials also included logistics test and evaluation test points, such as assessing the ease of towing the aircraft in the constrained spaces below deck as well as testing a variety of chaining configurations for the aircraft on deck."

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/article.html?item_id=126

CAPTION:
"The LSO watched closely as Marine Capt. Michael Kingen prepared for a short takeoff in BF-5. Photo by Todd R. McQueen"

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/images/m ... 7_8423.jpg

Re: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 10 Jul 2014, 05:38
by spazsinbad
What a great read the latest AIR International F-35 Special Edition July 2014 is.... Below are some excerpts from a LONG article about USS Wasp DT I and II testing embarkations with the F-35Bs. Some stuff here I had not read about before such as the two detent STO takeoff throttle settings.... (maybe I do not read enough eh).
Jumping Jack Flash
July 2014 unknown author AIR International F-35 Special Edition

“...The DT I test plan was released as a 150-page document, one of the most complex ever written for any aircraft and requiring countless meetings over an 18-month period to finalise. Maj Rusnok said: “That’s a real tribute to the folks with the knowledge base and the wherewithal to write that kind of stuff.”

Pilots, Training and Embarkation Four pilots were selected for DT I: Peter Wilson of BAE Systems and three US Marine Corps test pilots, LtCol Schenk, LtCol Matthew Kelly and Maj Richard Rusnok. Each required ten vertical landings in their pocket as a test plan prerequisite prior to starting workups for the ship. Peter Wilson, the STOVL-lead pilot with the F-35 ITF at Pax, the test conductors and test directors played a pivotal role in the training to get the pilots ready to go. The process involved each pilot undertaking multiple simulator events to mirror the daily morning and afternoon flight periods available on the ship – which lasted for up to five hours and took place between May and October.

Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) simulators at Pax were developed for the test mission and can be linked to the test control rooms on the base. Landing Signal Officers (LSOs) and carrier suitability engineers took part in the simulator training and provided the calls usually made by controllers in the bridge of the ship, primary flight control and the tower. “We started with just the basic mechanics and worked our way into specific test points, emergency procedures and eventually to periods involving every conceivable type of test. You name it, we basically simulated it,” said Maj Rusnok. The next training requirement was Field Carrier Landing Practice (FCLP) at Pax for which a deck painted to look like a ship with instrumentation was set up in the middle of the airfield and equipped with a landing aid used on LHDs.

FCLPs were flown with the support of sailors assigned to Pax with prior LHD experience. Two weeks before embarkation, the entire Wasp flightdeck crew came to Pax for academic training. “We had the fire fighters learning how to rescue a pilot out of an F-35 – because there are so many unique aspects about the jet – and the full deck crew with the air boss and the mini boss running our flight period on the airfield,” said Rusnok.

On the afternoon of October 3, lead government STOVL pilot LtCol Schenk took off from Pax River in BF-02, flew the short distance to the USS Wasp under way off the coast of Wallops Island, Virginia, flew a couple of passes alongside the ship and then executed a vertical landing – the first aboard an LHD-class ship – to ‘spot seven’.

He also made the first launch the next morning, and completed a further three take-offs and landings in the first flight period. Maj Rusnok flew in the second period. Each pilot completed a nominal CQ qualification period inside the envelope before venturing into more interesting pieces of the envelope.

“We didn’t learn anything too crazy. We were pleasantly surprised at what we saw – there was no smoking gun, we didn’t have any near misses and the deck crew was happy with what they were doing,” said Rusnok.

Spray Coming onto the Ship
All of the initial missions flown from the Wasp during DT I were in the daytime and involved the jets recovering to the ship to a ‘case one’ pattern: coming into the break over the top of the ship, turning downwind, and then approaching the ship from approximately one mile aft of the stern.

“We generally come out of a final approach turn somewhere between 375 and 400 feet above the water for a three-degree glide slope to decelerate abeam the ship, usually about a wingspan’s worth off the ship,” said Rusnok. “As we get down and ready to cross the deck we do so at 90 or 45-degrees depending on how our closure is on our control and what the LSO is clearing us to do. He’s really running the pattern.

“At that point we’re somewhere in the vicinity of 110 to 120 feet above the water, and that’s when you start to see some of the wash coming up – but from the pilot’s perspective you don’t even know it’s there. The only time we [the pilots] saw any spray was during tailwind test points, at the edges of envelope. There were no adverse handling characteristics caused by the spray; you just see it because it’s getting blown back towards you as expected.

“There was concern that spray was a potentially big issue. Because we have our closure under control we can keep the aeroplane moving right across the deck, that’s really no issue, but if time is spent dwelling at that position there’s time for a mini tornado to develop – and we see that ashore with dust as well. At sea, generally we didn’t even know it was there and it wasn’t affecting the guys on the flight deck or the tower, so it was a non-event in that respect.” The test events were undertaken methodically, and not at war ops high tempo, to ensure procedures were conducted correctly and that nothing broke.

Aircraft Handling Around the Ship
Maj Rusnok described flying the F-35B around the ship: “The aeroplane in all its basic flying qualities, especially in STOVL mode, is kind of magical, it really is. You sit at 150 feet in a hover and it’s like sitting in this chair except that you’re elevated. The aeroplane is incredibly stable. Hypothetically, you could put a drink on the dashboard and it’s not going to spill.

“If you watch it from the outside, you’ll see the control effectors actually moving very rapidly and making all kinds of corrections – I’m not. They’re not making big swings, but making minute movements, keeping the aeroplane in the rock-steady hover that we experience in flight; and we saw that at sea in just the same way albeit with some forward speed to continue to fly formation with the ship as it moves through the water.”

Taking an aircraft to the ship presents concerns: the salt environment, the potential for disruptive interaction between the ship and the aircraft caused by the burble (the unusual air flow around the ship), the compatibility of the avionics with the ship, and the basic vehicle interface and displays – are there unknowns that have not been thought about?

“We never saw any of that at sea,” said Rusnok. “Was everything perfect? Absolutely not, that’s why we do developmental testing. But do I feel comfortable with a properly trained F-35 pilot, who’s not a test pilot, taking an aeroplane out to sea to do basic daylight landings? Absolutely, based on what we saw, especially in the nominal envelope they’ll provide the fleet with for initial operation.”....

...STO-ing...
...Maj Rusnok noted: “We weren’t only stepping through flying with varying crosswinds but also various centre of gravity load-outs for the aircraft, done with fuel. To achieve the very specific weight bands on the aircraft required to match the model, sometimes we had to refuel on the deck or wait to burn down fuel to meet the requirement of the specific test band. So not very fast launches, but very controlled. We’d take off and burn the fuel down to a specific landing weight to maintain divert options ashore and stay in the weight band.”

There are three ways to conduct a short take off (STO) in the F-35B: stick STO, button STO – and auto STO. “That’s a completely automated way to STO the aircraft off the flight deck. You punch in a distance and the aircraft will auto rotate to its optimal fly-out condition. It’s all based on distance: we know where the aircraft is spotted [before it starts its take-off run] and where it should start its actual rotation,” explained Rusnok. “Unlike a Harrier, which launches off the end of the ship flat, the F-35 rotates at about 225 feet from the bow, sits on two wheels until it gets to the end of the ship and actually takes off, a much different process to a Harrier. From a pilot perspective, you lose some sight of the front of the ship; in a Harrier you can see all the deck. But that’s all part of optimising a 35,000lb aeroplane to get off the ship compared to the Harrier, which is only 16,000 to 25,000lb.”

With stick STO the pilot controls the take-off by pulling back on the stick, holding it there and then rotating to the optimal pitch angle to fly off. In button STO, the pilot uses a trim switch which rotates the aircraft when pushed in, activating it when the aircraft passes the yellow STO rotation line positioned 225 feet from the bow of the ship.

“That was a temporary marking applied on the flight deck for this trial and is now being permanently installed on the ship with lighting,” explained Rusnok. “It’s based on optimising the performance of the aircraft and its flying qualities, so we can get the aeroplane off with the maximum amount of nozzle clearance and performance. The STO line is our visual cue to either pull the stick aft or hit the button; or if you’re on automated STO you should start seeing the aeroplane’s flight controls moving by the line, otherwise the pilot can intervene and pull back on the stick. We’ve never had to intervene.” [joker]

The pilot also has command of the throttle. Two power setting options are available for take-off: Mil STO and Max STO [have not read about this before], as Maj Rusnok explained: “When you taxi to the tram line you stay in mode one, the conventional flight mode. You convert the aircraft into mode four, the STOVL flight mode, and it takes about 15 seconds or so for the doors to open up and the lift fan to engage.

“Then you push the throttle about halfway up the throttle slide into a detent position at about 34% engine thrust request. It sits there and you check the engine gauges: if the readings are okay you slam the throttle to either Mil or Max position and then release the brakes simultaneously. Pushing through to max is like an afterburner detent. But it’s not an afterburner – you can’t go to afterburner in mode four.

“It’s a very fast acceleration. The closest we would spot from the bow is 400 feet, so about 175 feet before we would actually start rotating the aeroplane [at the STO rotation line]; so very, very quick.”

One of the big test points for DT I was to ensure adequate nozzle clearance in all the different test conditions. The engine nozzle swings down and back up during the take-off in accordance with inputs from the aircraft control laws.

“It’s all automated,” said Rusnok. “The pilot is not in the loop whatsoever – either they’re pushing the button and letting the aeroplane do its own thing or pulling back on the stick to help it. Monitoring systems cue when something is wrong, so you have to rely on them to keep you safe because the flight controls are being moved unbelievably quickly.”

Maj Rusnok said the take-off was very much like that ashore, with very little sink off the end of the deck. “The aeroplane is ridiculously powerful in STOVL mode. Just raw, unadulterated power.”

Recovery to the Deck
Generally, each time an aircraft took off it would burn down its fuel load by flying around the ship and making approaches until the appropriate landing weight was reached for the test points required. Landing spots seven and nine were used: seven is the primary location for STOVL jets on LHD ships, while nine is further aft on the tram line. The landing spot selected for each flight was mainly driven by NAVSEA’s environmental engineers who specified a certain number of landings on each one to determine their flow characteristics – and how that affected minimum time between landings – ultimately working up to demonstrate two-ship F-35B operations.

Both spots were instrumented to measure different parameters: seven for deck deflection and nine to measure heat on an experimental non-skid deck surface called Thermion. According to NAVSEA this new coating – a bond of ceramic and aluminium designed to be more resistant to extreme heat, and wear and tear, from flight operations – showed no signs of heat stress during DT I.

“Sometimes BF-04, the mission systems aircraft, would fly instrument approaches to come alongside the ship and side step over to the flight deck . But we were primarily testing compatibility of TACAN and carrier-controlled approaches, not the full transition from an instrument approach across the stern to a landing,” said Maj Rusnok....

...Feedback from DT I
Over the course of the 19-day DT I test period the two jets logged 28 hours’ flight time and completed 72 short take-offs and 72 vertical landings in conditions of up to 33 knots of wind-over-deck and 10 knots of starboard crosswind....

...The Director, Operational Test & Evaluation’s Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Report (DOT&E FY2011 AR) said: “As expected, high starboard crosswinds produced the most challenging environment. One approach to hover prior to a vertical landing was waved off by the pilot due to turbulence in the ship’s air wake.

“A minimal nozzle clearance of two inches was observed at rotation during a short take-off with high starboard crosswinds when the pilot made an aggressive correction to maintain centreline....

...The good story was the tyres. We thought they were going to be eaten up by the non-skid because that’s a pretty rough surface out there. We only changed two.” He was enthusiastic about the aircraft’s performance during DT I: “We’ve proved the F-35B is compatible with LHD ships and we’ll eventually prove that with the UK’s CVF-class ships too. We didn’t hurt anybody, we didn’t break anything and the aeroplane performed outstandingly in terms of flying qualities and maintenance.”

Development Test Phase Two
On August 10, some 21 months after the conclusion of DT I, USS Wasp hosted the follow-on F-35B sea trials – known as Developmental Test Phase Two, or DT II.

Just like DT I, VX-23 deployed four pilots, two jets and a 200-strong team for an 18-day test period. Pilots selected for DT II were LtCol Jimi Clift and Maj Mike Kingen of the US Marine Corps, Squadron Leader Jim Schofield from the Royal Air Force and BAE Systems’ Peter Wilson, the only pilot to fly in both sea trials.

DT II was undertaken to expand the F-35B’s allowable wind envelope for launch and recovery, conduct the first-ever night operations and initial mission systems evaluations at sea, evaluate the dynamics associated with aircraft operations on a moving flight deck and further test shipboard sustainment of the F-35.

“We tried as best we could to keep all the flying fleet-relevant, as opposed to DT I where there were a lot more tests to maintain configuration for longer periods of time,” said Maj Mike Kingen.

Test Events
VX-23 devoted considerable time in 2013 to clearing the envelope to be used onboard the USS Wasp and vigorously testing the In-Service Release (ISR) of the propulsion system. There are two standards of the propulsion system: First Flight Release (FFR) and ISR, each distinctly different in terms of software and hardware. The two aircraft used for DT II incorporated the different standards – BF-01 is an FFR, and BF-05 is an ISR, the only such aeroplane in the SDD fleet.

“That gave us a unique opportunity to take the ISR propulsion system to the boat and compare it back-to-back with the capabilities of the FFR system: we only found very minor differences,” said Peter Wilson, STOVL-lead pilot for the F-35. An ISR propulsion system has more capability than an FFR and is able to cope with wider variations in aircraft centre of gravity (CG), a key factor when bringing weapons back to the boat. With forward CG, such as when weapons are carried internally, the lift fan must produce more thrust than the three-bearing swivel module (3BSM) in order to balance the aircraft at a steady hover attitude. “You have more capability to handle off-nominal CGs but that doesn’t necessarily mean you always have more performance because of knock-on effects. If for example a gust pushes the nose up, the control system has to vary the balance of forces between the lift fan and the 3BSM to bring it down again. All this happens automatically in very quick time such that the pilot doesn’t even know it. But the adjustment process may lose the aircraft a couple of feet because maximum thrust is not always available while adjusting the attitude in the hover. This happened twice during DT II.”

As part of the test programme, VX-23 undertook crosswind and tailwind envelope expansion. This included what Peter Wilson described as “some very interesting test points” with the aircraft positioned with a tailwind – which involved tracking the centreline with various bank angles moving backwards at 25 knots or so, “really testing close to the limits of the propulsion system’s capability. So we’ve hit the corners of the envelope going backwards and sideways”.

VX-23 also conducted vertical landings with a 15-knot crosswind and with expected hot gas ingestion from the ship’s funnels. “We’ve completed extreme descent rates touching down at 12ft/sec and not exceeded the load limits of the landing gear,” said Wilson.

Crosswind testing is an interesting scenario.

There are two ways to achieve the required objective. The pilot can generate crosswind in the hover by turning 90-degrees away from a headwind to generate crosswind from the natural wind and then move sideways over the ground to achieve the required test condition. The wind can be forced to come at any angle to the aircraft. The alternate way is to test when the desired wind speed is available naturally, pedal turning the aircraft until the direction required by the test point is achieved.

“DT II was about crosswind envelope expansion; getting out to 40 knots of headwind; tailwind envelope expansion; and the internal carriage of inert weapons during take-offs and landings for the first time,” said Wilson.

Carriage of weapons in the internal bays moves the aircraft’s CG forward, which makes it behave a little differently. Testing it was a DT II goal. Wilson explained: “We also had to periodically jettison weapons to meet the necessary landing weight. DT II was the first time the F-35B had jettisoned weapons. We also wanted to fly at night, conduct landings with ship motion to increase the loads envelope, evaluate the effects of motion on the control system, and how the pilot would track the motion, and further stress the Thermion flightdeck coating.”

US Marine Corps test pilot LtCol Jimi Clift flew the first night vertical landing on August 14. VX-23 also performed regression testing of the test points that failed during DT I. Take-offs during DT I showed that the nozzle swung, in some angles, just two inches from the flight deck, requiring improvements to the flight control system. “You can’t test that scenario ashore, so we repeated some of the conditions seen during DT I to prove that the corrections made aligned with the simulation,” said Wilson.

Night Ops, HMDS, Mission Systems and Crosswinds
Maj Kingen and Squadron Leader Schofield gained their carrier qualification on the first day of DT II, after which the flight test team was ready to conduct night ops.

“I had a ridiculous grin on my face when I returned to the ready room after my first night mission. I’d never flown a night mission to a boat before feeling anything other than stressed,” said Wilson. “That’s what the Harrier was like at night. You really felt like you got away with it. You’re highly trained so you’re probably going to be fine, but you always knew not much had to go wrong and you’d be screwed. “In the F-35 the experience was so different because it holds the height for you, it looks after you and you can actually leave it alone, which is often the best thing you can do. And it holds a beautiful hover, far better than you could do manually.

“It’s really a task that requires you to just monitor the systems. Having done three vertical landings in about two hours, taking fuel, launching again and returning was a doddle by comparison to the Harrier.”


The testing sought to prove the pilot could improve the night landing task relative to the Harrier by using the naked eye and the Gen II Helmet Mounted Display. “That’s what we did supremely,” said Wilson.

He confirmed that the functionality problems of the Gen II-standard HMDS are not encountered with STOVL operations. “You see effects at sea that you don’t necessarily see ashore. For example, low sun on the horizon can bounce back off the water and potentially wash out some of the HMD symbology. It’s not fantastic, but it’s okay. The primary issue with the helmet occurs when the aeroplane starts to buffet. We don’t get much buffet in STOVL mode and it’s a comfortable ride most of the time.”

Test events were also undertaken while the jets were airborne, as Wilson explained: “We conducted mission system tests to ensure interoperability with the ship: communications, navigation, TACAN and IFF. We also flew instrument approaches in visual conditions by day and by night to simulate our ability to get back to the ship in bad weather.”

Another aspect of STOVL ops tested during DT II determined the effect of wind coming around the ship’s island. When an aircraft is in the hover, the island is on the right. If the wind comes from the right it makes its way around the island and catches the aircraft from various angles. “That makes the hot gas coming out of the ship’s stack come at you, which is bad news. Aeroplanes don’t like ingesting hot gas: it reduces performance,” said Wilson. “We had mixed results, some good, some bad. With the wind coming from ‘round the back of the island, the aeroplane starts to feel like it’s jostling around. And the effects of the hot gas coming from around the front eroded our performance margin, but not to a point we were concerned because the aircraft has the capability to withstand the effects. We opened out to 10 knots of crosswind from the right and 15 knots from the left, which is a super envelope. It was a great success.”...

...During the 18-day sea trial the two jets completed 95 take-offs and vertical landings, both forward and aft-facing, and 17 night take-offs and landings in 10 days of testing.

“It was an extremely successful at-sea period. We hashed out the envelope and we got the fleet something they’re going to be able to work with. In fact we’ve got everything except for elevated sea state,” said Maj Kingen.

Source: AIR International F-35 Special Edition July 2014

Re: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2014, 15:06
by spazsinbad
In article above I had a question about this:
"...The pilot also has command of the throttle. Two power setting options are available for take-off: Mil STO and Max STO [have not read about this before], as Maj Rusnok explained: “When you taxi to the tram line you stay in mode one, the conventional flight mode. You convert the aircraft into mode four, the STOVL flight mode, and it takes about 15 seconds or so for the doors to open up and the lift fan to engage.

“Then you push the throttle about halfway up the throttle slide into a detent position at about 34% engine thrust request. It sits there and you check the engine gauges: if the readings are okay you slam the throttle to either Mil or Max position and then release the brakes simultaneously. Pushing through to max is like an afterburner detent. But it’s not an afterburner – you can’t go to afterburner in mode four...."

ANSWER:
FLIGHT TEST: F-35 Simulator - Virtual fighter
31 Jul 2007 Mike Gerzanics

"...Seated in the simulator, my left hand fell to the large throttle, called the "cow pie" due to its size and shape, which moves along a long linear track. The active throttle is back-driven by the autothrottle system and has variable electronic detents for afterburner and STOVL operations. There is no "cut-off" position, a single guarded engine master switch performing that function...."

Source: http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... er-215810/

Re: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 25 Dec 2014, 02:29
by spazsinbad
Rather than put this SHOL [Ship Helicopter Operating Limit (various locations)] for the F-35B diagram from DT-1 on that thread (shows intention and NOT results) I thought this thread would be more appropriate, with this quote from the very long screed above about 'results of DT-1' etc.:
"...Feedback from DT I
Over the course of the 19-day DT I test period the two jets logged 28 hours’ flight time and completed 72 short take-offs and 72 vertical landings in conditions of up to 33 knots of wind-over-deck and 10 knots of starboard crosswind....

...The Director, Operational Test & Evaluation’s Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Report (DOT&E FY2011 AR) said: “As expected, high starboard crosswinds produced the most challenging environment. One approach to hover prior to a vertical landing was waved off by the pilot due to turbulence in the ship’s air wake...."

Source: AIR International F-35 Special Edition July 2014


Note the 'keyhole aspect of the diagram on the right mimics the AV-8B SHOL envelope for VL spots 7/9 apparently.

Re: Marine test pilot makes first F-35B night landing at sea

Unread postPosted: 19 Jan 2015, 06:09
by spazsinbad
FY 14 DOD PROGRAMS F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
Jan 2015 UNK

"...Air-Ship Integration and Ship Suitability Testing - F-35B
• The program previously completed two test periods on the USS Wasp with developmental test aircraft, one in October 2011 and one in August 2013. These periods assessed handling qualities for take-off and landing operations at sea, and were used to develop an initial flight operating envelope for ship operations. ALIS was not deployed to the ship, and very limited maintenance operations were conducted (routine pre- and post-flight inspections, refueling operations, etc.).

• The Marine Corps began making plans to conduct another test period on the USS Wasp in May 2015 to assess ship integration and suitability issues, using non-instrumented production aircraft and a non-deployable version of ALIS (SOU V1) installed on the vessel. This deployment was originally a part of the Block 2B OUE; however, it is being re-scoped to support plans for the Marine Corps IOC later in 2015.

- Up to six production aircraft are planned to be used for the deployment. These aircraft are not instrumented (as test aircraft are) and will allow the USS Wasp to operate its radars and communications systems in a representative manner since there is no concern with electromagnetic interference with flight test instrumentation.

- The flight operations will not be representative of combat operations, unless the flight clearance and associated certifications enabling the deployment include clearances for weapons carriage and employment. These clearances are expected at fleet release, which the program plans to occur in July 2015, after the deployment.

- Maintenance will be mostly military, but with contractor logistics support in line with expected 2015 shore-based operations, such as contractors for propulsion data downloads after each flight. Maintenance will be limited to that required for basic flight operations, staging necessary support equipment for engine and lift fan removals only to check if space permits, and loading and downloading demonstrations of inert ordnance on the flight deck.

- These limitations are not representative of combat deployment operations.

• The Marine Corps and Naval Air Systems Command began exploring issues that would arise with employing more than six F-35B aircraft per Air Combat Element (ACE) on L-class ships. ACE represents the mix of fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft assigned to the ship to conduct flight operations in support of Marine Corps combat objectives. These “heavy” ACEs could include up to 20 F-35Bs, or 12 or 16 F-35Bs plus MV-22Bs, depending on the specific L-class vessel. Through these exercises, they identified issues, many which will apply to standard-sized ACE operations as well. These issues include:

- The currently-planned service maintenance concept, where few components will be repaired underway but must be sent for repair back to a depot facility or to the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) may not be achievable for initial fielding. The program is conducting a Level Of Repair Analysis (LORA) to assess the feasibility of repairing components at the Intermediate level, including onboard CVN and L-class ships.

- More than six F-35Bs in the ACE will require a more robust engine repair and resupply process than for the standard, six F-35B ACE. The Services are still investigating the best method for F135 engine re-supply at sea. Work continues on the heavy underway replenishment station and a re-designed engine storage container that can survive a drop of 18 inches while protecting the engine and weighing low enough to be transferred across the wire between the supply ship and the L-class or CVN ship. Adequate storage is needed for the engines, spare parts, and lift fans, as well as workspace for engine module maintenance within the small engine shops on L-class vessels.

- Moving an engine container, including placing an engine in or taking one out of the container, requires a 20,000 pound-class forklift and cannot be concurrent with flight ops since this item is required to be on the flight deck for crash and salvage purposes while flying. Engines can be moved around on a transportation trailer once removed from the container to enable engine maintenance in the hangar bay during flight operations.

- Adequate Special Access Program Facilities (SAPF) are required for flight planning and debriefing aboard the ship. Current modification plans for L-class vessels are expected to meet the requirements for a six F-35B ACE, but would be inadequate for an operation with more aircraft.

- Unlike many legacy aircraft, the F-35B needs external air conditioning when on battery power or an external power source. Cold fueling operations, when the engine is not turned on, will thus need an air conditioning cart. For many more F-35B’s in the ACE, the logistics footprint will have to increase significantly to include more air conditioning units as many aircraft are refueled cold to achieve efficient operations...."