Fast 5: Details of Pratt & Whitney’s Gatorworks

All about the Pratt & Whitney F135 and the (cancelled) General Electric/Rolls-Royce F136
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spazsinbad

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Unread post10 Jul 2018, 15:47

How does your GATOR work?
Fast 5: Details of Pratt & Whitney’s Gatorworks
06 Jul 2018 Lee Ann Shay

"Matthew Bromberg, president of Pratt & Whitney Military Engines, talks with Lee Ann Shay about how GatorWorks, a rapid prototyping group of the company, will deliver 50% reductions in “it.” P&W announced GatorWorks on June 12 but actually launched it internally about one year ago.

Question:
GatorWorks’s objective is to cut engine development time for military engines by half. What metrics are you working toward for the first project?

Answer: Let me back up. Over the last few years, we have spent a lot of time listening to customers and getting feedback on what Pratt & Whitney is doing well, what we’re not doing well and what our priorities are. The Department of Defense and the U.S. Air Force are looking for more agile and more rapid development, and more insertion of commercial capabilities into military technologies, whether that be suppliers, software, actual hardware technology. One of Pratt & Whitney’s strength is that we leverage our commercial and military businesses. If we step back at look at how successful we’ve been over multiple generations of products, we see that the large military engine development cycle hasn’t improved dramatically—it’s the 10-year cycle to go from a clean sheet to the next-generation of engines. That cycle does have some tremendous benefits. If you look at Pratt & Whitney’s single-engine reliability and safety records, we set the standard in the industry. If you look at the performance of the F135, it’s the most accomplished fighter engine ever produced. If you compare the F135 in its first 100,000 hours of service, which we just recently passed, to that of the F119 and F100, when each of those engines was at that point of service, we’re at 13 times more reliable at 100,000 hours. Over time, to clarify, we’ve improved the reliability of the F119 and F100, but it goes to show the benefits of our development cycles. What we’re wrestling with is, how do we maintain the strengths of what Pratt & Whitney has, yet be responsive to the services...."

Source: http://www.mro-network.com/maintenance- ... et-numbers
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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popcorn

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Unread post11 Jul 2018, 01:46

Amazing statistics. :shock:
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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Unread post11 Jul 2018, 02:17

Amazing statistics, but does he explain where the biggest gains were?

When I click on the link it goes to the company home page.
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Unread post11 Jul 2018, 04:53

Probably the story has been removed. I did not save the article but recall nothing much else explained about that F135 paragraph - because otherwise any other info would have been included in the post - there were generalities about stuff.
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post11 Jul 2018, 13:51


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